National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for field size mmboe

  1. Impact of Secondary Users' Field Size on Spectrum Sharing Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    Aramco, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. spatial size of the field of secondary users. In most studies, the spatial

  2. Visual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumoulin, Serge O.

    of processing in human motion-selective cortex. I N T R O D U C T I O N Neuroimaging experiments localize human by additional experiments. Defining human MT based on stimulus selectivity means that the identificationVisual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT

  3. Size distribution and structure of Barchan dune fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orencio Durán; Veit Schwämmle; Pedro G. Lind; Hans J. Herrmann

    2011-05-19

    Barchans are isolated mobile dunes often organized in large dune fields. Dune fields seem to present a characteristic dune size and spacing, which suggests a cooperative behavior based on dune interaction. In Duran et al. (2009), we propose that the redistribution of sand by collisions between dunes is a key element for the stability and size selection of barchan dune fields. This approach was based on a mean-field model ignoring the spatial distribution of dune fields. Here, we present a simplified dune field model that includes the spatial evolution of individual dunes as well as their interaction through sand exchange and binary collisions. As a result, the dune field evolves towards a steady state that depends on the boundary conditions. Comparing our results with measurements of Moroccan dune fields, we find that the simulated fields have the same dune size distribution as in real fields but fail to reproduce their homogeneity along the wind direction.

  4. An Optimization Approach to the Design of Multi-Size Heliostat fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 28, 2014 ... Maximizing the efficiency of the plant, i.e., optimizing the energy ... Keywords: solar thermal power; multi-size heliostat field; greedy algorithm.

  5. Thermodynamics and Finite size scaling in Scalar Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debasish Banerjee; Saumen Datta; Sourendu Gupta

    2008-12-05

    In this work we consider the 1-component real scalar $\\phi^4$ theory in 4 space-time dimensions on the lattice and investigate the finite size scaling of thermodynamic quantities to study whether the thermodynamic limit is attained. The results are obtained for the symmetric phase of the theory.

  6. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes of Controlled Diameter and Bundle Size and Their Field Emission Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resasco, Daniel

    Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes of Controlled Diameter and Bundle Size and Their Field Emission: June 8, 2005 Field emission studies were conducted on as-produced CoMoCAT single-walled carbon nanotube became larger, but the bundle size became smaller. A gradual and consistent reduction in the emission

  7. Angular Sizes of Faint Field Disk Galaxies: Intrinsic Luminosity Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Cayon; Joseph Silk; Stephane Charlot

    1996-06-07

    In order to explain the small scale-lengths detected in the recent deep field observations performed from large ground-based telescopes and from the Hubble Space Telescope, we investigate the predictions at high redshifts for disk galaxies that formed by infall. Changes with redshift in the observed properties of field galaxies are directly related to the evolution of the disks and of the stellar populations. We see that changes in the rest frame luminosity of a galaxy induce smaller values of half-light radii than are predicted assuming no evolution. Comparisons are presented with two observed samples from Mutz et al. (1994) and Smail et al. (1995).

  8. The dune size distribution and scaling relations of barchan dune fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orencio Durán; Veit Schwämmle; Pedro G. Lind; Hans J. Herrmann

    2008-10-27

    Barchan dunes emerge as a collective phenomena involving the generation of thousands of them in so called barchan dune fields. By measuring the size and position of dunes in Moroccan barchan dune fields, we find that these dunes tend to distribute uniformly in space and follow an unique size distribution function. We introduce an analyticalmean-field approach to show that this empirical size distribution emerges from the interplay of dune collisions and sand flux balance, the two simplest mechanisms for size selection. The analytical model also predicts a scaling relation between the fundamental macroscopic properties characterizing a dune field, namely the inter-dune spacing and the first and second moments of the dune size distribution.

  9. Debye size microprobes for electric field measurements in laboratory plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pribyl, P.; Gekelman, W.; Nakamoto, M.; Lawrence, E.; Chiang, F.; Stillman, J.; Judy, J.; Katz, N.; Kintner, P.; Niknejadi, P. [Department of Physics Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, MIT, Cambridge, Massachussetts (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cal Poly, Pomona, California 91768 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the development of a host of tiny machines and sensors over the past decade. Plasma physics is in great need of small detectors for several reasons. First of all, very small detectors do not disturb a plasma, and secondly some detectors can only work because they are very small. We report on the first of a series of small (sub-Debye length) probes for laboratory plasmas undertaken at the basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA. The goal of the work is to develop robust and sensitive diagnostic probes that can survive in a plasma. The probes must have electronics packages in close proximity. We report on the construction and testing of probes that measure the electric field.

  10. Size-dependent polarization distribution in ferroelectric nanostructures: Phase field simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    to memory and storage devices, sen- sors, and actuators. The properties of low-dimensional ferro- electricsSize-dependent polarization distribution in ferroelectric nanostructures: Phase field simulations distribution in ferroelectric nanostructures embedded in a nonferroelectric medium. The simulation results

  11. Effect of magnetic field applied during secondary annealing on texture and grain size of silicon steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    Abstract Temper cold rolled silicon steel samples were annealed with and without an applied magnetic field. Keywords: Soft magnet; Magnetic annealing; Texture; Grain growth 1. Introduction Silicon steel is a softEffect of magnetic field applied during secondary annealing on texture and grain size of silicon

  12. Matrix multiplication over word-size prime fields using Bini's approximate formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Matrix multiplication over word-size prime fields using Bini's approximate formula Brice Boyer Jean-Guillaume Dumas Abstract Bini's approximate formula (or border rank) for matrix multiplication achieves a better the approximate formula in the special case where the ring is Z/pZ. Besides, we show an implemen- tation à la

  13. SU-E-T-589: A Comparison of Field Size Dependence of Electron Depth Dose From Different Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, M; Zhu, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For accurate dose calculation in electron beam therapy, it is important to know the percentage depth dose (PDD) for each beam. This can vary depending on the machine make and model and the field size. Three different linear accelerators were compared in this study. Methods: PDD data was collected for different output beam energies and different field sizes for three different linear accelerators (Siemens Primus, Varian 2300ix, Varian Truebeam). Data was compared for the same energy with the same field size to see if the PDD differed among manufacturers. Furthermore, PDD was compared for different field sizes of the same machine at the same energy. Results: For the same beam energy and the same field size, the PDD curves were comparable for the three linacs with variations within 13%. PDD curves for different field sizes and beam energies were compared to verify this result. At higher beam energies, the disagreement between PDD curves is more pronounced between different field sizes for all three of the linacs compared. Conclusions: For the same energy and field size, the variation between different machines was within 13%. For the same manufacturer (Varian Clinac 2300ix and Truebeam), the agreement is within 3% with a standard deviation of less than 2.5%. PDD curves for different field sizes for the same energy were also investigated for the three linacs.

  14. For economic energy, we need: tritium, large size to obtain hot fusing plasma; high fields and large currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11 For economic energy, we need: tritium, large size to obtain hot fusing plasma; high fields: a Component Test Facility is much needed; ST appears simplest and most economic in tritium: BUT the high cost

  15. SU-E-T-98: Dependence of Radiotherapy Couch Transmission Factors On Field Size and Couch-Isocenter Distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benhabib, S; Duan, J; Wu, X; Cardan, R; Shen, S; Huang, M; Popple, R; Brezovich, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric effect of the treatment couch is non-negligible in today's radiotherapy treatment. To accurately include couch in dose calculation, we investigated the dependence of couch transmission factors on field size and couch-isocenter distance. Methods: Couch transmission factors for Varian Exact Couch were determined by taking the ratios of ionization of a posterior-anterior beam with and without the couch in the beam path. Measurements were performed at the isocenter using a PTW cylindrical ionization chamber (Model 31030) with an Aluminum buildup cap of 1.1 cm thick for the 6 MV photon beam. Ionization readings for beam sizes ranging from 2 × 2 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2 were taken. Transmission factors for couch-isocenter distances ranging from 3 cm to 20 cm were also investigated. Results: The couch transmission factors increased with the field size approximately in an exponential manner. For the field sizes that we tested, the transmission factor ranged from 0.976 to 0.992 for couch-isocenter distance of 3 cm. The transmission factor was also monotonically dependent on couch-isocenter separation distance, but in a lighter magnitude. For the tested couch heights, the transmission factor ranged from 0.974 – 0.972 for 2 × 2 cm2 field size and 0.992 – 0.986 for 40 × 40 cm2 field size. The dependence on couch-isocenter distance is stronger for larger field size. Conclusions: The transmission factor of a radiotherapy treatment couch increases with field size of the radiation beam and its distance from the isocenter. Such characterization of the couch transmission factor helps improve the accuracy of couch modeling for radiotherapy treatment planning.

  16. Field investigation of the relationship between battery size and PV system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, J.; Kratochvil, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harrington, S. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Four photovoltaic-powered lighting systems were installed in a National Forest Service campground in June of 1991. These systems have identical arrays, loads and charge controllers. The only difference was in the rated capacity of the battery bank for each system. The battery banks all use the same basic battery as a building block with the four systems utilizing either one battery, two batteries, three batteries or four batteries. The purpose of the experiment is to examine the effect of the various battery sizes on the ability of the system to charge the battery, energy available to the load, and battery lifetime. Results show an important trend in system performance concerning the impact of charge controllers on the relation between array size and battery size which results in an inability to achieve the days of battery storage originally designed for.

  17. Farm Size in Relation to Market Outlets and Forward Contracts for Major Field Crops and Beef Cattle Texas Rollin Plains. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Donald S.; Martin, J. Rod

    1978-01-01

    STATION / Neville P. Clarke, Director The Texas A&M University System 1 College Station, Texas Farm Size in Relation to Market Outlets and Fomd Contracts for Major Field Crops and Beef Cattle, B-1187 Texas Rolling Plains February 1978 Donald S. Moore... and J. Rod Martin* Agricultural producers are continually adjusting to changing marketing channels. Some farmers obviously seek these changes, while others are only later affected by the changing conditions. One example of changing marketing channels...

  18. Influence of compensator thickness, field size, and off-axis distance on the effective attenuation coefficient of a cerrobend compensator for intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghparast, Abbas; Hashemi, Bijan; Eivazi, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be performed by using compensators. To make a compensator for an IMRT practice, it is required to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient (?{sub eff}) of its material, which is affected by various factors. We studied the effect of the variation of the most important factors on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} of the cerrobend compensator for 6-MV photon beams, including the field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis distance. Experimental measurements were carried out at 100 cm source-to-surface distance and 10 cm depth for the 6-MV photon beams of an Elekta linac using various field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis settings. The field sizes investigated ranged from 4 × 4 to 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} and the cerrobend compensator thicknesses from 0.5–6 cm. For a fixed compensator thickness, variation of the ?{sub eff} with the field size ranged from 3.7–6.8%, with the highest value attributed to the largest compensator thickness. At the reference field size of 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}, the ?{sub eff} varied by 16.5% when the compensator thickness was increased from 0.5–6 cm. However, the variation of the ?{sub eff} with the off-axis distance was only 0.99% at this field size, whereas for the largest field size, it was more significant. Our results indicated that the compensator thickness and field size have the most significant effect on the calculation of the compensator ?{sub eff} for the 6-MV photon beam. Therefore, it is recommended to consider these parameters when calculating the compensator thickness for an IMRT practice designed for these beams. The off-axis distance had a significant effect on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} only for the largest field size. Hence, it is recommended to consider the effect of this parameter only for field sizes larger than 25 × 25 cm{sup 2}.

  19. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richters, Dorothee; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  20. Determination of the Average Aromatic Cluster Size of Fossil Fuels by Solid-State NMR at High Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Kanmi; Kennedy, Gordon J.; Althaus, Stacey M.; Pruski, Marek

    2013-01-07

    We show that the average aromatic cluster size in complex carbonaceous materials can be accurately determined using fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR at a high magnetic field. To accurately quantify the nonprotonated aromatic carbon, we edited the 13C spectra using the recently reported MAS-synchronized spin–echo, which alleviated the problem of rotational recoupling of 1H-13C dipolar interactions associated with traditional dipolar dephasing experiments. The dependability of this approach was demonstrated on selected Argonne Premium coal standards, for which full sets of basic structural parameters were determined with high accuracy.

  1. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermann, Robert Michael, E-mail: hermann@strahlentherapie-westerstede.com [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Meyer, Andreas [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Gemeinschaftspraxis für Strahlentherapie Hildesheim/Goslar (Germany); Becker, Alexandra [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Schneider, Michael [Orthopaedic Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Würzburg (Germany); Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Christiansen, Hans [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Klinik für Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Universität Kiel (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ?6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  2. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same precision and confidence.

  3. Energy Landscape of the Finite-Size Mean-field 2-Spin Spherical Model and Topology Trivialization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhagash Mehta; Jonathan D. Hauenstein; Matthew Niemerg; Nicholas J. Simm; Daniel A. Stariolo

    2014-09-29

    Motivated by the recently observed phenomenon of topology trivialization of potential energy landscapes (PELs) for several statistical mechanics models, we perform a numerical study of the finite size $2$-spin spherical model using both numerical polynomial homotopy continuation and a reformulation via non-hermitian matrices. The continuation approach computes all of the complex stationary points of this model while the matrix approach computes the real stationary points. Using these methods, we compute the average number of stationary points while changing the topology of the PEL as well as the variance. Histograms of these stationary points are presented along with an analysis regarding the complex stationary points. This work connects topology trivialization to two different branches of mathematics: algebraic geometry and catastrophe theory, which is fertile ground for further interdisciplinary research.

  4. Kinetic (particle-in-cell) simulation of nonlinear laser absorption in a finite-size plasma with a background inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehdian, H. Kargarian, A.; Hajisharifi, K.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, the effect of an external inhomogeneous magnetic field on the high intensity laser absorption rate in a sub-critical plasma has been investigated by employing a relativistic electromagnetic 1.5 dimensional particle-in-cell code. Relying on the effective nonlinear phenomena such as phase-mixing and scattering, this study shows that in a finite-size plasma the laser absorption increases with inhomogeneity of the magnetic field (i.e., reduction of characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, ?{sub p}) before exiting a considerable amount of laser energy from the plasma due to scattering process. On the other hand, the presence of the external inhomogeneous magnetic field causes the maximum absorption of laser to occur at a shorter time. Moreover, study of the kinetic results associated with the distribution function of plasma particles shows that, in a special range of the plasma density and the characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, a considerable amount of laser energy is transferred to the particles producing a population of electrons with kinetic energy along the laser direction.

  5. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

    field field-type-text field-field-page-name">
  6. Field Study of Performance, Comfort, and Sizing of Two Variable-Speed Heat Pumps Installed in a Single 2-Story Residence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Odukomaiya, Adewale O [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    With the recent advancements in the application of variable-speed (VS) compressors to residential HVAC systems, opportunities are now available to size heat pumps (HPs) to more effectively meet heating and cooling loads in many of the climate zones in the US with limited use of inefficient resistance heat. This is in contrast to sizing guidance for traditional single-speed HPs that limits the ability to oversize with regard to cooling loads, because of risks of poor dehumidification during the cooling season and increased cycling losses. VS-drive HPs can often run at 30-40% of their rated cooling capacity to reduce cycling losses, and can adjust fan speed to provide better indoor humidity control. Detailed air-side performance data was collected on two VS-drive heat pumps installed in a single unoccupied research house in Knoxville, TN, a mixed-humid climate. One system provided space conditioning for the upstairs, while the other unit provided space conditioning for the downstairs. Occupancy was simulated by operating the lights, shower, appliances, other plug loads, etc. to simulate the sensible and latent loads imposed on the building space by internal electric loads and human occupants according to the Building America Research Benchmark (2008). The seasonal efficiency and energy use of the units are calculated. Annual energy use is compared to that of the single speed minimum efficiency HPs tested in the same house previously. Sizing of the units relative to the measured building load and manual J design load calculations is examined. The impact of the unit sizing with regards to indoor comfort is also evaluated.

  7. The Asymptotics of the Correlations Functions in $(1+1)d$ Quantum Field Theory From Finite Size Effects in Conformal Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mironov; A. Zabrodin

    1992-01-08

    Using the finite-size effects the scaling dimensions and correlation functions of the main operators in continuous and lattice models of 1d spinless Bose-gas with pairwise interaction of rather general form are obtained. The long-wave properties of these systems can be described by the Gaussian model with central charge $c=1$. The disorder operators of the extended Gaussian model are found to correspond to some non-local operators in the {\\it XXZ} Heisenberg antiferromagnet. Just the same approach is applicable to fermionic systems. Scaling dimensions of operators and correlation functions in the systems of interacting Fermi-particles are obtained. We present a universal treatment for $1d$ systems of different kinds which is independent of the exact integrability and gives universal expressions for critical exponents through the thermodynamic characteristics of the system.

  8. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jian (Port Jefferson, NY); Kulkarni, Pramod (Port Jefferson Station, NY)

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  9. Countering Aging Effects through Field Gate Sizing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrichson, Trenton D.

    2010-01-14

    Transistor aging through negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) has become a major lifetime constraint in VLSI circuits. We propose a technique that uses antifuses to widen PMOS transistors later in a circuit?s life cycle to combat aging...

  10. Does size matter?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carreras, B. A.; Physics Department, College of Natural Science and Mathematics and Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775; Physics Department, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ; Newman, D. E.; Dobson, Ian

    2014-06-15

    Failures of the complex infrastructures society depends on having enormous human and economic cost that poses the question: Are there ways to optimize these systems to reduce the risks of failure? A dynamic model of one such system, the power transmission grid, is used to investigate the risk from failure as a function of the system size. It is found that there appears to be optimal sizes for such networks where the risk of failure is balanced by the benefit given by the size.

  11. Fire Size in Tunnels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvel, Ricky O

    In recent years, a number of high profile accidental fires have occurred in several road and rail tunnels throughout the world. Many of these fires grew rapidly to catastrophic size and claimed many lives. The processes ...

  12. Oil discoveries and basin resource prediction in Latin America: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronman, G.E.; Aleman, A.M.; Rushworth, S.W. (Amoco Production Company, Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Over 350 oil discoveries were made in Latin America during the 1980s. About 12% are estimated to contain reserves greater than 100 MMBO. Several of the larger finds (>500 MMBO), such as Cusiana (Colombia), Furrial/Musipan (Venezuela), Cano Lima (Colombia) and Marlim (Brazil) represent an important part of the giant field found worldwide since 1980. Most of the larger discoveries were made by national oil companies in Venezuela, Mexico and Brazil. Undiscovered oil resources of 40-80 BBO are estimated to remain in the highest potential Latin American basins, including those in Mexico, based on historical field size data and current geological knowledge. Over 150 BBO of produced oil and proven reserves has been found in the same group of basins. The probability of finding large undiscovered oil and gas fields (>100 MMBOE) in selected established and mature Latin American basins is high. The Campos (Brazil), Llanos (Colombia), Magadalena (Colombia), Maracaibo (Venezuela), Marahon-Oriente-Putomayo (Peru-Ecuador-Colombia), Maturin (Venezuela), Reforma-Campeche (Mexico) and Ucayali (Peru) basins have the best possibility for such accumulations. Another tier of frontier and emerging basins may also contain significant resources, but limited data makes it difficult to estimate their undiscovered resources. Some of the higher potential basins in this group include the Sierra de Chiapas (Mexico/Guatemala), Huallaga (Peru), Yucatan (Mexico), Sabinas, and Burgos (Mexico) basins.

  13. A note on string size evolution in phantom cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soon-Tae Hong

    2015-04-05

    We analyze evolution of string size in higher-dimensional cosmology with phantom field. Assuming that the Universe possesses the phantom field defined in a ten-dimensional spacetime, we predict string size which is claimed to be that of photon in nature at present. The Universe size increases as in the standard inflationary Universe model while the photon size decreases drastically at the early stage of the string evolution after the Big Bang. Moreover, the photon spin in the phantom Universe is analyzed in the framework of the stringy cosmology.

  14. Edison Job Size Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES Science Network RequirementsEdison ElectrifiesJob Size Charts

  15. Hardware Sizing for Software Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Ganesh

    2009-05-15

    Hardware sizing is an approximation of the hardware resources required to support a software implementation. Just like any theoretical model, hardware sizing model is an approximation of the reality. Depending on the infrastructure needs, workload...

  16. Field Guide Field Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    and demand in the U.S., with only part of the demand being met by U.S. production. Canola oil has achieved1 1 June 2011 A-1280 Canola Production Field Guide Canola Production Field Guide 2 2 Edited.....................................101 · Contributors to Canola Production Field Guide........102 · Resource Contact Information

  17. Thermodynamics and Finite size scaling in Scalar Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai for the degree of Master of Science, in Physics By Debasish Research, Mumbai December 2008 #12;ii #12;Synopsis In this work we study the thermodynamics

  18. Debye size microprobes for electric field measurements in laboratory plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Troy

    July 2006 Microelectromechanical systems MEMS have led to the development of a host of tiny machines can only be constructed with microelec- tromechanical system MEMS techniques, will make their mark

  19. Wide size range fast integrated mobility spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jian

    2013-10-29

    A mobility spectrometer to measure a nanometer particle size distribution is disclosed. The mobility spectrometer includes a conduit and a detector. The conduit is configured to receive and provide fluid communication of a fluid stream having a charged nanometer particle mixture. The conduit includes a separator section configured to generate an electrical field of two dimensions transverse to a dimension associated with the flow of the charged nanometer particle mixture through the separator section to spatially separate charged nanometer particles of the charged nanometer particle mixture in said two dimensions. The detector is disposed downstream of the conduit to detect concentration and position of the spatially-separated nanometer particles.

  20. Does semantic size affect size constancy scaling using lexical stimuli? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beveridge, Madeleine

    2010-11-24

    Binocular disparity allows us to perceive the world in 3-dimensions through the process of stereopsis. In this study, we used binocular disparity to induce the size constancy illusion in lexical stimuli. 47 undergraduate ...

  1. Size scaling of self gravitating polymers and strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Kawamoto; Toshihiro Matsuo

    2015-06-03

    We study a statistical ensemble of a single polymer with self gravitational interaction. This is a model of a gravitating string --- the precursor of a black hole. We analyze averaged sizes by mean field approximations with an effective Hamiltonian a la Edwards with Newtonian potential as well as a contact repulsive interaction. We find that there exists a certain scaling region where the attractive and the repulsive forces balance out. The repulsive interaction pushes the critical gravitational coupling to a larger value, at which the size of a polymer becomes comparable to its Schwarzschild radius, and as a result the size of the corresponding black hole increases considerably.

  2. Size scaling of self gravitating polymers and strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawamoto, Shoichi

    2015-01-01

    We study a statistical ensemble of a single polymer with self gravitational interaction. This is a model of a gravitating string --- the precursor of a black hole. We analyze averaged sizes by mean field approximations with an effective Hamiltonian a la Edwards with Newtonian potential as well as a contact repulsive interaction. We find that there exists a certain scaling region where the attractive and the repulsive forces balance out. The repulsive interaction pushes the critical gravitational coupling to a larger value, at which the size of a polymer becomes comparable to its Schwarzschild radius, and as a result the size of the corresponding black hole increases considerably.

  3. Children's Clothes - Size and Selection. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderpoorten, Ann; Kerbel, Claudia

    1980-01-01

    , children's clothing should fit well, allow for growth and be durable and easy to care for. Children's Sizes The age of a child does not determine size. Chil dren of the same age may vary greatly in height, weight and body measurements. Clothing... and pants provide room for growth. Durability Because growing children are active and vigorous in play, select clothing that will withstand stress and strain. Clothing that wears out or falls apart before the child outgrows it is frustrating as well...

  4. ARM - Measurement - Cloud droplet size

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Roomparticle size distributionconcentrationdroplet size

  5. Size scaling of self gravitating polymers and strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Kawamoto; Toshihiro Matsuo

    2015-08-04

    We study a statistical ensemble of a single polymer with self gravitational interaction. This is a model of a gravitating string --- the precursor of a black hole. We analyze averaged sizes by mean field approximations with an effective Hamiltonian a la Edwards with Newtonian potential as well as a contact repulsive interaction. We find that there exists a certain scaling region where the attractive and the repulsive forces balance out. The repulsive interaction pushes the critical gravitational coupling to a larger value, at which the size of a polymer becomes comparable to its Schwarzschild radius, and as a result the size of the corresponding black hole increases considerably. We show phase diagrams in various dimensions that clarify how the size changes as the strengths of repulsive and gravitational forces vary.

  6. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL); Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A slashing process for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns.

  7. Charge, from EM fields only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Collins

    2007-03-04

    Consider the electric field E about an electron. Its source has been thought a substance called charge, enclosed within a small volume that defines the size of the electron. Scattering experiments find no size at all. Charge is useful, but mysterious. This study concludes that charge is not real. Useful, but not real. Absent real charge, the electric field must look to a different source. We know another electric field, vxB, not sourced by charge. A simple model of the electron, using EM fields only, has been found that generates an electric field vxB very like E. Gauss' law finds the model contains charge, but div vxB cannot find the charge density. The model contains a permanent magnetic flux quantum, configured as a dipole. The dipolar B fields spin around the symmetry axis, accounting for angular momentum. Spin stabilizes the magnetic flux quantum, and creates the vxB electric field. Stability in this model is dynamic. Energy is exchanged between the dipolar magnetic moment and an encircling toroidal displacement current, at the Compton frequency, mc^2/h = 1.24x10^20 Hz. The electric field undulates at this rate, instead of being static like E associated with charge. Absent any real charge, we have to abandon the notion that size of a charged particle is that of a small sack full of charge. The only electric field is vxB, and its source is not charge. What is the size of an electron? Coulomb scattering finds it point-like, but its spinning B fields extend to infinity.

  8. ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor Size Distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Roomparticle sizefraction ARMGeometry ARM DataSize

  9. Effect of Particle Optical Properties on Size Distribution of Soils Obtained by Laser Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    ) is essential infor- mation for those in the fields of engineering and environmental geosciences, sedimentology, sedimentology, pedology, etc. (Wen et al., 2002). In geotechnical practices, PSD and clay-size fraction of soils

  10. Calibrating page sized Gafchromic EBT3 films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crijns, W.; Maes, F.; Heide, U. A. van der; Van den Heuvel, F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department ESAT/PSI-Medical Image Computing, Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose is the development of a novel calibration method for dosimetry with Gafchromic EBT3 films. The method should be applicable for pretreatment verification of volumetric modulated arc, and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Because the exposed area on film can be large for such treatments, lateral scan errors must be taken into account. The correction for the lateral scan effect is obtained from the calibration data itself. Methods: In this work, the film measurements were modeled using their relative scan values (Transmittance, T). Inside the transmittance domain a linear combination and a parabolic lateral scan correction described the observed transmittance values. The linear combination model, combined a monomer transmittance state (T{sub 0}) and a polymer transmittance state (T{sub {infinity}}) of the film. The dose domain was associated with the observed effects in the transmittance domain through a rational calibration function. On the calibration film only simple static fields were applied and page sized films were used for calibration and measurements (treatment verification). Four different calibration setups were considered and compared with respect to dose estimation accuracy. The first (I) used a calibration table from 32 regions of interest (ROIs) spread on 4 calibration films, the second (II) used 16 ROIs spread on 2 calibration films, the third (III), and fourth (IV) used 8 ROIs spread on a single calibration film. The calibration tables of the setups I, II, and IV contained eight dose levels delivered to different positions on the films, while for setup III only four dose levels were applied. Validation was performed by irradiating film strips with known doses at two different time points over the course of a week. Accuracy of the dose response and the lateral effect correction was estimated using the dose difference and the root mean squared error (RMSE), respectively. Results: A calibration based on two films was the optimal balance between cost effectiveness and dosimetric accuracy. The validation resulted in dose errors of 1%-2% for the two different time points, with a maximal absolute dose error around 0.05 Gy. The lateral correction reduced the RMSE values on the sides of the film to the RMSE values at the center of the film. Conclusions: EBT3 Gafchromic films were calibrated for large field dosimetry with a limited number of page sized films and simple static calibration fields. The transmittance was modeled as a linear combination of two transmittance states, and associated with dose using a rational calibration function. Additionally, the lateral scan effect was resolved in the calibration function itself. This allows the use of page sized films. Only two calibration films were required to estimate both the dose and the lateral response. The calibration films were used over the course of a week, with residual dose errors Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 2% or Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 0.05 Gy.

  11. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  12. Hydrocracking process using disparate catalyst particle sizes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukes, S.G.; Miller, J.T.; Gutberlet, L.C.; Kelterboro, J.C

    1989-05-30

    This patent describes a process for the hydrocracking of a hydrocarbon feedstock which comprises reacting the feedstock with hydrogen at hydrocracking conversion conditions in a plurality of reaction zones in series containing hydrocracking catalyst wherein at least one of the reaction zones contains a small nominal size hydrocracking catalyst wherein the small nominal size catalyst has a U.S. sieve mesh size ranging from about 10 to about 16, and wherein at least one reaction zone upstream of the reaction zone containing the small nominal size hydrocracking catalyst having a particle size greater than the small nominal size hydrocracking catalyst.

  13. Ecophysiology and plant size in a tropical epiphytic fern, Asplenium nidus, in Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Craig E.; Lin, Teng-Chiu; Hsu, Chia-Chin; Lin, Shin-Hwei; Lin, Kuo-Chuan; Hsia, Yue-Joe; Chiou, Wen-Liang

    2004-01-01

    lost water at lower rates in laboratory drying experiments. Although rates of net CO2 exchange of the fronds measured in situ in the field appeared to increase with plant size, this increase and other size-related differences in gas exchange parameters...

  14. Corridors of barchan dunes: Stability and size selection P. Hersen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corridors of barchan dunes: Stability and size selection P. Hersen,1 K. H. Andersen,2 H. Elbelrhiti 29 January 2004 Barchans are crescentic dunes propagating on a solid ground. They form dune fields in the shape of elongated corridors in which the size and spacing between dunes are rather well selected. We

  15. The role of eddy currents and nanoparticle size on AC magnetic fieldinduced reflow in solder/magnetic nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHenry, Michael E.

    The role of eddy currents and nanoparticle size on AC magnetic field­induced reflow in solder://jap.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;The role of eddy currents and nanoparticle size on AC magnetic field­induced reflow in solder be derived from eddy current losses in Cu planes in the substrate board. Eddy current heating in Cu sheets

  16. Do Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents detect coherent structures?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karrasch, Daniel; Haller, George, E-mail: georgehaller@ethz.ch [Institute of Mechanical Systems, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)] [Institute of Mechanical Systems, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-12-15

    Ridges of the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE) field have been used as indicators of hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs). A rigorous mathematical link between the FSLE and LCSs, however, has been missing. Here, we prove that an FSLE ridge satisfying certain conditions does signal a nearby ridge of some Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field, which in turn indicates a hyperbolic LCS under further conditions. Other FSLE ridges violating our conditions, however, are seen to be false positives for LCSs. We also find further limitations of the FSLE in Lagrangian coherence detection, including ill-posedness, artificial jump-discontinuities, and sensitivity with respect to the computational time step.

  17. Finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellemans, V.; Heenen, P.-H.; Bender, M.

    2012-10-20

    The systematic lack of convergence of self-consistent mean-field calculations with certain parameterizations of the Skyrme energy density functional has been attributed to the appearance of finite-size instabilities. In this contribution, we investigate what happens at the instability associated with the C{sub 0}{sup {Delta}s}s{sub 0} Dot-Operator {Delta}s{sub 0} term in a high-spin state of the superdeformed band in {sup 194}Hg.

  18. 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Optical sizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, Norbert H.

    mining operation, from the drilling and blasting to the final product; the material size dictates all downstream operating costs. Previously, the only way to measure a size distribution was to stop production

  19. Grain size dependence of barchan dune dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Groh; N. Aksel; I. Rehberg; C. Kruelle

    2008-11-28

    The dependence of the barchan dune dynamics on the size of the grains involved is investigated experimentally. Downsized barchan dune slices are observed in a narrow water flow tube. The relaxation time from an initial symmetric triangular heap towards an asymmetric shape attractor increases with dune mass and decreases with grain size. The dune velocity increases with grain size. In contrast, the velocity scaling and the shape of the barchan dune is independent of the size of the grains.

  20. Semicontinuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    , and classical applications are total correctness and termination of partial evaluation. In languagesSemi­continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel # Institut für Informatik Ludwig to termination uses sized types: an ordinal bound for the size of a data structure is stored in its type

  1. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations Print Wednesday, 28 March 2007 00:00 In micrometer-sized magnetic thin...

  2. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  3. Sex, Size and Gender Roles evolutionary studies of sexual size dimorphism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Wendy

    , John L. Gittleman and Kate E. Jones 3. Sexual Size Dimorphism in Birds , Tamás Székely, Terje Lislevand in the Hartebeest, Isabella Capellini 13. Sexual Size Dimorphism and Offspring Vulnerability in Birds, EllenSex, Size and Gender Roles evolutionary studies of sexual size dimorphism Edited by Daphne J

  4. Tachyonic field interacting with Scalar (Phantom) Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2009-01-29

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  5. On measures of size for convex cones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-05-18

    Section 2 presents a battery of examples of size indices disseminated in the literature. For each ...... ferent measures of conditioning for conic linear systems.

  6. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A. [Nanomaterials Program, Advance Materials Centre (AMREC), SIRIM Berhad, Lot 34, Jalan Hi-Tech Park, 09000, Kulim, Kedah (Malaysia)

    2010-03-11

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam registered 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure registered 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure registered 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam registered 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure registered 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  7. Squibs and Discussions Pipelines and Size Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Squibs and Discussions Pipelines and Size Constraints Ehud Reiter* University of Aberdeen Some. This can be a difficult constraint to enforce in a pipelined natural language generation (NLG) system of the pipeline, but size cannot be accurately measured until the document has been completely processed

  8. Sizing up nuclear fuel | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vaporRisks:Sitesix| DepartmentSizing

  9. Conglomeration of kilometre-sized planetesimals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon, Andrew; Wu, Yanqin; Lithwick, Yoram

    2015-02-25

    out of ? 104M? of primordial solids. The total disk mass, if supplemented with the missing hydro- gen gas, would then reach of order a solar mass. This is very surprising and, in our view, invalidates the low-efficiency conglomeration model. Moreover... . This corresponds to a dis- ruption velocity of v ? 100 cm/ s, or e ? 10?3 at 40 AU. When bodies of size s1 are catastrophically disrupted, we re-distribute their masses to smaller size bins with a number distribution that is power-law in size, dn/ds ? sq? for s < s...

  10. Finite size scaling analysis of compact QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Arnold; Th. Lippert; Th. Neuhaus; K. Schilling

    2000-11-13

    We describe results of a high-statistics finite size scaling analysis of 4d compact U(1) lattice gauge theory with Wilson action at the phase transition point. Using a multicanonical hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm we generate data samples with more than 150 tunneling events between the metastable states of the system, on lattice sizes up to 18^4. We performed a first analysis within the Borgs-Kotecky finite size scaling scheme. As a result, we report evidence for a first-order phase transition with a plaquette energy gap, G=0.02667(20), at a transition coupling, beta_T=1.011128(11).

  11. Particle Size Distribution of Gypseous Samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnett, Morgan P.

    2010-01-16

    Particle size distribution (PSD) of gypseous soils is important in the soil science community. When gypsum constitutes a major portion of the soil, its removal prior to PSD analysis distorts the results and may lead to ...

  12. Control of gene expression by cell size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Chia-Yung

    2010-01-01

    Polyploidy, increased copy number of whole chromosome sets in the genome, is a common cellular state in evolution, development and disease. Polyploidy enlarges cell size and alters gene expression, producing novel phenotypes ...

  13. Software Productivity Measurement Using Multiple Size Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    Software Productivity Measurement Using Multiple Size Measures Software Productivity MeasurementContents Introduction Background Related work Motivation Productivity measurement - Measurement model - Productivity measure construction - Productivity analysis Conclusion Discussion #12;Software Engineering Lab, KAIST 3

  14. Continuous Nanoparticle Sizing and Characterization via Microfluidics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Fanxu

    2015-04-27

    conductivity measurements can be exploited to instantaneously obtain size and species information in oxide nanoparticle suspensions. This approach is readily implemented in an easy to build platform that can be employed either online to provide real...

  15. Angular Size in a Static Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David F. Crawford

    1994-07-11

    In principle the geometry of the universe can be investigated by measuring the angular size of known objects as a function of distance. Thus the distribution of angular sizes provides a critical test of the stable and static model of the universe described by Crawford (1991,1993) that has a simple and explicit relationship between the angular size of an object and its redshift. The result is that the agreement with observations of galactic diameters and the size of double radio sources with the static model is much better than the standard (Big Bang) theory without evolution. However there is still a small discrepancy at large redshifts that could be due to selection effects.

  16. Antiferromagnetic domain size and exchange bias 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Lederman, D.; Cheon, M.; Shi, H.; Olamit, J.; Roshchin, Igor V.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2008-01-01

    Using neutron diffraction, we measured the sizes of antiferromagnetic domains in three ferromagnet/antiferromagnet bilayer samples as a function of the magnitude and sign of exchange bias, temperature, and antiferromagnet composition. Neutron...

  17. Galaxy sizes as a function of environment at intermediate redshift from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelkar, Kshitija; Gray, Meghan E; Maltby, David; Vulcani, Benedetta; De Lucia, Gabriella; Poggianti, Bianca M; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess whether the environment has a significant effect on galaxy sizes, we compare the mass--size relations of cluster and field galaxies in the $0.4 1$), with early-type/passive galaxies in higher density environments growing earlier. Such dependence disappears at lower redshifts. Therefore, if the reported difference at higher-$z$ is real, the growth of field galaxies has caught up with that of cluster galaxies by $z\\sim1$. Any putative mechanism responsible for galaxy growth has to account for the existence of environmental differences at high redshift and their absence (or weakening) at lower redshifts.

  18. Investigations of initiation spot size effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Steven A; Akinci, Adrian A; Leichty, Gary; Schaffer, Timothy; Murphy, Michael J; Munger, Alan; Thomas, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    As explosive components become smaller, a greater understanding of the effect of initiation spot size on detonation becomes increasingly critical. A series of tests of the effect of initiation spot size will be described. A series of DOI (direct optical initiation) detonators with initiation spots sizes from {approx}50 um to 1000um have been tested to determine laser parameters for threshold firing of low density PETN pressings. Results will be compared with theoretical predictions. Outputs of the initiation source (DOI ablation) have been characterized by a suite of diagnostics including PDV and schlieren imaging. Outputs of complete detonators have been characterized using PDV, streak, and/or schlieren imaging. At present, we have not found the expected change in the threshold energy to spot size relationship for DOI type detonators found in similar earlier for projectiles, slappers and EBWs. New detonators designs (Type C) are currently being tested that will allow the determination of the threshold for spot sizes from 250 um to 105um, where we hope to see change in the threshold vs. spot size relationship. Also, one test of an extremely small diameter spot size (50um) has resulted in preliminary NoGo only results even at energy densities as much as 8 times the energy density of the threshold results presented here. This gives preliminary evidence that 50um spot may be beyond the critical initiation diameter. The constant threshold energy to spot size relationship in the data to date does however still give some insight into the initiation mechanism of DOI detonators. If the DOI initiation mechanism were a 1D mechanism similar to a slapper or a flyer impact, the expected inflection point in the graph would have been between 300um and 500um diameter spot size, within the range of the data presented here. The lack of that inflection point indicates that the DOI initiation mechanism is more likely a 2D mechanism similar to a sphere or rod projectile. We expect to see a three region response as the results from the smaller spot size Type C detonators are completed.

  19. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) | SciTechSubmittedEcologist for a Day Field Guide Program

  20. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Lee, Elizabeth (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Kallam, Alekhya (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Majumdar, Partha (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J. (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  1. Can amphiphile architecture directly control vesicle size?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Greenall; C. M. Marques

    2013-01-28

    Bilayer membranes self-assembled from simple amphiphiles in solution always have a planar ground-state shape. This is a consequence of several internal relaxation mechanisms of the membrane and prevents the straightforward control of vesicle size. Here, we show that this principle can be circumvented and that direct size control by molecular design is a realistic possibility. Using coarse-grained calculations, we design tetrablock copolymers that form membranes with a preferred curvature, and demonstrate how to form low-polydispersity vesicles while suppressing micellization.

  2. Structure Optimization of FePt Nanoparticles of Various Sizes for Magnetic Data Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    to a modified reaction route based on Sun et al.[1] Hexane dispersions of nanoparticles were dried increases with particle size and with the temperature in the range 600 °C to 650 °C, being close to unity-assembly over large areas, and a narrow distribution of switching fields. The long storage time and high storage

  3. Unwinding of circular helicoidal molecules versus size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Zoli

    2015-04-12

    The thermodynamical stability of a set of circular double helical molecules is analyzed by path integral techniques. The minicircles differ only in \\textit{i)} the radius and \\textit{ii)} the number of base pairs ($N$) arranged along the molecule axis. Instead, the rise distance is kept constant. For any molecule size, the computational method simulates a broad ensemble of possible helicoidal configurations while the partition function is a sum over the path trajectories describing the base pair fluctuational states. The stablest helical repeat of every minicircle is determined by free energy minimization. We find that, for molecules with $N$ larger than $100$, the helical repeat grows linearly with the size and the twist number is constant. On the other hand, by reducing the size below $100$ base pairs, the double helices sharply unwind and the twist number drops to one for $N=\\,20$. This is predicted as the minimum size for the existence of helicoidal molecules in the closed form. The helix unwinding appears as a strategy to release the bending stress associated to the circularization of the molecules.

  4. Grain-size distributions of tsunami sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, Sarah

    2011-08-08

    tsunamis, Chile 2010 and Peru 2008. The grain-size of the sediment from each tsunami was measured by two common techniques: sieving and digital particle counter. To interpret this real tsunami data, numerical and analytical analysis were used to simulate...

  5. NEEDS SIZE ADJUSTMENT 2 Perfect Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    NEEDS SIZE ADJUSTMENT #12;2 Perfect Chemistry 8 Starr Power 10 Balancing Act 14 A Rare Thing.B.A. EDitors Dee Metaj Jill Smith DEsigN Anderson McConaughy Design Co. WritErs Todd Schwartz Jill Smith Jim and friends. Please send correspondence to: Bridges Magazine sm-alum@ohsu.edu OHSU School of Medicine 3181 SW

  6. Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Analysis of size options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    This report presents the results of the deliberations of the interagency group formed to study the costs and benefits of expanding the size of the SPR. The study concentrated on severe oil supply disruptions involving sharp reductions in world oil production that were 2 to 4 times larger than the largest 1970s interruption. The disruption sizes and estimated probability of occurrence of these scenarios were supplied by the CIA. The most critical part of the CIA's analysis was the assessment of likelihood of these cases occurring. The CIA approached the likelihood problem by combining an examination of past oil supply disruptions with qualitative analysis of important oil market and regional trends. The study group then used statistical techniques and probability distributions to synthesize the historical data with CIA evaluations of as yet unobserved events. The SPR size study assumed direct purchases of SPR oil and did not assume the use of alternative financing mechanisms. Members of the working group with foreign policy and national security responsibilities provided an in-depth review of strategic considerations affecting SPR size. A number of prior studies, some classified, have addressed the strategic importance and insurance value of the SPR to the US and its allies. The results of these studies have also been incorporated in the current effort. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Sizing and burn time measurements of micron-sized metal powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, Robert J.; Mohan, Salil; Dreizin, Edward L. [New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Detailed ignition and combustion mechanisms are needed to develop optimized propellant and energetic formulations using micron-sized metal powders, such as aluminum. Combustion researchers have traditionally used relatively coarse metal particles to characterize the burn time dependence on particle size. However, measurements of burn times for particles below 10 {mu}m in diameter are still needed for aluminum powders and other metal fuels. The apparatus described here sizes the particles just before the ignition event, providing a direct correlation between individual particle size and its burn time. Two lasers were utilized: a 785 nm laser diode for sizing the particles and a 125 W CO{sub 2} laser for particle ignition. The particles crossed the 785 nm laser beam just before crossing the CO{sub 2} laser beam. The particle size was determined from the amplitude of the scattered 785 nm light pulse. The burn time was determined from the duration of the visible light emission produced from the ignited particle. The in situ measured particle size distributions compared well with the size distributions measured for the same powders by a commercial instrument using low angle laser light scattering. Our measurements with two nominally spherical aluminum powders, suggest that the burn times increase from 0.5 to {approx}2.5 ms as the particle diameters increase from 3 to 8 {mu}m.

  8. Surface plasmon standing waves on Ag nanorods: observations of finite size effects and size dependency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Surface plasmon standing waves on Ag nanorods: observations of finite size effects and size to have clear configuration of standing waves of the nanorod. The nm resolution of the electron probe standing wave on a string with fixed ends, we observed that the wavelength of the SP standing wave

  9. Computer Stochastics in Scalar Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. B. Lang

    1993-12-01

    This is a series of lectures on Monte Carlo results on the non-perturbative, lattice formulation approach to quantum field theory. Emphasis is put on 4D scalar quantum field theory. I discuss real space renormalization group, fixed point properties and logarithmic corrections, partition function zeroes, the triviality bound on the Higgs mass, finite size effects, Goldstone bosons and chiral perturbation theory, and the determination of scattering phase shifts for some scalar models.

  10. INITIAL PLANETESIMAL SIZES AND THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlichting, Hilke E. [UCLA, Department of Earth and Space Science, 595 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E., E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, P.O. Box 6010, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The Kuiper Belt is a remnant from the early solar system and its size distribution contains many important constraints that can be used to test models of planet formation and collisional evolution. We show, by comparing observations with theoretical models, that the observed Kuiper Belt size distribution is well matched by coagulation models, which start with an initial planetesimal population with radii of about 1 km, and subsequent collisional evolution. We find that the observed size distribution above R {approx} 30 km is primordial, i.e., it has not been modified by collisional evolution over the age of the solar system, and that the size distribution below R {approx} 30 km has been modified by collisions and that its slope is well matched by collisional evolution models that use published strength laws. We investigate in detail the resulting size distribution of bodies ranging from 0.01 km to 30 km and find that its slope changes several times as a function of radius before approaching the expected value for an equilibrium collisional cascade of material strength dominated bodies for R {approx}< 0.1 km. Compared to a single power-law size distribution that would span the whole range from 0.01 km to 30 km, we find in general a strong deficit of bodies around R {approx} 10 km and a strong excess of bodies around 2 km in radius. This deficit and excess of bodies are caused by the planetesimal size distribution left over from the runaway growth phase, which left most of the initial mass in small planetesimals while only a small fraction of the total mass is converted into large protoplanets. This excess mass in small planetesimals leaves a permanent signature in the size distribution of small bodies that is not erased after 4.5 Gyr of collisional evolution. Observations of the small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) size distribution can therefore test if large KBOs grew as a result of runaway growth and constrained the initial planetesimal sizes. We find that results from recent KBO occultation surveys and the observed KBO size distribution can be best matched by an initial planetesimal population that contained about equal mass per logarithmic mass bin in bodies ranging from 0.4 km to 4 km in radius. We further find that we cannot match the observed KBO size distribution if most of the planetesimal mass was contained in bodies that were 10 km in radius or larger simply because their resulting size distribution cannot be sufficiently depleted over 4.5 Gyr to match observations.

  11. Synthesis and optical properties of quantum-size metal sulfide particles in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nedeljkovic, J.M.; Patel, R.C.; Kaufman, P.; Joyce-Pruden, C.; O'Leary, N. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States))

    1993-04-01

    During the past decade, small-particle' research has become quite popular in various fields of chemistry and physics. The recognition of quantum-size effects in very small colloidal particles has led to renewed interest in this area. Small particles' are clusters of atoms or molecules ranging in size from 1 nm to almost 10 nm or having agglomeration numbers from 10 up to a few hundred. In other words, small particles fall in size between single atoms or molecules and bulk materials. The agglomeration number specifies the number of individual atoms or molecules in a given cluster. The research in this area is interdisciplinary, and it links colloidal science and molecular chemistry. The symbiosis of these two areas of research has revealed some intriguing characteristics of small particles. This experiment illustrates the following: simple colloidal techniques for the preparation of two different types of quantum-size metal sulfide particles; the blue shift of the measured optical absorption spectra when the particle size is decreased in the quantum-size regime; and use of a simple quantum mechanical model to calculate the particle size from the absorption onset measured for CdS.

  12. Real-Time Simultaneous Measurements of Size, Density, and Composition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Simultaneous Measurements of Size, Density, and Composition of Single Ultrafine Diesel Tailpipe Particles Real-Time Simultaneous Measurements of Size, Density, and Composition of...

  13. Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System Needs: Scoping Study Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System Needs: Scoping Study Emerging...

  14. SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    review of all size standards for the next several years. An SBA-issued White Paper entitled, "Size Standards Methodology," which explains how SBA establishes, reviews...

  15. Reduce Pumping Costs Through Optimum Pipe Sizing | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduce Pumping Costs Through Optimum Pipe Sizing Reduce Pumping Costs Through Optimum Pipe Sizing This tip sheet discusses how to reduce pumping system costs through optimum pipe...

  16. Overview of Detailed Chemical Speciation and Particle Sizing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Detailed Chemical Speciation and Particle Sizing for Diesel Exhaust, Both Real Time and Filter Based Measurements Overview of Detailed Chemical Speciation and Particle Sizing for...

  17. Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01

    We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

  18. Scaling of Seismic Memory with Earthquake Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Zeyu; Tenenbaum, Joel; Podobnik, Boris; Stanley, H Eugene

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that the earthquake events possess short-term memory, i.e. that events occurring in a particular location are dependent on the short history of that location. We conduct an analysis to see whether real-time earthquake data also possess long-term memory and, if so, whether such autocorrelations depend on the size of earthquakes within close spatiotemporal proximity. We analyze the seismic waveform database recorded by 64 stations in Japan, including the 2011 "Great East Japan Earthquake", one of the five most powerful earthquakes ever recorded which resulted in a tsunami and devastating nuclear accidents. We explore the question of seismic memory through use of mean conditional intervals and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). We find that the waveform sign series show long-range power-law anticorrelations while the interval series show long-range power-law correlations. We find size-dependence in earthquake auto-correlations---as earthquake size increases, both of these correlation beha...

  19. Nanoconfined catalytic Ångström-size motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter H. Colberg; Raymond Kapral

    2015-01-13

    Chemically-powered synthetic micron and nano-scale motors that propel themselves in solution are being intensively studied because of the wide range of potential applications that exploit their directed motion. Recent experiments have shown that, even on the molecular scale, small-molecule catalysts and single enzyme molecules exhibit properties that have been attributed to self-propulsion. Simulations of very small {\\AA}ngstr\\"om-size synthetic motors in bulk solution have shown similar effects. Applications of such small motors in the cell or in microfluidic devices require knowledge of how these motors interact with boundaries. Molecular dynamics is used to investigate the properties of {\\AA}ngstr\\"om-size synthetic chemically-powered motors confined between walls separated by distances of tens of nanometers. Evidence for strong structural ordering of the motors between the walls, which reflects the finite size of solvent molecules and depends on solvent exclusion forces, is provided. Dynamical properties, such as average motor velocity, orientational relaxation and mean square displacement, are anisotropic and depend on the distance from the walls. This research presents information needed for potential applications that use these motors in the complex confined geometries encountered in biology and the laboratory.

  20. Internal split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat; Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  1. Size Dependent Population Dynamics of Microtus Ochrogaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sauer, John R.; Slade, Norman A.

    1986-06-01

    stream_size 20190 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name slade_american_naturalist.pdf.txt stream_source_info slade_american_naturalist.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Vol. 127... therefore could make no direct comparison of age- and mass-based methods (such as the analysis in Werner and Caswell 1977 of a population of teasel, Dipsacus sylvestris Huds.). Subsequent to our analysis of voles, we com­ pared age- and mass...

  2. Assessing Learning in Small Sized Physics Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ene, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    We describe the construction, validation and testing of a concept inventory for an Introduction to Physics of Semiconductors course offered by the department of physics for undergraduate engineering students. By design, this inventory addresses both content knowledge and ability to interpret content via different cognitive processes described in Bloom's taxonomy. The primary challenge comes from the low number of test takers. Since the Rasch Model (aka 1PL IRT model), can be used with small sample sizes, we describe Rasch Modeling analysis and results for this concept inventory.

  3. On the Physics of Size Selectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roland Roth; Dirk Gillespie

    2005-11-07

    We demonstrate that two mechanisms used by biological ion channels to select particles by size are driven by entropy. With uncharged particles in an infinite cylinder, we show that a channel that attracts particles is small-particle selective and that a channel that repels water from the wall is large-particle selective. Comparing against extensive density-functional theory calculations of our model, we find that the main physics can be understood with surprisingly simple bulk models that neglect the confining geometry of the channel completely.

  4. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Roomparticle size distribution ARM Data Discovery

  5. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Size

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic Monthly Actual Data10)Households,Size of

  6. #MarketSize | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult formatswindMarketSize Home n/a n/a n/a

  7. Limitations of Using Uniform Heat Flux Assumptions in Sizing Vertical Borehole Heat Exchanger Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ground heat exchangers (GHE) used with ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems. These models can account approach with a parametric study. Keywords - Ground Source Heat Pumps; Borehole Heat Exchangers; Finite Line Source Theory; g-functions 1. Introduction Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are a widely

  8. An Optimization Approach to the Design of Multi-Size Heliostat fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-28

    May 28, 2014 ... ciency of the plant, i.e., optimizing the energy generated per unit .... the efficiency factors (usual in this framework), that is, ? = fat fcos fsb fsp .

  9. Using the depth-velocity-size diagram to interpret equilibrium bed configurations in river flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southard, J.B. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Data from flume studies that report equilibrium bed configuration as well as water temperature, flow depth, flow velocity, and sediment size were used to develop the best approximation to the relationships among the various bed phases (ripples, dunes, lower regime plane bed, upper regime plane bed, and antidunes) in a three-axis graph (depth-velocity-size diagram) with dimensionless measures of mean flow depth, mean flow velocity, and sediment size along the axis. Relationships are shown in a series of depth-velocity and velocity-size sections through the diagram. Boundaries between bed-phase stability fields are drawn as surfaces that minimize, misplacement of data points. A large subset of the data, for which reliable values of bed shear stress are reported, was also used to represent the stability relationships in a graph of dimensionless boundary shear stress against dimensionless sediment size, but with results less useful for fluvial flow interpretation. The diagram covers about one order of magnitude in flow depth. To be useful for river flows, the diagram must be extrapolated in flow depth by about one more order of magnitude, but this is not a serious problem for approximate work. The depth-velocity-size diagram permits prediction of equilibrium bed configuration in river flows when the approximate flow depth and mean flow velocity are known. Because the diagram is essentially dimensionless, the effect of water temperature (via the fluid viscosity) on the bed configuration is easily accounted for by use of the diagram.

  10. LNG fleet increases in size and capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linser, H.J. Jr.; Drudy, M.J.; Endrizzi, F.; Urbanelli, A.A.

    1997-06-02

    The LNG fleet as of early 1997 consisted of 99 vessels with total cargo capacity of 10.7 million cu m, equivalent to approximately 4.5 million tons. One of the newest additions to the fleet, the 137,000-cu m tanker Al Zubarah, is five times the size of the original commercial vessel Methane Princess. Al Zubarah`s first loading of more than 60,000 tons occurred in December 1996 for deliver to Japanese buyers from the newly commissioned Qatargas LNG plant at Ras Laffan. That size cargo contains enough clean-burning energy to heat 60,000 homes in Japan for 1 month. Measuring nearly 1,000 ft long, the tanker is among the largest in the industry fleet and joined 70 other vessels of more than 100,000 cu m. Most LNG tankers built since 1975 have been larger-capacity vessels. The paper discusses LNG shipping requirements, containment systems, vessel design, propulsion, construction, operations and maintenance, and the future for larger vessels.

  11. Right-Sizing Laboratory Equipment Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenze, David; Greenberg, Steve; Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Starr, William

    2005-11-29

    Laboratory equipment such as autoclaves, glass washers, refrigerators, and computers account for a significant portion of the energy use in laboratories. However, because of the general lack of measured equipment load data for laboratories, designers often use estimates based on 'nameplate' rated data, or design assumptions from prior projects. Consequently, peak equipment loads are frequently overestimated. This results in oversized HVAC systems, increased initial construction costs, and increased energy use due to inefficiencies at low part-load operation. This best-practice guide first presents the problem of over-sizing in typical practice, and then describes how best-practice strategies obtain better estimates of equipment loads and right-size HVAC systems, saving initial construction costs as well as life-cycle energy costs. This guide is one in a series created by the Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs21') program, a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. Geared towards architects, engineers, and facilities managers, these guides provide information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  12. Inflating with large effective fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, C.P. [PH-TH Division, CERN, CH-1211, Genève 23 (Switzerland); Cicoli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Quevedo, F. [Abdus Salam ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Williams, M., E-mail: cburgess@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: mcicoli@ictp.it, E-mail: f.quevedo@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: mwilliams@perimeterinsititute.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton ON (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    We re-examine large scalar fields within effective field theory, in particular focussing on the issues raised by their use in inflationary models (as suggested by BICEP2 to obtain primordial tensor modes). We argue that when the large-field and low-energy regimes coincide the scalar dynamics is most effectively described in terms of an asymptotic large-field expansion whose form can be dictated by approximate symmetries, which also help control the size of quantum corrections. We discuss several possible symmetries that can achieve this, including pseudo-Goldstone inflatons characterized by a coset G/H (based on abelian and non-abelian, compact and non-compact symmetries), as well as symmetries that are intrinsically higher dimensional. Besides the usual trigonometric potentials of Natural Inflation we also find in this way simple large-field power laws (like V ? ?{sup 2}) and exponential potentials, V(?) = ?{sub k}V{sub x}e{sup ?k?/M}. Both of these can describe the data well and give slow-roll inflation for large fields without the need for a precise balancing of terms in the potential. The exponential potentials achieve large r through the limit |?| || ? and so predict r ? (8/3)(1-n{sub s}); consequently n{sub s} ? 0.96 gives r ? 0.11 but not much larger (and so could be ruled out as measurements on r and n{sub s} improve). We examine the naturalness issues for these models and give simple examples where symmetries protect these forms, using both pseudo-Goldstone inflatons (with non-abelian non-compact shift symmetries following familiar techniques from chiral perturbation theory) and extra-dimensional models.

  13. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Wang Jiaxiang [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2012-11-15

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  14. Measurement of particle size, velocity and temperature in the plasma spray coating process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fincke, J.R.; Swank, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    The quality and uniformity of coatings fabricated by the plasma spray process is controlled by the condition of the particles on impact. In this work a measurement technique for simultaneously obtaining particle size, velocity, and temperature is used to characterize the particle spray field. Particle size and velocity are obtained from a combination laser particle sizing system and laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). The particle temperature is determined by a two-color pyrometer technique and the relative particle number density is derived from the data rate. The fraction of unheated or unprocessed particles which result from temperature and velocity fluctuations is also obtained. This fraction can approach 10% by mass of the total particle flow. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  15. A Medium Sized Schwarzschild-Couder Cherenkov Telescope Mechanical Design Proposed for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrum, K; Benbow, W; Cameron, R; Criswell, S; Errando, M; Guarino, V; Kaaret, P; Kieda, D; Mukherjee, R; Naumann, D; Nieto, D; Northrop, R; Okumura, A; Roache, E; Rousselle, J; Schlenstedt, S; Sternberger, R; Vassiliev, V; Wakely, S; Zhao, H

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is an international next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory. CTA will be implemented as southern and northern hemisphere arrays of tens of small, medium and large-sized imaging Cherenkov telescopes with the goal of improving the sensitivity over the current-generation experiments by an order of magnitude. CTA will provide energy coverage from ~20 GeV to more than 300 TeV. The Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) medium size (9.5m) telescopes will feature a novel aplanatic two-mirror optical design capable of accommodating a wide field-of-view with significantly improved angular resolution as compared to the traditional Davies-Cotton optical design. A full-scale prototype SC medium size telescope structure has been designed and will be constructed at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona during the fall of 2015. concentrate on the novel features of the design.

  16. Characteristic Size and Mass of Galaxies in the Bose-Einstein Condensate Dark Matter Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jae-Weon

    2015-01-01

    We study an inherent length scale of galactic halos in the Bose-Einstein condensate (or scalar field) dark matter model. Considering evolution of the density perturbation we show that the average background matter density determines a quantum Jeans mass and hence the spatial size of galaxies. In this model the minimum size of galaxies increases, while the minimum mass of the galaxies decreases as the universe evolves. The observed values of the mass and the size of the dwarf galaxies are successfully reproduced with the dark matter particle mass $m\\simeq 5\\times 10^{-22}eV$. The rotation velocity of dwarf galaxies is $O(\\sqrt{H/m}$) c, where $H$ is the Hubble parameter. We also suggest that ultra compact dwarf galaxies are remnants of dwarf galaxies formed in the early universe.

  17. Direct measurement of the size of 2003 UB313 from the Hubble Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Brown; E. L. Schaller; H. G. Roe; D. L. Rabinowitz; C. A. Trujillo

    2006-04-11

    We have used the Hubble Space Telescope to directly measure the angular size of the large Kuiper belt object 2003 UB313. By carefully calibrating the point spread function of a nearby field star, we measure the size of 2003 UB313 to be 34.3$\\pm$1.4 milliarcseconds, corresponding to a diameter of 2400$\\pm$100 km or a size $\\sim5$% larger than Pluto. The V band geometric albedo of 2003 UB313 is $86\\pm7$%. The extremely high albedo is consistent with the frosty methane spectrum, the lack of red coloring, and the lack of observed photometric variation on the surface of 2003 UB313. Methane photolysis should quickly darken the surface of 2003 UB313, but continuous evaporation and redeposition of surface ices appears capable of maintaining the extreme alebdo of this body.

  18. Source Temperatures and Sizes in Central Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Schwarz; ALADIN collaboration

    1997-04-03

    For midrapidity fragments from central 50-200 AMeV Au+Au collisions temperatures from double ratios of isotopic yields were compared with temperatures from particle unbound states. Temperatures from particle unbound states with T = 4-5 MeV show with increasing beam energy an increasing difference to temperatures from double ratios of isotopic yields, which increase from T = 5MeV to T = 12MeV. The lower temperatures extracted from particle unstable states can be explained by increasing cooling of the decaying system due to expansion. This expansion is driven by the radial flow, and freeze out of particle unstable states might depend on the dynamics of the expanding system. Source sizes from pp-correlation functions were found to be 9 to 11 fm.

  19. Pore size distribution and accessible pore size distribution in bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakurovs, Richard [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell [ORNL; Blach, Tomasz P [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The porosity and pore size distribution of coals determine many of their properties, from gas release to their behavior on carbonization, and yet most methods of determining pore size distribution can only examine a restricted size range. Even then, only accessible pores can be investigated with these methods. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) are increasingly used to characterize the size distribution of all of the pores non-destructively. Here we have used USANS/SANS to examine 24 well-characterized bituminous and subbituminous coals: three from the eastern US, two from Poland, one from New Zealand and the rest from the Sydney and Bowen Basins in Eastern Australia, and determined the relationships of the scattering intensity corresponding to different pore sizes with other coal properties. The range of pore radii examinable with these techniques is 2.5 nm to 7 {micro}m. We confirm that there is a wide range of pore sizes in coal. The pore size distribution was found to be strongly affected by both rank and type (expressed as either hydrogen or vitrinite content) in the size range 250 nm to 7 {micro}m and 5 to 10 nm, but weakly in intermediate regions. The results suggest that different mechanisms control coal porosity on different scales. Contrast-matching USANS and SANS were also used to determine the size distribution of the fraction of the pores in these coals that are inaccessible to deuterated methane, CD{sub 4}, at ambient temperature. In some coals most of the small ({approx} 10 nm) pores were found to be inaccessible to CD{sub 4} on the time scale of the measurement ({approx} 30 min - 16 h). This inaccessibility suggests that in these coals a considerable fraction of inherent methane may be trapped for extended periods of time, thus reducing the effectiveness of methane release from (or sorption by) these coals. Although the number of small pores was less in higher rank coals, the fraction of total pores that was inaccessible was not rank dependent. In the Australian coals, at the 10 nm to 50 nm size scales the pores in inertinites appeared to be completely accessible to CD{sub 4}, whereas the pores in the vitrinite were about 75% inaccessible. Unlike the results for total porosity that showed no regional effects on relationships between porosity and coal properties, clear regional differences in the relationships between fraction of closed porosity and coal properties were found. The 10 to 50 nm-sized pores of inertinites of the US and Polish coals examined appeared less accessible to methane than those of the inertinites of Australian coals. This difference in pore accessibility in inertinites may explain why empirical relationships between fluidity and coking properties developed using Carboniferous coals do not apply to Australian coals.

  20. Resurrecting the Size Effect: Firm Size, Profitability Shocks, and Expected Stock Returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    and Mathijs A. van Dijk* September 2008 Abstract Recent studies report that the size effect in U.S. stock of Business, Ohio State University. Mathijs A. van Dijk is at the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus Dijk (2006) for a survey of the literature to date. 2 Dichev (1998), Chan, Karceski, and Lakonishok

  1. size; island size promoted abundances of some organisms and reduced others (Fig. 1). Second,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springer, Timothy A.

    - systems. Although a growing number of studies have used the concepts developed in island geographysize; island size promoted abundances of some organisms and reduced others (Fig. 1). Second, our study found diversity, community compo- sition, and ecosystem functioning all responded to island

  2. External split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  3. Renormalization Group Analysis of Finite-Size Scaling in the $?^4_4$ Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Kenna; C. B. Lang

    1992-10-08

    A finite-size scaling theory for the $\\phi^4_4$ model is derived using renormalization group methods. Particular attention is paid to the partition function zeroes, in terms of which all thermodynamic observables can be expressed. While the leading scaling behaviour is identical to that of mean field theory, there exist multiplicative logarithmic corrections too. A non-perturbative test of these formulae in the form of a high precision Monte Carlo analysis reveals good quantitative agreement with the analytical predictions.

  4. Cost Sharing for the Economic Lot-Sizing Problem with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-04-18

    Keywords: game theory; cooperative game; cost sharing; integrality gap; economic lot-sizing ... order to meet demand, the retailer can either place an order for newly ...... Capacitated dynamic lot sizing problems in closed-loop supply chain.

  5. Size homeostasis in adherent cells studied by synthetic phase microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Yongjin

    The coupling of the rate of cell growth to the rate of cell division determines cell size, a defining characteristic that is central to cell function and, ultimately, to tissue architecture. The physiology of size homeostasis ...

  6. SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    You may also mail comments to Khem R. Sharma, Chief, Office of Size Standards, 409 3rd St., SW, Mail Code 6530, Washington, DC 20416. As part of an ongoing review of all size...

  7. do_over.sized.v2.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulationdetonation detection |Innovation Portaldnn

  8. Perceptual Affordances of Wall-Sized Displays for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isenberg, Petra

    .g., HCI)]: Miscellaneous. Introduction Wall-sized displays (PowerWalls) engulf viewers in very large high

  9. Cogeneration System Size Optimization Constant Capacity and Constant Demand Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong-Kcomt, J. B.; Turner, W. C.

    1993-01-01

    is made up by auxiliary boilers. 2. Isolated Operation, Thermal Load Following: the system is sized to match or exceed the maximum thermal load. Any electrical load deficit is made up by auxiliary generator. 3. Electrically Baseloaded, the system... is sized to meet - or slightly exceed the minimum electrical demand. 4. Thermally Baseloaded, the system is sized to meet - or slightly exceed the minimum thermal demand. 5. Maximum Legal System Size, as determined by the Public Utilities...

  10. Prediction of Solar Flare Size and Time-to-Flare Using Support Vector Machine Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucheron, Laura E; McAteer, R T James

    2015-01-01

    We study the prediction of solar flare size and time-to-flare using 38 features describing magnetic complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. This work uses support vector regression to formulate a mapping from the 38-dimensional feature space to a continuous-valued label vector representing flare size or time-to-flare. When we consider flaring regions only, we find an average error in estimating flare size of approximately half a \\emph{geostationary operational environmental satellite} (\\emph{GOES}) class. When we additionally consider non-flaring regions, we find an increased average error of approximately 3/4 a \\emph{GOES} class. We also consider thresholding the regressed flare size for the experiment containing both flaring and non-flaring regions and find a true positive rate of 0.69 and a true negative rate of 0.86 for flare prediction. The results for both of these size regression experiments are consistent across a wide range of predictive time windows, indicating that the magnetic complexity fe...

  11. Sexual size dimorphism and phylogeny in North American minnows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyron, Mark

    often sexually size dimorphic than birds with nonlekking mating systems (Oakes, 1992). In snakes (ShineSexual size dimorphism and phylogeny in North American minnows MARK PYRON University of Oklahoma 1995 Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is predicted to vary across mating systems. A previous study examined

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank

    and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used.6 lm) and small (0.2­1.6 lm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox gradients, size fraction was a significantly stronger predictor of community

  13. Semi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Semi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel-based approach to termination uses sized types: an ordinal bound for the size of a data structure is stored criterion, * *a calculus for semi-continuous function is developed. 1 Introduction Termination

  14. Semi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    , and classical applications are total correctness and termination of partial evaluation. In languagesSemi-continuous Sized Types and Termination Andreas Abel Institut für Informatik Ludwig to termination uses sized types: an ordinal bound for the size of a data structure is stored in its type

  15. Concentration of measures via size biased couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Subhankar

    2009-01-01

    Let $Y$ be a nonnegative random variable with mean $\\mu$ and finite positive variance $\\sigma^2$, and let $Y^s$, defined on the same space as $Y$, have the $Y$ size biased distribution, that is, the distribution characterized by E[Yf(Y)]=\\mu E f(Y^s) for all functions $f$ for which these expectations exist. Under a variety of conditions on the coupling of Y and $Y^s$, including combinations of boundedness and monotonicity, concentration of measure inequalities hold. Examples include the number of relatively ordered subsequences of a random permutation, sliding window statistics including the number of m-runs in a sequence of coin tosses, the number of local maximum of a random function on a lattice, the number of urns containing exactly one ball in an urn allocation model, the volume covered by the union of $n$ balls placed uniformly over a volume n subset of d diml Euclidean space, the number of bulbs switched on at the terminal time in the so called lightbulb process, the number of isolated vertices in the ...

  16. Unexpected ferromagnetic ordering enhancement with crystallite size growth observed in La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO? nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iniama, G.; Ita, B. I. [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Calabar, Calabar (Nigeria); Presa, P. de la, E-mail: pmpresa@ucm.es; Hernando, A. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-ADIF-CSIC, 28230 Las Rozas (Spain); Fac. CC Físicas, Dpto. Física de Materiales, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alonso, J. M. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-ADIF-CSIC, 28230 Las Rozas (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Multigner, M. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-ADIF-CSIC, 28230 Las Rozas (Spain); Cortés-Gil, R.; Ruiz-González, M. L. [Fac. CC Químicas, Dpto. Química Inorgánica, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Calbet, J. M. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-ADIF-CSIC, 28230 Las Rozas (Spain); Fac. CC Químicas, Dpto. Química Inorgánica, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-21

    In this paper, the physical properties of half-doped manganite La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO? with crystallite sizes ranging from 15 to 40 nm are investigated. As expected, ferromagnetic order strengthens at expense of antiferromagnetic one as crystallite size is reduced to 15 nm. However, contrary to previously reported works, an enhancement of saturation magnetization is observed as crystallite size increases from 15 to 22 nm. This unexpected behavior is accompanied by an unusual cell volume variation that seems to induce ferromagnetic-like behavior at expense of antiferromagnetic one. Besides, field cooled hysteresis loops show exchange bias field and coercivity enhancement for increasing cooling fields, which suggest a kind of core-shell structure with AFM-FM coupling for crystallite sizes as small as 15 nm. It is expected that inner core orders antiferromagnetically, whereas uncompensated surface spins behave as spin glass with ferromagnetic-like ordering.

  17. An analytical method to calculate equivalent fields to irregular symmetric and asymmetric photon fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Mohamad J.; Chegeni, Nahid; Zabihzadeh, Mansoor; Hamzian, Nima

    2014-04-01

    Equivalent field is frequently used for central axis depth-dose calculations of rectangular- and irregular-shaped photon beams. As most of the proposed models to calculate the equivalent square field are dosimetry based, a simple physical-based method to calculate the equivalent square field size was used as the basis of this study. The table of the sides of the equivalent square or rectangular fields was constructed and then compared with the well-known tables by BJR and Venselaar, et al. with the average relative error percentage of 2.5 ± 2.5% and 1.5 ± 1.5%, respectively. To evaluate the accuracy of this method, the percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured for some special irregular symmetric and asymmetric treatment fields and their equivalent squares for Siemens Primus Plus linear accelerator for both energies, 6 and 18 MV. The mean relative differences of PDDs measurement for these fields and their equivalent square was approximately 1% or less. As a result, this method can be employed to calculate equivalent field not only for rectangular fields but also for any irregular symmetric or asymmetric field.

  18. Superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES) external fields and safety considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Boom, R.W.; Eyssa, Y.M. . Applied Superconductivity Center)

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses preferred SMES configurations and the external magnetic fields which they generate. Possible biological effects of fields are reviewed briefly. It is proposed that SMES units be fenced at the 10 gauss (1 mT) level to keep unrestricted areas safe, even for persons with cardiac pacemakers. For a full size 5000 MWh (1.8 {times} 10 {sup 13} J) SMES the magnetic field decreases to 10 gauss at a radial distance of 2 km from the center of the coil. Other considerations related to the environmental impact of large SMES magnetic fields are discussed briefly.

  19. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  20. Solar nebula magnetic fields recorded in the Semarkona meteorite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Roger R.; Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Harrison, Richard J.; Bai, Xue-Ning; Desch, Steven J.; Ebel, Denton S.; Suavet, Clement; Wang, Huapei; Glenn, David; Le Sage, David; Kasama, Takeshi; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Kuan, Aaron T.

    2014-11-13

    stream_source_info Final-Revised-Submisson.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 143440 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Final-Revised-Submisson.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8   1   Solar nebula... constrain the strength of nebular magnetic fields. Chondrules are 55   millimeter-sized lithic constituents of primitive meteorites that formed in transient heating events 56   in the solar nebula. If a stable field was present during cooling...

  1. On the size-Ramsey number of hypergraphs Andrzej Dudek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mubayi, Dhruv

    On the size-Ramsey number of hypergraphs Andrzej Dudek Steven La Fleur Dhruv Mubayi Vojtech R¨odl§ March 20, 2015 Abstract The size-Ramsey number of a graph G is the minimum number of edges in a graph H such that every 2-edge-coloring of H yields a monochromatic copy of G. Size-Ramsey numbers of graphs have been

  2. A Note on Ramsey Size-Linear Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simonovits, Miklós

    A Note on Ramsey Size-Linear Graphs P.N. Balister,1 R.H. Schelp,1 and M. Simonovits1,2 1 DEPARTMENT is a Ramsey size-linear graph and x,y 2 V(G ) then if we add a sufficiently long path between x and y we obtain a new Ramsey size-linear graph. As a consequence we show that if G is any graph such that every

  3. THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE NEPTUNE TROJANS AND THE MISSING INTERMEDIATE-SIZED PLANETESIMALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Trujillo, Chadwick A.

    2010-11-10

    We present an ultra-deep survey for Neptune Trojans using the Subaru 8.2 m and Magellan 6.5 m telescopes. The survey reached a 50% detection efficiency in the R band at m{sub R} = 25.7 mag and covered 49 deg{sup 2} of sky. m{sub R} = 25.7 mag corresponds to Neptune Trojans that are about 16 km in radius (assuming an albedo of 0.05). A paucity of smaller Neptune Trojans (radii < 45 km) compared with larger ones was found. The brightest Neptune Trojans appear to follow a steep power-law slope (q = 5 {+-} 1) similar to the brightest objects in the other known stable reservoirs such as the Kuiper Belt, Jupiter Trojans, and main belt asteroids. We find a roll-over for the Neptune Trojans that occurs around a radius of r = 45 {+-} 10 km (m{sub R} = 23.5 {+-} 0.3), which is also very similar to the other stable reservoirs. All the observed stable regions in the solar system show evidence for Missing Intermediate-Sized Planetesimals (MISPs). This indicates a primordial and not collisional origin, which suggests that planetesimal formation proceeded directly from small to large objects. The scarcity of intermediate- and smaller-sized Neptune Trojans may limit them as being a strong source for the short period comets.

  4. CHARACTERISTIC SIZE OF FLARE KERNELS IN THE VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED CONTINUA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Cao, Wenda, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Big Bear Solar Observatory, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    In this Letter, we present a new approach to estimate the formation height of visible and near-infrared emission of an X10 flare. The sizes of flare emission cores in three wavelengths are accurately measured during the peak of the flare. The source size is the largest in the G band at 4308 A and shrinks toward longer wavelengths, namely the green continuum at 5200 A and NIR at 15600 A, where the emission is believed to originate from the deeper atmosphere. This size-wavelength variation is likely explained by the direct heating model as electrons need to move along converging field lines from the corona to the photosphere. Therefore, one can observe the smallest source, which in our case is 0.''65 {+-} 0.''02 in the bottom layer (represented by NIR), and observe relatively larger kernels in upper layers of 1.''03 {+-} 0.''14 and 1.''96 {+-} 0.''27, using the green continuum and G band, respectively. We then compare the source sizes with a simple magnetic geometry to derive the formation height of the white-light sources and magnetic pressure in different layers inside the flare loop.

  5. Adjustable virtual pore-size filter for automated sample preparation using acoustic radiation force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K; Mariella, R

    2008-05-22

    We present a rapid and robust size-based separation method for high throughput microfluidic devices using acoustic radiation force. We developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices. Here we compare the results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. With optimized design of our microfluidic flow system we were able to achieve yields of > 90% for the MS2 with > 80% of the S. cerevisiae being removed in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  6. Solar Trackers Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Trackers Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2010 - 2020 Home > Groups > Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency John55364's picture...

  7. Efficient Algorithm for Locating and Sizing Series Compensation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Compensation Devices in Large Transmission Grids: Model Implementation We explore optimization methods for planning the placement, sizing and operations of Flexible Alternating...

  8. Sizing a New Water Heater | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    systems: Tankless or demand-type water heaters Solar water heating system Storage and heat pump (with tank) water heaters. For sizing combination water and space heating systems --...

  9. Development of Model Filtration Media for Investigating Size...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency A novel method for fabricating custom porous filtration media for emission control has been developed. Controlled pore sizes could be used to optimize...

  10. Algorithm for Lot Sizing with Inventory Bounds and Fixed Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alper Atamturk

    2007-06-26

    Jun 26, 2007 ... An O(n^2) Algorithm for Lot Sizing with Inventory Bounds and Fixed Costs. Alper Atamturk (atamturk ***at*** berkeley.edu) Simge Kucukyavuz ...

  11. Simulations of Sizing and Comfort Improvements for Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL 47309 1 Simulations of Sizing and Comfort Improvements for Residential Forced-Air Heating...................................................................................... 18 PEAK DEMAND AND POWER CONSUMPTION

  12. Scalable Heuristics for Planning, Placement and Sizing of Flexible...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Sizing of Flexible AC Transmission System Devices Aiming to relieve transmission grid congestion and improve or extend feasibility domain of the operations, we build...

  13. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    for nuclear energy (Prelaw 2008). Energy Efficiency ServicesEnergy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size Two implementation contractor respondents mentioned defense, semiconductor, nuclear, and

  14. Optimization Online - Optimal management and sizing of energy ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavithra Harsha

    2012-07-30

    Jul 30, 2012 ... Optimal management and sizing of energy storage under dynamic pricing for the efficient integration of renewable energy. Pavithra Harsha ...

  15. Evaluation of Powertrain Options and Component Sizing for MD...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sizing for MD and HD Applications on Real World Drive Cycles 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  16. SELF-CONSISTENT SIZE AND VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF COLLISIONAL CASCADES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Margaret [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schlichting, Hilke E., E-mail: mpan@astro.berkeley.edu, E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential size spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan and Sari can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of size. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-sized bodies for the Kuiper belt, the asteroid belt, and extrasolar debris disks may constrain the mass and number of large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies' internal strengths.

  17. Strong Field, Noncommutative QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Ilderton; Joakim Lundin; Mattias Marklund

    2010-05-26

    We review the effects of strong background fields in noncommutative QED. Beginning with the noncommutative Maxwell and Dirac equations, we describe how combined noncommutative and strong field effects modify the propagation of fermions and photons. We extend these studies beyond the case of constant backgrounds by giving a new and revealing interpretation of the photon dispersion relation. Considering scattering in background fields, we then show that the noncommutative photon is primarily responsible for generating deviations from strong field QED results. Finally, we propose a new method for constructing gauge invariant variables in noncommutative QED, and use it to analyse the physics of our null background fields.

  18. Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hager, J. D.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; Delettrez, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2013-05-15

    Filamentary electromagnetic fields previously observed in the coronae of laser-driven spherical targets [F. H. Séguin et al., Phys. Plasma. 19, 012701 (2012)] have been further investigated in laser-irradiated plastic foils. Face-on proton-radiography provides an axial view of these filaments and shows coherent cellular structure regardless of initial foil-surface conditions. The observed cellular fields are shown to have an approximately constant scale size of ?210 ?m throughout the plasma evolution. A discussion of possible field-generation mechanisms is provided and it is demonstrated that the likely source of the cellular field structure is the magnetothermal instability. Using predicted temperature and density profiles, the fastest growing modes of this instability were found to be slowly varying in time and consistent with the observed cellular size.

  19. Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hager, J. D.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; Delettrez, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2013-04-15

    Filamentary electromagnetic fields previously observed in the coronae of laser-driven spherical targets [F. H. S#2;eguin et al., Phys. Plasma. 19, 012701 (2012)] have been further investigated in laser irradiated plastic foils. Face-on proton-radiography provides an axial view of these filaments and shows coherent cellular structure regardless of initial foil-surface conditions. The observed cellular fields are shown to have an approximately constant scale size of #2;210 lm throughout the plasma evolution. A discussion of possible field-generation mechanisms is provided and it is demonstrated that the likely source of the cellular field structure is the magnetothermal instability. Using predicted temperature and density profiles, the fastest growing modes of this instability were found to be slowly varying in time and consistent with the observed cellular size.

  20. Instability-driven electromagnetic fields in coronal plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Sinenian, N.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hager, J. D.; Betti, R.; Hu, S. X.; et al

    2013-04-15

    Filamentary electromagnetic fields previously observed in the coronae of laser-driven spherical targets [F. H. S#2;eguin et al., Phys. Plasma. 19, 012701 (2012)] have been further investigated in laser irradiated plastic foils. Face-on proton-radiography provides an axial view of these filaments and shows coherent cellular structure regardless of initial foil-surface conditions. The observed cellular fields are shown to have an approximately constant scale size of #2;210 lm throughout the plasma evolution. A discussion of possible field-generation mechanisms is provided and it is demonstrated that the likely source of the cellular field structure is the magnetothermal instability. Using predicted temperature and densitymore »profiles, the fastest growing modes of this instability were found to be slowly varying in time and consistent with the observed cellular size.« less

  1. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zihua Weng

    2011-03-31

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in the interplanetary space between the sun and the earth.

  2. Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, Trap Selectivity Studies: Mesh Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, Trap Selectivity Studies: Mesh Size VINCENT GUILLORY and PAUL had replaced drop nets and trot lines as the dominant gear in the commercial blue crab, Callinectes, LA 70343. ABSTRACT-Catch rates and sizes of blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, were com pared in traps

  3. Energy Storage System Sizing for Smoothing Power Generation , P. Bydlowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy Storage System Sizing for Smoothing Power Generation of Direct J. Aubry1 , P. Bydlowski 1 E-mail: judicael.aubry Abstract This paper examines the sizing energy storage system (ESS) for energy converter. Keywords: Energy Storage System (ESS), power smoothing, Direct Wave Energy Converter, Supercapacitor, Power

  4. The Hydrogen Atom with a Finite Sized Nucleus Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    The Hydrogen Atom with a Finite Sized Nucleus Frank Rioux This exercise explores the impact of nuclear size on the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom's electron. The traditional approach assumes that the proton is a dimensionless point charge, which is a very good approximation for the hydrogen atom. However

  5. Contrasting size evolution in marine and freshwater diatoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carbon cycle and most aquatic ecosystems. Their cell sizes impact carbon sequestration and en- ergy carbon cycle and the structure and functioning of aquatic ecosystems. evolutionarily stable strategy and forming the basis of many aquatic food webs (6). Diatom size distributions greatly influence carbon

  6. Enhancing cancer therapeutics using size-optimized magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Kannan M.

    Enhancing cancer therapeutics using size-optimized magnetic fluid hyperthermia Amit P. Khandhar, R cancer therapeutics using size-optimized magnetic fluid hyperthermia Amit P. Khandhar,1 R. Matthew & Engineering, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Division of Clinical

  7. Network Dynamics of City Sizes, Trade Networks, and Conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    Network Dynamics of City Sizes, Trade Networks, and Conflict Doug White In collaboration world, scale-free ­ but they are not going to get us where we need to go What are the possibilites: city size hierarchies and how they are likely to be driven by trade networks Network realism

  8. Biodistribution Particle Size, Surface Coating, and PEGylation Influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Jianghong

    Biodistribution Particle Size, Surface Coating, and PEGylation Influence the Biodistribution of particle size, PEGylation, and surface coating on the quantitative biodistribution of near-infrared-emitting quantum dots (QDs) in mice. Polymer- or peptide-coated 64 Cu-labeled QDs 2 or 12 nm in diameter

  9. Method of producing submicron size particles and product produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourne, R.S.; Eichman, C.C.; Welbon, W.W.

    1988-05-11

    Submicron size particles are produced by using a sputtering process to deposit particles into a liquid. The liquid is processed to recover the particles therefrom, and the particles have sizes in the range of twenty to two hundred Angstroms. Either metallic or non-metallic particles can be produced, and the metallic particles can be used in ''metallic inks.'' 4 figs.

  10. D-D Nuclear Fusion Using Different Size Pyroelectric Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    D-D Nuclear Fusion Using Different Size Pyroelectric Crystals A. M. Kovanen, D. J. Gillich, T. Z the conditions for D-D fusion in pyroelectric crystal accelerators. Three different pyroelectric crystal sizes are with the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. A. M

  11. THE COLLISIONAL DIVOT IN THE KUIPER BELT SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraser, Wesley C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, MC 150-21, 1200 E. California Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2009-11-20

    This paper presents the results of collisional evolution calculations for the Kuiper Belt starting from an initial size distribution similar to that produced by accretion simulations of that region-a steep power-law large object size distribution that breaks to a shallower slope at r approx 1-2 km, with collisional equilibrium achieved for objects r approx< 0.5 km. We find that the break from the steep large object power law causes a divot, or depletion of objects at r approx 10-20 km, which, in turn, greatly reduces the disruption rate of objects with r approx> 25-50 km, preserving the steep power-law behavior for objects at this size. Our calculations demonstrate that the roll-over observed in the Kuiper Belt size distribution is naturally explained as an edge of a divot in the size distribution; the radius at which the size distribution transitions away from the power law, and the shape of the divot from our simulations are consistent with the size of the observed roll-over, and size distribution for smaller bodies. Both the kink radius and the radius of the divot center depend on the strength scaling law in the gravity regime for Kuiper Belt objects. These simulations suggest that the sky density of r approx 1 km objects is approx10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} objects per square degree. A detection of the divot in the size distribution would provide a measure of the strength of large Kuiper Belt objects, and constrain the shape of the size distribution at the end of accretion in the Kuiper Belt.

  12. Larger sized wire arrays on 1.5 MA Z-pinch generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safronova, A. S. Kantsyrev, V. L. Weller, M. E. Shlyaptseva, V. V. Shrestha, I. K. Esaulov, A. A. Stafford, A.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Coverdale, C. A.; Jones, B.

    2014-12-15

    Experiments on the UNR Zebra generator with Load Current Multiplier (LCM) allow for implosions of larger sized wire array loads than at standard current of 1 MA. Advantages of larger sized planar wire array implosions include enhanced energy coupling to plasmas, better diagnostic access to observable plasma regions, and more complex geometries of the wire loads. The experiments with larger sized wire arrays were performed on 1.5 MA Zebra with LCM (the anode-cathode gap was 1 cm, which is half the gap used in the standard mode). In particular, larger sized multi-planar wire arrays had two outer wire planes from mid-atomic-number wires to create a global magnetic field (gmf) and plasma flow between them. A modified central plane with a few Al wires at the edges was put in the middle between outer planes to influence gmf and to create Al plasma flow in the perpendicular direction (to the outer arrays plasma flow). Such modified plane has different number of empty slots: it was increased from 6 up to 10, hence increasing the gap inside the middle plane from 4.9 to 7.7 mm, respectively. Such load configuration allows for more independent study of the flows of L-shell mid-atomic-number plasma (between the outer planes) and K-shell Al plasma (which first fills the gap between the edge wires along the middle plane) and their radiation in space and time. We demonstrate that such configuration produces higher linear radiation yield and electron temperatures as well as advantages of better diagnostics access to observable plasma regions and how the load geometry (size of the gap in the middle plane) influences K-shell Al radiation. In particular, K-shell Al radiation was delayed compared to L-shell mid-atomic-number radiation when the gap in the middle plane was large enough (when the number of empty slots was increased up to ten)

  13. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  14. The Ness field: An integrated field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasek, R.M.; Kean, K.R.; Richards, M.L. (Mobil North Sea Ltd., London (England))

    1990-05-01

    The Ness oil field, located in UK Block 9/13, was discovered in May 1986 by well 9/13b-28A. The field comprises a high-quality Middle Jurassic reservoir with an average 148-ft oil column trapped in a west-dipping, fault-bounded closure. The oil is substantially undersaturated. The field was brought on production as a subsea satellite development tied back to the Beryl B Platform. Oil was first delivered on August 11, 1987, just over a year from discovery. Initial producing rates from the 9/13B-28A well averaged about 10,000 BOPD. Since this well, another producer and water injector have been completed. Based on the frequent and accurate pressure data available from permanent downhole gauges installed in all three wells of the Ness field, material balance was used to calculate initial oil in place. These calculations gave an oil in place value consistent with recent calculations of 87 {times} 166 STB after less than 3% of the oil-in-place had been produced, compared with 55 {times} 106 STB initially mapped. Pressure monitoring enabled reservoir drive mechanisms to be tracked and a high offtake rate to be maintained by balancing water injection with withdrawals. A reevaluation of the mapped structure was prompted by a revision of the geological model following the 9/13b-38/38Z appraisal wells, together with the discrepancy between the oil in place from mapping and material balance. The seismic data was reinterpreted using the additional well control, and the field remapped. This resulted in a revised volume of 129 {times} 106 STB. Additional insight into the differentiation between oil and water volumes in this low compressibility system and a resolution of the differences between material balance and volumetrics were obtained through a black-oil simulation.

  15. The Effect of PV Array Size and Battery Size on the Economics of PV/Diesel/Battery Hybrid RAPS Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Effect of PV Array Size and Battery Size on the Economics of PV/Diesel/Battery Hybrid RAPS WA 6150 Abstract This paper focuses on pv/diesel/battery hybrid RAPS systems meeting loads above 50 kWh. INTRODUCTION A diesel hybrid system, incorporating a battery and inverter, can often provide power at a lower

  16. Alignment of Iron Nanoparticles in a Magnetic Field Due to Shape Anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Rios, Orlando; Parish, Chad M

    2015-07-09

    During high magnetic field processing there is evidence for alignment of non-spherical metallic particles above the Curie temperature in alloys with negligible magneto-crystalline anisotropy. The main driving force for alignment is the magnetic shape anisotropy. Current understanding of the phenomenon is not adequate to quantify the effect of particle size, aspect ratio, temperature and the magnetic field on particle alignment. We demonstrate a Monte Carlo approach coupled with size scaling to show the conditions under which alignment is possible.

  17. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  18. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  19. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  20. FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, W.J.

    FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA. William J. Reed #3; JUNE, 1999. Abstract A probability distribution derived from percolation theory is #12;tted to large datasets on the sizes of forest forest #12;res and oil #12;elds as percolation phenomena as well as suggesting the consideration of a new

  1. Photometry of Star Clusters in the M31 Galaxy. Aperture Size Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Narbutis; V. Vansevicius; K. Kodaira; A. Bridzius; R. Stonkute

    2007-12-23

    A study of aperture size effects on star cluster photometry in crowded fields is presented. Tests were performed on a sample of 285 star cluster candidates in the South-West field of the M31 galaxy disk, measured in the Local Group Galaxy Survey mosaic images (Massey et al. 2006). In the majority of cases the derived UBVRI photometry errors represent the accuracy of cluster colors well, however, for faint objects, residing in crowded environments, uncertainties of colors could be underestimated. Therefore, prior to deriving cluster parameters via a comparison of measured colors with SSP models, biases of colors, arising due to background crowding, must be taken into account. A comparison of our photometry data with Hubble Space Telescope observations of the clusters by Krienke and Hodge (2007) is provided.

  2. Quantum Chemistry, and Eclectic Mix: From Silicon Carbide to Size Consistency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamie Marie Rintelman

    2004-12-19

    Chemistry is a field of great breadth and variety. It is this diversity that makes for both an interesting and challenging field. My interests have spanned three major areas of theoretical chemistry: applications, method development, and method evaluation. The topics presented in this thesis are as follows: (1) a multi-reference study of the geometries and relative energies of four atom silicon carbide clusters in the gas phase; (2) the reaction of acetylene on the Si(100)-(2x1) surface; (3) an improvement to the Effective Fragment Potential (EFP) solvent model to enable the study of reactions in both aqueous and nonaqueous solution; and (4) an evaluation of the size consistency of Multireference Perturbation Theory (MRPT). In the following section, the author briefly discusses two topics central to, and present throughout, this thesis: Multi-reference methods and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) methods.

  3. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga`s mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  4. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga's mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  5. Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet produces a magnetic field, B Set up a B field two ways: Moving electrically charged particles Current in a wire Intrinsic magnetic field Basic) Opposite magnetic poles attract like magnetic poles repel #12;Like the electric field lines

  6. Microfabricated Field Calibration Assembly

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2013-03-19

    Reliable determination of the presence and/or quantity of a particular analyte in the field can be greatly enhanced if the analytical instrument is equipped with a time-of-use calibration standard. While proper calibration is necessary for reliability and accuracy, it can be challenging and cumbersome to provide such calibration in the field using conventional methods found in analytical laboratories....

  7. Scalar Field Inhomogeneous Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Feinstein; J. Ibáñez; P. Labraga

    1995-11-24

    Some exact solutions for the Einstein field equations corresponding to inhomogeneous $G_2$ cosmologies with an exponential-potential scalar field which generalize solutions obtained previously are considered. Several particular cases are studied and the properties related to generalized inflation and asymptotic behaviour of the models are discussed.

  8. Emergent Gauge Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter G. O. Freund

    2010-08-24

    Erik Verlinde's proposal of the emergence of the gravitational force as an entropic force is extended to abelian and non-abelian gauge fields and to matter fields. This suggests a picture with no fundamental forces or forms of matter whatsoever.

  9. Topological quantum field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert Schwarz

    2000-11-29

    Following my plenary lecture on ICMP2000 I review my results concerning two closely related topics: topological quantum field theories and the problem of quantization of gauge theories. I start with old results (first examples of topological quantum field theories were constructed in my papers in late seventies) and I come to some new results, that were not published yet.

  10. Fields of an ultrashort tightly-focused laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jian-Xing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-01-01

    Analytic expressions for the electromagnetic fields of an ultrashort, tightly focused, laser pulse in vacuum are derived from scalar and vector potentials, using on equal footing two small parameters connected with the waist size of the laser beam and its duration. Compared with fields derived from a complex-source-point approach and a Lax series expansion approach, the derived fields are shown to be well-behaved and accurate even in the subcycle pulse regime. Terms stemming from the scalar potential are shown to be non-negligible and could significantly influence laser-matter interactions, in particular, direct electron acceleration in vacuum by an ultrashort laser pulse.

  11. Optimal Urban Population Size: National vs Local Economic Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Kyung-min

    This paper explores whether the population size of the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA) in Korea is efficient in terms of the national economy. To undertake this analysis, a recursively dynamic interregional computable general ...

  12. Characterization of Nanocrystalline CdSe by Size Exclusion Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    that recycling size exclusion chromatogra- phy can be applied to assess the fine details of a sample such as polymers and proteins.8-14 Fischer et al. first evaluated chromatography for separating aqueous colloidal

  13. Fiber Sizing Sensor and Controller | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sample size is large and usually consists of hundreds of fibers. FibrSizr consists of a laser instrument developed for the accurate real-time and in-situ determination of fiber...

  14. Fuel Cells Market Size | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuel Cells Market Size Home John55364's picture Submitted by John55364(100) Contributor 15 May, 2015 - 02:14 Global Fuel Cells Market to Value USD910.3 million by 2018 Fuel Cells...

  15. Energy Efficiency Programs for Small and Medium Sized Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipley, A. M.; Elliott, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    Abundant, low-cost energy efficiency opportunities exist in industries with a high representation of small and medium-sized manufacturers. Small industrial facilities with fewer than 250 employees consume 25% of all industrial energy. Designing...

  16. Size-Dependent Filtration of Non-Loaded Particulate Traps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Jessica

    2014-12-12

    This work investigates the filtration efficiency of uncoated, commercial Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) substrates of three porosities (55.8%, 61.1%, 65.0%) for particulate sizes representative of Gasoline Direct Injection ...

  17. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Detailed Tables--Size...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Complete Set of 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Detailed Tables- of Buildings Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings b6.pdf (PDF file), b6.xls (Excel spreadsheet file), b6.txt...

  18. Size Effect of Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Catalytic Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, Jeong Y.; Renzas, J. Russell; Butcher, Derek R.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-04-04

    Carbon monoxide oxidation over ruthenium catalysts has shown an unusual catalytic behavior. Here we report a particle size effect on CO oxidation over Ru nanoparticle (NP) catalysts. Uniform Ru NPs with a tunable particle size from 2 to 6 nm were synthesized by a polyol reduction of Ru(acac){sub 3} precursor in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) stabilizer. The measurement of catalytic activity of CO oxidation over two-dimensional Ru NPs arrays under oxidizing reaction conditions (40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2}) showed an activity dependence on the Ru NP size. The CO oxidation activity increases with NP size, and the 6 nm Ru NP catalyst shows 8-fold higher activity than the 2 nm catalysts. The results gained from this study will provide the scientific basis for future design of Ru-based oxidation catalysts.

  19. Knowledge-based sizing of cogeneration plant in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.; Griffiths, A.J.; Knight, I.P.

    1998-10-01

    Cogeneration is now accepted as a cost-effective and environmentally friendly means of meeting some of a building`s heating and power needs. Cogeneration plants have been installed in many buildings throughout the United Kingdom. Because of commercial pressures, building owners and cogeneration companies are keen to reduce the time and money involved in sizing units, and a decision support tool has been developed to aid the engineer in selecting the unit size. An initial assessment of the sizing can be made with only knowledge of the building`s type, size, and location, which enables the model to be used in new build situations. For an existing building, the accuracy of the predictions can then be progressively improved by providing more information about the building`s energy use, enabling the optimum unit to be identified. This paper briefly describes the model and demonstrates its use through an example feasibility study.

  20. Effective Size and Zeta Potential of Nanorods by Ferguson Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Sunho

    The effective hydrodynamic size and free mobility of particles of varying aspect ratio were evaluated by Ferguson analysis of gel electrophoresis. The ligand layer thickness was estimated from the difference between the ...

  1. Reduce Pumping Costs through Optimum Pipe Sizing: Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 * October 2005 Reduce Pumping Costs through Optimum Pipe Sizing Every industrial facility has a piping network that carries water or other fluids. According to the U.S....

  2. Particle Size Classification of Glass Particles Using Aerodynamic Jet Vectoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Barton L.

    Particle Size Classification of Glass Particles Using Aerodynamic Jet Vectoring Zachary E. Humes blowing and suction control flows­flows that are a fraction of the jet flow rate­to sharply change

  3. Grain size effects on the fatigue response of nanocrystalline materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanlon, Timothy, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    The resistance of metals and alloys to fatigue crack initiation and propagation is known to be influenced significantly by grain size. Based on a wealth of experimental results obtained from microcrystalline metals, where ...

  4. Measuring Cepheid Angular Sizes Directly using the Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measuring Cepheid Angular Sizes Directly using the Palomar Testbed Interferometer M. Kuchner, B Cepheids with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) to measure their angular diameters at H and K bands

  5. Incorporating cycle time uncertainty to improve railcar fleet sizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagatheesan, Jay

    2011-01-01

    This thesis involves railcar fleet sizing strategies with a specific company in the chemical industry. We note that the identity of the company in this report has been disguised, and some portions of the fleets have been ...

  6. A stochastic method for stand-alone photovoltaic system sizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, Claudia Valeria Tavora; Filho, Delly Oliveira; Martins, Jose Helvecio; Toledo, Olga Moraes

    2010-09-15

    Photovoltaic systems utilize solar energy to generate electrical energy to meet load demands. Optimal sizing of these systems includes the characterization of solar radiation. Solar radiation at the Earth's surface has random characteristics and has been the focus of various academic studies. The objective of this study was to stochastically analyze parameters involved in the sizing of photovoltaic generators and develop a methodology for sizing of stand-alone photovoltaic systems. Energy storage for isolated systems and solar radiation were analyzed stochastically due to their random behavior. For the development of the methodology proposed stochastic analysis were studied including the Markov chain and beta probability density function. The obtained results were compared with those for sizing of stand-alone using from the Sandia method (deterministic), in which the stochastic model presented more reliable values. Both models present advantages and disadvantages; however, the stochastic one is more complex and provides more reliable and realistic results. (author)

  7. The geographic distribution of mammal body size in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, M A; Lopez-Sanudo, I L; Hawkins, Bradford A.

    2006-01-01

    the mammals of Britain and Europe. Houghton Mif?in, Boston.mammals of Britain and Europe. Collins, London. Cotgreave,of mammal body size in Europe Miguel Á. Rodríguez 1 *, Irene

  8. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) ?-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakagemore »assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM ?-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.« less

  9. Barchan dune corridors: field characterization and investigation of control parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicham Elbelrhiti; Bruno Andreotti; Philippe Claudin

    2007-07-10

    The structure of the barchan field located between Tarfaya and Laayoune (Atlantic Sahara, Morocco) is quantitatively investigated and compared to that in La Pampa de la Joya (Arequipa, Peru). On the basis of field measurements, we show how the volume, the velocity and the output sand flux of a dune can be computed from the value of its body and horn widths. The dune size distribution is obtained from the analysis of aerial photographs. It shows that these fields are in a statistically homogeneous state along the wind direction and present a `corridor' structure in the transverse direction, in which the dunes have a rather well selected size. Investigating the possible external parameters controlling these corridors, we demonstrate that none among topography, granulometry, wind and sand flux is relevant. We finally discuss the dynamical processes at work in these fields (collisions and wind fluctuations), and investigate the way they could regulate the size of the dunes. Furthermore we show that the overall sand flux transported by a dune field is smaller than the maximum transport that could be reached in the absence of dunes, i.e. in saltation over the solid ground.

  10. THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  11. Development of a mid-sized Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, Robert A.

    2012-06-28

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a ground-based observatory for very high-energy (10 GeV to 100 TeV) gamma rays, planned for operation starting in 2018. It will be an array of dozens of optical telescopes, known as Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACTs), of 8 m to 24 m diameter, deployed over an area of more than 1 square km, to detect flashes of Cherenkov light from showers initiated in the Earth's atmosphere by gamma rays. CTA will have improved angular resolution, a wider energy range, larger fields of view and an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over current ACT arrays such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. Several institutions have proposed a research and development program to eventually contribute 36 medium-sized telescopes (9 m to 12 m diameter) to CTA to enhance and optimize its science performance. The program aims to construct a prototype of an innovative, Schwarzschild-Couder telescope (SCT) design that will allow much smaller and less expensive cameras and much larger fields of view than conventional Davies-Cotton designs, and will also include design and testing of camera electronics for the necessary advances in performance, reliability and cost. We report on the progress of the mid-sized SCT development program.

  12. Process system and method for fabricating submicron field emission cathodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Hayes, Jeffrey P. (Ripon, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A process method and system for making field emission cathodes exists. The deposition source divergence is controlled to produce field emission cathodes with height-to-base aspect ratios that are uniform over large substrate surface areas while using very short source-to-substrate distances. The rate of hole closure is controlled from the cone source. The substrate surface is coated in well defined increments. The deposition source is apertured to coat pixel areas on the substrate. The entire substrate is coated using a manipulator to incrementally move the whole substrate surface past the deposition source. Either collimated sputtering or evaporative deposition sources can be used. The position of the aperture and its size and shape are used to control the field emission cathode size and shape.

  13. Cosmology of Bifundamental Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmay Vachaspati

    2008-12-17

    If a field theory contains gauged, non-Abelian, bi-fundamental fields i.e. fields that are charged under two separate non-Abelian gauge groups, the transition from a deconfined phase to a hadronic phase may be frustrated. Similar frustration may occur in non-Abelian gauge models containing matter only in higher dimensional representations e.g. models with pure glue, or if ordinary quarks are confined by two flux tubes, as implied in the triangular configuration of baryons within QCD. In a cosmological setting, such models can lead to the formation of a web of confining electric flux tubes that can potentially have observational signatures.

  14. Transient horizontal magnetic fields in solar plage regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ishikawa; S. Tsuneta; K. Ichimoto; H. Isobe; Y. Katsukawa; B. W. Lites; S. Nagata; T. Shimizu; R. A. Shine; Y. Suematsu; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-02-13

    We report the discovery of isolated, small-scale emerging magnetic fields in a plage region with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode. Spectro-polarimetric observations were carried out with a cadence of 34 seconds for the plage region located near disc center. The vector magnetic fields are inferred by Milne-Eddington inversion. The observations reveal widespread occurrence of transient, spatially isolated horizontal magnetic fields. The lateral extent of the horizontal magnetic fields is comparable to the size of photospheric granules. These horizontal magnetic fields seem to be tossed about by upflows and downflows of the granular convection. We also report an event that appears to be driven by the magnetic buoyancy instability. We refer to buoyancy-driven emergence as type1 and convection-driven emergence as type2. Although both events have magnetic field strengths of about 600 G, the filling factor of type1 is a factor of two larger than that of type2. Our finding suggests that the granular convection in the plage regions is characterized by a high rate of occurrence of granular-sized transient horizontal fields.

  15. Near-field thermal electromagnetic transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edalatpour, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    A general near-field thermal electromagnetic transport formalism that is independent of the size, shape and number of heat sources is derived. The formalism is based on fluctuational electrodynamics, where fluctuating currents due to thermal agitation are added into Maxwell's curl equations, and is thus valid for heat sources in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Using a volume integral formulation, it is shown that the proposed formalism is a generalization of the classical electromagnetic scattering framework in which thermal emission is implicitly assumed to be negligible. The near-field thermal electromagnetic transport formalism is afterwards applied to a problem involving three spheres exchanging thermal radiation, where all multipolar interactions are taken into account. Using the thermal discrete dipole approximation, it is shown that depending on the dielectric function, the presence of a third sphere slightly affects the spatial distribution of power absorbed compared to the two-sphere case. The forma...

  16. Preliminary Phase Field Computational Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Xu, Ke; Suter, Jonathan D.; McCloy, John S.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2014-12-15

    This interim report presents progress towards the development of meso-scale models of magnetic behavior that incorporate microstructural information. Modeling magnetic signatures in irradiated materials with complex microstructures (such as structural steels) is a significant challenge. The complexity is addressed incrementally, using the monocrystalline Fe (i.e., ferrite) film as model systems to develop and validate initial models, followed by polycrystalline Fe films, and by more complicated and representative alloys. In addition, the modeling incrementally addresses inclusion of other major phases (e.g., martensite, austenite), minor magnetic phases (e.g., carbides, FeCr precipitates), and minor nonmagnetic phases (e.g., Cu precipitates, voids). The focus of the magnetic modeling is on phase-field models. The models are based on the numerical solution to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. From the computational standpoint, phase-field modeling allows the simulation of large enough systems that relevant defect structures and their effects on functional properties like magnetism can be simulated. To date, two phase-field models have been generated in support of this work. First, a bulk iron model with periodic boundary conditions was generated as a proof-of-concept to investigate major loop effects of single versus polycrystalline bulk iron and effects of single non-magnetic defects. More recently, to support the experimental program herein using iron thin films, a new model was generated that uses finite boundary conditions representing surfaces and edges. This model has provided key insights into the domain structures observed in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. Simulation results for single crystal thin-film iron indicate the feasibility of the model for determining magnetic domain wall thickness and mobility in an externally applied field. Because the phase-field model dimensions are limited relative to the size of most specimens used in experiments, special experimental methods were devised to create similar boundary conditions in the iron films. Preliminary MFM studies conducted on single and polycrystalline iron films with small sub-areas created with focused ion beam have correlated quite well qualitatively with phase-field simulations. However, phase-field model dimensions are still small relative to experiments thus far. We are in the process of increasing the size of the models and decreasing specimen size so both have identical dimensions. Ongoing research is focused on validation of the phase-field model. Validation is being accomplished through comparison with experimentally obtained MFM images (in progress), and planned measurements of major hysteresis loops and first order reversal curves. Extrapolation of simulation sizes to represent a more stochastic bulk-like system will require sampling of various simulations (i.e., with single non-magnetic defect, single magnetic defect, single grain boundary, single dislocation, etc.) with distributions of input parameters. These outputs can then be compared to laboratory magnetic measurements and ultimately to simulate magnetic Barkhausen noise signals.

  17. Graphene nanopore field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios, E-mail: sskaf@unimelb.edu.au [Centre for Neural Engineering, The University of Melbourne, 203 Bouverie Street, Carlton, Victoria 3053 (Australia); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2014-07-14

    Graphene holds great promise for replacing conventional Si material in field effect transistors (FETs) due to its high carrier mobility. Previously proposed graphene FETs either suffer from low ON-state current resulting from constrained channel width or require complex fabrication processes for edge-defecting or doping. Here, we propose an alternative graphene FET structure created on intrinsic metallic armchair-edged graphene nanoribbons with uniform width, where the channel region is made semiconducting by drilling a pore in the interior, and the two ends of the nanoribbon act naturally as connecting electrodes. The proposed GNP-FETs have high ON-state currents due to seamless atomic interface between the channel and electrodes and are able to be created with arbitrarily wide ribbons. In addition, the performance of GNP-FETs can be tuned by varying pore size and ribbon width. As a result, their performance and fabrication process are more predictable and controllable in comparison to schemes based on edge-defects and doping. Using first-principle transport calculations, we show that GNP-FETs can achieve competitive leakage current of ?70?pA, subthreshold swing of ?60?mV/decade, and significantly improved On/Off current ratios on the order of 10{sup 5} as compared with other forms of graphene FETs.

  18. dfield8 Direction Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-08-05

    dfield8 Direction Fields. • The routine dfield8 is already loaded on all ITaP machines as standard software. To access MAtlAB from any ITaP machine: Start

  19. Gravitational Field Tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen M. Barnett

    2014-12-05

    We present a tensorial relative of the familiar affine connection and argue that it should be regarded as the gravitational field tensor. Remarkably, the Lagrangian density expressed in terms of this tensor has a simple form, which depends only on the metric and its first derivatives and, moreover, is a true scalar quantity. The geodesic equation, moreover, shows that our tensor plays a role that is strongly reminiscent of the gravitational field in Newtonian mechanics and this, together with other evidence, which we present, leads us to identify it as the gravitational field tensor. We calculate the gravitational field tensor for the Schwarzschild metric. We suggest some of the advantages to be gained from applying our tensor to the study of gravitational waves.

  20. Gauge Fields and Unparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2008-02-03

    We show that a rigorous path integral method of introducing gauge fields in the UnParticle lagrangian leads to somewhat different and more complicated vertexes than those currently used.

  1. Finite size scaling for quantum criticality using the finite-element method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwin Antillon; Birgit Wehefritz-Kaufmann; Sabre Kais

    2012-03-08

    Finite size scaling for the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation is a systematic approach to calculate the quantum critical parameters for a given Hamiltonian. This approach has been shown to give very accurate results for critical parameters by using a systematic expansion with global basis-type functions. Recently, the finite element method was shown to be a powerful numerical method for ab initio electronic structure calculations with a variable real-space resolution. In this work, we demonstrate how to obtain quantum critical parameters by combining the finite element method (FEM) with finite size scaling (FSS) using different ab initio approximations and exact formulations. The critical parameters could be atomic nuclear charges, internuclear distances, electron density, disorder, lattice structure, and external fields for stability of atomic, molecular systems and quantum phase transitions of extended systems. To illustrate the effectiveness of this approach we provide detailed calculations of applying FEM to approximate solutions for the two-electron atom with varying nuclear charge; these include Hartree-Fock, density functional theory under the local density approximation, and an "exact"' formulation using FEM. We then use the FSS approach to determine its critical nuclear charge for stability; here, the size of the system is related to the number of elements used in the calculations. Results prove to be in good agreement with previous Slater-basis set calculations and demonstrate that it is possible to combine finite size scaling with the finite-element method by using ab initio calculations to obtain quantum critical parameters. The combined approach provides a promising first-principles approach to describe quantum phase transitions for materials and extended systems.

  2. Size exclusion deep bed filtration: Experimental and modelling uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badalyan, Alexander You, Zhenjiang; Aji, Kaiser; Bedrikovetsky, Pavel; Carageorgos, Themis; Zeinijahromi, Abbas

    2014-01-15

    A detailed uncertainty analysis associated with carboxyl-modified latex particle capture in glass bead-formed porous media enabled verification of the two theoretical stochastic models for prediction of particle retention due to size exclusion. At the beginning of this analysis it is established that size exclusion is a dominant particle capture mechanism in the present study: calculated significant repulsive Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential between latex particles and glass beads is an indication of their mutual repulsion, thus, fulfilling the necessary condition for size exclusion. Applying linear uncertainty propagation method in the form of truncated Taylor's series expansion, combined standard uncertainties (CSUs) in normalised suspended particle concentrations are calculated using CSUs in experimentally determined parameters such as: an inlet volumetric flowrate of suspension, particle number in suspensions, particle concentrations in inlet and outlet streams, particle and pore throat size distributions. Weathering of glass beads in high alkaline solutions does not appreciably change particle size distribution, and, therefore, is not considered as an additional contributor to the weighted mean particle radius and corresponded weighted mean standard deviation. Weighted mean particle radius and LogNormal mean pore throat radius are characterised by the highest CSUs among all experimental parameters translating to high CSU in the jamming ratio factor (dimensionless particle size). Normalised suspended particle concentrations calculated via two theoretical models are characterised by higher CSUs than those for experimental data. The model accounting the fraction of inaccessible flow as a function of latex particle radius excellently predicts normalised suspended particle concentrations for the whole range of jamming ratios. The presented uncertainty analysis can be also used for comparison of intra- and inter-laboratory particle size exclusion data.

  3. Residential Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps Sized to Heating Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Odukomaiya, Adewale; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Variable capacity heat pumps are an emerging technology offering significant energy savings potential and improved efficiency. With conventional single-speed systems, it is important to appropriately size heat pumps for the cooling load as over-sizing would result in cycling and insufficient latent capacity required for humidity control. These appropriately sized systems are often under-sized for the heating load and require inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat to meet the heating demand. Variable capacity heat pumps address these shortcomings by providing an opportunity to intentionally size systems for the dominant heating season load without adverse effects of cycling or insufficient dehumidification in the cooling season. This intentionally-sized system could result in significant energy savings in the heating season, as the need for inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat is drastically reduced. This is a continuation of a study evaluating the energy consumption of variable capacity heat pumps installed in two unoccupied research homes in Farragut, a suburb of Knoxville, Tennessee. In this particular study, space conditioning systems are intentionally sized for the heating season loads to provide an opportunity to understand and evaluate the impact this would have on electric resistance heat use and dehumidification. The results and conclusions drawn through this research are valid and specific for portions of the Southeastern and Midwestern United States falling in the mixed-humid climate zone. While other regions in the U.S. do not experience this type of climate, this work provides a basis for, and can help understand the implications of other climate zones on residential space conditioning energy consumption. The data presented here will provide a framework for fine tuning residential building EnergyPlus models that are being developed.

  4. Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wornell, Gregory W.

    Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation Anthony Accardi1,2 and Gregory light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of coherent image formation that strikes a balance between the utility of the light field

  5. Small, high frequency probe for internal magnetic field measurements in high temperature plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    temperature 50 eV , high density ( 1020 m 3 ) plasmas such as the field-reversed configuration FRC , it has eV , high density ( 1020 m 3 ) plasmas such as the field-reversed configuration FRC , it has be exposed to the plasma. An estimate of the limiting probe size for the FRC can be obtained from

  6. Storage Size Determination for Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ru, Yu; Martinez, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of determining the size of battery storage used in grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems. In our setting, electricity is generated from PV and is used to supply the demand from loads. Excess electricity generated from the PV can be stored in a battery to be used later on, and electricity must be purchased from the electric grid if the PV generation and battery discharging cannot meet the demand. The objective is to minimize the electricity purchase from the electric grid while at the same time choosing an appropriate battery size. More specifically, we want to find a unique critical value (denoted as $E_{max}^c$) of the battery size such that the cost of electricity purchase remains the same if the battery size is larger than or equal to $E_{max}^c$, and the cost is strictly larger if the battery size is smaller than $E_{max}^c$. We propose an upper bound on $E_{max}^c$, and show that the upper bound is achievable for certain scenarios. For the case with ideal PV generat...

  7. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuyu Liu

    2012-12-31

    Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as "organs of sense" or "eyes of the accelerator." Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

  8. Finite-size energy of non-interacting Fermi gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Gebert

    2014-06-14

    We prove the asymptotics of the difference of the ground-state energies of two non-interacting $N$-particle Fermi gases on the half line of length $L$ in the thermodynamic limit up to order $1/L$. We are particularly interested in subdominant terms proportional to $1/L$, called finite-size energy. In the nineties Affleck and co-authors [Aff97, ZA97, AL94] claimed that the finite-size energy equals the decay exponent occuring in Anderson's orthogonality catastrophe. It turns out that the finite-size energy depends on the details of the thermodynamic limit and typically also includes a linear term in the scattering phase shift.

  9. Size dependence of the Directional Scattering Conditions on Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Camara, Braulio; Cuadrado, Alexander; Urruchi, Virginia; Sanchez-Pena, Jose Manuel; Vergaz, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The resonant modes observed in semiconductor nanoparticles and the coherence interaction between them, producing directional light scattering, may be very interesting for CMOS integrated all-optical devices. In these systems the control over the light scattering should be crucial, as well as the strength of this control. Fabrication parameters such as the size and shape of the nanoparticles and the optical properties of the environment can strongly affect to the emergence of these phenomena. In this work, we numerically explore the size dependence of the directional scattering conditions of semiconductor nanoparticles. Several semiconductor materials and a large size range have been considered to be a reference for further works. An interesting and unexpected linear behavior has been observed.

  10. Dust size distribution and concentrations with cottonseed oil mills 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiederhold, Lee Roy

    1976-01-01

    -VOLUME SAMPLES FOR P. S. D OF PARTICLES & 100 um DIAMETER (MMD) ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE ON HIGH-VOLUME SAMPLES FOR P. S. D. OF PARTICLES & 100 um DIAMETER (og) MULTIPLE RANGE TEST FOR MEAN VALUES OF MMD BY AREA MULTIPLE RANGE TEST OF MMD BY MILL PARTICLE SIZE... TEST OF AREA DUST CONCENTRATIONS = 15 Pm IN DIAMETER MULTIPLE RANGE TEST OF MILL DUST CONCENTRATIONS & 15 um IN DIAMETER ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE ON PARTICLE SIZING HEAD SAMPLES OF CONCENTRATIONS FOR PARTICLES & 100 IJBI DIAMETER . . . . 47 47 54...

  11. Finite-size behaviour of the microcanonical specific heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Behringer; M. Pleimling; A. Hueller

    2004-11-05

    For models which exhibit a continuous phase transition in the thermodynamic limit a numerical study of small systems reveals a non-monotonic behaviour of the microcanonical specific heat as a function of the system size. This is in contrast to a treatment in the canonical ensemble where the maximum of the specific heat increases monotonically with the size of the system. A phenomenological theory is developed which permits to describe this peculiar behaviour of the microcanonical specific heat and allows in principle the determination of microcanonical critical exponents.

  12. Metal oxide porous ceramic membranes with small pore sizes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of metal oxide ceramic membranes of very small pore size. The process is particularly useful in the creation of titanium and other transition metal oxide membranes. The method utilizes a sol-gel process in which the rate of particle formation is controlled by substituting a relatively large alcohol in the metal alkoxide and by limiting the available water. Stable, transparent metal oxide ceramic membranes are created having a narrow distribution of pore size, with the pore diameter being manipulable in the range of 5 to 40 Angstroms.

  13. Novel ultrafine grain size processing of soft magnetic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Robino, Charles Victor

    2009-01-01

    High performance soft magnetic alloys are used in solenoids in a wide variety of applications. These designs are currently being driven to provide more margin, reliability, and functionality through component size reductions; thereby providing greater power to drive ratio margins as well as decreases in volume and power requirements. In an effort to produce soft magnetic materials with improved properties, we have conducted an initial examination of one potential route for producing ultrafine grain sizes in the 49Fe-49Co-2V alloy. The approach was based on a known method for the production of very fine grain sizes in steels, and consisted of repeated, rapid phase transformation cycling through the ferrite to austenite transformation temperature range. The results of this initial attempt to produce highly refined grain sizes in 49Fe-49Co-2V were successful in that appreciable reductions in grain size were realized. The as-received grain size was 15 {micro}m with a standard deviation of 9.5 {micro}m. For the temperature cycling conditions examined, grain refinement appears to saturate after approximately ten cycles at a grain size of 6 {micro}m with standard deviation of 4 {micro}m. The process also reduces the range of grain sizes present in these samples as the largest grain noted in the as received and treated conditions were 64 and 26 {micro}m, respectively. The results were, however, complicated by the formation of an unexpected secondary ferritic constituent and considerable effort was directed at characterizing this phase. The analysis indicates that the phase is a V-rich ferrite, known as {alpha}{sub 2}, that forms due to an imbalance in the partitioning of vanadium during the heating and cooling portions of the thermal cycle. Considerable but unsuccessful effort was also directed at understanding the conditions under which this phase forms, since it is conceivable that this phase restricts the degree to which the grains can be refined. Due to this difficulty and the relatively short timeframe available in the study, magnetic and mechanical properties of the refined material could not be evaluated. An assessment of the potential for properties improvement through the transformation cycling approach, as well as recommendations for potential future work, are included in this report.

  14. The Influence of Availability Costs on Optimal Heat Exchanger Size 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witte, L. C.

    1987-01-01

    OF AVAILABILITY COSTS ON OPTIMAL H~ EXCHANGER SIZE Larry C. Witte Professor of Mechanical Engineering University of Houston Houston, TX 77004 examples of such a process. I I Optimizing heat exchangers based on se cond law rather than first law co... ) we can make the plot in Figure 5 of heat duty vs. ~gt. Figures 4 and 5 contain the required inrormation for the selection of an appropri.te optimally sized condensing heater for a p.rticular he.t duty. 300 () 0 I Q) ... n; ~ ... Q...

  15. Ex-vessel demand by size for the Gulf shrimp 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chui, Margaret Kam-Too

    1980-01-01

    EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR THE GULF SHRIMP A Thesis by MARGARET RAM-TOO CHUI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major... Subject: Agricultural Economics EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR SHRIMP IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by MARGARET KAM-TOO CHUI Approved as to style and content by: ai an of Committee) (Hea f ep tment) (Member) (Member) August 1980 ABSTRACT Ex...

  16. Sizing a New Water Heater | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3 OutlookSize selective absorption ofSizing a

  17. Large-Scale Magnetic Fields, Dark Energy and QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federico R. Urban; Ariel R. Zhitnitsky

    2010-08-20

    Cosmological magnetic fields are being observed with ever increasing correlation lengths, possibly reaching the size of superclusters, therefore disfavouring the conventional picture of generation through primordial seeds later amplified by galaxy-bound dynamo mechanisms. In this paper we put forward a fundamentally different approach that links such large-scale magnetic fields to the cosmological vacuum energy. In our scenario the dark energy is due to the Veneziano ghost (which solves the $U(1)_A$ problem in QCD). The Veneziano ghost couples through the triangle anomaly to the electromagnetic field with a constant which is unambiguously fixed in the standard model. While this interaction does not produce any physical effects in Minkowski space, it triggers the generation of a magnetic field in an expanding universe at every epoch. The induced energy of the magnetic field is thus proportional to cosmological vacuum energy: $\\rho_{EM}\\simeq B^2 \\simeq (\\frac{\\alpha}{4\\pi})^2 \\rho_{DE}$, $\\rho_{DE}$ hence acting as a source for the magnetic energy $\\rho_{EM}$. The corresponding numerical estimate leads to a magnitude in the nG range. There are two unique and distinctive predictions of our proposal: an uninterrupted active generation of Hubble size correlated magnetic fields throughout the evolution of the universe; the presence of parity violation on the enormous scales $1/H$, which apparently has been already observed in CMB. These predictions are entirely rooted into the standard model of particle physics.

  18. Plasma confinement by circularly polarized electromagnetic field in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); and Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    A novel plasma confinement concept based on plasma confinement by electromagnetic pressure of circularly polarized electromagnetic fields is proposed. Practical implementation of this concept in a toroidal device is suggested. In this concept the confining field frequency is in the lower range such that the size of the device is much smaller than the vacuum wavelength. Most of the previous radio-frequency (rf) confinement concepts of unmagnetized plasma were related to confinement in rf cavities which operated at high frequency for which the size of the cavity is comparable to the wavelength. Operation at lower frequencies simplifies rf design, reduces Ohmic losses in the conducting walls and probably makes application of superconductors for wall materials more feasible. It is demonstrated that circular (or nearly circular) polarization of the electromagnetic field is required for confinement from both the equilibrium and stability considerations. Numerical analysis of plasma confinement for magnetohydrodynamic plasma model in two-dimensional toroidal geometry is performed. Within this model plasma is confined by the applied rf fields and its equilibrium is stable. Technically feasible compact and medium size toroidal plasma confinement devices based on this concept are proposed. Application of this approach to the fusion reactor requires use of superconducting materials for the toroidal shell to reduce the Ohmic losses. Further theoretical and experimental studies are required for a more reliable conclusion about the attractiveness of this plasma confinement concept.

  19. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  20. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  1. Magnetic agglomeration method for size control in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huber, Dale L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-07-05

    A method for controlling the size of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles that employs magnetic interaction between particles to control particle size and does not rely on conventional kinetic control of the reaction to control particle size. The particles are caused to reversibly agglomerate and precipitate from solution; the size at which this occurs can be well controlled to provide a very narrow particle size distribution. The size of particles is controllable by the size of the surfactant employed in the process; controlling the size of the surfactant allows magnetic control of the agglomeration and precipitation processes. Agglomeration is used to effectively stop particle growth to provide a very narrow range of particle sizes.

  2. Classical dynamics of a two-species condensate driven by a quantum field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Rodríguez-Lara; Ray-Kuang Lee

    2011-07-08

    We present a stability analysis of an interacting two-species Bose-Einstein condensate driven by a quantized field in the semi-classical limit. Transitions from Rabi to Josephson dynamics are identified depending on both the inter-atomic interaction to field-condensate coupling ratio and the ratio between the total excitation number and the condensate size. The quantized field is found to produce asymmetric dynamics for symmetric initial conditions for both Rabi and Josephson oscillations.

  3. Heavy Field Artillery Shelling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H.H. Horne Co.

    2011-09-05

    Africa, Matar’s work has suggested for scholars a key strategy for disaggregating ideas about English representations of Islam. Professor Matar next commenced production of a series of works offering new, scholarly editions of early modern texts... stream_source_info 3.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 9555 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name 3.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 199 seventeenth-century news increased mechanism that is a...

  4. Sedimentation of algae: relationships with biomass and size distribution1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    Sedimentation of algae: relationships with biomass and size distribution1 Isabelle Larocque, A distribution of epilimnetic algae on patterns of algal sedimentation was determined in lake enclosures under the mean length of algae in fish-free enclosures and reduced the mean length in the enclosures to which

  5. Mechanical tugging force regulates the size of cellcell junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Christopher S.

    Mechanical tugging force regulates the size of cell­cell junctions Zhijun Liua,1 , John L. Tanb,1 through the generation of mechanical forces at sites of cell­matrix and cell­cell contact. While increased mechanical load- ing at cell­matrix adhesions results in focal adhesion growth, whether forces drive changes

  6. Improving large-sized PLC programs verification using abstractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in formal verification by model-checking. In parallel, many researches have been undertaken since several project which was funded by Alstom Power Plant Information and Control Systems, Engineering toolsImproving large-sized PLC programs verification using abstractions V. Gourcuff O. de Smet J

  7. Monovalent, reduced-size quantum dots for imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The small size improved access of QD-labeled glutamate receptors to neuronal synapses, and monovalency small QDs (sQDs) had a hydrodynamic diameter of 11.1 ± 0.1 nm, not much larger than an immunoglobulinQDs or commercial streptavidin-QD605 (hydro- dynamic diameter 21.2 ± 0.2 nm; Supplementary Fi

  8. THE STICKINESS OF MICROMETER-SIZED WATER-ICE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2015-01-01

    Water ice is one of the most abundant materials in dense molecular clouds and in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks. In contrast to other materials (e.g., silicates), water ice is assumed to be stickier due to its higher specific surface energy, leading to faster or more efficient growth in mutual collisions. However, experiments investigating the stickiness of water ice have been scarce, particularly in the astrophysically relevant micrometer-sized region and at low temperatures. In this work, we present an experimental setup to grow aggregates composed of ?m-sized water-ice particles, which we used to measure the sticking and erosion thresholds of the ice particles at different temperatures between 114 K and 260 K. We show with our experiments that for low temperatures (below ?210 K), ?m-sized water-ice particles stick below a threshold velocity of 9.6 m s{sup –1}, which is approximately 10 times higher than the sticking threshold of ?m-sized silica particles. Furthermore, erosion of the grown ice aggregates is observed for velocities above 15.3 m s{sup –1}. A comparison of the experimentally derived sticking threshold with model predictions is performed to determine important material properties of water ice, i.e., the specific surface energy and the viscous relaxation time. Our experimental results indicate that the presence of water ice in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks can enhance the growth of planetesimals by direct sticking of particles.

  9. Global Patterns of City Size Distributions and Their Fundamental Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerkhoff, Andrew J.

    a global perspective on the problem. If we hope to successfully manage urban environmental impacts, we capita environmental impact of humans varies across settlements of different sizes and across regions¤ *, Andrew J. Kerkhoff2 , Melanie E. Moses3 1 Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

  10. Calculating Horsepower Requirements and Sizing Supply Pipelines for Irrigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fipps, Guy

    1995-09-05

    between 2 and 3 ft/s in order to prevent cavitation. Table 5 lists the maximum flow rates recommended for different ID (internal diameter) pipe sizes using the 5 ft/s rule. Many friction loss tables give both the friction loss and velocity for any given...

  11. Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lloyd, Milton H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Collins, Jack L. (Knoxville, TN); Shell, Sam E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01

    Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

  12. Simultaneous regulation of cell size and chromosome replication in bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Po-Yi Ho; Ariel Amir

    2015-07-24

    Bacteria are able to maintain a narrow distribution of cell sizes by regulating the timing of cell divisions. In rich nutrient conditions, cells divide much faster than their chromosomes replicate. This implies that cells maintain multiple rounds of chromosome replication per cell division by regulating the timing of chromosome replications. Here, we show that both cell size and chromosome replication may be simultaneously regulated by the long-standing initiator accumulation strategy. The strategy proposes that initiators are produced in proportion to the volume increase and is accumulated at each origin of replication, and chromosome replication is initiated when a critical amount per origin has accumulated. We show that this model maps to the incremental model of size control, which was previously shown to reproduce experimentally observed correlations between various events in the cell cycle and explains the exponential dependence of cell size on the growth rate of the cell. Furthermore, we show that this model also leads to the efficient regulation of the timing of initiation and the number of origins consistent with existing experimental results.

  13. Solvent Size vs Cohesive Energy as the Origin of Hydrophobicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazaridis, Themis

    of Chemistry, City College of CUNY, Convent Avenue & 138th Street, New York, New York 10031 Received March 22Solvent Size vs Cohesive Energy as the Origin of Hydrophobicity THEMIS LAZARIDIS* Department of water's properties and report a detailed decomposition of the solvation free energy, enthalpy, entropy

  14. Design and sizing of electromagnetic linear actuators for valve applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Page 1/9 Design and sizing of electromagnetic linear actuators for valve applications J.C Vannier1. These structures have been studied in order to drive the valves of a car motor. According to general specifications magnet, valves. 1. Introduction, general specifications The valves which can be found in thermal engines

  15. Food-supplementing parents reduces their sons' song repertoire size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanette, Liana

    Food-supplementing parents reduces their sons' song repertoire size Liana Zanette1,*, Michael, Canada Food-supplemented parents typically produce more offspring, as numerous experiments on vertebrate, with implications concerning the adult quality of offspring, although few experiments have addressed whether food-supplementing

  16. The Evolution of Maximum Body Size of Terrestrial Mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    The Evolution of Maximum Body Size of Terrestrial Mammals Felisa A. Smith,1 * Alison G. Boyer,2 the primary driver for the evolution of giant mammals was diversification to fill ecological niches extracted from the Paleobiology Database (12), using the range- through option for each interval of time. We

  17. Size Correlations in Colloidal Suspensions Alexandre G. Derivi a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    Size Correlations in Colloidal Suspensions Alexandre G. Derivi a Marcia C. Barbosa a aInstituto de and stabilize the solution against coagulation. But the electrostatic interaction between the colloidal double layers. The stability of the suspension results from the competition between the van der Waals

  18. 2006 EAAM Photogrammetric Estimates of Size and Mass in Hawaiian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © 2006 EAAM Photogrammetric Estimates of Size and Mass in Hawaiian Monk Seals (Monachus-invasive photographic technique was devel- oped to estimate the body mass of Hawaiian monk seals (Monachus schauinslandi-kg weaned pups. Key Words: Hawaiian monk seals, Monachus schauinslandi, photogrammetry, morphometric

  19. Library Efficiency Cat. No. 18262-014 Size: 1 ml

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Marc W.

    Library Efficiency DH5 Cells Cat. No. 18262-014 Size: 1 ml Store at -70°C. Do not store in liquid nitrogen. Description: Library Efficiency® DH5® Competent Cells have been prepared by a patented amounts of DNA. DH5® is capable of being transformed efficiently with large plasmids, and can also serve

  20. Termination Checking: Comparing Structural Recursion and Sized Types by Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking: Comparing Structural Recursion and Sized Types by Examples David Thibodeau Decemer 3, 2011 Abstract Termination is an important property for programs and is necessary for formal proofs to make sense. In order to make sure that a program using recursion is terminating, one can use

  1. THE SIZE-CHANGE TERMINATION PRINCIPLE FOR CONSTRUCTOR BASED LANGUAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyvernat, Pierre

    THE SIZE-CHANGE TERMINATION PRINCIPLE FOR CONSTRUCTOR BASED LANGUAGES PIERRE HYVERNAT Laboratoire describes an automatic termination checker for a generic first- order call-by-value language in ML style. We arguments of recursive calls evolve during evaluation. The result is a criterion for termination extending

  2. How Focal Adhesion Size Depends on Integrin Affinity Tong Zhao,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    How Focal Adhesion Size Depends on Integrin Affinity Tong Zhao,, Ying Li,, and Aaron R. Dinner the thermodynamics and kinetics of integrin receptor binding and clustering impact the formation of focal adhesions in their environment. Cells on chemically well-defined surfaces were observed to have distributions of focal adhesions

  3. Economics of the Family Equilibrium Group Size and Genetic Relatedness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caraco, Thomas

    Benefits Increase Large Groups: Competitive Costs May Dominate Equilibrium Group Size Rules of Entry 1: Solitaries Decide to Enter Group Or Remain G = 1 Solitaries Enter Group at No Cost Assume r = 0 Free Entry (Overcome Territory Defense) Larger Group May Also Increase Local Competition (Cost) #12;3. Groups Reduce

  4. SUMO Protease Cat. No. 12588-018 Size: 250 units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    SUMO Protease Cat. No. 12588-018 Size: 250 units Description SUMO Protease, a highly active can be used to cleave SUMO from recombinant fusion proteins. The optimal temperature for cleavage-term storage. Avoid multiple freeze/thaw cycles at -80°C. Store 10X SUMO Protease Buffers at 4°C or -20°C. Part

  5. Automatic calibration of LDA measurement volume size Mark Saffman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    Automatic calibration of LDA measurement volume size Mark Saffman The problem of particle number the instrument measurement cross section are given. An automatic calibration method for determining unknown are difficult and have rarely been reported inthe liter- ature. A new method of automatically determining

  6. Improving Size-Change Analysis in Offline Partial Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Germán

    local and global termination of the specialization This work has been partially supported by the EUImproving Size-Change Analysis in Offline Partial Evaluation Michael Leuschel1 and Salvador Tamarit {stamarit,gvidal}@dsic.upv.es Abstract. Some recent approaches for scalable offline partial evalua- tion

  7. Optimizing buffer sizes for pipeline workflow scheduling with setup times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit, Anne

    Optimizing buffer sizes for pipeline workflow scheduling with setup times Anne Benoit1, Jean real-life applications have a linear pipelined struc- ture, where each data set must go through all (data sets) enters the pipeline and must go through several stages such as filters, encoders, and so

  8. Influence of defects distribution and specimen size on fracture initiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivtsov, Anton M.

    Influence of defects distribution and specimen size on fracture initiation Anton M. Krivtsov akrivtsov@bk.ru Abstract An analytical model for the scale dependence of the fracture initiation is suggested. The model is based on the idea that fracture is a stochastic process, for the bigger specimens

  9. Quantum field tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Steffens; C. A. Riofrío; R. Hübener; J. Eisert

    2014-11-06

    We introduce the concept of quantum field tomography, the efficient and reliable reconstruction of unknown quantum fields based on data of correlation functions. At the basis of the analysis is the concept of continuous matrix product states, a complete set of variational states grasping states in quantum field theory. We innovate a practical method, making use of and developing tools in estimation theory used in the context of compressed sensing such as Prony methods and matrix pencils, allowing us to faithfully reconstruct quantum field states based on low-order correlation functions. In the absence of a phase reference, we highlight how specific higher order correlation functions can still be predicted. We exemplify the functioning of the approach by reconstructing randomised continuous matrix product states from their correlation data and study the robustness of the reconstruction for different noise models. We also apply the method to data generated by simulations based on continuous matrix product states and using the time-dependent variational principle. The presented approach is expected to open up a new window into experimentally studying continuous quantum systems, such as encountered in experiments with ultra-cold atoms on top of atom chips. By virtue of the analogy with the input-output formalism in quantum optics, it also allows for studying open quantum systems.

  10. Sports Field Maintenance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duble, Richard L.

    1995-07-31

    by the ryegrasses adds to the enjoyment of the players and fans. To prepare for overseeding, thin the bermudagrass turf with a flail mower or dethatching mower. Sweep or vacuum the field after mowing to remove grass clip- pings and thatch. Where common bermudagrass...

  11. Comment on "Minimal size of a barchan dune"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Andreotti; P. Claudin

    2007-05-24

    It is now an accepted fact that the size at which dunes form from a flat sand bed as well as their `minimal size' scales on the flux saturation length. This length is by definition the relaxation length of the slowest mode toward equilibrium transport. The model presented by Parteli, Duran and Herrmann [Phys. Rev. E 75, 011301 (2007)] predicts that the saturation length decreases to zero as the inverse of the wind shear stress far from the threshold. We first show that their model is not self-consistent: even under large wind, the relaxation rate is limited by grain inertia and thus can not decrease to zero. A key argument presented by these authors comes from the discussion of the typical dune wavelength on Mars (650 m) on the basis of which they refute the scaling of the dune size with the drag length evidenced by Claudin and Andreotti [Earth Pla. Sci. Lett. 252, 30 (2006)]. They instead propose that Martian dunes, composed of large grains (500 micrometers), were formed in the past under very strong winds. We show that this saltating grain size, estimated from thermal diffusion measurements, is not reliable. Moreover, the microscopic photographs taken by the rovers on Martian aeolian bedforms show a grain size of 87 plus or minus 25 micrometers together with hematite spherules at millimetre scale. As those so-called ``blueberries'' can not be entrained by reasonable winds, we conclude that the saltating grains on Mars are the small ones, which gives a second strong argument against the model of Parteli et al.

  12. Screen bowl centrifuge: a high-efficiency particle size separator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, M.K.; Zhang, B.; Khanna, N.; Palit, A.; Dube, B.

    2008-05-15

    Over the years, screen bowl centrifuges have been widely used for dewatering fine coal in coal preparation plants in the United States and elsewhere. It is generally recognized in the engineering and scientific communities that screen bowl centrifuges provide some degree of particle size separation while dewatering fine coal in a common application. However, the extent of differential partitioning of coarse and fine particles achievable by a screen bowl centrifuge has not been systematically studied in the past. The present investigation was aimed at conducting a parametric study using a statistically designed experimental program to better understand and optimize the size classification performance of a screen bowl centrifuge. A continuously operating screen bowl centrifuge having a bowl diameter of 0.5 m was used for this study at the Illinois Coal Development Park. Three key operating parameters, i.e., feed flow rate, feed solid content and pool depth, were varied to conduct a total of 17 experiments using a three-level factorial test matrix. Some of the best size separation performances achieved in this study may be described as having an imperfection value of 0.13 at an effective separation size (d(50c)) of 38 mu m and an imperfection value of 0.27 at an effective separation size (d(50c)) of 2.8 mu m. Due to an effective separation of ultrafine high ash materials, the ash content of the screen bowl feed was reduced from 22.3% to a minimum of 8.84% with a combustible recovery of 84.1% and an ash rejection of 71.6%. A higher combustible recovery of 92.1% was achieved at a product ash content of 12.5% with a d(50c) of 2.8 mu m and imperfection of 0.27.

  13. agreement with the size of the estimated pseudo-field (45 nm). The density-of-states peaks ob-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sow-Hsin

    by combining the 1 SD in the addition energy variation for the first and last set of energies in Fig. 3G Electrical Wind Force­Driven and Dislocation-Templated Amorphization in Phase-Change Nanowires Sung-Wook Nam

  14. Visual Sample Plan (VSP) - FIELDS Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulsipher, Brent A.; Wilson, John E.; Gilbert, Richard O.; Hassig, Nancy L.; Carlson, Deborah K.; Bing-Canar, John; Cooper, Brian; Roth, Chuck

    2003-04-19

    Two software packages, VSP 2.1 and FIELDS 3.5, are being used by environmental scientists to plan the number and type of samples required to meet project objectives, display those samples on maps, query a database of past sample results, produce spatial models of the data, and analyze the data in order to arrive at defensible decisions. VSP 2.0 is an interactive tool to calculate optimal sample size and optimal sample location based on user goals, risk tolerance, and variability in the environment and in lab methods. FIELDS 3.0 is a set of tools to explore the sample results in a variety of ways to make defensible decisions with quantified levels of risk and uncertainty. However, FIELDS 3.0 has a small sample design module. VSP 2.0, on the other hand, has over 20 sampling goals, allowing the user to input site-specific assumptions such as non-normality of sample results, separate variability between field and laboratory measurements, make two-sample comparisons, perform confidence interval estimation, use sequential search sampling methods, and much more. Over 1,000 copies of VSP are in use today. FIELDS is used in nine of the ten U.S. EPA regions, by state regulatory agencies, and most recently by several international countries. Both software packages have been peer-reviewed, enjoy broad usage, and have been accepted by regulatory agencies as well as site project managers as key tools to help collect data and make environmental cleanup decisions. Recently, the two software packages were integrated, allowing the user to take advantage of the many design options of VSP, and the analysis and modeling options of FIELDS. The transition between the two is simple for the user – VSP can be called from within FIELDS, automatically passing a map to VSP and automatically retrieving sample locations and design information when the user returns to FIELDS. This paper will describe the integration, give a demonstration of the integrated package, and give users download instructions and software requirements for running the integrated package.

  15. Method for sizing and desizing yarns with liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Yonker, Clement R. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard R. (Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Bowman, Lawrence E. (Richland, WA); Silva, Laura J. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of sizing and desizing yarn, or more specifically to a method of coating yarn with size and removing size from yarn with liquid carbon dioxide solvent.

  16. Method for sizing and desizing yarns with liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, J.L.; Yonker, C.R.; Hallen, R.R.; Baker, E.G.; Bowman, L.E.; Silva, L.J.

    1999-01-26

    Disclosed is a method of sizing and desizing yarn, or more specifically to a method of coating yarn with size and removing size from yarn with liquid carbon dioxide solvent. 3 figs.

  17. Prevalence of Earth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petigura, Erik Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    of Earth-Size Planets Orbiting Sun-Like 4.1 PlanetEarth-size Planets Orbiting Sun- like Stars 5.1 The Best42kEarth-size Planets Orbiting Sun-like Stars By Erik Ardeshir

  18. StochasticModeling of the Independent Roles of Particle Size and Grain Size in Transgranular Cleavage Fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Cleavage Fracture TSANN LIN, A. G. EVANS, and R. O. RITCHIE The independent roles of grain size. INTRODUCTION CLEAVAGE fracture in most metals occurs by the nu- cleation of a microcrack, assisted by the local, concentrated, tensile stress exceeds some critical fracture stress. In mild steels, such microcracks were

  19. THE MASSIVE SATELLITE POPULATION OF MILKY-WAY-SIZED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Aldo; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Drory, Niv, E-mail: apuebla@astro.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2013-08-20

    Several occupational distributions for satellite galaxies more massive than m{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} around Milky-Way (MW)-sized hosts are presented and used to predict the internal dynamics of these satellites as a function of m{sub *}. For the analysis, a large galaxy group mock catalog is constructed on the basis of (sub)halo-to-stellar mass relations fully constrained with currently available observations, namely the galaxy stellar mass function decomposed into centrals and satellites, and the two-point correlation functions at different masses. We find that 6.6% of MW-sized galaxies host two satellites in the mass range of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC, respectively). The probabilities of the MW-sized galaxies having one satellite equal to or larger than the LMC, two satellites equal to or larger than the SMC, or three satellites equal to or larger than Sagittarius (Sgr) are Almost-Equal-To 0.26, 0.14, and 0.14, respectively. The cumulative satellite mass function of the MW, N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}) , down to the mass of the Fornax dwarf is within the 1{sigma} distribution of all the MW-sized galaxies. We find that MW-sized hosts with three satellites more massive than Sgr (as the MW) are among the most common cases. However, the most and second most massive satellites in these systems are smaller than the LMC and SMC by roughly 0.7 and 0.8 dex, respectively. We conclude that the distribution N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}) for MW-sized galaxies is quite broad, the particular case of the MW being of low frequency but not an outlier. The halo mass of MW-sized galaxies correlates only weakly with N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}). Then, it is not possible to accurately determine the MW halo mass by means of its N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}); from our catalog, we constrain a lower limit of 1.38 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} at the 1{sigma} level. Our analysis strongly suggests that the abundance of massive subhalos should agree with the abundance of massive satellites in all MW-sized hosts, i.e., there is not a missing (massive) satellite problem for the {Lambda}CDM cosmology. However, we confirm that the maximum circular velocity, v{sub max}, of the subhalos of satellites smaller than m{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is systematically larger than the v{sub max} inferred from current observational studies of the MW bright dwarf satellites; different from previous works, this conclusion is based on an analysis of the overall population of MW-sized galaxies. Some pieces of evidence suggest that the issue could refer only to satellite dwarfs but not to central dwarfs, then environmental processes associated with dwarfs inside host halos combined with supernova-driven core expansion should be on the basis of the lowering of v{sub max}.

  20. Lower Bounds on Q for Finite Size Antennas of Arbitrary Shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Oleksiy S

    2015-01-01

    The problem of the lower bound on the radiation Q for an arbitrarily shaped finite size antenna of non-zero volume is formulated in terms of equivalent electric and magnetic currents densities distributed on a closed surface coinciding with antenna exterior surface. When these equivalent currents radiate in free space, the magnetic current augments the electric current, so that the fields interior to the surface vanish. In contrast to approaches based solely on electric currents, the proposed technique ensures no stored energy interior to the antenna exterior surface, and thus, allows the fundamental lower bound on Q to be determined. To facilitate the computation of the bound, new expressions for the stored energy, radiated power, and Q of coupled electric and magnetic source currents in free space are derived.

  1. Homoclinic snaking in plane Couette flow: bending, skewing, and finite-size effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, John F

    2015-01-01

    Invariant solutions of shear flows have recently been extended from spatially periodic solutions in minimal flow units to spatially localized solutions on extended domains. One set of spanwise-localized solutions of plane Couette flow exhibits homoclinic snaking, a process by which steady-state solutions grow additional structure smoothly at their fronts when continued parametrically. Homoclinic snaking is well understood mathematically in the context of the one-dimensional Swift-Hohenberg equation. Consequently, the snaking solutions of plane Couette flow form a promising connection between the largely phenomenological study of laminar-turbulent patterns in viscous shear flows and the mathematically well-developed field of pattern-formation theory. In this paper we present a numerical study of the snaking solutions, generalizing beyond the fixed streamwise wavelength of previous studies. We find a number of new solution features, including bending, skewing, and finite-size effects. We show that the finite-si...

  2. Field-regulated force by grafted polyelectrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Seidel; Yury A. Budkov; Nikolay V. Brilliantov

    2014-11-08

    Generation of mechanical force regulated by external electric field is studied both theoretically and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The force arises in deformable bodies linked to the free end of a grafted polyelectrolyte chain which is exposed to electric field that favours its adsorption. We consider a few target bodies with different force-deformation relations including (i) linear and (ii) cubic dependences as well as (iii) Hertzian-like force. Such force-deformation relations mimic the behaviour of (i) coiled and (ii) stretched polymer chains, respectively, or (iii) that of a squeezed colloidal particle. The magnitude of the arising force varies over a wide interval although the electric field alters within a relatively narrow range only. The predictions of our theory agree quantitatively well with the results of numerical simulations. Both cases of zero and finite electrical current are investigated and we do not obtain substantial differences in the force generated. The phenomenon studied could possibly be utilised to design, e.g., vice-like devices to fix nano-sized objects.

  3. SIZE AND SURFACE AREA OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES AFTER A HEATING EVENT AT A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirono, Sin-iti

    2013-03-01

    The activity of a young star rises abruptly during an FU Orionis outburst. This event causes a temporary temperature increase in the protoplanetary nebula. H{sub 2}O icy grains are sublimated by this event, and silicate cores embedded inside the ice are ejected. During the high-temperature phase, the silicate grains coagulate to form silicate core aggregates. After the heating event, the temperature drops, and the ice recondenses onto the aggregates. I determined numerically the size distribution of the ice-covered aggregates. The size of the aggregates exceeds 10 {mu}m around the snow line. Because of the migration of the ice to large aggregates, only a small fraction of the silicate core aggregate is covered with H{sub 2}O ice. After the heating event, the surface of an ice-covered aggregate is totally covered by silicate core aggregates. This might reduce the fragmentation velocity of aggregates when they collide. It is possible that the covering silicate cores shield the UV radiation field which induces photodissociation of H{sub 2}O ice. This effect may cause the shortage of cold H{sub 2}O vapor observed by Herschel.

  4. Impact of Balancing Areas Size, Obligation Sharing, and Ramping Capability on Wind Integration: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2007-06-01

    This paper examines wind integration costs as a function of balancing area size to determine if the larger system size helps mitigate wind integration cost increases.

  5. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-31

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  6. Global electronic funds transfer between small and medium sized companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stovall, Shawn Eric

    2006-01-01

    Cross-border electronic funds transfer is a rapidly expanding field for business and consumer payments. Large multi-national corporations have been able to invest the capital necessary to create infrastructures or work ...

  7. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  8. Polymer Parametrised Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok Laddha; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2008-05-02

    Free scalar field theory on 2 dimensional flat spacetime, cast in diffeomorphism invariant guise by treating the inertial coordinates of the spacetime as dynamical variables, is quantized using LQG type `polymer' representations for the matter field and the inertial variables. The quantum constraints are solved via group averaging techniques and, analogous to the case of spatial geometry in LQG, the smooth (flat) spacetime geometry is replaced by a discrete quantum structure. An overcomplete set of Dirac observables, consisting of (a) (exponentials of) the standard free scalar field creation- annihilation modes and (b) canonical transformations corresponding to conformal isometries, are represented as operators on the physical Hilbert space. None of these constructions suffer from any of the `triangulation' dependent choices which arise in treatments of LQG. In contrast to the standard Fock quantization, the non- Fock nature of the representation ensures that the algebra of conformal isometries as well as that of spacetime diffeomorphisms are represented in an anomaly free manner. Semiclassical states can be analysed at the gauge invariant level. It is shown that `physical weaves' necessarily underly such states and that such states display semiclassicality with respect to, at most, a countable subset of the (uncountably large) set of observables of type (a). The model thus offers a fertile testing ground for proposed definitions of quantum dynamics as well as semiclassical states in LQG.

  9. Testing General Relativity with the Shadow Size of Sgr A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Johannsen; Avery E. Broderick; Philipp M. Plewa; Sotiris Chatzopoulos; Sheperd S. Doeleman; Frank Eisenhauer; Vincent L. Fish; Reinhard Genzel; Ortwin Gerhard; Michael D. Johnson

    2015-12-08

    In general relativity, the angular radius of the shadow of a black hole is primarily determined by its mass-to-distance ratio and depends only weakly on its spin and inclination. If general relativity is violated, however, the shadow size may also depend strongly on parametric deviations from the Kerr metric. Based on a reconstructed image of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) from a simulated one-day observing run of a seven-station Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) array, we employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to demonstrate that such an observation can measure the angular radius of the shadow of Sgr A* with an uncertainty of ~1.5 uas (6%). We show that existing mass and distance measurements can be improved significantly when combined with upcoming EHT measurements of the shadow size and that tight constraints on potential deviations from the Kerr metric can be obtained.

  10. Size-reduction of nanodiamonds via air oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaebel, T; Chen, J; Hemmer, P; Rabeau, J R

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the size reduction and effects on nitrogen-vacancy centres in nanodiamonds by air oxidation using a combined atomic force and confocal microscope. The average height reduction of individual crystals as measured by atomic force microscopy was 10.6 nm/h at 600 {\\deg}C air oxidation at atmospheric pressure. The oxidation process modified the surface including removal of non-diamond carbon and organic material which also led to a decrease in background fluorescence. During the course of the nanodiamond size reduction, we observed the annihilation of nitrogen-vacancy centres which provided important insight into the formation of colour centres in small crystals. In these unirradiated samples, the smallest nanodiamond still hosting a stable nitrogen-vacancy centre observed was 8 nm.

  11. Size-reduction of nanodiamonds via air oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Gaebel; C. Bradac; J. Chen; P. Hemmer; J. R. Rabeau

    2011-04-27

    Here we report the size reduction and effects on nitrogen-vacancy centres in nanodiamonds by air oxidation using a combined atomic force and confocal microscope. The average height reduction of individual crystals as measured by atomic force microscopy was 10.6 nm/h at 600 {\\deg}C air oxidation at atmospheric pressure. The oxidation process modified the surface including removal of non-diamond carbon and organic material which also led to a decrease in background fluorescence. During the course of the nanodiamond size reduction, we observed the annihilation of nitrogen-vacancy centres which provided important insight into the formation of colour centres in small crystals. In these unirradiated samples, the smallest nanodiamond still hosting a stable nitrogen-vacancy centre observed was 8 nm.

  12. Ab initio estimates of the size of the observable universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Don N., E-mail: profdonpage@gmail.com [Department of Physics, 4-183 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 Canada (Canada)

    2011-09-01

    When one combines multiverse predictions by Bousso, Hall, and Nomura for the observed age and size of the universe in terms of the proton and electron charge and masses with anthropic predictions of Carter, Carr, and Rees for these masses in terms of the charge, one gets that the age of the universe should be roughly the inverse 64th power, and the cosmological constant should be around the 128th power, of the proton charge. Combining these with a further renormalization group argument gives a single approximate equation for the proton charge, with no continuous adjustable or observed parameters, and with a solution that is within 8% of the observed value. Using this solution gives large logarithms for the age and size of the universe and for the cosmological constant that agree with the observed values within 17%.

  13. Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.; Apte, M.G.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for HRV and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine a detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 1000-fold. To measure the size distribution of HRV aerosols, volunteers with a head cold spent two hours in a ventilated research chamber. Airborne particles from the chamber were collected using an Andersen Six-Stage Cascade Impactor. Each stage of the impactor was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for HRV. For the first two volunteers with confirmed HRV infection, but with mild symptoms, we were unable to detect HRV on any stage of the impactor.

  14. A novel hybrid (wind-photovoltaic) system sizing procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hocaoglu, Fatih O.; Gerek, Oemer N.; Kurban, Mehmet

    2009-11-15

    Wind-photovoltaic hybrid system (WPHS) utilization is becoming popular due to increasing energy costs and decreasing prices of turbines and photovoltaic (PV) panels. However, prior to construction of a renewable generation station, it is necessary to determine the optimum number of PV panels and wind turbines for minimal cost during continuity of generated energy to meet the desired consumption. In fact, the traditional sizing procedures find optimum number of the PV modules and wind turbines subject to minimum cost. However, the optimum battery capacity is either not taken into account, or it is found by a full search between all probable solution spaces which requires extensive computation. In this study, a novel description of the production/consumption phenomenon is proposed, and a new sizing procedure is developed. Using this procedure, optimum battery capacity, together with optimum number of PV modules and wind turbines subject to minimum cost can be obtained with good accuracy. (author)

  15. Size dependent phase diagrams of Nickel-Carbon nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnin, Yann; Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, François; Bichara, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The carbon rich phase diagrams of nickel-carbon nanoparticles, relevant to catalysis and catalytic chemical vapor deposition synthesis of carbon nanotubes, are calculated for system sizes up to about 3 nanometers (807 Ni atoms). A tight binding model for interatomic interactions drives the Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations used to locate solid, core/shell and liquid stability domains, as a function of size, temperature and carbon chemical potential or concentration. Melting is favored by carbon incorporation from the nanoparticle surface, resulting in a strong relative lowering of the eutectic temperature and a phase diagram topology different from the bulk one. This should be taken into account in our understanding of the nanotube growth mechanisms.

  16. Coating thermal noise of a finite-size cylindrical mirror

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentaro Somiya; Kazuhiro Yamamoto

    2009-03-17

    Thermal noise of a mirror is one of the limiting noise sources in the high precision measurement such as gravitational-wave detection, and the modeling of thermal noise has been developed and refined over a decade. In this paper, we present a derivation of coating thermal noise of a finite-size cylindrical mirror based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The result agrees to a previous result with an infinite-size mirror in the limit of large thickness, and also agrees to an independent result based on the mode expansion with a thin-mirror approximation. Our study will play an important role not only to accurately estimate the thermal-noise level of gravitational-wave detectors but also to help analyzing thermal noise in quantum-measurement experiments with lighter mirrors.

  17. Size distribution of particle systems analyzed with organic photodetectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sentis, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    As part of a consortium between academic and industry, this PhD work investigates the interest and capabilities of organic photo-sensors (OPS) for the optical characterization of suspensions and two-phase flows. The principle of new optical particle sizing instruments is proposed to characterize particle systems confined in a cylinder glass (standard configuration for Process Analytical Technologies). To evaluate and optimize the performance of these systems, a Monte-Carlo model has been specifically developed. This model accounts for the numerous parameters of the system: laser beam profile, mirrors, lenses, sample cell, particle medium properties (concentration, mean & standard deviation, refractive indices), OPS shape and positions, etc. Light scattering by particles is treated either by using Lorenz-Mie theory, Debye, or a hybrid model (that takes into account the geometrical and physical contributions). For diluted media (single scattering), particle size analysis is based on the inversion of scatter...

  18. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  19. The size of macroscopic superposition states in flux qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Korsbakken; F. K. Wilhelm; K. B. Whaley

    2010-03-27

    The question as to whether or not quantum mechanics is applicable to the macroscopic scale has motivated efforts to generate superposition states of macroscopic numbers of particles and to determine their effective size. Superpositions of circulating current states in flux qubits constitute candidate states that have been argued to be at least mesoscopic. We present a microscopic analysis that reveals the number of electrons participating in these superpositions to be surprisingly but not trivially small, even though differences in macroscopic observables are large.

  20. Size and weight graded multi-ply laminar electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chia-Tsun (Monroeville, PA); Demczyk, Brian G. (Rostrover Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Rittko, Irvin R. (Murrysville Borough, PA)

    1984-01-01

    An electrode is made comprising a porous backing sheet, and attached thereto a catalytically active layer having an electrolyte permeable side and a backing layer contacting side, where the active layer comprises a homogeneous mixture of active hydrophobic and hydrophilic agglomerates with catalyst disposed equally throughout the active layer, and where the agglomerate size increases from the electrolyte permeable side to the backing sheet contacting side.

  1. Improving Size-Change Analysis in Offline Partial Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leuschel, Michael; Vidal, German

    2009-01-01

    Some recent approaches for scalable offline partial evaluation of logic programs include a size-change analysis for ensuring both so called local and global termination. In this work|inspired by experimental evaluation|we introduce several improvements that may increase the accuracy of the analysis and, thus, the quality of the associated specialized programs. We aim to achieve this while maintaining the same complexity and scalability of the recent works.

  2. The use of computed radiography plates to determine light and radiation field coincidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerns, James R. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Anand, Aman [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona 85259 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona 85259 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Photo-stimulable phosphor computed radiography (CR) has characteristics that allow the output to be manipulated by both radiation and optical light. The authors have developed a method that uses these characteristics to carry out radiation field and light field coincidence quality assurance on linear accelerators.Methods: CR detectors from Kodak were used outside their cassettes to measure both radiation and light field edges from a Varian linear accelerator. The CR detector was first exposed to a radiation field and then to a slightly smaller light field. The light impinged on the detector's latent image, removing to an extent the portion exposed to the light field. The detector was then digitally scanned. A MATLAB-based algorithm was developed to automatically analyze the images and determine the edges of the light and radiation fields, the vector between the field centers, and the crosshair center. Radiographic film was also used as a control to confirm the radiation field size.Results: Analysis showed a high degree of repeatability with the proposed method. Results between the proposed method and radiographic film showed excellent agreement of the radiation field. The effect of varying monitor units and light exposure time was tested and found to be very small. Radiation and light field sizes were determined with an uncertainty of less than 1 mm, and light and crosshair centers were determined within 0.1 mm.Conclusions: A new method was developed to digitally determine the radiation and light field size using CR photo-stimulable phosphor plates. The method is quick and reproducible, allowing for the streamlined and robust assessment of light and radiation field coincidence, with no observer interpretation needed.

  3. Analytical determination of critical crack size in solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.P.

    1988-05-01

    Although solar cells usually have chips and cracks, no material specifications concerning the allowable crack size on solar cells are available for quality assurance and engineering design usage. Any material specifications that the cell manufacturers use were developed for cosmetic reasons that have no technical basis. Therefore, the Applied Solar Energy Corporation (ASEC) has sponsored a continuing program for the fracture mechanics evaluation of GaAs. Fracture mechanics concepts were utilized to develop an analytical model that can predict the critical crack size of solar cells. This model indicates that the edge cracks of a solar cell are more critical than its surface cracks. In addition, the model suggests that the material specifications on the allowable crack size used for Si solar cells should not be applied to GaAs solar cells. The analytical model was applied to Si and GaAs solar cells, but it would also be applicable to the semiconductor wafers of other materials, such as a GaAs thin film on a Ge substrate, using appropriate input data.

  4. Water holding capacities of fly ashes: Effect of size fractionation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, A.; Rano, R.

    2007-07-01

    Water holding capacities of fly ashes from different thermal power plants in Eastern India have been compared. Moreover, the effect of size fractionation (sieving) on the water holding capacities has also been determined. The desorption rate of water held by the fly ash fractions at ambient temperature (25-30{sup o}C) has been investigated. The effect of mixing various size fractions of fly ash in increasing the water holding capacities of fly ash has been studied. It is observed that the fly ash obtained from a thermal power plant working on stoker-fired combustor has the highest water holding capacity, followed by the one that works on pulverized fuel combustor. Fly ash collected from super thermal power plant has the least water holding capacity (40.7%). The coarser size fractions of fly ashes in general have higher water holding capacities than the finer ones. An attempt has been made to correlate the results obtained, with the potential use in agriculture.

  5. Nature of Electric and Magnetic Fields; How the Fields Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivezic, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the proofs are given that the electric and magnetic fields are properly defined vectors on the four-dimensional (4D) spacetime (the 4-vectors in the usual notation) and not the usual 3D fields. Furthermore, the proofs are presented that under the mathematically correct Lorentz transformations (LT), e.g., the electric field vector transforms as any other vector transforms, i.e., again to the electric field vector; there is no mixing with the magnetic field vector B, as in the usual transformations (UT) of the 3D fields. The derivations of the UT from some well-known textbooks are discussed and objected.

  6. Generalized Gravitational Entropy of Interacting Scalar Field and Maxwell Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2014-11-11

    The generalized gravitational entropy proposed by Lewkowycz and Maldacena in recent is extended to the interacting real scalar field and Maxwell field system. Using the BTZ geometry we first investigate the case of free real scalar field and then show a possible way to calculate the entropy of the interacting scalar field. Next, we investigate the Maxwell field system. We exactly solve the wave equation and calculate the analytic value of the generalized gravitational entropy. We also use the Einstein equation to find the effect of backreaction of the Maxwell field on the area of horizon. The associated modified area law is consistent with the generalized gravitational entropy.

  7. Nature of Electric and Magnetic Fields; How the Fields Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomislav Ivezic

    2015-08-10

    In this paper the proofs are given that the electric and magnetic fields are properly defined vectors on the four-dimensional (4D) spacetime (the 4-vectors in the usual notation) and not the usual 3D fields. Furthermore, the proofs are presented that under the mathematically correct Lorentz transformations (LT), e.g., the electric field vector transforms as any other vector transforms, i.e., again to the electric field vector; there is no mixing with the magnetic field vector B, as in the usual transformations (UT) of the 3D fields. The derivations of the UT from some well-known textbooks are discussed and objected.

  8. New developments in pulsed fields at the US National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, L.J.; Parkin, D.M.; Rickel, D.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pernambuco-Wise, P. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a member of a consortium (with Florida State University and the University of Florida) to operate the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), with funding from the National Science Foundation and the State of Florida. Los Alamos provides unique resources for its component of NHMFL in the form of a 1.4 GW inertial storage motor-generator for high field pulsed magnets and infrastructure for fields generated by flux compression. The NHMFL provides a user facility open to all qualified users, develops magnet technology in association with the private sector, and advances science and technology opportunities. The magnets in service at Los Alamos are of three types. Starting with the pre-existing explosive flux compression capability in 1991, NHMFL added capacitor-driven magnets in December, 1992, and a 20 tesla superconducting magnet in January, 1993. The capacitor-driven magnets continue to grow in diversity and accessibility, with four magnet stations now available for several different magnet types. Two magnets of unprecedented size and strength are nearing completion of assembly and design, respectively. Under final assembly is a quasi-continuous magnet that contains 90 MJ of magnetic energy at full field, and being designed is a non-destructive 100 T magnet containing 140 MJ.

  9. Lattice field theory simulations of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joaquín E. Drut; Timo A. Lähde

    2009-04-21

    We discuss the Monte Carlo method of simulating lattice field theories as a means of studying the low-energy effective theory of graphene. We also report on simulational results obtained using the Metropolis and Hybrid Monte Carlo methods for the chiral condensate, which is the order parameter for the semimetal-insulator transition in graphene, induced by the Coulomb interaction between the massless electronic quasiparticles. The critical coupling and the associated exponents of this transition are determined by means of the logarithmic derivative of the chiral condensate and an equation-of-state analysis. A thorough discussion of finite-size effects is given, along with several tests of our calculational framework. These results strengthen the case for an insulating phase in suspended graphene, and indicate that the semimetal-insulator transition is likely to be of second order, though exhibiting neither classical critical exponents, nor the predicted phenomenon of Miransky scaling.

  10. Bayesian parameter estimation for effective field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesolowski, S; Furnstahl, R J; Phillips, D R; Thapaliya, A

    2015-01-01

    We present procedures based on Bayesian statistics for effective field theory (EFT) parameter estimation from data. The extraction of low-energy constants (LECs) is guided by theoretical expectations that supplement such information in a quantifiable way through the specification of Bayesian priors. A prior for natural-sized LECs reduces the possibility of overfitting, and leads to a consistent accounting of different sources of uncertainty. A set of diagnostic tools are developed that analyze the fit and ensure that the priors do not bias the EFT parameter estimation. The procedures are illustrated using representative model problems and the extraction of LECs for the nucleon mass expansion in SU(2) chiral perturbation theory from synthetic lattice data.

  11. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2009-03-01

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  12. Plumage and body size in Blue-winged and Cinnamon teals 107 Plumage and body size in Blue-winged and Cinnamon teals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCracken, Kevin G.

    Plumage and body size in Blue-winged and Cinnamon teals 107 Plumage and body size in Blue-winged and Cinnamon teals doi: 10.3184/175815512X13350025801205 Plumage and body size differentiation in Blue-mail: wils0289@yahoo.com ABSTRACT Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) and Cinnamon Teal (A. cyanoptera

  13. Ethan Burns (UNH) Iterative-deepening Search with On-line Tree Size Prediction 1 / 30 Iterative-deepening Search with On-line Tree Size Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruml, Wheeler

    Ethan Burns (UNH) Iterative-deepening Search with On-line Tree Size Prediction ­ 1 / 30 Iterative-deepening Search with On-line Tree Size Prediction Ethan Burns and Wheeler Ruml {eaburns, ruml} at cs Evaluation Ethan Burns (UNH) Iterative-deepening Search with On-line Tree Size Prediction ­ 2 / 30 On

  14. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the author describes an innovative method of measuring high-frequency electric fields using a toroid. For typical geophysical applications the new sensor will detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from 1.0 MHz. This window, in particular the lower frequency range between 1.0 to 100 MHz, has not been used for existing electromagnetic or radar systems to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) can be used successfully in this depth range if the ground is resistive but most soils are, in fact, conductive (0.01 to 1.0 S/m) rendering GPR inefficient. Other factors controlling the resolution of GPR system for small objects is the spatial averaging inherent in the electric dipole antenna and the scattering caused by soil inhomogeneities of dimensions comparable to the wavelength (and antenna size). For maximum resolution it is desirable to use the highest frequencies but the scattering is large and target identification is poor. Time-varying magnetic fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroid. The electric field at the center of the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroid one can easily and accurately determine the electric field. The new sensor will greatly simplify the cumbersome procedure involved with GPR measurements with its center frequency less than 100 MHz. The overall size of the toroidal sensor can be as small as a few inches. It is this size advantage that will not only allow easy fabrication and deployment of multi-component devices either on the surface or in a borehole, but it will render greatly improved resolution over conventional systems.

  15. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium MarketingYear Jan Feb Mar OIL & GAS FIELD

  16. Hybrid conformal field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bertolini; Ilarion V. Melnikov; M. Ronen Plesser

    2013-07-26

    We describe a class of (2,2) superconformal field theories obtained by fibering a Landau-Ginzburg orbifold CFT over a compact Kaehler base manifold. While such models are naturally obtained as phases in a gauged linear sigma model, our construction is independent of such an embedding. We discuss the general properties of such theories and present a technique to study the massless spectrum of the associated heterotic compactification. We test the validity of our method by applying it to hybrid phases of linear models and comparing spectra among the phases.

  17. ARM - AMIE Field Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See EnergyCurrent : 0.0 Waiting for0govField

  18. ARM - Field Participants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENAField Participants Campaign Details News Field Participants

  19. Field Office, Osk Ridge

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N S I551 - g-- !Field

  20. Quasi light fields: Extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi, Anthony J.

    Imaging technologies such as dynamic viewpoint generation are engineered for incoherent radiation using the traditional light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of ...

  1. Relationship between Particle Size Distribution of Low-Rank Pulverized Coal and Power Plant Performance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ganguli, Rajive; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar

    2012-01-01

    The impact of particle size distribution (PSD) of pulverized, low rank high volatile content Alaska coal on combustion related power plant performance was studied in a series of field scale tests. Performance was gauged through efficiency (ratio of megawatt generated to energy consumed as coal), emissions (SO 2 , NO x , CO), and carbon content of ash (fly ash and bottom ash). The study revealed that the tested coal could be burned at a grind as coarse as 50% passing 76 microns, with no deleterious impact on power generation andmore »emissions. The PSD’s tested in this study were in the range of 41 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. There was negligible correlation between PSD and the followings factors: efficiency, SO 2 , NO x , and CO. Additionally, two tests where stack mercury (Hg) data was collected, did not demonstrate any real difference in Hg emissions with PSD. The results from the field tests positively impacts pulverized coal power plants that burn low rank high volatile content coals (such as Powder River Basin coal). These plants can potentially reduce in-plant load by grinding the coal less (without impacting plant performance on emissions and efficiency) and thereby, increasing their marketability. « less

  2. Electrophoresis without charge: Mobility of nanometer-size solutes in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammadhasan Dinpajooh; Dmitry V. Matyushov

    2015-07-28

    We investigate the mobility of nanometer-size solutes in water induced by a uniform external electric field. General arguments are presented to show that a closed surface cutting a volume from a polar liquid will carry an effective non-zero surface charge density when preferential orientation of dipoles exists in the interface. This effective charge will experience a non-vanishing drag in an external electric field even in the absence of free charge carriers. Numerical simulations of model solutes are used to estimate the magnitude of the surface charge density. We find it to be comparable to the values typically reported from the mobility measurements. Hydrated ions can potentially carry a significant excess of the effective charge due to over-polarization of the interface. As a result, the electrokinetic charge can significantly deviate from the physical charge of free charge carriers. We propose to test the model by manipulating the polarizability of hydrated semiconductor nanoparticles with light. The inversion of the mobility direction can be achieved by photoexcitation, which increases the nanoparticle polarizability and leads to an inversion of the dipolar orientations of water molecules in the interface.

  3. Evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies and future observational tests with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tigran G. Arshakian; Rainer Beck; Marita Krause; Dmitry Sokoloff

    2008-11-18

    Aims. We investigate the cosmological evolution of large- and small-scale magnetic fields in galaxies in the light of present models of formation and evolution of galaxies. Methods. We use the dynamo theory to derive the timescales of amplification and ordering of magnetic fields in disk and puffy galaxies. Turbulence in protogalactic halos generated by thermal virialization can drive an efficient turbulent dynamo. Results from simulations of hierarchical structure formation cosmology provide a tool to develop an evolutionary model of regular magnetic fields coupled with galaxy formation and evolution. Results. The turbulent (small-scale) dynamo was able to amplify a weak seed magnetic field in halos of protogalaxies to a few muG strength within a few 10^8 yr. This turbulent field served as a seed to the mean-field (large-scale) dynamo. Galaxies similar to the Milky Way formed their disks at z~10 and regular fields of muG strength and a few kpc coherence length were generated within 2 Gyr (at z~3), but field-ordering on the coherence scale of the galaxy size required an additional 6 Gyr (at z~0.5). Giant galaxies formed their disks at z~10, allowing more efficient dynamo generation of strong regular fields (with kpc coherence length) already at z~4. However, the age of the Universe is short for fully coherent fields in giant galaxies larger than 15 kpc to have been achieved. Dwarf galaxies should have hosted fully coherent fields at z~1. After a major merger, the strength of the turbulent field is enhanced by a factor of a few. Conclusions. This evolutionary scenario can be tested by measurements of polarized synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation with the planned SKA. We predict an anticorrelation between galaxy size and ratio between ordering scale and galaxy size (abridged).

  4. Size matters . . . and so does shape Symmetry and singularities Ultraworld A mathematician's Divina Commedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoutens, Hans

    Size matters . . . and so does shape Symmetry and singularities Ultraworld A mathematician's Divina matters . . . and so does shape Symmetry and singularities Ultraworld Outline 1 Size matters #12;Size matters . . . and so does shape Symmetry and singularities Ultraworld Outline 1 Size matters 2

  5. Systems and methods of varying charged particle beam spot size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-09-02

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A modified dielectric wall accelerator includes a high gradient lens section and a main section. The high gradient lens section can be dynamically adjusted to establish the desired electric fields to minimize undesirable transverse defocusing fields at the entrance to the dielectric wall accelerator. Once a baseline setting with desirable output beam characteristic is established, the output beam can be dynamically modified to vary the output beam characteristics. The output beam can be modified by slightly adjusting the electric fields established across different sections of the modified dielectric wall accelerator. Additional control over the shape of the output beam can be excreted by introducing intentional timing de-synchronization offsets and producing an injected beam that is not fully matched to the entrance of the modified dielectric accelerator.

  6. Measurement of radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonowich, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    We are literally surrounded by radiofrequency (RFR) and microwave radiation, from both natural and man-made sources. The identification and control of man-made sources of RFR has become a high priority of radiation safety professionals in recent years. For the purposes of this paper, we will consider RFR to cover the frequencies from 3 kHz to 300 MHz, and microwaves from 300 MHz to 300 GHz, and will use the term RFR interchangeably to describe both. Electromagnetic radiation and field below 3 kHz is considered Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and will not be discussed in this paper. Unlike x- and gamma radiation, RFR is non-ionizing. The energy of any RFR photon is insufficient to produce ionizations in matter. The measurement and control of RFR hazards is therefore fundamentally different from ionizing radiation. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the reader with the fundamental issues involved in measuring and safely using RFR fields. 23 refs.

  7. Enhanced exchange bias effect in size modulated Sm{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} phase separated manganite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giri, S. K.; Nath, T. K.; Yusuf, S. M.; Mukadam, M. D.

    2014-03-07

    The effect of grain size modulation on exchange bias effect in CE-type antiferromagnetic Sm{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} phase separated manganite is reported here. With the reduction of particle size, ferromagnetic clusters are found to form in the charge ordered antiferromagnetic matrix and gradually become larger. The horizontal and vertical shifts of the magnetic hysteresis loops in the field cooled magnetization process clearly indicate the size dependent exchange bias effect and it can be tuned with the reduction of particle sizes. The values of exchange bias parameter, i.e., exchange bias field (H{sub E}), coercivity (H{sub C}), remanence asymmetry (M{sub E}), and magnetic coercivity (M{sub C}) are found to depend strongly on the particle size. The variations of H{sub E} follow non-monotonic dependencies with reduction in particle size and show maximum (1205?Oe) at particle size of 150?nm at T?=?5?K, which can be ascribed due to the changes in uncompensated surface spins. The values of H{sub E} and M{sub E} are found to decrease exponentially with increasing temperature below the spin- or cluster-glass like freezing temperature. The spin relaxation model has been employed for analysis of large magnetic training effect. The linear relationship between H{sub E} and M{sub E} further confirms the role of uncompensated surface spins. In view of spintronics application of manganites, the present observation of large exchange bias shift in this half-doped manganite may have great technological importance.

  8. System size and energy dependence of $?$ meson production at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Chen

    2008-04-28

    We present a system size and energy dependence of $\\phi$ meson production in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=62.4 GeV and 200 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that the number of participant scaled $\\phi$ meson yields in heavy ion collisions over that of p+p collisions are larger than 1 and increase with collision energy. We compare the results with those of open-strange particles and discuss the physics implication.

  9. Effect Size and Moderators of Effects for Token Economy Interventions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soares, Denise

    2012-02-14

    of this investigation was to Meta-analyze the single case research on TE implemented in school and is the first to offer effect size analysis and identify moderators. The use of TE?s has been widely established as an evidence-based intervention for use in prisons... to implement a TE is needed in our literature. Empirical evidence for the use of a token economy in a classroom is presented along with suggested implementation ideas. Twenty four studies were included in this Meta-analysis with an overall combined Tau...

  10. Size reduction techniques for vital compliant VHDL simulation models

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rich, Marvin J.; Misra, Ashutosh

    2006-08-01

    A method and system select delay values from a VHDL standard delay file that correspond to an instance of a logic gate in a logic model. Then the system collects all the delay values of the selected instance and builds super generics for the rise-time and the fall-time of the selected instance. Then, the system repeats this process for every delay value in the standard delay file (310) that correspond to every instance of every logic gate in the logic model. The system then outputs a reduced size standard delay file (314) containing the super generics for every instance of every logic gate in the logic model.

  11. Neutrons measure phase behavior in pores at Angstrom size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have measured the phase behavior of green house gases in pores at the Angstrom-level, using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor. Yuri Melnichenko, an instrument scientist on the General Purpose Small Angle Neutron Scattering (GP SANS) Diffractometer at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor, his postdoctoral associate Lilin He and collaborators Nidia Gallego and Cristian Contescu from the Material Sciences Division (ORNL) were engaged in the work. They were studying nanoporous carbons to assess their attractiveness as storage media for hydrogen, with a view to potential use for on-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications. Nanoporous carbons can also serve as electrode material for supercapacitors and batteries. The researchers successfully determined that the most efficiently condensing pore size in a carbon nanoporous material for hydrogen storage is less than one nanometer. In a paper recently published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the collaborators used small angle neutron scattering to study how hydrogen condenses in small pores at ambient temperature. They discovered that the surface-molecule interactions create internal pressures in pores that may exceed the external gas pressure by a factor of up to 50. 'This is an exciting result,' Melnichenko said, 'as you achieve extreme densification in pores 'for free', i.e. without spending any energy. These results can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored to maximize hydrogen storage capacities.' Another important factor that defines the adsorption capacity of sub-nanometer pores is their shape. In order to get accurate structural information and maximize sorption capacity, it is important that pores are small and of approximately uniform size. In collaboration with Drexel University's Yury Gogotsi who supplied the samples, Melnichenko and his collaborators used the GP SANS instrument to study how the size and shape of pores in sub-nanometer porous carbons varies, depending on the manufacturing conditions. While small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can do the job too, Melnichenko says, the SANS method broke new ground in analyzing the shape and behavior of pores at subnanometer size, when subjected to varying synthesis temperature. 'We found that these very small pores are in fact spherical, and that when we change the synthesis conditions, they become elongated, even 'slit-like', and all of this on a subnanometer scale,' Melnichenko said.

  12. Buildings","Building Size"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 Relative Standard ErrorsYear Jan Feb MarA6. Building Size,

  13. Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22PrimaryB6. Building Size, Number

  14. Dimethyl Ether Market Size | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to: navigation,Department ofEnergieSize Home There are

  15. Microturbine Systems Market Size | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysvilleMicrogravity-Hybrid MicrogravitySize Home There are

  16. Offshore Lubricants Market Size | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd|Northfork ElectricName01988)IIslands LtdSize Home

  17. Size selective absorption of DNA tetrahedra in ATO nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3 OutlookSize selective absorption of DNA

  18. Size-Selective Incorporation of DNA Nanocages into Nanoporous

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3 OutlookSize selective absorption of

  19. Subdiffraction field localisation in the scattering of femtosecond laser radiation by a dielectric microsphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geints, Yu E; Zemlyanov, A A; Panina, E K

    2014-01-31

    The time dynamics of the optical field was theoretically considered in the near-field diffraction zone in the scattering of a femtosecond laser pulse by a transparent spherical microparticle. The spatial region of field focusing by the particle (the 'photonic jet' zone) was investigated; the evolution of the jet shape and the peak intensity in this region were analysed. For the first time it was determined that an extremely tight optical field localisation to a subdiffraction size is possible at a certain (resonance) temporal stage of photonic jet development. (radiation scattering)

  20. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, Allen R. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  1. Diamond-graphite field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

  2. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  3. Fuzzy-Oil-Drop Hydrophobic Force Field A Model to Represent Late-stage Folding (In Silico) of Lysozyme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skolnick, Jeff

    Fuzzy-Oil-Drop Hydrophobic Force Field ­ A Model to Represent Late-stage Folding (In Silico the external field in the form of a fuzzy-oil-drop assumed to represent the environment. The drop is expressed is the parameter to be mini- mized in the structure optimization procedure. The size of fuzzy-oil-drop is critical

  4. Upper critical field in nanostructured Nb: Competing effects of the reduction in density of states and the mean free path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    Upper critical field in nanostructured Nb: Competing effects of the reduction in density of states and the mean free path Sangita Bose,1 Pratap Raychaudhuri,1 Rajarshi Banerjee,2 and Pushan Ayyub1 1Department December 2006 We show that the upper critical field in nanometer-sized Nb particles is governed

  5. The quantum character of physical fields. Foundations of field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. I. Petrova

    2006-03-15

    The existing field theories are based on the properties of closed exterior forms, which are invariant ones and correspond to conservation laws for physical fields. Hence, to understand the foundations of field theories and their unity, one has to know how such closed exterior forms are obtained. In the present paper it is shown that closed exterior forms corresponding to field theories are obtained from the equations modelling conservation (balance)laws for material media. It has been developed the evolutionary method that enables one to describe the process of obtaining closed exterior forms. The process of obtaining closed exterior forms discloses the mechanism of evolutionary processes in material media and shows that material media generate, discretely, the physical structures, from which the physical fields are formed. This justifies the quantum character of field theories. On the other hand, this process demonstrates the connection between field theories and the equations for material media and points to the fact that the foundations of field theories must be conditioned by the properties of material media. It is shown that the external and internal symmetries of field theories are conditioned by the degrees of freedom of material media. The classification parameter of physical fields and interactions, that is, the parameter of the unified field theory, is connected with the number of noncommutative balance conservation laws for material media.

  6. Effective Field Theory out of Equilibrium: Brownian quantum fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Boyanovsky

    2015-06-19

    The emergence of an effective field theory out of equilibrium is studied in the case in which a light field --the system-- interacts with very heavy fields in a finite temperature bath. We obtain the reduced density matrix for the light field, its time evolution is determined by an effective action that includes the \\emph{influence action} from correlations of the heavy degrees of freedom. The non-equilibrium effective field theory yields a Langevin equation of motion for the light field in terms of dissipative and noise kernels that obey a generalized fluctuation dissipation relation. These are completely determined by the spectral density of the bath which is analyzed in detail for several cases. At $T=0$ we elucidate the effect of thresholds in the renormalization aspects and the asymptotic emergence of a local effective field theory with unitary time evolution. At $T\

  7. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  8. Oil field management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  9. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  10. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Bradley K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    Providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure.

  11. Size-dependent structure of silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, Kristie Jo

    2008-12-31

    Silver noble metal nanoparticles that are<10 nm often possess multiply twinned grains allowing them to adopt shapes and atomic structures not observed in bulk materials. The properties exhibited by particles with multiply twinned polycrystalline structures are often far different from those of single-crystalline particles and from the bulk. I will present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles<10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. Results for nanoparticles in the intermediate size range of 5 to 10 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. I propose a mechanism for this transitiion that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. Results for nanoparticles of 3.9 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent orthorhombic distortion. This distortion is interpreted in the context of idealized decahedral particles. In addition, given these size-dependent measurements of silver nanoparticle compression with pressure, we have constructed a pressure calibration curve. Encapsulating these silver nanoparticles in hollow metal oxide nanospheres then allows us to measure the pressure inside a nanoshell using x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate the measurement of pressure gradients across nanoshells and show that these nanoshells have maximum resolved shear strengths on the order of 500 MPa to IGPa.

  12. Method of assembly of molecular-sized nets and scaffolding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Michl, Josef (Boulder, CO); Magnera, Thomas F. (Louisville, CO); David, Donald E. (Boulder, CO); Harrison, Robin M. (Boulder, CO)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and starting materials for forming molecular-sized grids or nets, or other structures based on such grids and nets, by creating molecular links between elementary molecular modules constrained to move in only two directions on an interface or surface by adhesion or bonding to that interface or surface. In the methods of this invention, monomers are employed as the building blocks of grids and more complex structures. Monomers are introduced onto and allowed to adhere or bond to an interface. The connector groups of adjacent adhered monomers are then polymerized with each other to form a regular grid in two dimensions above the interface. Modules that are not bound or adhered to the interface are removed prior to reaction of the connector groups to avoid undesired three-dimensional cross-linking and the formation of non-grid structures. Grids formed by the methods of this invention are useful in a variety of applications, including among others, for separations technology, as masks for forming regular surface structures (i.e., metal deposition) and as templates for three-dimensional molecular-sized structures.

  13. Method of assembly of molecular-sized nets and scaffolding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Michl, J.; Magnera, T.F.; David, D.E.; Harrison, R.M.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention relates to methods and starting materials for forming molecular-sized grids or nets, or other structures based on such grids and nets, by creating molecular links between elementary molecular modules constrained to move in only two directions on an interface or surface by adhesion or bonding to that interface or surface. In the methods of this invention, monomers are employed as the building blocks of grids and more complex structures. Monomers are introduced onto and allowed to adhere or bond to an interface. The connector groups of adjacent adhered monomers are then polymerized with each other to form a regular grid in two dimensions above the interface. Modules that are not bound or adhered to the interface are removed prior to reaction of the connector groups to avoid undesired three-dimensional cross-linking and the formation of non-grid structures. Grids formed by the methods of this invention are useful in a variety of applications, including among others, for separations technology, as masks for forming regular surface structures (i.e., metal deposition) and as templates for three-dimensional molecular-sized structures. 9 figs.

  14. The dust grain size - stellar luminosity trend in debris discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawellek, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The cross section of material in debris discs is thought to be dominated by the smallest grains that can still stay in bound orbits despite the repelling action of stellar radiation pressure. Thus the minimum (and typical) grain size $s_\\text{min}$ is expected to be close to the radiation pressure blowout size $s_\\text{blow}$. Yet a recent analysis of a sample of Herschel-resolved debris discs showed the ratio $s_\\text{min}/s_\\text{blow}$ to systematically decrease with the stellar luminosity from about ten for solar-type stars to nearly unity in the discs around the most luminous A-type stars. Here we explore this trend in more detail, checking how significant it is and seeking to find possible explanations. We show that the trend is robust to variation of the composition and porosity of dust particles. For any assumed grain properties and stellar parameters, we suggest a recipe of how to estimate the "true" radius of a spatially unresolved debris disc, based solely on its spectral energy distribution. The r...

  15. Compressor Selection and Equipment Sizing for Cold Climate Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    In order to limit heating capacity degradation at -25 C (-13 F) ambient to 25%, compared to the nominal rating point capacity at 8.3 C (47 F), an extensive array of design and sizing options were investigated, based on fundamental equipment system modeling and building energy simulation. Sixteen equipment design options were evaluated in one commercial building and one residential building, respectively in seven cities. The energy simulation results were compared to three baseline cases: 100% electric resistance heating, a 9.6 HSPF single-speed heat pump unit, and 90% AFUE gas heating system. The general recommendation is that variable-speed compressors and tandem compressors, sized such that their rated heating capacity at a low speed matching the building design cooling load, are able to achieve the capacity goal at low ambient temperatures by over-speeding, for example, a home with a 3.0 ton design cooling load, a tandem heat pump could meet this cooling load running a single compressor, while running both compressors to meet heating load at low ambient temperatures in a cold climate. Energy savings and electric resistance heat reductions vary with building types, energy codes and climate zones. Oversizing a heat pump can result in larger energy saving in a less energy efficient building and colder regions due to reducing electric resistance heating. However, in a more energy-efficient building or for buildings in warmer climates, one has to consider balance between reduction of resistance heat and addition of cyclic loss.

  16. EFFECT OF PORE SIZE ON TRAPPING ZINC VAPORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2010-12-17

    A series of experiments were conducted to determine the effect of pore size on pumping efficiency and zinc vapor trapping efficiency. A simple pumping efficiency test was conducted for all five pore diameters where it was observed that evacuation times were adversely affected by reducing the pore size below 5 {micro}m. Common test conditions for the zinc trapping efficiency experiments were used. These conditions resulted in some variability, to ascribe different efficiencies to the filter media. However, the data suggest that there is no significant difference in trapping efficiency for filter media with pores from 0.2 to 20 {micro}m with a thickness of 0.065-inch. Consequently, the 20 {micro}m pore filter media that is currently used at SRS is a suitable filter material for to utilize for future extractions. There is evidence that smaller pore filter will adversely affect the pumping times for the TEF and little evidence to suggest that a smaller pore diameters have significant impact on the trapping efficiency.

  17. Prototype development of the Integral-Field unit for VIRUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Kelz; Svend M. Bauer; Frank Grupp; Gary J. Hill; Emil Popow; Povilas Palunas; Martin M. Roth; Phillip J. MacQueen; Ute Tripphahn

    2006-06-09

    VIRUS is a planned integral-field instrument for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). In order to achieve a large field-of-view and high grasp at reasonable costs, the approach is to replicate integral-field units (IFU) and medium sized spectrographs many times. The Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP) contributes to VIRUS with the development and testing of the IFU prototype. This paper describes the optomechanical design and the manufacture of the fiber-based IFU subsystem. The initial VIRUS development aims to produce a prototype and to measure its performance. Additionally, techniques will be investigated to allow industrial replication of the highly specific fiber-bundle layout. This will be necessary if this technique is to be applied to the next generation of even larger astronomical instrumentation.

  18. Field tests of carbon monitoring methods in forestry projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    In response to the emerging scientific consensus on the facts of global climate change, the international Joint Implementation (JI) program provided a pilot phase in which utilities and other industries could finance, among other activities, international efforts to sequester carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. To make JI and its successor mechanisms workable, however, cost-effective methods are needed for monitoring progress in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The papers in this volume describe field test experiences with methods for measuring carbon storage by three types of land use: natural forest, plantation forest, and agroforestry. Each test, in a slightly different land-use situation, contributes to the knowledge of carbon-monitoring methods as experienced in the field. The field tests of the agroforestry guidelines in Guatemala and the Philippines, for example, suggested adaptations in terms of plot size and method of delineating the total area for sampling.

  19. The Electromagnetic Field as a Synchrony Gauge Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert D. Bock

    2015-09-24

    Building on our previous work, we investigate the identification of the electromagnetic field as a local gauge field of a restricted group of synchrony transformations. We begin by arguing that the inability to measure the one-way speed of light independent of a synchronization scheme necessitates that physical laws must be reformulated without distant simultaneity. As a result, we are forced to introduce a new operational definition of time which leads to a fundamental space-time invariance principle that is related to a subset of the synchrony group. We identify the gauge field associated with this new invariance principle with the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the electromagnetic field acquires a space-time interpretation, as suggested in our previous work. In addition, we investigate the static, spherically symmetric solution of the resulting field equations. Also, we discuss implications of the present work for understanding the tension between classical and quantum theory.

  20. The Electromagnetic Field as a Synchrony Gauge Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bock, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Building on our previous work, we investigate the identification of the electromagnetic field as a local gauge field of a restricted group of synchrony transformations. We begin by arguing that the inability to measure the one-way speed of light independent of a synchronization scheme necessitates that physical laws must be reformulated without distant simultaneity. As a result, we are forced to introduce a new operational definition of time which leads to a fundamental space-time invariance principle that is related to a subset of the synchrony group. We identify the gauge field associated with this new invariance principle with the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the electromagnetic field acquires a space-time interpretation, as suggested in our previous work. In addition, we investigate the static, spherically symmetric solution of the resulting field equations. Also, we discuss implications of the present work for understanding the tension between classical and quantum theory.

  1. Electronic field permeameter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Mark A. (Madison, WI); Goggin, David J. (Austin, TX); Horne, Patrick J. (Austin, TX); Kocurek, Gary G. (Roundrock, TX); Lake, Larry W. (Austin, TX)

    1989-01-01

    For making rapid, non-destructive permeability measurements in the field, a portable minipermeameter of the kind having a manually-operated gas injection tip is provided with a microcomputer system which operates a flow controller to precisely regulate gas flow rate to a test sample, and reads a pressure sensor which senses the pressure across the test sample. The microcomputer system automatically turns on the gas supply at the start of each measurement, senses when a steady-state is reached, collects and records pressure and flow rate data, and shuts off the gas supply immediately after the measurement is completed. Preferably temperature is also sensed to correct for changes in gas viscosity. The microcomputer system may also provide automatic zero-point adjustment, sensor calibration, over-range sensing, and may select controllers, sensors, and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements. Electronic sensors may provide increased accuracy and precision. Preferably one microcomputer is used for sensing instrument control and data collection, and a second microcomputer is used which is dedicated to recording and processing the data, selecting the sensors and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements, and instructing the user how to set-up and operate the minipermeameter. To provide mass data collection and user-friendly operation, the second microcomputer is preferably a lap-type portable microcomputer having a non-volatile or battery-backed CMOS memory.

  2. Grain size limits derived from 3.6 {\\mu}m and 4.5 {\\mu}m coreshine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinacker, J; Thi, W -F; Paladini, R; Juvela, M; Bacmann, A; Pelkonen, V -M; Pagani, L; Lefèvre, C; Henning, Th; Noriega-Crespo, A

    2015-01-01

    Recently discovered scattered light from molecular cloud cores in the wavelength range 3-5 {\\mu}m (called "coreshine") seems to indicate the presence of grains with sizes above 0.5 {\\mu}m. We aim to analyze 3.6 and 4.5 {\\mu}m coreshine from molecular cloud cores to probe the largest grains in the size distribution. We analyzed dedicated deep Cycle 9 Spitzer IRAC observations in the 3.6 and 4.5 {\\mu}m bands for a sample of 10 low-mass cores. We used a new modeling approach based on a combination of ratios of the two background- and foreground-subtracted surface brightnesses and observed limits of the optical depth. The dust grains were modeled as ice-coated silicate and carbonaceous spheres. We discuss the impact of local radiation fields with a spectral slope differing from what is seen in the DIRBE allsky maps. For the cores L260, ecc806, L1262, L1517A, L1512, and L1544, the model reproduces the data with maximum grain sizes around 0.9, 0.5, 0.65, 1.5, 0.6, and > 1.5 {\\mu}m, respectively. The maximum coreshi...

  3. Indentation size effect and the plastic compressibility of glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M., E-mail: mos@bio.aau.dk [Section of Chemistry, Aalborg University, 9000 Aalborg (Denmark)

    2014-06-23

    Oxide glasses exhibit significant densification under an applied isostatic pressure at the glass transition temperature. The glass compressibility is correlated with the chemical composition and atomic packing density, e.g., borate glasses with planar triangular BO{sub 3} units are more disposed for densification than silicate glasses with tetrahedral units. We here show that there is a direct relation between the plastic compressibility following hot isostatic compression and the extent of the indentation size effect (ISE), which is the decrease of hardness with indentation load exhibited by most materials. This could suggest that the ISE is correlated with indentation-induced shear bands, which should form in greater density when the glass network is more adaptable to volume changes through structural and topological rearrangements under an applied pressure.

  4. Fluctuating fitness shapes the clone size distribution of immune repertoires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desponds, Jonathan; Walczak, Aleksandra M

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune system relies on the diversity of receptors expressed on the surface of B and T-cells to protect the organism from a vast amount of pathogenic threats. The proliferation and degradation dynamics of different cell types (B cells, T cells, naive, memory) is governed by a variety of antigenic and environmental signals, yet the observed clone sizes follow a universal power law distribution. Guided by this reproducibility we propose effective models of somatic evolution where cell fate depends on an effective fitness. This fitness is determined by growth factors acting either on clones of cells with the same receptor responding to specific antigens, or directly on single cells with no regards for clones. We identify fluctuations in the fitness acting specifically on clones as the essential ingredient leading to the observed distributions. Combining our models with experiments we characterize the scale of fluctuations in antigenic environments and we provide tools to identify the relevant growth...

  5. Status of the Cherenkov Telescope Array's Large Size Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortina, J

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory, will be deployed over two sites in the two hemispheres. Both sites will be equipped with four Large Size Telescopes (LSTs), which are crucial to achieve the science goals of CTA in the 20-200 GeV energy range. Each LST is equipped with a primary tessellated mirror dish of 23 m diameter, supported by a structure made mainly of carbon fibre reinforced plastic tubes and aluminum joints. This solution guarantees light weight (around 100 tons), essential for fast repositioning to any position in the sky in Canary island of La Palma (Spain). In this talk we will outline the technical solutions adopted to fulfill the design requirem...

  6. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, J.E.; Kelly, T.F.

    1999-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains. 20 figs.

  7. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kelly, Thomas F. (Madison, WI)

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains.

  8. Depositional environments, diagenesis, and porosity development of Mississippian Chappel carbonates at Thrash and Quanah SE Fields, Hardeman County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Shiliang T.

    1989-01-01

    /mudstone microfacies (Thrash Field) 5) Argillaceous, spiculitic, crinoid ? bryozoan mudstone/ 32 wackestone micro facies (Quanah SE Field) 6) Dolomitic, spiculiferous, silt ? sized wackestone/mudstone microfacies (Quanah SE Field) 7) Dolomitic, cherty floatstone... crinoi. d-bryozoan mudstona/wackestone Dolomitic, spiculiferous silty wackestone/muc(ALone Well Well to morleratc Pine to medium (0. 007 mm to 0. 00 ~) silty to I'ine to 0. 00 mm) Dul row Discontinuous, p&. anar, thin, laminae Micro(null inn...

  9. hp-finite-elements for simulating electromagnetic fields in optical devices with rough textures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, S; Hammerschmidt, M; Herrmann, S; Pomplun, J; Schmidt, F; Wohlfeil, B; Zschiedrich, L

    2015-01-01

    The finite-element method is a preferred numerical method when electromagnetic fields at high accuracy are to be computed in nano-optics design. Here, we demonstrate a finite-element method using hp-adaptivity on tetrahedral meshes for computation of electromagnetic fields in a device with rough textures. The method allows for efficient computations on meshes with strong variations in element sizes. This enables to use precise geometry resolution of the rough textures. Convergence to highly accurate results is observed.

  10. Electromagnetic Waves Reflectance of Graphene -- Magnetic Semiconductor Superlattice in Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmin, Dmitry A; Shavrov, Vladimir G

    2014-01-01

    Electrodynamic properties of the graphene - magnetic semiconductor - graphene superlattice placed in magnetic field have been investigated theoretically in Faraday geometry with taking into account dissipation processes. Frequency and field dependences of the reflectance, transmittance and absorbtance of electromagnetic waves by such superlattice have been calculated for different numbers of periods of the structure and different sizes of the periods with using a transfer matrix method. The possibility of efficient control of electrodynamic properties of graphene - magnetic semiconductor - graphene superlattice has been shown.

  11. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Fuller, Merrian C.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Peters, Jane S.; McRae, Marjorie; Albers, Nathaniel; Lutzenhiser, Susan; Spahic, Mersiha

    2010-03-22

    The energy efficiency services sector (EESS) is poised to become an increasingly important part of the U.S. economy. Climate change and energy supply concerns, volatile and increasing energy prices, and a desire for greater energy independence have led many state and national leaders to support an increasingly prominent role for energy efficiency in U.S. energy policy. The national economic recession has also helped to boost the visibility of energy efficiency, as part of a strategy to support economic recovery. We expect investment in energy efficiency to increase dramatically both in the near-term and through 2020 and beyond. This increase will come both from public support, such as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and significant increases in utility ratepayer funds directed toward efficiency, and also from increased private spending due to codes and standards, increasing energy prices, and voluntary standards for industry. Given the growing attention on energy efficiency, there is a concern among policy makers, program administrators, and others that there is an insufficiently trained workforce in place to meet the energy efficiency goals being put in place by local, state, and federal policy. To understand the likelihood of a potential workforce gap and appropriate response strategies, one needs to understand the size, composition, and potential for growth of the EESS. We use a bottom-up approach based upon almost 300 interviews with program administrators, education and training providers, and a variety of EESS employers and trade associations; communications with over 50 sector experts; as well as an extensive literature review. We attempt to provide insight into key aspects of the EESS by describing the current job composition, the current workforce size, our projections for sector growth through 2020, and key issues that may limit this growth.

  12. Interagency Field Test & Evaluation: Field Test 2 Public Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Connor

    2013-03-30

    This fact sheet summarizes the second field tests of technologies intended to address wind turbine interference with land-based surveillance radar, which took place in Lubbock, TX.

  13. Gravity as field - field oriented framework reproducing General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Ogonowski; Piotr Skindzier

    2015-09-21

    In the last article we have created foundations for gravitational field oriented framework (DaF) that reproduces GR. In this article we show, that using DaF approach, we can reproduce Schwarzschild solution with orbit equations, effective potential and constants of motion. Next we generalize results to other GR solutions and show, how gravitational field affects spacetime curvature and intrinsic spin of the bodies. It also appears, that field oriented approach requests to assign some spin value to the massless particles. Derived DaF framework has therefore significant meaning for searching for field based interpretation of gravity requested by quantum gravity.

  14. Exact solution of the EM radiation-reaction problem for classical finite-size and Lorentzian charged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremaschini, Claudio; 10.1140/epjp/i2011-11042-8

    2012-01-01

    An exact solution is given to the classical electromagnetic (EM) radiation-reaction (RR) problem, originally posed by Lorentz. This refers to the dynamics of classical non-rotating and quasi-rigid finite size particles subject to an external prescribed EM field. A variational formulation of the problem is presented. It is shown that a covariant representation for the EM potential of the self-field generated by the extended charge can be uniquely determined, consistent with the principles of classical electrodynamics and relativity. By construction, the retarded self 4-potential does not possess any divergence, contrary to the case of point charges. As a fundamental consequence, based on Hamilton variational principle, an exact representation is obtained for the relativistic equation describing the dynamics of a finite-size charged particle (RR equation), which is shown to be realized by a second-order delay-type ODE. Such equation is proved to apply also to the treatment of Lorentzian particles, i.e., point-m...

  15. Tropical cyclone size in observations and in radiative-convective equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavas, Daniel Robert

    2013-01-01

    Tropical cyclone size remains an unsolved problem in tropical meteorology, yet size plays a significant role in the damage caused by tropical cyclones due to wind, storm surge, and inland freshwater flooding. This work ...

  16. Better Buildings Alliance, Advanced Rooftop Unit Campaign: RTU Sizing Guidance (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    This fact sheet discusses the causes and consequences of incorrect RTU sizing (with respect to cooling tonnage and supply fan horsepower) and points to resources that can help ensure accurate sizing calculations.

  17. Equilibrium Tropical Cyclone Size in an Idealized State of Axisymmetric Radiative–Convective Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavas, Daniel Robert

    Tropical cyclone size remains an unsolved problem in tropical meteorology, yet size plays a significant role in modulating damage. This work employs the Bryan cloud model (CM1) to systematically explore the sensitivity of ...

  18. Effects of droplet size on intrusion of sub-surface oil spills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Godine Kok Yan

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the effects of droplet size on droplet intrusion in sub-surface oil spills. Laboratory experiments were performed where glass beads of various sizes, which serve to simulate oil droplets in deepsea oil ...

  19. Size Influence on the Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity and Instability of Supported Pt Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Wenchao

    Size-dependent oxygen reduction reaction activity (ORR) and instability of Pt nanoparticles is of great importance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications. In this study, the size-dependence of ORR activity on ...

  20. Size based separation of submicron nonmagnetic particles through magnetophoresis in structured obstacle arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annavarapu, V. N. Ravikanth (Venkata Nagandra Ravikanth)

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this work was on developing a novel scalable size based separation technology for nonmagnetic particles in the submicron size range utilizing magnetophoretic forces. When a nonmagnetic particle is immersed in ...

  1. Retroviruses and sexual size dimorphism in domestic cats (Felis catus L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courchamp, Franck

    Retroviruses and sexual size dimorphism in domestic cats (Felis catus L.) Dominique Pontier1 cat Felis catus. Orange cats have greater body size dimorphism than non-orange cats. Orange females; domestic cat, Felis catus: Yamane

  2. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  3. Magnetic fields in massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Hubrig; M. Schoeller; M. Briquet; M. A. Pogodin; R. V. Yudin; J. F. Gonzalez; T. Morel; P. De Cat; R. Ignace; P. North; G. Mathys; G. J. Peters

    2007-12-02

    We review the recent discoveries of magnetic fields in different types of massive stars and briefly discuss strategies for spectropolarimetric observations to be carried out in the future.

  4. Magnetic fields in massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Briquet, M; Pogodin, M A; Yudin, R V; González, J F; Morel, T; De Cat, P; Ignace, R; North, P; Mathys, G; Peters, G J

    2007-01-01

    We review the recent discoveries of magnetic fields in different types of massive stars and briefly discuss strategies for spectropolarimetric observations to be carried out in the future.

  5. Continuous Profiling of Magnetotelluric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdin, C.T.

    2009-01-01

    those employed in seismic data interpretation under the nameseismic nature, these techniques power implicit in the at least two decades of continued field and interpretation

  6. UV Radiation Fields Produced by Young Embedded Star Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Fatuzzo; F. C. Adams

    2007-12-20

    A large fraction of stars form within young embedded clusters, and these environments produce a substantial ultraviolet (UV) background radiation field, which can provide feedback on the star formation process. To assess the possible effects of young stellar clusters on the formation of their constituent stars and planets, this paper constructs the expected radiation fields produced by these clusters. We include both the observed distribution of cluster sizes $N$ in the solar neighborhood and an extended distribution that includes clusters with larger $N$. The paper presents distributions of the FUV and EUV luminosities for clusters with given stellar membership $N$, distributions of FUV and EUV luminosity convolved over the expected distribution of cluster sizes $N$, and the corresponding distributions of FUV and EUV fluxes. These flux distributions are calculated both with and without the effects of extinction. Finally, we consider the effects of variations in the stellar initial mass function on these radiation fields. Taken together, these results specify the distributions of radiation environments that forming solar systems are expected to experience.

  7. Energy spectrum of the electrons accelerated by reconnection electric field: exponential or power-law?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, W J; Ding, M D; Fang, C

    2008-01-01

    The direct current (DC) electric field near the reconnection region has been proposed as an effective mechanism to accelerate protons and electrons in solar flares. A power-law energy spectrum was generally claimed in the simulations of electron acceleration by the reconnection electric field. However, in most of the literature, the electric and magnetic fields were chosen independently. In this paper, we perform test particle simulations of electron acceleration in reconnecting magnetic field, where both the electric and magnetic fields are adopted from numerical simulations of the MHD equations. It is found that the accelerated electrons present a truncated power-law energy spectrum with an exponential tail at high energies, which is analogous to the case of diffusive shock acceleration. The influences of the reconnection parameters on the spectral feature are also investigated, such as the longitudinal and transverse components of the magnetic field and the size of the current sheet. It is suggested that t...

  8. Motion of small bodies in classical field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gralla, Samuel E. [Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics University of Chicago 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    I show how prior work with R. Wald on geodesic motion in general relativity can be generalized to classical field theories of a metric and other tensor fields on four-dimensional spacetime that (1) are second-order and (2) follow from a diffeomorphism-covariant Lagrangian. The approach is to consider a one-parameter-family of solutions to the field equations satisfying certain assumptions designed to reflect the existence of a body whose size, mass, and various charges are simultaneously scaled to zero. (That such solutions exist places a further restriction on the class of theories to which our results apply.) Assumptions are made only on the spacetime region outside of the body, so that the results apply independent of the body's composition (and, e.g., black holes are allowed). The worldline 'left behind' by the shrinking, disappearing body is interpreted as its lowest-order motion. An equation for this worldline follows from the 'Bianchi identity' for the theory, without use of any properties of the field equations beyond their being second-order. The form of the force law for a theory therefore depends only on the ranks of its various tensor fields; the detailed properties of the field equations are relevant only for determining the charges for a particular body (which are the ''monopoles'' of its exterior fields in a suitable limiting sense). I explicitly derive the force law (and mass-evolution law) in the case of scalar and vector fields, and give the recipe in the higher-rank case. Note that the vector force law is quite complicated, simplifying to the Lorentz force law only in the presence of the Maxwell gauge symmetry. Example applications of the results are the motion of 'chameleon' bodies beyond the Newtonian limit, and the motion of bodies in (classical) non-Abelian gauge theory. I also make some comments on the role that scaling plays in the appearance of universality in the motion of bodies.

  9. Conducting interpenetrating polymer network sized to fabricate microactuators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaldi, Alexandre; Plesse, Cedric; Vidal, Frederic; Teyssie, Dominique; Soyer, Caroline; Cattan, Eric; Legrand, Christiane

    2011-04-18

    Interpenetrating polymer networks can become successful actuators in the field of microsystems providing they are compatible with microtechnologies. In this letter, we report on a material synthesized from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and polytetrahydrofuran/poly(ethylene oxide) and microsized by decreasing its thickness to 12 {mu}m and patterning the lateral side using plasma etching at high etch rates and with vertical sidewalls. A chemical process and a 'self degradation' are proposed to explain such etching rates. Preliminary actuation results show that microbeams can move with very large displacements. These microsized actuators are potential candidates in numerous applications, including microswitches, microvalves, microoptical instrumentation, and microrobotics.

  10. Conservation laws. Generation of physical fields. Principles of field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. I. Petrova

    2007-04-19

    In the paper the role of conservation laws in evolutionary processes, which proceed in material systems (in material media) and lead to generation of physical fields, is shown using skew-symmetric differential forms. In present paper the skew-symmetric differential forms on deforming (nondifferentiable) manifolds were used in addition to exterior forms, which have differentiable manifolds as a basis. Such skew-symmetric forms (which were named evolutionary ones since they possess evolutionary properties), as well as the closed exterior forms, describe the conservation laws. But in contrast to exterior forms, which describe conservation laws for physical fields, the evolutionary forms correspond to conservation laws for material systems. The evolutionary forms possess an unique peculiarity, namely, the closed exterior forms are obtained from these forms. It is just this that enables one to describe the process of generation of physical fields, to disclose connection between physical fields and material systems and to resolve many problems of existing field theories.

  11. Electromagnetic field with induced massive term: Case with spinor field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. P. Rybakov; G. N. Shikin; Yu. A. Popov; Bijan Saha

    2010-08-12

    We consider an interacting system of spinor and electromagnetic field, explicitly depending on the electromagnetic potentials, i.e., interaction with broken gauge invariance. The Lagrangian for interaction is chosen in such a way that the electromagnetic field equation acquires an additional term, which in some cases is proportional to the vector potential of the electromagnetic field. This equation can be interpreted as the equation of motion of photon with induced non-trivial rest-mass. This system of interacting spinor and scalar fields is considered within the scope of Bianchi type-I (BI) cosmological model. It is shown that, as a result of interaction the electromagnetic field vanishes at $t \\to \\infty$ and the isotropization process of the expansion takes place.

  12. Electromagnetic field with induced massive term: Case with scalar field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. P. Rybakov; G. N. Shikin; Yu. A. Popov; Bijan Saha

    2010-04-21

    We consider an interacting system of massless scalar and electromagnetic field, with the Lagrangian explicitly depending on the electromagnetic potentials, i.e., interaction with broken gauge invariance. The Lagrangian for interaction is chosen in such a way that the electromagnetic field equation acquires an additional term, which in some cases is proportional to the vector potential of the electromagnetic field. This equation can be interpreted as the equation of motion of photon with induced nonzero rest-mass. This system of interacting fields is considered within the scope of Bianchi type-I (BI) cosmological model. It is shown that, as a result of interaction the electromagnetic field vanishes at $t \\to \\infty$ and the isotropization process of the expansion takes place.

  13. Cosmic Electromagnetic Fields due to Perturbations in the Gravitational Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop Mongwane; Peter K. S. Dunsby; Bob Osano

    2012-10-21

    We use non-linear gauge-invariant perturbation theory to study the interaction of an inflation produced seed magnetic field with density and gravitational wave perturbations in an almost Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime. We compare the effects of this coupling under the assumptions of poor conductivity, infinite conductivity and the case where the electric field is sourced via the coupling of velocity perturbations to the seed field in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regime, thus generalizing, improving on and correcting previous results. We solve our equations for long wavelength limits and numerically integrate the resulting equations to generate power spectra for the electromagnetic field variables, showing where the modes cross the horizon. We find that the rotation of the electric field dominates the power spectrum on small scales, in agreement with previous arguments.

  14. Transitional properties of starch colloid with particle size reduction from micro-to nanometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for implant materials, bioplastics, and drug carriers [5­7]. Furthermore, because of their size and good

  15. Spectroscopic study of the Moses Lake dune field, Washington: Determination of compositional distributions and source lithologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandfield, Joshua L.

    Spectroscopic study of the Moses Lake dune field, Washington: Determination of compositional Coulee, dune samples, and clast deposits. Factor analysis, target transformation, and end-member recovery techniques were applied to the set of dune samples as well as a set of grain size fractions. The dune sample

  16. Molecular Dynamics in Strong Laser Fields: A New Algorithm for ab Initio Classical Trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    dynamics (AIMD) calculations13-15 in the time-varying field. In AIMD calculations, an electronic structure of electronic structure computations, but without sacrificing accuracy of the trajectory calculation. Methods the electronic structure calculations.17 However, the step size must be relatively small in order to maintain

  17. Statistical distributions of water content and sizes for clouds above Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Statistical distributions of water content and sizes for clouds above Europe R. P. H. Berton O and water content (IWC), horizontal and vertical sizes (L and H), and top temperatures (T) of clouds above and water contents) controlling radiation transfer in the cloud, and geo- metrical sizes used

  18. Wilson Bull., 112(4), 2000, pp. 457466 SEXUAL SIZE DIMORPHISM OF THE MUSK DUCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afton, Alan D.

    457 Wilson Bull., 112(4), 2000, pp. 457­466 SEXUAL SIZE DIMORPHISM OF THE MUSK DUCK KEVIN G. McCRACKEN,1, 2, 3, 4, 5 DAVID C. PATON, 2 AND ALAN D. AFTON3 ABSTRACT.--We examined sexual size dimorphism-displaying species, Musk Ducks exhibit extreme sexual size di- morphism in addition to structural dimorphism. Body

  19. Simplified Wiener LMS Tracking Automatic Tuning of the Step-Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simplified Wiener LMS Tracking With Automatic Tuning of the Step-Size Jonas Rutstr¨om March 2005- size for the Simplified Wiener LMS algorithm (SWLMS). When tracking time-varying parameters, variable step-size algorithms, LMS, WLMS. c Jonas Rutstr¨om 2005 This thesis has been prepared using LATEX

  20. Retrieval of subpixel snow covered area, grain size, and albedo from MODIS Thomas H. Painter a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Retrieval of subpixel snow covered area, grain size, and albedo from MODIS Thomas H. Painter a Keywords: Snow Grain size Albedo Spectral mixture analysis MODIS We describe and validate a model that retrieves fractional snow-covered area and the grain size and albedo of that snow from surface reflectance

  1. A Hyperspectral Method for Remotely Sensing the Grain Size of Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    A Hyperspectral Method for Remotely Sensing the Grain Size of Snow Anne W. Nolin* and Jeff Dozier in the snowpack. Changes in snow grain size can help identifynique for estimating the grain size in a snowpack's surface ice sheet surface features, such as melt areas, snow dunes,layer from imaging spectrometer data

  2. Comment on "Minimal size of a barchan dune" B. Andreotti and P. Claudin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, Philippe

    Comment on "Minimal size of a barchan dune" B. Andreotti and P. Claudin Laboratoire de Physique et Received 23 May 2007; published 21 December 2007 It is now an accepted fact that the size at which dunes of the typical dune wavelength on Mars 650 m on the basis of which they refute the scaling of the dune size

  3. The Size-Ramsey Number of Trees P.E. Haxell1* and Y. Kohayakawa2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

    The Size-Ramsey Number of Trees P.E. Haxell1* and Y. Kohayakawa2 1Department of Pure- matic copy of H in any 2-colouring of the edges of G. The size-Ramsey number re* *(H) of a graph H are concerned with a numerical problem in Ramsey theory: we shall study the size-Ramsey number of trees. Before

  4. Climate change, body size evolution, and Cope's Rule in deep-sea ostracodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Kaustuv

    Climate change, body size evolution, and Cope's Rule in deep-sea ostracodes Gene Hunt* and Kaustuv in response to climate change can be an important determinant of macroevolutionary trends in body size (10), and it has been shown that body size can change in response to climatic change (11, 12). Thus

  5. Journal of Mammalogy, 84(1):197204, 2003 GROUP SIZE BUT NOT DISTANCE TO COVER INFLUENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    wallabies (Macropus agilis). The ability to modify time allocation as a function of group size allocated to foraging and vigilance as a function of group size but were insensitive to distance from cover to manage predation risk, the ability to modify time allocation as a function of group size (Bednekoff

  6. Developing a Model for Planning and Controlling Production in Small Sized Building Firms Proceedings IGLC `98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    Developing a Model for Planning and Controlling Production in Small Sized Building Firms Proceedings IGLC `98 DEVELOPING A MODEL FOR PLANNING AND CONTROLLING PRODUCTION IN SMALL SIZED BUILDING FIRMS process of a model for planning and controlling production in small sized building companies, as well

  7. BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results -Child -Sample Size 500

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Laura E.

    GS PC TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child - Sample Size 500 Error Bars GS PC TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child3 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars TPDA GES BayesianScore(BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child5 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars

  8. Improvements on the "Size Change Termination Principle" in a functional language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improvements on the "Size Change Termination Principle" in a functional language Pierre Hyvernat improvements of Lee, Jones and Ben-Amram size change termination principle specialised to functional-graphs and yields a more precise test for termination. 1 Introduction Lee, Jones and Ben-Amram size change

  9. SSP: A Simple Software Process for Small-Size Software Development Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero, Luis

    SSP: A Simple Software Process for Small- Size Software Development Projects Sergio F. Ochoa1 number of software development projects in Latin- America countries are small-size, poorly defined development projects in Chile are information systems of small or medium size (1-2 months or 3-6 months) [17

  10. Relationships among Egg Size, Composition, and Energy: A Comparative Study of Geminate Sea Urchins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relationships among Egg Size, Composition, and Energy: A Comparative Study of Geminate Sea Urchins histories of marine organisms. However, few studies have examined the relationships among egg size among egg size, composition, and energy using a comparative system, geminate species formed

  11. NectarCAM : a camera for the medium size telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicenstein, J-F; Barrio, J-A; Blanch~Bigas, O; Bolmont, J; Bouyjou, F; Brun, P; Chabanne, E; Champion, C; Colonges, S; Corona, P; Delagnes, E; Delgado, C; Ginzov, C Diaz; Durand, D; Ernenwein, J-P; Fegan, S; Ferreira, O; Fesquet, M; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Fouque, N; Gascon, D; Giebels, B; Henault, F; Hermel, R; Hoffmann, D; Horan, D; Houles, J; Jean, P; Jocou, L; Karkar, S; Knoedlseder, J; Kossakowski, R; Lamanna, G; LeFlour, T; Lenain, J-P; Leveque, A; Louis, F; Martinez, G; Moudden, Y; Moulin, E; Nayman, P; Nunio, F; Olive, J-F; Panazol, J-L; Pavy, S; Petrucci, P-O; Pierre, E; Prast, J; Punch, M; Ramon, P; Rateau, S; Ravel, T; Rosier-Lees, S; Sanuy, A; Shayduk, M; Sizun, P-Y; Sulanke, K-H; Tavernet, J-P; Tejedor~Alvarez, L-A; Toussenel, F; Vasileiadis, G; Voisin, V; Waegebert, V; Wischnewski, R

    2015-01-01

    NectarCAM is a camera proposed for the medium-sized telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) covering the central energy range of ~100 GeV to ~30 TeV. It has a modular design and is based on the NECTAr chip, at the heart of which is a GHz sampling Switched Capacitor Array and a 12-bit Analog to Digital converter. The camera will be equipped with 265 7-photomultiplier modules, covering a field of view of 8 degrees. Each module includes the photomultiplier bases, high voltage supply, pre-amplifier, trigger, readout and Ethernet transceiver. The recorded events last between a few nanoseconds and tens of nanoseconds. The camera trigger will be flexible so as to minimize the read-out dead-time of the NECTAr chips. NectarCAM is designed to sustain a data rate of more than 4 kHz with less than 5\\% dead time. The camera concept, the design and tests of the various subcomponents and results of thermal and electrical prototypes are presented. The design includes the mechanical structure, cooling of the electro...

  12. Size-dependent magnetic ordering and spin-dynamics in DyPO4 and GdPO4 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelisti, Marco; Sorop, Tibi G; Bakharev, Oleg N; Visser, Dirk; Hillier, Adrian D.; Alonso, Juan; Haase, Markus; Boatner, Lynn A; De Jongh, L. Jos

    2011-01-01

    Low-temperature magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements on nanoparticles (d 2.6 nm) of the antiferromagnetic compounds DyPO4 (TN = 3:4 K) and GdPO4 (TN = 0:77 K) provide clear demonstrations of finite-size effects, which limit the divergence of the magnetic correlation lengths, thereby suppressing the bulk long-range magnetic ordering transitions. Instead, the incomplete antiferromagnetic order inside the particles leads to the formation of net magnetic moments on the particles. For the nanoparticles of Ising-type DyPO4 superparamagnetic blocking is found in the ac-susceptibility at 1 K, those of the XY-type GdPO4 analogue show a dipolar spin-glass transition at 0:2 K. Monte Carlo simulations for the magnetic heat capacities of both bulk and nanoparticle samples are in agreement with the experimental data. Strong size effects are also apparent in the Dy3+ and Gd3+ spin-dynamics, which were studied by zero-field SR relaxation and high-field 31P-NMR nuclear relaxation measurements. The freezing transitions observed in the ac-susceptibility of the nanoparticles also appear as peaks in the temperature dependence of the zero-field SR rates, but at slightly higher temperatures - as to be expected from the higher frequency of the muon probe. For both bulk and nanoparticles of GdPO4, the muon and 31P-NMR rates are for T 5 K dominated by exchange-narrowed hyperfine broadening arising from the electron spin-spin interactions inside the particles. The dipolar hyperfine interactions acting on the muons and the 31P are, however, much reduced in the nanoparticles. For the DyPO4 analogues the high-temperature rates appear to be fully determined by electron spin-lattice relaxation processes.

  13. Micro moon versus macro moon: Brightness and size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Dulli Chandra

    2015-01-01

    The moon, moonlight, phases of the moon and its relatively simple recurring cycle has been of interest since time immemorial to the human beings, navigators, astronomers and astrologers. The fact that its orbit is elliptical as well its plane is inclined with the plane of rotation of the earth gives rise to new moon to full moon and solar and lunar eclipses. During the phase of the full moon, the luminous flux and its apparent size will depend on its distance from the earth. In case it is at farthest point known as lunar apogee causes smallest full moon or micro full moon and if it is closest to us termed as lunar perigee will result in macro full moon, also known as super moon, a term coined by astrologer Richard Nolle in 1979. The theoretical expressions for the lunar luminous fluxes on the earth representing the power of lunar light the earth intercepts in the direction normal to the incidence over an area of one square meter are derived for two extreme positions lunar apogee and lunar perigee. The express...

  14. Sifting attacks in finite-size quantum key distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corsin Pfister; Patrick J. Coles; Stephanie Wehner; Norbert Lütkenhaus

    2015-09-02

    A central assumption in quantum key distribution (QKD) is that Eve has no knowledge about which rounds will be used for parameter estimation or key distillation. Here we show that this assumption is violated for iterative sifting, a commonly used sifting procedure that has been em- ployed in both theoretical and experimental finite-size QKD. We show that iterative sifting leads to two problems: (1) some rounds are more likely to be key rounds than others, (2) the public communication of past measurement choices changes this bias round by round. We analyze these two previously unnoticed problems, present eavesdropping strategies that exploit them, and find that the two problems are independent. We propose corrections to the protocol and prove that the resulting protocol, which we call the fixed round number sifting protocol, is secure and can thus replace iterative sifting in future QKD protocols. It outperforms other recently suggested protocols, increasing the efficiency by a factor of almost two. More generally, we present two formal criteria for a sifting protocol which ensure that they are secure. Our criteria may guide the design of future protocols and inspire a more rigorous QKD analysis, which has neglected sifting-related attacks so far.

  15. Quantifying multipartite nonlocality via the size of the resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian John Curchod; Nicolas Gisin; Yeong-Cherng Liang

    2014-11-17

    The generation of (Bell-)nonlocal correlations, i.e., correlations leading to the violation of a Bell-like inequality, requires the usage of a nonlocal resource, such as an entangled state. When given a correlation (a collection of conditional probability distributions) from an experiment or from a theory, it is desirable to determine the extent to which the participating parties would need to collaborate nonlocally for its (re)production. Here, we propose to achieve this via the minimal group size (MGS) of the resource, i.e., the smallest number of parties that need to share a given type of nonlocal resource for the above-mentioned purpose. In addition, we provide a general recipe --- based on the lifting of Bell-like inequalities --- to construct MGS witnesses for non-signaling resources starting from any given ones. En route to illustrating the applicability of this recipe, we also show that when restricted to the space of full-correlation functions, non-signaling resources are as powerful as unconstrained signaling resources. Explicit examples of correlations where their MGS can be determined using this recipe and other numerical techniques are provided.

  16. Size dependence of solar X-ray flare properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marina Battaglia; Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2005-05-09

    Non-thermal and thermal parameters of 85 solar flares of GOES class B1 to M6 (background subtracted classes A1 to M6) have been compared to each other. The hard X-ray flux has been measured by RHESSI and a spectral fitting provided flux and spectral index of the non-thermal emission, as well as temperature and emission measure of the thermal emission. The soft X-ray flux was taken from GOES measurements. We find a linear correlation in a double logarithmic plot between the non-thermal flux and the spectral index. The higher the acceleration rate of a flare, the harder the non-thermal electron distribution. The relation is similar to the one found by a comparison of the same parameters from several sub-peaks of a single flare. Thus small flares behave like small subpeaks of large flares. Thermal flare properties such as temperature, emission measure and the soft X-ray flux also correlate with peak non-thermal flux. A large non-thermal peak flux entails an enhancement in both thermal parameters. The relation between spectral index and the non-thermal flux is an intrinsic feature of the particle acceleration process, depending on flare size. This property affects the reported frequency distribution of flare energies.

  17. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

  18. Field Dependence of Blocking Temperature in Magnetite Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. F. Goya; M. P. Morales

    2011-03-22

    Spherical magnetite nanoparticles having average particle size = 5 nm have been synthesized by coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts in KOH with Polyvinylalcohol (PVA). The resulting dry powder displayed superparamgnetic (SPM) behaviour at room temperature, with a transition to a blocked state at TB ~ 45 K for applied field Happ = 500 Oe. The effect of dipolar interactions was investigated by measuring the dependence of TB on the applied field Hap and driven ac field in susceptibility data. A thermally activated model has been used to fit the dynamic data to obtain the single-particle energy barriers Ea = KeffV, allowing us to estimate the contributions of dipolar interactions to the single-particle effective magnetic anisotropy Keff. We have measured the dependence of TB with Hap in order to draw the transition contours of a H-T diagram. Two different regimes are found for the (TB-T0) ~H{\\lambda} dependence at low and high fields, that can be understood within a pure SPM relaxation-time (N\\'eel-Brown) landscape. The TB(H) data shows a crossover from {\\lambda} = 2/3 to {\\lambda} ~2 for applied magnetic fields of \\approx 550 Oe.

  19. The Origin of Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    is an aerodynamic drag force resisting motion of the tube through the external, field­free plasma. The mag­ netic of Sun's X­ray Emission: #12; Emerging Active Regions -- what we see at the photo­ sphere: (from Cauzzi buoyancy force, FT is the force due to magnetic tension (field line bending), FC represents the Coriolis

  20. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  1. Exceptional geometry and tensor fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Cederwall; Joakim Edlund; Anna Karlsson

    2013-03-21

    We present a tensor calculus for exceptional generalised geometry. Expressions for connections, torsion and curvature are given a unified formulation for different exceptional groups E_n(n). We then consider "tensor gauge fields" coupled to the exceptional generalised gravity. Many of the properties of forms on manifolds are carried over to these fields.

  2. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  3. Primordial Magnetic Fields in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain A. Brown

    2008-12-09

    Magnetic fields have been observed in galaxies, clusters of galaxies and probably in superclusters. While mechanisms exist to generate these in the late universe, it is possible that magnetic fields have existed since very early times. This thesis is concerned with methods to predict the form of such imprints. We review in detail a standard, linearised cosmology before introducing an electromagnetic field. We then consider the intrinsic statistics of the magnetic stresses in two ways, analytically and via static realisations. We construct the power spectra, some of which we present for the first time. At the one- and three-point level we find significant intrinsic non-Gaussianities. Finally we turn to the observable impacts a primordial magnetic field. Assuming coherence, the statistics of the source can be mapped onto the CMB in a simple manner. We demonstrate that our approach is valid by reproducing the signals for Gaussian power law fields on the microwave sky. [ABRIDGED

  4. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  5. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  6. Emergence of granular-sized magnetic bubbles through the solar atmosphere. I. Spectropolarimetric observations and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, Ada; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Van der Voort, Luc Rouppe [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Bellot Rubio, Luis R. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apdo. 3040, E-18080 Granada (Spain); De la Cruz Rodríguez, Jaime, E-mail: ada@astro.uio.no [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-02-01

    We study a granular-sized magnetic flux emergence event that occurred in NOAA 11024 in 2009 July. The observations were made with the CRISP spectropolarimeter at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope achieving a spatial resolution of 0.''14. Simultaneous full Stokes observations of the two photospheric Fe I lines at 630.2 nm and the chromospheric Ca II 854.2 nm line allow us to describe in detail the emergence process across the solar atmosphere. We report here on three-dimensional (3D) semi-spherical bubble events, where instead of simple magnetic footpoints, we observe complex semi-circular feet straddling a few granules. Several phenomena occur simultaneously, namely, abnormal granulation, separation of opposite-polarity legs, and brightenings at chromospheric heights. However, the most characteristic signature in these events is the observation of a dark bubble in filtergrams taken in the wings of the Ca II 854.2 nm line. There is a clear coincidence between the emergence of horizontal magnetic field patches and the formation of the dark bubble. We can infer how the bubble rises through the solar atmosphere as we see it progressing from the wings to the core of Ca II 854.2 nm. In the photosphere, the magnetic bubble shows mean upward Doppler velocities of 2 km s{sup –1} and expands at a horizontal speed of 4 km s{sup –1}. In about 3.5 minutes it travels some 1100 km to reach the mid chromosphere, implying an average ascent speed of 5.2 km s{sup –1}. The maximum separation attained by the magnetic legs is 6.''6. From an inversion of the observed Stokes spectra with the SIR code, we find maximum photospheric field strengths of 480 G and inclinations of nearly 90° in the magnetic bubble interior, along with temperature deficits of up to 250 K at log ? = –2 and above. To aid the interpretation of the observations, we carry out 3D numerical simulations of the evolution of a horizontal, untwisted magnetic flux sheet injected in the convection zone, using the Bifrost code. The computational domain spans from the upper convection zone to the lower corona. In the modeled chromosphere, the rising flux sheet produces a large, cool, magnetized bubble. We compare this bubble with the observed ones and find excellent agreement, including similar field strengths and velocity signals in the photosphere and chromosphere, temperature deficits, ascent speeds, expansion velocities, and lifetimes.

  7. Field assessment of an aluminum intensive passenger car

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuenca, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Ford Motor Co. has made a small batch of ``aluminum intensive vehicles`` (AIV), consisting of mid-size cars (Taurus/Sable) with all-aluminum bodies. The first twenty vehicles were made for internal evaluation at Ford, but the second batch of twenty has been placed on the hands of selected independent users, primarily automotive suppliers, for long term field assessment. The mass reduction achieved in the body of an AIV is shown, and compared with an equivalent standard steel body. Argonne obtained one of these vehicles last October; this is an assessment of the fuel consumption and other operational characteristics of this type of car to date.

  8. Probing the size of extra dimension with gravitational wave astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi; Norihiro Tanahashi; Takahiro Tanaka

    2011-12-28

    In Randall-Sundrum II (RS-II) braneworld model, it has been conjectured according to the AdS/CFT correspondence that brane-localized black hole (BH) larger than the bulk AdS curvature scale $\\ell$ cannot be static, and it is dual to a four dimensional BH emitting the Hawking radiation through some quantum fields. In this scenario, the number of the quantum field species is so large that this radiation changes the orbital evolution of a BH binary. We derived the correction to the gravitational waveform phase due to this effect and estimated the upper bounds on $\\ell$ by performing Fisher analyses. We found that DECIGO/BBO can put a stronger constraint than the current table-top result by detecting gravitational waves from small mass BH/BH and BH/neutron star (NS) binaries. Furthermore, DECIGO/BBO is expected to detect 10$^5$ BH/NS binaries per year. Taking this advantage, we found that DECIGO/BBO can actually measure $\\ell$ down to $\\ell=0.33 \\mu$m for 5 year observation if we know that binaries are circular a priori. This is about 40 times smaller than the upper bound obtained from the table-top experiment. On the other hand, when we take eccentricities into binary parameters, the detection limit weakens to $\\ell=1.5 \\mu$m due to strong degeneracies between $\\ell$ and eccentricities. We also derived the upper bound on $\\ell$ from the expected detection number of extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) with LISA and BH/NS binaries with DECIGO/BBO, extending the discussion made recently by McWilliams. We found that these less robust constraints are weaker than the ones from phase differences.

  9. Gap-Size Distribution Functions of a Random Sequential Adsorption Model of Segments on the Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. M. Araujo; A. Cadilhe

    2006-04-24

    We performed extensive simulations accompanied by a detailed study of a two-segment size random sequential model on the line. We followed the kinetics towards the jamming state, but we paid particular attention to the characterization of the jamming state structure. In particular, we studied the effect of the size ratio on the mean-gap size, the gap-size dispersion, gap-size skewness, and gap-size kurtosis at the jamming state. We also analyzed the above quantities for the four possible segment-to-segment gap types. We ranged the values of the size ratio from one to twenty. In the limit of a size ratio of one, one recovers the classical car-parking problem. We observed that at low size ratios the jamming state is constituted by short streaks of small and large segments, while at high values of the size ratio the jamming state structure is formed by long streaks of small segments separated by a single large segment. This view of the jamming state structure as a function of the size ratio is supported by the various measured quantities. The present work can help provide insight, for example, on how to minimize the interparticle distance or minimize fluctuations around the mean particle-to-particle distance.

  10. Reduced MHD in Nearly Potential Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Hank

    Reduced MHD in Nearly Potential Magnetic Fields H.R. Strauss Courant Institute of Mathematical that the magnetic field is close to a potential field. The potential field can have an arbitrary three dimensional. It is also the case in solar and stellar coronal magnetic fields, and in regions of the geomagnetic field

  11. ON THE SIZE, SHAPE, AND DENSITY OF DWARF PLANET MAKEMAKE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M. E.

    2013-04-10

    A recent stellar occultation by the dwarf planet Makemake provided an excellent opportunity to measure the size and shape of one of the largest objects in the Kuiper belt. The analysis of these results provided what were reported to be precise measurements of the lengths of the projected axes, the albedo, and even the density of Makemake, but these results were, in part, derived from qualitative arguments. We reanalyzed the occultation timing data using a quantitative statistical description, and, in general, found the previously reported results on the shape of Makemake to be unjustified. In our solution, in which we use our inference from photometric data that Makemake is being viewed nearly pole-on, we find a 1{sigma} upper limit to the projected elongation of Makemake of 1.02, with measured equatorial diameter of 1434 {+-} 14 km and a projected polar diameter of 1422 {+-} 14 km, yielding an albedo of 0.81{sup +0.01}{sub -0.02}. If we remove the external constraint on the pole position of Makemake, we find instead a 1{sigma} upper limit to the elongation of 1.06, with a measured equatorial diameter of 1434{sup +48}{sub -18} km and a projected polar diameter of 1420{sup +18}{sub -24} km, yielding an albedo of 0.81{sup +0.03}{sub -0.05}. Critically, we find that the reported measurement of the density of Makemake was based on the misapplication of the volatile retention models. A corrected analysis shows that the occultation measurements provide no meaningful constraint on the density of Makemake.

  12. A dosimetric study of small photon fields using polymer gel and Gafchromic EBT films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassani, Hossein; Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Zahmatkesh, Mohammad Hassan; Shirani, Kaveh

    2014-04-01

    The use of small field sizes is increasingly becoming important in radiotherapy particularly since the introduction of stereotactic radiosurgery and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques. The reliable measurement of delivered dose from such fields with conventional dosimeters, such as ionization chambers, is a challenging task. In this work, methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper polymer gel dosimeters are employed to measure dose in 3 dimensions. Field sizes of 5 × 5 mm{sup 2}, 10 × 10 mm{sup 2}, 20 × 20 mm{sup 2}, and 30 × 30 mm{sup 2} are investigated for a 6-MV x-rays. The results show an agreement with Gafchromic film, with some variation in measured doses near the edge of the fields, where the film data decrease more rapidly than the other methods. Dose penumbra widths obtained with gel dosimeters and Gafchormic film were generally in agreement with each other. The results of this work indicate that polymer gel dosimetry could be invaluable for the quantification of the 3-dimensional dose distribution in small field size.

  13. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, John A. (Ithaca, NY); Greenwald, Shlomo (Haifa, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  14. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Electromagnetic field limits set by the V-Curve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Hudson, Howard Gerald

    2014-07-01

    When emitters of electromagnetic energy are operated in the vicinity of sensitive components, the electric field at the component location must be kept below a certain level in order to prevent the component from being damaged, or in the case of electro-explosive devices, initiating. The V-Curve is a convenient way to set the electric field limit because it requires minimal information about the problem configuration. In this report we will discuss the basis for the V-Curve. We also consider deviations from the original V-Curve resulting from inductive versus capacitive antennas, increases in directivity gain for long antennas, decreases in input impedance when operating in a bounded region, and mismatches dictated by transmission line losses. In addition, we consider mitigating effects resulting from limited antenna sizes.

  16. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-04

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system’s quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  17. Near-field effects of asteroid impacts in deep water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gisler, Galen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gittings, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-06-11

    Our previous work has shown that ocean impacts of asteroids below 500 m in diameter do not produce devastating long-distance tsunamis. Nevertheless, a significant portion of the ocean lies close enough to land that near-field effects may prove to be the greatest danger from asteroid impacts in the ocean. Crown splashes and central jets that rise up many kilometres into the atmosphere can produce, upon their collapse, highly non-linear breaking waves that could devastate shorelines within a hundred kilometres of the impact site. We present illustrative calculations, in two and three dimensions, of such impacts for a range of asteroid sizes and impact angles. We find that, as for land impacts, the greatest dangers from oceanic impacts are the short-term near-field, and long-term atmospheric effects.

  18. Extracting magnetic cluster size and its distributions in advanced perpendicular recording media with shrinking grain size using small angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, Virat; Ikeda, Yoshihiro; Takano, Ken; Terris, Bruce D.; Hellwig, Olav; Wang, Tianhan; Wu, Benny; Graves, Catherine; Dürr, Hermann A.; Scherz, Andreas; Stöhr, Jo

    2015-05-18

    We analyze the magnetic cluster size (MCS) and magnetic cluster size distribution (MCSD) in a variety of perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) media designs using resonant small angle x-ray scattering at the Co L{sub 3} absorption edge. The different PMR media flavors considered here vary in grain size between 7.5 and 9.5?nm as well as in lateral inter-granular exchange strength, which is controlled via the segregant amount. While for high inter-granular exchange, the MCS increases rapidly for grain sizes below 8.5?nm, we show that for increased amount of segregant with less exchange the MCS remains relatively small, even for grain sizes of 7.5 and 8?nm. However, the MCSD still increases sharply when shrinking grains from 8 to 7.5?nm. We show evidence that recording performance such as signal-to-noise-ratio on the spin stand correlates well with the product of magnetic cluster size and magnetic cluster size distribution.

  19. Comparing Server Energy Use and Efficiency Using Small Sample Sizes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Henry C.; Qin, Yong; Price, Phillip N.

    2014-11-01

    This report documents a demonstration that compared the energy consumption and efficiency of a limited sample size of server-type IT equipment from different manufacturers by measuring power at the server power supply power cords. The results are specific to the equipment and methods used. However, it is hoped that those responsible for IT equipment selection can used the methods described to choose models that optimize energy use efficiency. The demonstration was conducted in a data center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. It was performed with five servers of similar mechanical and electronic specifications; three from Intel and one each from Dell and Supermicro. Server IT equipment is constructed using commodity components, server manufacturer-designed assemblies, and control systems. Server compute efficiency is constrained by the commodity component specifications and integration requirements. The design freedom, outside of the commodity component constraints, provides room for the manufacturer to offer a product with competitive efficiency that meets market needs at a compelling price. A goal of the demonstration was to compare and quantify the server efficiency for three different brands. The efficiency is defined as the average compute rate (computations per unit of time) divided by the average energy consumption rate. The research team used an industry standard benchmark software package to provide a repeatable software load to obtain the compute rate and provide a variety of power consumption levels. Energy use when the servers were in an idle state (not providing computing work) were also measured. At high server compute loads, all brands, using the same key components (processors and memory), had similar results; therefore, from these results, it could not be concluded that one brand is more efficient than the other brands. The test results show that the power consumption variability caused by the key components as a group is similar to all other components as a group. However, some differences were observed. The Supermicro server used 27 percent more power at idle compared to the other brands. The Intel server had a power supply control feature called cold redundancy, and the data suggest that cold redundancy can provide energy savings at low power levels. Test and evaluation methods that might be used by others having limited resources for IT equipment evaluation are explained in the report.

  20. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  1. Electric fields and quantum wormholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalit Engelhardt; Ben Freivogel; Nabil Iqbal

    2015-05-24

    Electric fields can thread a classical Einstein-Rosen bridge. Maldacena and Susskind have recently suggested that in a theory of dynamical gravity the entanglement of ordinary perturbative quanta should be viewed as creating a quantum version of an Einstein-Rosen bridge between the particles, or a "quantum wormhole". We demonstrate within low-energy effective field theory that there is a precise sense in which electric fields can also thread such quantum wormholes. We define a non-perturbative "wormhole susceptibility" that measures the ease of passing an electric field through any sort of wormhole. The susceptibility of a quantum wormhole is suppressed by powers of the U(1) gauge coupling relative to that for a classical wormhole but can be made numerically equal with a sufficiently large amount of entangled matter.

  2. Field ionization from carbon nanofibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeoti, Bosun J

    2008-01-01

    The Micro Gas Analyzer project aims to develop power-efficient, high resolution, high sensitivity, portable and real-time gas sensors. We developed a field ionizer array based on gated CNTs. Arrays of CNTs are used because ...

  3. Quantum Field Theory of Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Gripaios; Dave Sutherland

    2015-04-23

    The quantum theory of fields is largely based on studying perturbations around non-interacting, or free, field theories, which correspond to a collection of quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillators. The quantum theory of an ordinary fluid is `freer', in the sense that the non-interacting theory also contains an infinite collection of quantum-mechanical free particles, corresponding to vortex modes. By computing a variety of correlation functions at tree- and loop-level, we give evidence that a quantum perfect fluid can be consistently formulated as a low-energy, effective field theory. We speculate that the quantum behaviour is radically different to both classical fluids and quantum fields, with interesting physical consequences for fluids in the low temperature regime.

  4. Reverse Engineering Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Oeckl

    2012-10-02

    An approach to the foundations of quantum theory is advertised that proceeds by "reverse engineering" quantum field theory. As a concrete instance of this approach, the general boundary formulation of quantum theory is outlined.

  5. New Composite Thermoelectric Materials for Macro-size Applications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dresselhaus, Mildred [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2010-01-08

    A review will be given of several important recent advances in both thermoelectrics research and industrial thermoelectric applications, which have attracted much attention, increasing incentives for developing advanced materials appropriate for large-scale applications of thermoelectric devices. One promising strategy is the development of materials with a dense packing of random nanostructures as a route for the sacle-up of thermoelectrics applications. The concepts involved in designing composite materials containing nanostructures for thermoelectric applications will be discussed in general terms. Specific application is made to the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanocomposite system for use in power generation. Also emphasized are the scientific advantages of the nanocomposite approach for the simultaneous increase in the power factor and decrease of the thermal conductivity, along with the practical advantages of having bulk samples for property measurements and device applications. A straightforward path is identified for the scale-up of thermoelectric materials synthesis containing nanostructured constituents for use in thermoelectric applications. We end with some vision of where the field of thermoelectrics is now heading.

  6. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  7. Model for a dune field with exposed water table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Cesar M. de M. Luna; Eric J. R. Parteli; Hans J. Herrmann

    2011-09-01

    Aeolian transport in coastal areas can be significantly affected by the presence of an exposed water table. In some dune fields, such as in Len\\c{c}\\'ois Maranhenses, northeastern Brazil, the water table oscillates in response to seasonal changes of rainfall and rates of evapotranspiration, rising above the ground during the wet season and sinking below in the dry period. A quantitative understanding of dune mobility in an environment with varying groundwater level is essential for coastal management as well as for the study of long-term evolution of many dune fields. Here we apply a model for aeolian dunes to study the genesis of coastal dune fields in presence of an oscillating water table. We find that the morphology of the field depends on the time cycle, $T_{\\mathrm{w}}$, of the water table and the maximum height, $H_{\\mathrm{w}}$, of its oscillation. Our calculations show that long chains of barchanoids alternating with interdune ponds such as found at Len\\c{c}\\'ois Maranhenses arise when $T_{\\mathrm{w}}$ is of the order of the dune turnover time, whereas $H_{\\mathrm{w}}$ dictates the growth rate of dune height with distance downwind. We reproduce quantitatively the morphology and size of dunes at Len\\c{c}\\'ois Maranhenses, as well as the total relative area between dunes.

  8. A knife-edge array field emission cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B.

    1994-08-01

    many cathode applications require a new type of cathode that is able to produce short pulsed electron beams at high emission current. Gated field emitter arrays of micrometer size are recognized as candidates to meet this need and have become the research focus of vacuum microelectronics. Existing fabrication methods produce emitters that are limited either in frequency response or in current emission. One reason is that the structure of these emitters are not sufficiently optimized. In this study, the author investigated the factors that affect the performance of field emitters. An optimum emitter structure, the knife-edge field emitter array, was developed from the analysis. Large field enhancement factor, large effective emission area, and small emitter capacitance are the advantages of the structure. The author next explored various options of fabricating the knife-edge emitter structure. He proposed a unique thin film process procedure and developed the fabrication techniques to build the emitters on (110) silicon wafers. Data from the initial cathode tests showed very low onset voltages and Fowler-Nordheim type emission. Emission simulation based on the fabricated emitter structure indicated that the knife-edge emitter arrays have the potential to produce high performance in modulation frequency and current emission. Several fabrication issues that await further development are discussed and possible solutions are suggested.

  9. Trip report for field visit to Fayetteville Shale gas wells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-09-30

    This report describes a visit to several gas well sites in the Fayetteville Shale on August 9, 2007. I met with George Sheffer, Desoto Field Manager for SEECO, Inc. (a large gas producer in Arkansas). We talked in his Conway, Arkansas, office for an hour and a half about the processes and technologies that SEECO uses. We then drove into the field to some of SEECO's properties to see first-hand what the well sites looked like. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) made several funding awards under a program called Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil (LINGO). One of the projects that received an award is 'Probabilistic Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems'. The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has the lead on the project, and Argonne National Laboratory is a partner. The goal of the project is to develop a Web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of gas reserves in sensitive areas. The project focuses on a large new natural gas field called the Fayetteville Shale. Part of the project involves learning how the natural gas operators do business in the area and the technologies they employ. The field trip on August 9 provided an opportunity to do that.

  10. Geological input to reservoir simulation, Champion Field, offshore Brunei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, R.; Salahudin, S.; Ho, T.C.

    1994-07-01

    Brunei Shell Petroleum's giant Champion field is in a mature stage of development with about 23 yr of production history to date. The field comprises a complex sequence of Miocene shallow marine and deltaic layered clastic reservoirs cut by numerous growth faults. This study was aimed at providing a quantified estimate of the effect of lateral and vertical discontinuities within the I and J reservoirs on the recovery for both depletion drive and in a waterflood, with a view to identifying the optimal method of completing the development of the oil reserves in this area. Geological input to the ECLIPSE simulator was aimed at quantifying two key parameters: (1) STOIIP connected to the well bore and (2) permeability contrast. Connected STOIIP is a function of the domain size of interconnected sand bodies, and this parameter was quantified by the use of detailed sedimentology resulting in sand-body facies maps for each reservoir sublayer. Permeability contrast was quantified by using a wireline-log based algorithm, calibrated against core data, which improved the existing accuracy of permeability estimates in this part of the field. Results of simulation runs illustrate the importance of quantifying geologic heterogeneity and provide valuable information for future field development planning.

  11. A Hubble space telescope search for a sub-Earth-sized exoplanet in the GJ 436 system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Kevin B. [NASA Sagan Fellow. (United States); Bean, Jacob L.; Fabrycky, Daniel; Kreidberg, Laura, E-mail: kbs@uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    The detection of small planets orbiting nearby stars is an important step toward the identification of Earth twins. In previous work using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we found evidence to support at least one sub-Earth-sized exoplanet orbiting the nearby mid-M dwarf star GJ 436. As a follow up, here we used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to investigate the existence of one of these candidate planets, UCF-1.01, by searching for two transit signals as it passed in front of its host star. Interpretation of the data hinges critically on correctly modeling and removing the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument systematics from the light curves. Building on previous HST work, we demonstrate that WFC3 analyses need to explore the use of a quadratic function to fit a visit-long time-dependent systematic. This is important for establishing absolute transit and eclipse depths in the white light curves of all transiting systems. The work presented here exemplifies this point by putatively detecting the primary transit of UCF-1.01 with the use of a linear trend. However, using a quadratic trend, we achieve a better fit to the white light curves and a reduced transit depth that is inconsistent with previous Spitzer measurements. Furthermore, quadratic trends with or without a transit model component produce comparable fits to the available data. Using extant WFC3 transit light curves for GJ 436b, we further validate the quadratic model component by achieving photon-limited model fit residuals and consistent transit depths over multiple epochs. We conclude that, when we fit for a quadratic trend, our new data contradict the prediction of a sub-Earth-sized planet orbiting GJ 436 with the size, period, and ephemeris posited from the Spitzer data by a margin of 3.1?.

  12. Direct Characterization of Airborne Particles Associated with Arsenic-rich Mine Tailings: Particle Size Mineralogy and Texture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Corriveau; H Jamieson; M Parsons; J Campbell; A Lanzirotti

    2011-12-31

    Windblown and vehicle-raised dust from unvegetated mine tailings can be a human health risk. Airborne particles from As-rich abandoned Au mine tailings from Nova Scotia, Canada have been characterized in terms of particle size, As concentration, As oxidation state, mineral species and texture. Samples were collected in seven aerodynamically fractionated size ranges (0.5-16 {micro}m) using a cascade impactor deployed at three tailings fields. All three sites are used for recreational activities and off-road vehicles were racing on the tailings at two mines during sample collection. Total concentrations of As in the <8 {micro}m fraction varied from 65 to 1040 ng/m{sup 3} of air as measured by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. The same samples were analysed by synchrotron-based microfocused X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy ({micro}XANES) and X-ray diffraction ({micro}XRD) and found to contain multiple As-bearing mineral species, including Fe-As weathering products. The As species present in the dust were similar to those observed in the near-surface tailings. The action of vehicles on the tailings surface may disaggregate material cemented with Fe arsenate and contribute additional fine-grained As-rich particles to airborne dust. Results from this study can be used to help assess the potential human health risks associated with exposure to airborne particles from mine tailings.

  13. The Size-Ramsey Number of Trees P.E. Haxell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

    The Size-Ramsey Number of Trees P.E. Haxell1 and Y. Kohayakawa2 1Department of Pure Mathematics-colouring of the edges of G. The size-Ramsey number re(H) of a graph H is the smallest possible number in Ramsey theory: we shall study the size-Ramsey number of trees. Before we proceed, let us introduce some

  14. k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Ave. Bayesian Score Results -Child -Sample Size 500

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Laura E.

    SC k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Bayesian Score (BDeu) Ave. Bayesian Score Results - Child - Sample Size 500 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std.Dev. -130 -120 -110 -100 -90 MMHC OR1 k=5 OR1 k=10 OR1 k=20 OR2 k=5 - Child5 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std.Dev. -260 -240 -220 -200 -180 * MMHC OR1 k=5 OR1 k=10 OR1

  15. Soot particle size measurements in laminar premixed ethylene flames with laser-induced incandescence and scanning mobility particle sizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Chung-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Size Measurements in Laminar Premixed Ethylene Flames withof soot aggregate sampled from a laminar acetyleneSize Measurements in Laminar Premixed Ethylene Flames with

  16. Canonical quantization of substrate-less fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerold Gründler

    2015-09-12

    An inconsistency of quantum field theory, regarding the sign of the vacuum energy of elementary fields, is pointed out. An improved law for the canonical quantization of fields is presented, which is based on the distinction between fields which have material substrates, and substrate-less fields. Remarkably, the improved quantization method removes not only the inconsistency of quantum field theory, but at the same time solves the (old) cosmological constant problem for all fields of the standard model of elementary particles, but not for the hypothetical inflaton fields, without compromising any of the achievements of established quantum field theory.

  17. Finite Temperature Field Theory Joe Schindler 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    energy spectrum. #12;Field Thermodynamics Example For a free boson field at thermal equilibrium, calculate energy spectrum. #12;Field Thermodynamics Example For a free boson field at thermal equilibriumFinite Temperature Field Theory Joe Schindler 2015 #12;Part 1: Basic Finite Temp Methods #12

  18. Distribution Effectiveness and Impacts on Equipment Sizing for Residential Thermal Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 LBNL-43724 Distribution Effectiveness and Impacts on Equipment Sizing for Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Walker, I., Sherman, M., and Siegel, J. Environmental Energy Technologies Division Energy

  19. Wave-Climate Risk Analysis: Predicting the Size, Frequency and Duration of Large Wave Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobey, Rodney

    2002-01-01

    2001, “Wave Climate Risk Analysis. ” Winslow, Kyle, Ph.D. in2.28.2001 Wave-Climate Risk Analysis: Predicting the Size,

  20. How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    explosion pretreatment of wood: effect of chip size, acid,In: Soltes, E.J. (Ed. ), Wood and Agriculture Residues –D. , Wegener, G. , 1984. Wood: Chemistry, Ultrastructure,

  1. The island rule and the evolution of body size in the deep sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Alison G.

    & Handley, 2002). Here we test the island rule of body-size evolution in a non- island system, the deep sea

  2. How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Klass, D.L. , 1998. Biomass for Renewable Energy, Fuels andof woody biomass size reduction for energy production. In:of woody biomass for biofuel production: Energy efficiency,

  3. Aerosol measurements at a high-elevation site: composition, size, and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Beth

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, single particle composition and size distributions at a high-elevation research site from March 2011 are presented.

  4. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Electricity Generation from CHP by Building Types, Referenceimpact of mid-sized building CHP systems on CO 2 emissions.Electricity Generation from CHP by Building Types, Reference

  5. Modelling credit risk of small and medium sized enterprises using transactional, accounting and market variables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yigui

    2012-06-26

    This thesis comprehensively explores the credit risk of Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) using transactional characteristics, financial variables and market information. It contributes SMEs credit risk modelling ...

  6. Ultrasonic processor reduces drill-cuttings size and eliminates subsea mounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaddy, D.E.

    1997-10-06

    Drill cuttings size reduction using ultrasonics eliminated a subsea clean-up and significantly reduced the environmental impact in a North Sea drilling project. Reduction in cuttings size allows for a wider areal dispersion when released into the ocean because they are held in suspension longer than larger sizes. Thus, ocean currents carry the smaller cuttings farther away from the well template, leaving a much wider footprint than larger cuttings sizes. This eliminates the pile-up of cuttings that otherwise would contaminate and harm the marine habitat.

  7. The influence of size, shape, and surface coating on the stability of aqueous nanoparticle suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulvihill, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Size, Shape, and Surface Coating on the Stability of Aqueoussize, shape, and surface coating of cadmium selenideinstability of the ligand coatings, which varied directly

  8. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afed feed families |fff |

  9. Wide field of view telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-01-15

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  10. Solid phase microextraction field kit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-08-16

    A field kit for the collection, isolation and concentration of trace amounts of high explosives (HE), biological weapons (BW) and chemical weapons (CW) residues in air, soil, vegetation, swipe, and liquid samples. The field kit includes a number of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) fiber and syringe assemblies in a hermetically sealed transportation container or tubes which includes a sampling port, a number of extra SPME fiber and syringe assemblies, the fiber and syringe assemblies including a protective cap for the fiber, and an extractor for the protective cap, along with other items including spare parts, protective glove, and an instruction manual, all located in an airtight container.

  11. Negative Energies and Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2008-11-20

    The assumption that the vacuum is the minimum energy state, invariant under unitary transformations, is fundamental to quantum field theory. However, the assertion that the conservation of charge implies that the equal time commutator of the charge density and its time derivative vanish for two spatially separated points is inconsistent with the requirement that the vacuum be the lowest energy state. Yet, for quantum field theory to be gauge invariant, this commutator must vanish. This essay explores how this conundrum is resolved in quantum electrodynamics.

  12. field | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual Conference on FossilFateOctober 2013field | National

  13. "Cold Venal Advocate": Henry Fielding's lawyers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joshua R

    2013-02-22

    Henry Fielding wrote frequently and harshly about lawyers. While many commentators have noted Fielding's criticism of lawyers and studied Fielding's concern with legal institutions generally, none have yet undertaken a ...

  14. GROWTH OF A LOCALIZED SEED MAGNETIC FIELD IN A TURBULENT MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Jungyeon; Yoo, Hyunju

    2012-11-10

    Turbulence dynamo deals with the amplification of a seed magnetic field in a turbulent medium and has been studied mostly for uniform or spatially homogeneous seed magnetic fields. However, some astrophysical processes (e.g., jets from active galaxies, galactic winds, or ram-pressure stripping in galaxy clusters) can provide localized seed magnetic fields. In this paper, we numerically study amplification of localized seed magnetic fields in a turbulent medium. Throughout the paper, we assume that the driving scale of turbulence is comparable to the size of the system. Our findings are as follows. First, turbulence can amplify a localized seed magnetic field very efficiently. The growth rate of magnetic energy density is as high as that for a uniform seed magnetic field. This result implies that magnetic field ejected from an astrophysical object can be a viable source of a magnetic field in a cluster. Second, the localized seed magnetic field disperses and fills the whole system very fast. If turbulence in a system (e.g., a galaxy cluster or a filament) is driven at large scales, we expect that it takes a few large-eddy turnover times for the magnetic field to fill the whole system. Third, growth and turbulence diffusion of a localized seed magnetic field are also fast in high magnetic Prandtl number turbulence. Fourth, even in decaying turbulence, a localized seed magnetic field can ultimately fill the whole system. Although the dispersal rate of the magnetic field is not fast in purely decaying turbulence, it can be enhanced by an additional forcing.

  15. Nevada Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Nevada Field Office Nevada Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  16. Sandia Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Sandia Field Office Sandia Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  17. Livermore Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Livermore Field Office Livermore Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year...

  18. Pantex Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Pantex Field Office Pantex Field Office FY12 Semi Annual Report FY11 Year End...

  19. Size effects on the onset of plastic deformation during nanoindentation of thin films and patterned lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    Size effects on the onset of plastic deformation during nanoindentation of thin films and patterned; accepted 13 August 2003 Plastic deformation of materials exhibits a strong size dependence when, particularly the transition from elastic to plastic deformation and the early stages of plastic deformation. We

  20. Buffer Sizing for Minimum Energy-Delay Product by Using an Approximating Polynomial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Buffer Sizing for Minimum Energy-Delay Product by Using an Approximating Polynomial Chang Woo Kang to derive sizing rules for buffered chains, which optimize the overall energy-delay product. Categories result in a poor solution in terms of the energy-delay product. The focus of this work is on multi

  1. Quantitative Reflectance Spectra of Solid Powders as a Function of Particle Size

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Ertel, Alyssa B.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2015-05-19

    We have recently developed vetted methods for obtaining quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra using a commercial integrating sphere. In this paper, the effects of particle size on the spectral properties are analyzed for several samples such as ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and sodium sulfate as well as one organic compound, lactose. We prepared multiple size fractions for each sample and confirmed the mean sizes using optical microscopy. Most species displayed a wide range of spectral behavior depending on the mean particle size. General trends of reflectance vs. particle size are observed such as increased albedo for smaller particles: for mostmore »wavelengths, the reflectivity drops with increased size, sometimes displaying a factor of 4 or more drop in reflectivity along with a loss of spectral contrast. In the longwave infrared, several species with symmetric anions or cations exhibited reststrahlen features whose amplitude was nearly invariant with particle size, at least for intermediate- and large-sized sample fractions; that is, > ~150 microns. Trends of other types of bands (Christiansen minima, transparency features) are also investigated as well as quantitative analysis of the observed relationship between reflectance vs. particle diameter.« less

  2. An interpretation of size-scale plasticity in geometrically confined systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    An interpretation of size-scale plasticity in geometrically confined systems H. D. Espinosa* , S been identified in both polycrystalline submicron thin films and single crystal micro pillars. The size characteristic dimension. The simulations reveal that two key concepts are at the root of the observed plasticity

  3. On the Distribution of Fragment Sizes in the Fragmentation of Polymer Chains.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hathorn, Bryan C.

    On the Distribution of Fragment Sizes in the Fragmentation of Polymer Chains. B.C. Hathorn, a B of a polymer is calcu­ lated using a simple model based on Transition State Theory to describe the distribution promotes completely random scission, with equal probability distribution for all possible fragment sizes. 1

  4. The size distribution of conspeci c populations: the peoples of New Guinea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The size distribution of conspeci c populations: the peoples of New Guinea Vojtech Novotny1, Department of Biology, Brafova 7, 701 03 Ostrava, Czech Republic The size distribution of the language analogous to the resource division models of species abun- dance distribution in ecological communities

  5. Determination of pore-size distribution in low-dielectric thin films D. W. Gidleya)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gidley, David

    -size distribution on pore shape/dimensionality and sample temperature is predicted using a simple quantum mechanicalDetermination of pore-size distribution in low-dielectric thin films D. W. Gidleya) and W. E. Frieze Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 T. L. Dull, J. Sun, and A

  6. %POWER: A SIMPLE MACRO FOR POWER AND SAMPLE SIZE CALCULATIONS Kristin R. Latour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friendly, Michael

    %POWER: A SIMPLE MACRO FOR POWER AND SAMPLE SIZE CALCULATIONS Kristin R. Latour Abstract Statisticians often desire to investigate the power of statistical effect tests, or to estimate the sample size required to provide a significant effect test. This paper describes the macro POWER which provides

  7. Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamhane, Ajit C.

    Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose This paper addresses the problem of power and sample size calculation for a stepwise multiple test procedure of a compound. A general expression for the power of this procedure is derived. It is used to find the minimum

  8. Sexual size dimorphism in birds Tama s Sze kely, Terje Lislevand, and Jordi Figuerola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figuerola, Jordi

    CHAPTER 3 Sexual size dimorphism in birds Tama´ s Sze´ kely, Terje Lislevand, and Jordi Figuerola always larger and stronger.'' Birds exhibit a modest range of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) relative ``The males of many birds are larger than the females, and this no doubt is the result of the advantage

  9. Sexual size dimorphism in mammals Patrik Lindenfors, John L. Gittleman, and Kate E. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enquist, Magnus

    CHAPTER 2 Sexual size dimorphism in mammals Patrik Lindenfors, John L. Gittleman, and Kate E. Jones 2.1 Introduction In this chapter we review the extent and direction of sexual size dimorphism­male competition as a driver of male-biased sexual dimorphism in mammals. Since theoretical models predict

  10. Application to EDGE Automatic Tuning of the Step size in WLMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is essential for high receiver performance. The Wiener LMS (WLMS) algorithm is an efficient estimator LMS (VSWLMS) scheme for adaptive tuning of the WLMS design parameters. The Wiener LMS is here combined with variable step-size schemes designed for LMS. The variable step-size LMS is a special case of the VSWLMS

  11. A Generalized Formula for Converting Chi-Square Tests to Effect Sizes for Meta-Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael S.

    A Generalized Formula for Converting Chi-Square Tests to Effect Sizes for Meta-Analysis Michael S Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, United States of America Abstract The common formula of the effect size. A corrected formula is provided. Citation: Rosenberg MS (2010) A Generalized Formula

  12. The Binary Energy Harvesting Channel with a Unit-Sized Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulukus, Sennur

    by the exogenous energy harvesting process, energy storage capacity of the battery, and the past channel inputs by an external energy harvesting process, the size of the battery, and the previous channel inputs. We consider1 The Binary Energy Harvesting Channel with a Unit-Sized Battery Kaya Tutuncuoglu1 , Omur Ozel2

  13. Ranking Bias in Deep Web Size Estimation Using Capture Recapture Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jianguo

    Ranking Bias in Deep Web Size Estimation Using Capture Recapture Method Jianguo Lu Preprint submitted to Elsevier March 12, 2010 #12;Ranking Bias in Deep Web Size Estimation Using Capture Recapture, Canada. email: jlu@uwindsor.ca Abstract Many deep web data sources are ranked data sources, i

  14. A methodology for optimal sizing of autonomous hybrid PV/wind system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A methodology for optimal sizing of autonomous hybrid PV/wind system S. Diaf 1* , D. Diaf2 , M paper presents a methodology to perform the optimal sizing of an autonomous hybrid PV/wind system system reliability requirements, with the lowest value of levelised cost of energy. Modelling a hybrid PV/wind

  15. Effect of solar wind pressure pulses on the size and strength of the auroral oval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Effect of solar wind pressure pulses on the size and strength of the auroral oval A. Boudouridis, E. [1] It has recently been found that solar wind dynamic pressure changes can dramatically affect solar wind dynamic pressure increases on the location, size, and intensity of the auroral oval using

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Long-term dynamics of household size and their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    impact Á Household size Á IPHoG Á Population Á Sustainable development Introduction The impacts of human the impacts of increased housing present a threat to sustainability even when population growth slows. Future research addressing environmental impacts of declining household size could use an adapted IPAT model, I

  17. Plastic Deformation of Single Nanometer-Sized Crystals Litao Sun,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    Plastic Deformation of Single Nanometer-Sized Crystals Litao Sun,1,2 Arkady V. Krasheninnikov,3 observations of the plastic deformation of individual nanometer- sized Au, Pt, W, and Mo crystals. Specifically. The correlation with atomistic simulations shows that the observed slow plastic deformation is due to dislocation

  18. The Impact of Irradiance Time Behaviors on Inverter Sizing and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    The Impact of Irradiance Time Behaviors on Inverter Sizing and Design Song Chen Peng Li David Brady, Massachusetts chen.son@husky.neu.edu Abstract--This paper investigates the time behavior of over- irradiance of inverters is also proposed. Keywords ­ Inverter sizing, short-interval irradiance data, inverter protection

  19. Reply to "Comment on `Minimal size of a barchan dune' " E. J. R. Parteli,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, Philippe

    Reply to "Comment on `Minimal size of a barchan dune' " E. J. R. Parteli,1 O. Durán,2 and H. J. Rev. E 75, 011301 2007 . We show that the equations of the dune model used in our calcula- tions are self-consistent and effectively lead to a dependence of the minimal dune size on the wind speed through

  20. ONLINE AND SIZE ANTI-RAMSEY NUMBERS MARIA AXENOVICH, KOLJA KNAUER, JUDITH STUMPP, AND TORSTEN UECKERDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felsner, Stefan

    ONLINE AND SIZE ANTI-RAMSEY NUMBERS MARIA AXENOVICH, KOLJA KNAUER, JUDITH STUMPP, AND TORSTEN of a graph H is the size anti-Ramsey number ARs(H) of H. This number in offline and online setting is investigated here. Keywords: Coloring, anti-Ramsey, rainbow, totally multicolored, proper coloring, online