National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for field size mmboe

  1. Diode magnetic-field influence on radiographic spot size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A. Jr.

    2012-09-04

    Flash radiography of hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a well-known diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories. The Dual-Axis Radiography for Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos was developed for flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) produce the bremsstrahlung radiographic source spots for orthogonal views of each experiment ('hydrotest'). The 2-kA, 20-MeV Axis-I LIA creates a single 60-ns radiography pulse. For time resolution of the hydrotest dynamics, the 1.7-kA, 16.5-MeV Axis-II LIA creates up to four radiography pulses by slicing them out of a longer pulse that has a 1.6-{micro}s flattop. Both axes now routinely produce radiographic source spot sizes having full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) less than 1 mm. To further improve on the radiographic resolution, one must consider the major factors influencing the spot size: (1) Beam convergence at the final focus; (2) Beam emittance; (3) Beam canonical angular momentum; (4) Beam-motion blur; and (5) Beam-target interactions. Beam emittance growth and motion in the accelerators have been addressed by careful tuning. Defocusing by beam-target interactions has been minimized through tuning of the final focus solenoid for optimum convergence and other means. Finally, the beam canonical angular momentum is minimized by using a 'shielded source' of electrons. An ideal shielded source creates the beam in a region where the axial magnetic field is zero, thus the canonical momentum zero, since the beam is born with no mechanical angular momentum. It then follows from Busch's conservation theorem that the canonical angular momentum is minimized at the target, at least in principal. In the DARHT accelerators, the axial magnetic field at the cathode is minmized by using a 'bucking coil' solenoid with reverse polarity to cancel out whatever solenoidal beam transport field exists there. This is imperfect in practice, because of radial variation of the total field across the cathode surface, solenoid misalignments, and long-term variability of solenoid fields for given currents. Therefore, it is useful to quantify the relative importance of canonical momentum in determining the focal spot, and to establish a systematic methodology for tuning the bucking coils for minimum spot size. That is the purpose of this article. Section II provides a theoretical foundation for understanding the relative importance of the canonical momentum. Section III describes the results of simulations used to quantify beam parameters, including the momentum, for each of the accelerators. Section IV compares the two accelerators, especially with respect to mis-tuned bucking coils. Finally, Section IV concludes with a methodology for optimizing the bucking coil settings.

  2. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles, P. H. Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.; Cranmer-Sargison, G.; Thwaites, D. I.; Kairn, T.; Knight, R. T.; Kenny, J.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. Methods: A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated into additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. Results: According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ?15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ?12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ?12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ?8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ?12 mm were considered to be theoretically very small for 6 MV beams. Conclusions: Extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as output factor measurement for each field size setting and also very precise detector alignment is required at field sizes at least ?12 mm and more conservatively?15 mm for 6 MV beams. These recommendations should be applied in addition to all the usual considerations for small field dosimetry, including careful detector selection.

  3. Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Wham, Robert M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1988-01-01

    A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

  4. SU-E-T-299: Small Fields Profiles Correction Through Detectors Spatial Response Functions and Field Size Dependence Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filipuzzi, M; Garrigo, E; Venencia, C; Germanier, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate the spatial response function of various radiation detectors, to evaluate the dependence on the field size and to analyze the small fields profiles corrections by deconvolution techniques. Methods: Crossline profiles were measured on a Novalis Tx 6MV beam with a HDMLC. The configuration setup was SSD=100cm and depth=5cm. Five fields were studied (200×200mm2,100×100mm2, 20×20mm2, 10×10mm2and 5×5mm2) and measured were made with passive detectors (EBT3 radiochromic films and TLD700 thermoluminescent detectors), ionization chambers (PTW30013, PTW31003, CC04 and PTW31016) and diodes (PTW60012 and IBA SFD). The results of passive detectors were adopted as the actual beam profile. To calculate the detectors kernels, modeled by Gaussian functions, an iterative process based on a least squares criterion was used. The deconvolutions of the measured profiles were calculated with the Richardson-Lucy method. Results: The profiles of the passive detectors corresponded with a difference in the penumbra less than 0.1mm. Both diodes resolve the profiles with an overestimation of the penumbra smaller than 0.2mm. For the other detectors, response functions were calculated and resulted in Gaussian functions with a standard deviation approximate to the radius of the detector in study (with a variation less than 3%). The corrected profiles resolve the penumbra with less than 1% error. Major discrepancies were observed for cases in extreme conditions (PTW31003 and 5×5mm2 field size). Conclusion: This work concludes that the response function of a radiation detector is independent on the field size, even for small radiation beams. The profiles correction, using deconvolution techniques and response functions of standard deviation equal to the radius of the detector, gives penumbra values with less than 1% difference to the real profile. The implementation of this technique allows estimating the real profile, freeing from the effects of the detector used for the acquisition.

  5. SU-E-T-98: Dependence of Radiotherapy Couch Transmission Factors On Field Size and Couch-Isocenter Distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benhabib, S; Duan, J; Wu, X; Cardan, R; Shen, S; Huang, M; Popple, R; Brezovich, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric effect of the treatment couch is non-negligible in today's radiotherapy treatment. To accurately include couch in dose calculation, we investigated the dependence of couch transmission factors on field size and couch-isocenter distance. Methods: Couch transmission factors for Varian Exact Couch were determined by taking the ratios of ionization of a posterior-anterior beam with and without the couch in the beam path. Measurements were performed at the isocenter using a PTW cylindrical ionization chamber (Model 31030) with an Aluminum buildup cap of 1.1 cm thick for the 6 MV photon beam. Ionization readings for beam sizes ranging from 2 × 2 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2 were taken. Transmission factors for couch-isocenter distances ranging from 3 cm to 20 cm were also investigated. Results: The couch transmission factors increased with the field size approximately in an exponential manner. For the field sizes that we tested, the transmission factor ranged from 0.976 to 0.992 for couch-isocenter distance of 3 cm. The transmission factor was also monotonically dependent on couch-isocenter separation distance, but in a lighter magnitude. For the tested couch heights, the transmission factor ranged from 0.974 – 0.972 for 2 × 2 cm2 field size and 0.992 – 0.986 for 40 × 40 cm2 field size. The dependence on couch-isocenter distance is stronger for larger field size. Conclusions: The transmission factor of a radiotherapy treatment couch increases with field size of the radiation beam and its distance from the isocenter. Such characterization of the couch transmission factor helps improve the accuracy of couch modeling for radiotherapy treatment planning.

  6. Field investigation of the relationship between battery size and PV system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, J.; Kratochvil, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harrington, S. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Four photovoltaic-powered lighting systems were installed in a National Forest Service campground in June of 1991. These systems have identical arrays, loads and charge controllers. The only difference was in the rated capacity of the battery bank for each system. The battery banks all use the same basic battery as a building block with the four systems utilizing either one battery, two batteries, three batteries or four batteries. The purpose of the experiment is to examine the effect of the various battery sizes on the ability of the system to charge the battery, energy available to the load, and battery lifetime. Results show an important trend in system performance concerning the impact of charge controllers on the relation between array size and battery size which results in an inability to achieve the days of battery storage originally designed for.

  7. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richters, Dorothee; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  8. Influence of compensator thickness, field size, and off-axis distance on the effective attenuation coefficient of a cerrobend compensator for intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghparast, Abbas; Hashemi, Bijan; Eivazi, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be performed by using compensators. To make a compensator for an IMRT practice, it is required to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient (?{sub eff}) of its material, which is affected by various factors. We studied the effect of the variation of the most important factors on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} of the cerrobend compensator for 6-MV photon beams, including the field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis distance. Experimental measurements were carried out at 100 cm source-to-surface distance and 10 cm depth for the 6-MV photon beams of an Elekta linac using various field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis settings. The field sizes investigated ranged from 4 × 4 to 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} and the cerrobend compensator thicknesses from 0.5–6 cm. For a fixed compensator thickness, variation of the ?{sub eff} with the field size ranged from 3.7–6.8%, with the highest value attributed to the largest compensator thickness. At the reference field size of 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}, the ?{sub eff} varied by 16.5% when the compensator thickness was increased from 0.5–6 cm. However, the variation of the ?{sub eff} with the off-axis distance was only 0.99% at this field size, whereas for the largest field size, it was more significant. Our results indicated that the compensator thickness and field size have the most significant effect on the calculation of the compensator ?{sub eff} for the 6-MV photon beam. Therefore, it is recommended to consider these parameters when calculating the compensator thickness for an IMRT practice designed for these beams. The off-axis distance had a significant effect on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} only for the largest field size. Hence, it is recommended to consider the effect of this parameter only for field sizes larger than 25 × 25 cm{sup 2}.

  9. Determination of the Average Aromatic Cluster Size of Fossil Fuels by Solid-State NMR at High Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Kanmi; Kennedy, Gordon J.; Althaus, Stacey M.; Pruski, Marek

    2013-01-07

    We show that the average aromatic cluster size in complex carbonaceous materials can be accurately determined using fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR at a high magnetic field. To accurately quantify the nonprotonated aromatic carbon, we edited the 13C spectra using the recently reported MAS-synchronized spin–echo, which alleviated the problem of rotational recoupling of 1H-13C dipolar interactions associated with traditional dipolar dephasing experiments. The dependability of this approach was demonstrated on selected Argonne Premium coal standards, for which full sets of basic structural parameters were determined with high accuracy.

  10. Size dependence of magnetization switching and its dispersion of Co/Pt nanodots under the assistance of radio frequency fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furuta, Masaki Okamoto, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Nobuaki; Kitakami, Osamu; Shimatsu, Takehito

    2014-04-07

    We have studied the dot size dependence of microwave assisted magnetization switching (MAS) on perpendicular magnetic Co/Pt multilayer dot array. The significant microwave assistance effect has been observed over the entire dot size D ranging from 50?nm to 330?nm examined in the present study. The MAS behavior, however, critically depends on D. The excitation frequency dependence of the switching field is well consistent with the spin wave theory, indicating that the magnetization precession in MAS is in accordance with the well defined eigenmodes depending on the dot diameter. The lowest order spin wave is only excited for D???100?nm, and then the MAS effect is well consistent with that of the single macrospin prediction. On the other hand, higher order spin waves are excited for D?>?100?nm, giving rise to the significant enhancement of the MAS effect. The dispersion of MAS effect also depends on D and is significantly reduced for the region of D?>?100?nm. This significant reduction of the dispersion is attributed to the essential feature of the MAS effect which is insensitive to the local fluctuation of anisotropy field, such as defect, damaged layer, and so on.

  11. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermann, Robert Michael, E-mail: hermann@strahlentherapie-westerstede.com [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Meyer, Andreas [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Gemeinschaftspraxis für Strahlentherapie Hildesheim/Goslar (Germany); Becker, Alexandra [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Schneider, Michael [Orthopaedic Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Würzburg (Germany); Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Christiansen, Hans [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Klinik für Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Universität Kiel (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ?6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

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  13. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

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  14. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same precision and confidence.

  15. Kinetic (particle-in-cell) simulation of nonlinear laser absorption in a finite-size plasma with a background inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehdian, H. Kargarian, A.; Hajisharifi, K.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, the effect of an external inhomogeneous magnetic field on the high intensity laser absorption rate in a sub-critical plasma has been investigated by employing a relativistic electromagnetic 1.5 dimensional particle-in-cell code. Relying on the effective nonlinear phenomena such as phase-mixing and scattering, this study shows that in a finite-size plasma the laser absorption increases with inhomogeneity of the magnetic field (i.e., reduction of characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, ?{sub p}) before exiting a considerable amount of laser energy from the plasma due to scattering process. On the other hand, the presence of the external inhomogeneous magnetic field causes the maximum absorption of laser to occur at a shorter time. Moreover, study of the kinetic results associated with the distribution function of plasma particles shows that, in a special range of the plasma density and the characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, a considerable amount of laser energy is transferred to the particles producing a population of electrons with kinetic energy along the laser direction.

  16. Field Study of Performance, Comfort, and Sizing of Two Variable-Speed Heat Pumps Installed in a Single 2-Story Residence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Odukomaiya, Adewale O [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    With the recent advancements in the application of variable-speed (VS) compressors to residential HVAC systems, opportunities are now available to size heat pumps (HPs) to more effectively meet heating and cooling loads in many of the climate zones in the US with limited use of inefficient resistance heat. This is in contrast to sizing guidance for traditional single-speed HPs that limits the ability to oversize with regard to cooling loads, because of risks of poor dehumidification during the cooling season and increased cycling losses. VS-drive HPs can often run at 30-40% of their rated cooling capacity to reduce cycling losses, and can adjust fan speed to provide better indoor humidity control. Detailed air-side performance data was collected on two VS-drive heat pumps installed in a single unoccupied research house in Knoxville, TN, a mixed-humid climate. One system provided space conditioning for the upstairs, while the other unit provided space conditioning for the downstairs. Occupancy was simulated by operating the lights, shower, appliances, other plug loads, etc. to simulate the sensible and latent loads imposed on the building space by internal electric loads and human occupants according to the Building America Research Benchmark (2008). The seasonal efficiency and energy use of the units are calculated. Annual energy use is compared to that of the single speed minimum efficiency HPs tested in the same house previously. Sizing of the units relative to the measured building load and manual J design load calculations is examined. The impact of the unit sizing with regards to indoor comfort is also evaluated.

  17. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jian (Port Jefferson, NY); Kulkarni, Pramod (Port Jefferson Station, NY)

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  18. Edison Job Size Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Size Charts Edison Job Size Charts Fraction of Hours Used per Job Size This chart shows the fraction of hours used on Edison in each of 5 job-core-size bins. 2015 Usage by Job Size Chart 2014 Fraction of Hours Used by Big Jobs This chart shows the fraction of hours used on Edison by jobs using 16,384 or more cores. 2015 Usage by Job Size Chart 2014 Last edited: 2015-02-18 16:06:26

  19. Hopper Job Size Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Size Charts Hopper Job Size Charts Fractional Jobs The following charts show the fraction of hours used on Hopper in each of five job-core-size bins: 2014 Usage by Job Size Chart 2013 2012 2011 Large Jobs The following charts show the fraction of hours used on Hopper by jobs using greater than 16,384 cores: 2014 2013 2012 Usage by Job Size Chart 2011 Last edited: 2014-12-22 12:16:26

  20. Does size matter?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carreras, B. A.; Physics Department, College of Natural Science and Mathematics and Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775; Physics Department, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ; Newman, D. E.; Dobson, Ian

    2014-06-15

    Failures of the complex infrastructures society depends on having enormous human and economic cost that poses the question: Are there ways to optimize these systems to reduce the risks of failure? A dynamic model of one such system, the power transmission grid, is used to investigate the risk from failure as a function of the system size. It is found that there appears to be optimal sizes for such networks where the risk of failure is balanced by the benefit given by the size.

  1. ARM - Measurement - Cloud droplet size

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    droplet size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of a cloud particle Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  2. Usage by Job Size Table

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage by Job Size Table Usage by Job Size Table page loading animation Usage Query Interface System All Hopper Edison Cori Carver Planck Matgen Franklin Hopper 1 Magellan Dirac...

  3. LIQUID & GAS NITROGEN LINE SIZING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    These calculations supplement sizing that was done in D-Zero EN-416, rev. 62695, II Pipe Sizing for SolenoidVLPC Cryogenic Systems", EN-416 only looked at the Solenoid and...

  4. ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor Size Distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of hydrometeors observed in a given size range. Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  5. Wide size range fast integrated mobility spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jian

    2013-10-29

    A mobility spectrometer to measure a nanometer particle size distribution is disclosed. The mobility spectrometer includes a conduit and a detector. The conduit is configured to receive and provide fluid communication of a fluid stream having a charged nanometer particle mixture. The conduit includes a separator section configured to generate an electrical field of two dimensions transverse to a dimension associated with the flow of the charged nanometer particle mixture through the separator section to spatially separate charged nanometer particles of the charged nanometer particle mixture in said two dimensions. The detector is disposed downstream of the conduit to detect concentration and position of the spatially-separated nanometer particles.

  6. Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing Arlan Burdick IBACOS, Inc. February 2012 This report received minimal editorial review at NREL NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

  7. Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2012-02-01

    The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is arguably the most complex system installed in a house and is a substantial component of the total house energy use. A right-sized HVAC system will provide the desired occupant comfort and will run efficiently. This Strategy Guideline discusses the information needed to initially select the equipment for a properly designed HVAC system. Right-sizing of an HVAC system involves the selection of equipment and the design of the air distribution system to meet the accurate predicted heating and cooling loads of the house. Right-sizing the HVAC system begins with an accurate understanding of the heating and cooling loads on a space; however, a full HVAC design involves more than just the load estimate calculation - the load calculation is the first step of the iterative HVAC design procedure. This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, Florida. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

  8. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL); Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A slashing process for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns.

  9. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.; Kupperman, D.S.

    1998-05-19

    A slashing process is disclosed for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns. 2 figs.

  10. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  11. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecologist for a Day Field Guide Program supported by: ©2011, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - Outreach Program INVERTEBRATES Page 1 Brown Millipede Burgundy Millipede Red Millipede Green Centipede Small Gray Millipede Carrion Beetle Larva Red Centipede Orb Weaver Trapdoor Spider W lf S id Harvestman (Daddy long legs) S i d Mi th Wolf Spiders Harvestman (Daddy-long-legs) Spined Micrathena MOUS SPIDER Black and Yellow Argiope Widow Spider Crab Spider Cross Spider ©2011, Savannah River Ecology

  12. Finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellemans, V.; Heenen, P.-H.; Bender, M.

    2012-10-20

    The systematic lack of convergence of self-consistent mean-field calculations with certain parameterizations of the Skyrme energy density functional has been attributed to the appearance of finite-size instabilities. In this contribution, we investigate what happens at the instability associated with the C{sub 0}{sup {Delta}s}s{sub 0} Dot-Operator {Delta}s{sub 0} term in a high-spin state of the superdeformed band in {sup 194}Hg.

  13. Field O

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -- ! Department of Energy Field O ffice, O s k Ridge P.O . Box 2001 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37031- 0723 April 20. 1993 Dr. Robert Kulikowskf Director, Bureau of Radiation Control New York City Department of Health 111 Livingston Street Brooklyn, New York 11201 Dear Dr. Kulfkowskf: BAKER AN0 W ILLIAM W AREHOUSES SITE - CORPLETION O F CLEANUP ACTIVITIES The purpose of this notice is to inform you about further scheduled c leanup activities to be conducted by the Department of Energy (WE) at 513-519

  14. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  15. ARM - Measurement - Cloud particle size distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    size distribution ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud particle size distribution The number of cloud particles present in any given volume of air within a specified size range, including liquid and ice. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each

  16. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed pre-processing supply system designs...

  17. Oscillating magnetocaloric effect in size-quantized diamagnetic film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.

    2014-03-21

    We investigate the oscillating magnetocaloric effect on a size-quantized diamagnetic film in a transverse magnetic field. We obtain the analytical expression for the thermodynamic potential in case of the arbitrary spectrum of carriers. The entropy change is shown to be the oscillating function of the magnetic field and the film thickness. The nature of this effect is the same as for the de Haas–van Alphen effect. The magnetic part of entropy has a maximal value at some temperature. Such behavior of the entropy is not observed in magneto-ordered materials. We discuss the nature of unusual behavior of the magnetic entropy. We compare our results with the data obtained for 2D and 3D cases.

  18. Internal split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat; Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  19. Investigations of initiation spot size effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Steven A; Akinci, Adrian A; Leichty, Gary; Schaffer, Timothy; Murphy, Michael J; Munger, Alan; Thomas, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    As explosive components become smaller, a greater understanding of the effect of initiation spot size on detonation becomes increasingly critical. A series of tests of the effect of initiation spot size will be described. A series of DOI (direct optical initiation) detonators with initiation spots sizes from {approx}50 um to 1000um have been tested to determine laser parameters for threshold firing of low density PETN pressings. Results will be compared with theoretical predictions. Outputs of the initiation source (DOI ablation) have been characterized by a suite of diagnostics including PDV and schlieren imaging. Outputs of complete detonators have been characterized using PDV, streak, and/or schlieren imaging. At present, we have not found the expected change in the threshold energy to spot size relationship for DOI type detonators found in similar earlier for projectiles, slappers and EBWs. New detonators designs (Type C) are currently being tested that will allow the determination of the threshold for spot sizes from 250 um to 105um, where we hope to see change in the threshold vs. spot size relationship. Also, one test of an extremely small diameter spot size (50um) has resulted in preliminary NoGo only results even at energy densities as much as 8 times the energy density of the threshold results presented here. This gives preliminary evidence that 50um spot may be beyond the critical initiation diameter. The constant threshold energy to spot size relationship in the data to date does however still give some insight into the initiation mechanism of DOI detonators. If the DOI initiation mechanism were a 1D mechanism similar to a slapper or a flyer impact, the expected inflection point in the graph would have been between 300um and 500um diameter spot size, within the range of the data presented here. The lack of that inflection point indicates that the DOI initiation mechanism is more likely a 2D mechanism similar to a sphere or rod projectile. We expect to see a three region response as the results from the smaller spot size Type C detonators are completed.

  20. NREL: Wind Research - Field Test Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field Test Sites Aerial view of the National Wind Technology Center with the Flatiron Mountains in the background NREL's NWTC has numerous test pads available to industry partners for testing wind turbines that range in size from a few hundred kilowatts to several megawatts. PIX 17711. Manufacturers can take advantage of NREL's numerous test pads and the technical expertise of its staff to field test prototypes of small and large wind turbines. Many of the small wind turbines tested at the NWTC

  1. Size separation of analytes using monomeric surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edward S.; Wei, Wei

    2005-04-12

    A sieving medium for use in the separation of analytes in a sample containing at least one such analyte comprises a monomeric non-ionic surfactant of the of the general formula, B-A, wherein A is a hydrophilic moiety and B is a hydrophobic moiety, present in a solvent at a concentration forming a self-assembled micelle configuration under selected conditions and having an aggregation number providing an equivalent weight capable of effecting the size separation of the sample solution so as to resolve a target analyte(s) in a solution containing the same, the size separation taking place in a chromatography or electrophoresis separation system.

  2. Strategic Petroleum Reserve: Analysis of size options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    This report presents the results of the deliberations of the interagency group formed to study the costs and benefits of expanding the size of the SPR. The study concentrated on severe oil supply disruptions involving sharp reductions in world oil production that were 2 to 4 times larger than the largest 1970s interruption. The disruption sizes and estimated probability of occurrence of these scenarios were supplied by the CIA. The most critical part of the CIA's analysis was the assessment of likelihood of these cases occurring. The CIA approached the likelihood problem by combining an examination of past oil supply disruptions with qualitative analysis of important oil market and regional trends. The study group then used statistical techniques and probability distributions to synthesize the historical data with CIA evaluations of as yet unobserved events. The SPR size study assumed direct purchases of SPR oil and did not assume the use of alternative financing mechanisms. Members of the working group with foreign policy and national security responsibilities provided an in-depth review of strategic considerations affecting SPR size. A number of prior studies, some classified, have addressed the strategic importance and insurance value of the SPR to the US and its allies. The results of these studies have also been incorporated in the current effort. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  3. External split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  4. livermore field office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    donation to those in need. 

    Livermore Field Office sets core values as part of continuous improvement process http:nnsa.energy.govbloglivermore-field-office-sets-cor...

  5. Biomass Engineering: Size reduction, drying and densification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Biomass Engineering: Size reduction, drying and densification March 25th, 2015 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Technology Review Area: Feedstock Supply and Logistics Jaya Shankar Tumuluru (PI) Research Team: Neal Yancey, Craig C Conner, Tyler Westover, Richard McCulloch, Kara Cafferty, and Mitch Plummer Organization: Biofuels and Renewable Energy Technology, Idaho National Laboratory DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO)

  6. AVTA: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures AVTA: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures PDF icon EV America Test Specifications PDF icon ...

  7. Sandia Energy - Self-Regulated Fabrication of Size-Controlled...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Self-Regulated Fabrication of Size-Controlled Quantum Nanostructures Home Highlights - Energy Research Self-Regulated Fabrication of Size-Controlled Quantum Nanostructures Previous...

  8. Sandia Energy - Enhanced Nanoparticle Size Control by Extending...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhanced Nanoparticle Size Control by Extending LaMer's Mechanism Home Office of Science Enhanced Nanoparticle Size Control by Extending LaMer's Mechanism Previous Next Enhanced...

  9. Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System Needs: Scoping Study Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System Needs: Scoping Study Michael ...

  10. Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System Needs: Scoping Study Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System Needs: Scoping Study Emerging ...

  11. MOSRC Field Definitions 01202016 MOSRC Field Definitions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MOSRC Field Definitions 01202016 MOSRC Field Definitions 1/5 1/20/2016 Field Name Definition Prime Contract Procurement Instrument Identifier The unique Prime Contractor identifier as it is recorded on the original (or base) contract in FPDS-NG. This must be a valid DOE M&O PIID, as recorded in FPDS-NG. Prime Contract DUNS Number The Prime Contractor's Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) as it is recorded on the prime contract in FPDS-NG. Subcontract DUNS Number The

  12. LNG fleet increases in size and capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linser, H.J. Jr.; Drudy, M.J.; Endrizzi, F.; Urbanelli, A.A.

    1997-06-02

    The LNG fleet as of early 1997 consisted of 99 vessels with total cargo capacity of 10.7 million cu m, equivalent to approximately 4.5 million tons. One of the newest additions to the fleet, the 137,000-cu m tanker Al Zubarah, is five times the size of the original commercial vessel Methane Princess. Al Zubarah`s first loading of more than 60,000 tons occurred in December 1996 for deliver to Japanese buyers from the newly commissioned Qatargas LNG plant at Ras Laffan. That size cargo contains enough clean-burning energy to heat 60,000 homes in Japan for 1 month. Measuring nearly 1,000 ft long, the tanker is among the largest in the industry fleet and joined 70 other vessels of more than 100,000 cu m. Most LNG tankers built since 1975 have been larger-capacity vessels. The paper discusses LNG shipping requirements, containment systems, vessel design, propulsion, construction, operations and maintenance, and the future for larger vessels.

  13. Nevada Field Office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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