Sample records for field size distribution

  1. Size-dependent polarization distribution in ferroelectric nanostructures: Phase field simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    to memory and storage devices, sen- sors, and actuators. The properties of low-dimensional ferro- electricsSize-dependent polarization distribution in ferroelectric nanostructures: Phase field simulations distribution in ferroelectric nanostructures embedded in a nonferroelectric medium. The simulation results

  2. The dune size distribution and scaling relations of barchan dune fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orencio Durán; Veit Schwämmle; Pedro G. Lind; Hans J. Herrmann

    2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Barchan dunes emerge as a collective phenomena involving the generation of thousands of them in so called barchan dune fields. By measuring the size and position of dunes in Moroccan barchan dune fields, we find that these dunes tend to distribute uniformly in space and follow an unique size distribution function. We introduce an analyticalmean-field approach to show that this empirical size distribution emerges from the interplay of dune collisions and sand flux balance, the two simplest mechanisms for size selection. The analytical model also predicts a scaling relation between the fundamental macroscopic properties characterizing a dune field, namely the inter-dune spacing and the first and second moments of the dune size distribution.

  3. The Time Evolution of Aerosol Size Distribution Over the Mexico...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Size Distribution Over the Mexico City Plateau. The Time Evolution of Aerosol Size Distribution Over the Mexico City Plateau. Abstract: As part of the MILAGRO field campaign, the...

  4. ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor Size Distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice particleSize Distribution ARM Data

  5. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  6. Grain-size distributions of tsunami sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, Sarah

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    of tsunamis. By implementing the use of simulation and modeling the tsunami depositional process may be fully understood. The program Python with PyLab was used to form distributions and calculate descriptive parameters with grain-size data from two past...

  7. 7, 1074310766, 2007 EC size distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    carbon in a coastal urban atmosphere in South China: characteristics, evolution processesACPD 7, 10743­10766, 2007 EC size distributions in an urban atmosphere in China Xiao-Feng Huang, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China Received: 30 May 2007 ­ Accepted: 19 July 2007 ­ Published: 25 July 2007

  8. 5, 1012510154, 2005 Size distributions of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ·veh). The separation of the emission factor into passenger cars20 ((5.8±2)·1013 #/(km·veh)) and trucks ((2.5±0.9)·1015 #/(km·veh)) yielded in a 40-times higher emission factor for trucks compared to passenger cars. 1ACPD 5, 10125­10154, 2005 Size distributions of soot particles and emission factors D. Rose et al

  9. Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, K.B.

    1990-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Pore size distribution and accessible pore size distribution in bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakurovs, Richard [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell [ORNL; Blach, Tomasz P [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The porosity and pore size distribution of coals determine many of their properties, from gas release to their behavior on carbonization, and yet most methods of determining pore size distribution can only examine a restricted size range. Even then, only accessible pores can be investigated with these methods. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) are increasingly used to characterize the size distribution of all of the pores non-destructively. Here we have used USANS/SANS to examine 24 well-characterized bituminous and subbituminous coals: three from the eastern US, two from Poland, one from New Zealand and the rest from the Sydney and Bowen Basins in Eastern Australia, and determined the relationships of the scattering intensity corresponding to different pore sizes with other coal properties. The range of pore radii examinable with these techniques is 2.5 nm to 7 {micro}m. We confirm that there is a wide range of pore sizes in coal. The pore size distribution was found to be strongly affected by both rank and type (expressed as either hydrogen or vitrinite content) in the size range 250 nm to 7 {micro}m and 5 to 10 nm, but weakly in intermediate regions. The results suggest that different mechanisms control coal porosity on different scales. Contrast-matching USANS and SANS were also used to determine the size distribution of the fraction of the pores in these coals that are inaccessible to deuterated methane, CD{sub 4}, at ambient temperature. In some coals most of the small ({approx} 10 nm) pores were found to be inaccessible to CD{sub 4} on the time scale of the measurement ({approx} 30 min - 16 h). This inaccessibility suggests that in these coals a considerable fraction of inherent methane may be trapped for extended periods of time, thus reducing the effectiveness of methane release from (or sorption by) these coals. Although the number of small pores was less in higher rank coals, the fraction of total pores that was inaccessible was not rank dependent. In the Australian coals, at the 10 nm to 50 nm size scales the pores in inertinites appeared to be completely accessible to CD{sub 4}, whereas the pores in the vitrinite were about 75% inaccessible. Unlike the results for total porosity that showed no regional effects on relationships between porosity and coal properties, clear regional differences in the relationships between fraction of closed porosity and coal properties were found. The 10 to 50 nm-sized pores of inertinites of the US and Polish coals examined appeared less accessible to methane than those of the inertinites of Australian coals. This difference in pore accessibility in inertinites may explain why empirical relationships between fluidity and coking properties developed using Carboniferous coals do not apply to Australian coals.

  11. Size-independent vs. size-dependent policies in scheduling heavy-tailed distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nham, John (John T.)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of scheduling jobs on a two-machine distributed server, where the job size distribution is heavy-tailed. We focus on two distributions, for which we prove that the performance of the optimal size-independent ...

  12. activity size distributions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of nutrients increased Mazumder, Asit 33 A COMPOSITE SOURCE MODEL WITH FRACTAL SUBEVENT SIZE DISTRIBUTION Geosciences Websites Summary: A COMPOSITE SOURCE MODEL WITH FRACTAL...

  13. activity size distribution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of nutrients increased Mazumder, Asit 33 A COMPOSITE SOURCE MODEL WITH FRACTAL SUBEVENT SIZE DISTRIBUTION Geosciences Websites Summary: A COMPOSITE SOURCE MODEL WITH FRACTAL...

  14. Impact of Secondary Users' Field Size on Spectrum Sharing Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    Aramco, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. spatial size of the field of secondary users. In most studies, the spatial

  15. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, AlaskaWhenimage ARM Dataparticle size

  16. Particle Size Distribution of Gypseous Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnett, Morgan P.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to conditions in the field. In order to understand the true characterization of the soil and the gypsum particles, the entire soil sample should be analyzed. Four different approaches to the BaCl2 method presented in the literature (Hesse, 1976, Matar...

  17. INITIAL PLANETESIMAL SIZES AND THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlichting, Hilke E. [UCLA, Department of Earth and Space Science, 595 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E., E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, P.O. Box 6010, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kuiper Belt is a remnant from the early solar system and its size distribution contains many important constraints that can be used to test models of planet formation and collisional evolution. We show, by comparing observations with theoretical models, that the observed Kuiper Belt size distribution is well matched by coagulation models, which start with an initial planetesimal population with radii of about 1 km, and subsequent collisional evolution. We find that the observed size distribution above R {approx} 30 km is primordial, i.e., it has not been modified by collisional evolution over the age of the solar system, and that the size distribution below R {approx} 30 km has been modified by collisions and that its slope is well matched by collisional evolution models that use published strength laws. We investigate in detail the resulting size distribution of bodies ranging from 0.01 km to 30 km and find that its slope changes several times as a function of radius before approaching the expected value for an equilibrium collisional cascade of material strength dominated bodies for R {approx}< 0.1 km. Compared to a single power-law size distribution that would span the whole range from 0.01 km to 30 km, we find in general a strong deficit of bodies around R {approx} 10 km and a strong excess of bodies around 2 km in radius. This deficit and excess of bodies are caused by the planetesimal size distribution left over from the runaway growth phase, which left most of the initial mass in small planetesimals while only a small fraction of the total mass is converted into large protoplanets. This excess mass in small planetesimals leaves a permanent signature in the size distribution of small bodies that is not erased after 4.5 Gyr of collisional evolution. Observations of the small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) size distribution can therefore test if large KBOs grew as a result of runaway growth and constrained the initial planetesimal sizes. We find that results from recent KBO occultation surveys and the observed KBO size distribution can be best matched by an initial planetesimal population that contained about equal mass per logarithmic mass bin in bodies ranging from 0.4 km to 4 km in radius. We further find that we cannot match the observed KBO size distribution if most of the planetesimal mass was contained in bodies that were 10 km in radius or larger simply because their resulting size distribution cannot be sufficiently depleted over 4.5 Gyr to match observations.

  18. Concentrations and Size Distributions of Particulate Matter Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Matter Emissions from Catalyzed Trap-Equipped Heavy-duty Diesel Vehicles Operating on Ultra-low Sulfur EC-D Fuel Concentrations and Size Distributions of Particulate Matter...

  19. Dust size distribution and concentrations with cottonseed oil mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiederhold, Lee Roy

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DUST SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND CONCENTRATIONS WITHIN COTTONSEED OIL MILLS A Thesis by LEE ROY WIEDERHOLD, JR. / I Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Aqricultural Engineering DUST SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND CONCENTRATIONS WITHIN COTTONSEED OIL MILLS A Thesis by LEE ROY WIEDERHOLD, JR. Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee ~Hd fdp t Member ber...

  20. Modeling the formation and size distribution of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlin, R.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of mathematical models has been developed to predict the size distribution of fly ash particles formed in pulverized coal combustion. The large particle mode of the size distribution, typically centered about 10 to 20 ..mu..m, is predicted by a simple breakup model that is based on the complete coalescence of molten mineral inclusions within fragments of the devolatilized coal char. The ultrafine particle mode, that is typically centered about 0.1 to 0.2 ..mu..m, is modeled in terms of ash volatilization, nucleation, and coagulation. Silica and alumina are reduced to volatile suboxides through reactions at the char surface. The volatile suboxides are transported from the char surface where they are oxidized back to the stable oxides in the bulk gas, and then nucleated in accordance with homogeneous nucleation theory. The ultrafine nuclei coagulate in accordance with Brownian coagulation theory. The predicted particle size spectra have been compared to measured size distributions from a pilot-scale combustor and a full-scale utility boiler. Considering the disproportionate loss of coarse particles in the pilot-scale unit, the agreement between the predicted and measured size distributions was considered reasonably good. Both the predicted ultrafine and large particle modes agreed reasonably well with the measured particle size distribution for the full scale boiler. The validated computer models were used to study the effect of changes in the coal ash content, coal particle size, and the combustion flame temperature.

  1. Temperature Fields Produced by Traveling Distributed Heat Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    Temperature Fields Produced by Traveling Distributed Heat Sources Use of a Gaussian heat distribution in dimensionless form indicates final weld pool shape can be predicted accurately for many welds information about both the size and the shape of arc weld pools. The results indicate that both welding

  2. Evolution of particle size distribution after the CFFF secondary combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Dujiu; Crawford, L.W.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle size distribution after the CFFF secondary combustor is studied in this paper. As an important mechanism of particle collision, thermophoresis is briefly discussed in this paper and the thermophoretic velocity is given. The temperature gradient that causes the thermophoretic force is established between high and low temperature particles in the flow, which results from convection and radiation heat balance between particles and wall. Particle temperature with respect to their sizes is obtained. Mechanism of agglomeration and collection efficiency of fine particles is presented. Finally, at the inlet of the ESP, theoretical particle size distribution is compared with the experimental measurements at CFFF.

  3. Evolution of particle size distribution after the CFFF secondary combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Dujiu; Crawford, L.W.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle size distribution after the CFFF secondary combustor is studied in this paper. As an important mechanism of particle collision, thermophoresis is briefly discussed in this paper and the thermophoretic velocity is given. The temperature gradient that causes the thermophoretic force is established between high and low temperature particles in the flow, which results from convection and radiation heat balance between particles and wall. Particle temperature with respect to their sizes is obtained. Mechanism of agglomeration and collection efficiency of fine particles is presented. Finally, at the inlet of the ESP, theoretical particle size distribution is compared with the experimental measurements at CFFF.

  4. ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A Report Submitted;2 ABSTRACT Interporosity flow in a naturslly fractured reservoir is modelled by a new formulation of the distribution. Thus, observed pressure response from fractured reservoirs can be analysed to obtain the matrix

  5. Sedimentation of algae: relationships with biomass and size distribution1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    Sedimentation of algae: relationships with biomass and size distribution1 Isabelle Larocque, A distribution of epilimnetic algae on patterns of algal sedimentation was determined in lake enclosures under the mean length of algae in fish-free enclosures and reduced the mean length in the enclosures to which

  6. Grain size, size-distribution and dislocation structure from diffraction peak profile analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    Grain size, size-distribution and dislocation structure from diffraction peak profile analysis T, Budapest, Hungary Abstract Diffraction peak profile analysis (or Line Profile Analysis, LPA) has recently and the strain diffraction profiles. Strain anisotropy is rationalized in terms of the contrast factors

  7. Gravitational Field of Fractal Distribution of Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasily E. Tarasov

    2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider the gravitational field of fractal distribution of particles. To describe fractal distribution, we use the fractional integrals. The fractional integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Using the fractional generalization of the Gauss's law, we consider the simple examples of the fields of homogeneous fractal distribution. The examples of gravitational moments for fractal distribution are considered.

  8. Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiation tests performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cavitation damage results from the irradiated test plates in contact with the mercury are available for correlation with the bubble populations. The most effective mitigating population can now be designed into prototypical geometries for implementation into an actual SNS target.

  9. Visual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumoulin, Serge O.

    of processing in human motion-selective cortex. I N T R O D U C T I O N Neuroimaging experiments localize human by additional experiments. Defining human MT based on stimulus selectivity means that the identificationVisual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT

  10. Lognormal Size Distribution Theory for Deposition of Polydisperse Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, S.H.; Lee, K.W. [Kwangju Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The moments method of the lognormal size distribution theory was applied to the deposition equation of a radioactive aerosol within a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor for analysis of postulated accidents. The deposition coefficient of Crump and Seinfeld was utilized to represent the Brownian and turbulent diffusions and the gravitational sedimentation. The deposition equation was converted into a set of three ordinary differential equations. This approach takes the view point that the size distribution of an aerosol is represented by a time-dependent lognormal size distribution function during the deposition process. Numerical calculations have been performed, and the results were found to be in good agreement with the exact solution. The derived model for aerosol deposition is convenient to use in a numerical general dynamic equation solution routine based on the moments method, where nucleation, condensation, coagulation, and deposition need to be solved simultaneously.

  11. Measurements and characterization of particle size distributions in coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stramski, Dariusz

    particle suspensions were measured using a laser diffractometer (LISST100X), an electrical impedance, the LISST provides an adequate proxy and has the capability for in situ measurements with high spatialMeasurements and characterization of particle size distributions in coastal waters R. A. Reynolds,1

  12. Loss Reduction of Power Distribution Network Using Optimum Size and Location of Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Generation Adnan Anwar, Student Member, IEEE, and H. R. Pota, Member, IEEE Abstract--Distributed generation be reduced significantly. Index Terms--Distributed generation, Optimum size, Optimum location, Power loss directly to utility distribution system. The insulation level of the machines may not synchronize

  13. Slant visual range from drop-size distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arrance, Edwin Stanley

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    YIci'Ai Ra', tq- DROP-SIZE DISTRIBU, ION A Thesi s EDWIN STANLEY ARPANCE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial ful fi 1 lment of the requirement for the degree of M AS I . R 0 r S C I E I'I C E August I 9BO I...'laj or Subject: Mete orol oqy SLANT VISUAL RANGE FROM DROP-SIZE DISTRIBUTION A Thesis by EDWIN STANLEY ARRANCE Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Vance E. Moyer; (Chairman of Committee) Dr. Geor L. Huebner, Jr. (Member) Dr. Glen N. Williams...

  14. The Size Distribution of Superbubbles in the Interstellar Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; C. J. Clarke

    1998-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the standard, adiabatic shell evolution to predict the size distribution N(R) for populations of SN-driven superbubbles in a uniform ISM. We derive N(R) for simple cases of superbubble creation rate and mechanical luminosity function. We then compare our predictions for N(R) with the largely complete HI hole catalogue for the SMC, with a view toward the global structure of the ISM in that galaxy. We also present a preliminary derivation for N(v), the distribution of shell expansion velocities.

  15. Aerosol size distribution evolution in large area fire plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porch, W.M.; Penner, J.E.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large fires are significant seasonal contributors to western visibility reduction. We have found that the relative concentration of supermicron size particles (assumed to be a mixture of mechanically generated particles by high winds associated with large fires and low density chain aggregates from coagulation in the fire) and high turbulence in fire plumes can radically change the aerosol sizes in the fire plume. This is especially important for aerosols with high visibility reduction and long range transport potential. This calculation was done with a 10 level one dimensional model with parameterized vertical and horizontal diffusion, sedimentation and coagulation. The optical effects of the evolving concentration and size distributions were modeled using Mie scattering and absorption assumptions.

  16. Mineralogy and particle size of bed sediments 173 Chapter 7 -Quantitative Mineralogy and Particle-Size Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mineralogy and particle size of bed sediments 173 Chapter 7 - Quantitative Mineralogy and Particle to assess particle-size distribution and mineralogical composition. Changes in particle- size distribution-ray diffraction, and their quantitative mineralogy was determined with a recently-developed computer program

  17. Population and Size Distribution of Small Jovian Trojan Asteroids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. C. Jewitt; C. A. Trujillo; J. X. Luu

    2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of Jovian Trojan objects detected serendipitously during the course of a sky survey conducted at the University of Hawaii 2.2-meter telescope. We used a 8192 x 8192 pixel charge-coupled device (CCD) mosaic to observe 20 deg^2 at locations spread over the L4 Lagrangian swarm and reached a limiting magnitude V = 22.5 mag (50% of maximum detection efficiency). Ninety-three Jovian Trojans were detected with radii 2 - 20 km (assumed albedo 0.04). Their differential magnitude distribution has a slope of 0.40 +/- 0.05 corresponding to a power law size distribution index 3.0 +/- 0.3 (1-sigma). The total number of L4 Trojans with radii > 1 km is of order 1.6 x 10^5 and their combined mass (dominated by the largest objects) is ~ 10^{-4} M_{Earth}. The bias-corrected mean inclination is 13.7 +/- 0.5 deg. We also discuss the size and spatial distribution of the L4 swarm.

  18. Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.; Apte, M.G.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for HRV and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine a detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 1000-fold. To measure the size distribution of HRV aerosols, volunteers with a head cold spent two hours in a ventilated research chamber. Airborne particles from the chamber were collected using an Andersen Six-Stage Cascade Impactor. Each stage of the impactor was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for HRV. For the first two volunteers with confirmed HRV infection, but with mild symptoms, we were unable to detect HRV on any stage of the impactor.

  19. Thermodynamics and Finite size scaling in Scalar Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermodynamics and Finite size scaling in Scalar Field Theory A thesis submitted to the Tata Research, Mumbai December 2008 #12;ii #12;Synopsis In this work we study the thermodynamics of an interacting 4 theory in 4 space- time dimensions. The expressions for the thermodynamic quantities are worked

  20. The Superbubble Size Distribution in the Interstellar Medium of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; C. J. Clarke

    1997-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the standard, adiabatic shell evolution to predict the size distribution N(R) for populations of OB superbubbles in a uniform ISM. We derive N(R) for simple cases of superbubble creation rate and mechanical luminosity function (MLF). For R R_e it is dominated by growing objects. We also briefly investigate N(R) resulting from momentum-conserving shell evolution. We predict a peak in N(R) corresponding to individual SNRs. To estimate the MLF, we also examine evolutionary effects on the HII region luminosity function (HII LF), finding that for nebular luminosity fading as a power law in time, there is a minimum observed slope for the HII LFs. Comparison with the largely complete HI hole catalog for the SMC shows surprising agreement in the predicted and observed slope of N(R), suggesting that no other fundamental process is needed to explain the size distribution of shells in the SMC. Further comparison with largely incomplete HI data for M31, M33, and Holmberg II is also encouraging. We present expressions for the ISM porosity parameters, and estimate that they are substantially <1 for all of the galaxies except Holmberg II. Most of these galaxies therefore may not be strongly dominated by a hot interstellar component. However, porosity results for the Galaxy remain inconclusive.

  1. Effect of Engine-Out NOx Control Strategies on PM Size Distribution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine-Out NOx Control Strategies on PM Size Distribution in Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines Developed for 2010 Effect of Engine-Out NOx Control Strategies on PM Size Distribution in...

  2. Fine scale modeling of wintertime aerosol mass, number, and size distributions in central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    Fine scale modeling of wintertime aerosol mass, number, and size distributions in central with the observed PM number and size distributions (with an NMB of -13.9%), indicating the importance of coagulation scale modeling of wintertime aerosol mass, number, and size distributions in central California, J

  3. Exploring Vector Fields with Distribution-based Streamline Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Kewei; Chaudhuri, Abon; Lee, Teng-Yok; Shen, Han-Wei; Wong, Pak C.

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Streamline-based techniques are designed based on the idea that properties of streamlines are indicative of features in the underlying field. In this paper, we show that statistical distributions of measurements along the trajectory of a streamline can be used as a robust and effective descriptor to measure the similarity between streamlines. With the distribution-based approach, we present a framework for interactive exploration of 3D vector fields with streamline query and clustering. Streamline queries allow us to rapidly identify streamlines that share similar geometric features to the target streamline. Streamline clustering allows us to group together streamlines of similar shapes. Based on users selection, different clusters with different features at different levels of detail can be visualized to highlight features in 3D flow fields. We demonstrate the utility of our framework with simulation data sets of varying nature and size.

  4. The inertial and electrical effects on aerosol sampling, charging, and size distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chuenchung.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of particle inertia on deposition behavior near the filter cassette sampler. Field sampling cassettes were tested in a subsonic wind tunnel for 0.2, 0.5 and 0.68 m/s wind speeds to simulate indoor air environment. Fluorescein aerosols of 2 and 5 {mu}m were generated from Berglund-Liu vibrating orifice generator as test material. Sampling tests were conducted in a subsonic wind tunnel with variables of particle size, wind speed, suction velocity and orientation of sampler examined to evaluate the combined effects. Sampling efficiencies were also examined. Electrostatic force is usually used as an effective method for removing, classifying and separating aerosols according to the electrical mobilities of the particulates. On the other hand, the aerosol charging theories possess differences in the ultrafine size range and need experimental verification. The present TSI's electrostatic aerosol analyzer has particle loss problem and cannot be used as a reliable tool in achieving efficient charging. A new unipolar charger with associated electronic circuits was designed, constructed and tested. The performance of the charger is tested in terms of particle loss, uncharged particles, and the collection efficiency of the precipitator. The results were compared with other investigator's data. The log-Beta distribution function is considered to be more versatile in representing size distribution. This study discussed the method in determining the size parameters under different conditions. Also the mutability of size distribution was evaluated when particles undergo coagulation or classification processes. Comparison of evolution between log-Beta and lognormal distributions were made.

  5. Adaptive Receding Horizon Control of a Distributed Collector Solar Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    for a distributed collector solar field which ex- plicitly explores its distributed parameter character. The plant, distributed collector solar fields are repre- sentative of an important class of distributed parameter plantsAdaptive Receding Horizon Control of a Distributed Collector Solar Field J.M. Igreja, J. M. Lemos

  6. EFFECTS OF SAMPLE SIZE ON CHARACTERIZATION OF WOOD-PARTICLE LENGTH DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECTS OF SAMPLE SIZE ON CHARACTERIZATION OF WOOD-PARTICLE LENGTH DISTRIBUTION Quang V. Cao of sample size on fitting length distribution of wood particles used for manufacturing wood-based composites moments and the ability of the sample distributions to characterize the population represented

  7. Fidelity of Analytic Drop Size Distributions in Drizzling Stratiform Clouds Based on Large-Eddy Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kogan, Yefim L.; Kogan, Zena N.; Mechem, David B.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud microphysical parameterizations and retrievals rely heavily on knowledge of the shape of drop size distributions (DSDs). Many investigations assume that DSDs in the entire or partial drop size range may be approximated ...

  8. Effects of dust size distribution on dust negative ion acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Yi-Rong; Qi, Xin; Sun, Jian-An; Duan, Wen-Shan [Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)] [Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Yang, Lei [Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China) [Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust negative ion acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized multi-ion dusty plasma containing hot isothermal electron, ions (light positive ions and heavy negative ions) and extremely massive charge fluctuating dust grains are investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. How the dust size distribution affect the height and the thickness of the nonlinear solitary wave are given. It is noted that the characteristic of the solitary waves are different with the different dust size distribution. The magnitude of the external magnetic field also affects the solitary wave form.

  9. Size distribution and chemical composition of aerosol particles in the free troposphere over Japan: Aircraft measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwasaka, Y.; Mori, I.; Mastunga, K. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aircraft measurements of number-, mass- and volume-size distributions of aerosols and concentration of sulfate, nitrate and others contained in particulate matter were made in the free troposphere over Japan in 1991-1994. Number-size distribution frequently shows a peak in the area of a diameter of D {ge} 1 {mu}m in the free troposphere during observational periods. A few peaks are identified in the volume-size distribution as estimated on the basis of number-size distribution having single mode in a coarse range. Mass-size distribution frequently indicate enhancement in the coarse size range. This feature of the distribution is more frequent in those measurements made at 4.42 km than those at 2.29 km. On the basis of a backward trajectory analysis of the air mass containing those particles, soil particles originating from the Asian continent affect the features found in the size distributions as well as and vertical change in those size distributions. Particulate sulfate concentration in the free troposphere suggested that chemical transformation of particles with D {ge} 1 {mu}m advanced during long range transport of the particle possibly through coagulation of sulfate particles on coarse size particles such as Asian dust particles, adsorption of gaseous sulfate. Those measurements provide useful data et to discuss global geochemical cycle and radiative forcing of particles originated from the Asian continent.

  10. Size distribution of recruited alveolar volumes in airway reopening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alencar, Adriano Mesquita

    during the reopening process can influence the distribution of recruited alveolar volumes and, hence, gas distribution of recruited alveolar volumes that become available for gas exchange during inflation from important quantity is the amount of alveolar volume available for gas exchange. This alveolar volume

  11. A fractal-based approach to lake size-distributions David A. Seekell,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    A fractal-based approach to lake size-distributions David A. Seekell,1 Michael L. Pace,1 Lars J in regional and global biogeochemical processes. Lakes are fractal but do not always conform to the power law size-distribution typically associated with fractal geographical features. Here, we evaluate

  12. Optimum Allocation and Sizing of DG Unit for Efficiency Enhancement of Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    of appropriate size and location of DG reduces total power loss in a distribution system significantly and hence, Power loss reduction, Sensitivity analysis. I. INTRODUCTION Distributed Generation (DG) has gained its size and inappropriate allocation of generation may lead to higher power loss than when there is no DG

  13. Determination of pore-size distribution in low-dielectric thin films D. W. Gidleya)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gidley, David

    -size distribution on pore shape/dimensionality and sample temperature is predicted using a simple quantum mechanicalDetermination of pore-size distribution in low-dielectric thin films D. W. Gidleya) and W. E. Frieze Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 T. L. Dull, J. Sun, and A

  14. A forward microphysical model to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory generated (mimic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    A forward microphysical model to predict the size- distribution parameters of laboratory generated Interactions ­ Condensational Growth and Coagulation, Submitted for Indian Aerosol Science and Technology Microphysical Model for the UTLS (FAMMUS) is applied to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory

  15. Size distribution of particle systems analyzed with organic photodetectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sentis, Matthias

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a consortium between academic and industry, this PhD work investigates the interest and capabilities of organic photo-sensors (OPS) for the optical characterization of suspensions and two-phase flows. The principle of new optical particle sizing instruments is proposed to characterize particle systems confined in a cylinder glass (standard configuration for Process Analytical Technologies). To evaluate and optimize the performance of these systems, a Monte-Carlo model has been specifically developed. This model accounts for the numerous parameters of the system: laser beam profile, mirrors, lenses, sample cell, particle medium properties (concentration, mean & standard deviation, refractive indices), OPS shape and positions, etc. Light scattering by particles is treated either by using Lorenz-Mie theory, Debye, or a hybrid model (that takes into account the geometrical and physical contributions). For diluted media (single scattering), particle size analysis is based on the inversion of scatter...

  16. SUPPORTING INFORMATION2 Simplifying aerosol size distributions modes4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    la Barceloneta 37-49, 08003 Barcelona, Spain27 28 29 30 #12;2 1 Table S1: Hourly k-means cluster size.35 0.40 0.45 T1 T2 T3 UB1 RB1 RB2 NU MIX NIT CO(mgm-3) CO RS UB TC RB (j) Figure S2: Comparison: Comparison for each significant cluster at each site (RS, UB, TC, RB) of: a) particle number2 concentration

  17. Distribution Network Design: Selection and Sizing of Congested Connections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagi, Rakesh

    promotions (i.e., seasonal) and regular demand. In response to this, at the strategic or aggregate level demand. Several multinational companies use distribution center networks in this manner. For example. For most fast moving consumer goods, demand patterns are quite erratic, being a function of both sales

  18. LOAD PROFILING IN DISTRIBUTED REALTIME SYSTEMS \\Lambda ``One Size Doesn't Fit All''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LOAD PROFILING IN DISTRIBUTED REAL­TIME SYSTEMS \\Lambda ``One Size Doesn't Fit All'' Azer Bestavros a new load­profiling strategy that allows the nodes of a distributed system to be unequally loaded. Using load profiling, the system attempts to distribute the load amongst its nodes so as to maximize

  19. Effect of a polynomial arbitrary dust size distribution on dust acoustic solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishak-Boushaki, M.; Djellout, D.; Annou, R. [Faculty of Physics, USTHB, P.B. 32 El Alia, Bab-ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of dust-acoustic solitons when dust grains are size-distributed and ions adiabatically heated is conducted. The influence of an arbitrary dust size-distribution described by a polynomial function on the properties of dust acoustic waves is investigated. An energy-like integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived. The solitary solutions are shown to undergo a transformation into cnoidal ones under some physical conditions. The dust size-distribution can significantly affect both lower and upper critical Mach numbers for both solitons and cnoidal solutions.

  20. Evolution of droplet size distribution and autoconversion parameterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13Evacuation248 EvaluationMAYEvidencein

  1. Time Evolution of the Mutual Fund Size Distribution Yonathan Schwarzkopf1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    empirically and theoreti- cally. The size of large mutual funds has a heavy tailed distribution that has been into a power law only over long time scales, suggesting that log-normality comes about because the industry

  2. Particle size distribution and mineralogy of Brazilian Ferralsols: Significance for the structure and hydraulic properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Particle size distribution and mineralogy of Brazilian Ferralsols: Significance for the structure of the mineralogy on the structure and hydraulic properties of Ferralsols. The Ferralsols (F) studied were selected according to the mineralogy of the

  3. Lipid-Protein Interactions Alter Line Tensions and Domain Size Distributions in Lung Surfactant Monolayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    The size distribution of domains in phase-separated lung surfactant monolayers influences monolayer viscoelasticity and compressibility which, in turn, influence monolayer collapse and set the compression at which the ...

  4. The influence of particle-size distribution and moisture levels on the formation of soil hardpans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Herman John

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND MOISTURE LEVELS ON THE FORMATION OF SOIL HARDPANS A Thesis By HERMAN J. BAUER Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1963 Major Subject: Soil Physics THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND MOISTURE LEVELS ON THE FORMATION OF SOIL HARDPANS A Thesis By HERMAN J. BAUER Approved as to style and content...

  5. The influence of particle-size distribution and moisture levels on the formation of soil hardpans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Herman John

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND MOISTURE LEVELS ON THE FORMATION OF SOIL HARDPANS A Thesis By HERMAN J. BAUER Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1963 Major Subject: Soil Physics THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND MOISTURE LEVELS ON THE FORMATION OF SOIL HARDPANS A Thesis By HERMAN J. BAUER Approved as to style and content...

  6. Notes on representing grain size distributions obtained by electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, Laszlo S., E-mail: laszlo.metz@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Biswas, Somjeet, E-mail: somjeetbiswas@gmail.com [Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France); Gu, Chengfan, E-mail: chengfan.gu@unsw.edu.au [School of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Beausir, Benoit, E-mail: benoit.beausir@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire d'Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), UMR 7239, CNRS/Université de Lorraine, F-57045 Metz (France); Laboratory of Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for low-mAss Structures (DAMAS), Université de Lorraine (France)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Grain size distributions measured by electron backscatter diffraction are commonly represented by histograms using either number or area fraction definitions. It is shown here that they should be presented in forms of density distribution functions for direct quantitative comparisons between different measurements. Here we make an interpretation of the frequently seen parabolic tales of the area distributions of bimodal grain structures and a transformation formula between the two distributions are given in this paper. - Highlights: • Grain size distributions are represented by density functions. • The parabolic tales corresponds to equal number of grains in a bin of the histogram. • A simple transformation formula is given to number and area weighed distributions. • The particularities of uniform and lognormal distributions are examined.

  7. Soil Sample Questionnaire --Field Crops Sample No. Field Identification Field Size acres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Jay B.

    . Subsoil: (if known) sand gravel clay hardpan lime solid rock 7. Water penetration: rapid moderate slow soil questionnaire on the back of this sheet. Have soil tested at least once every rotation. 2. Sample of the hole and put it in a clean container. Repeat this procedure at 10 or 12 locations in the field. Mix

  8. Size distributions of ionic aerosols measured at Waliguan Observatory: Implication for nitrate gas-to-particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    Size distributions of ionic aerosols measured at Waliguan Observatory: Implication for nitrate gas Plateau. Size-resolved ionic aerosols (NH4 + , Na+ , K+ , Ca2+ , Mg2+ , SO4 2À , ClÀ , NO3 À CO3 2À , formate, acetate and oxalate), organic aerosols, black carbon and gaseous HNO3 and SO2 were measured

  9. Sieving duration and sieve loading impacts on dry soil fragment size distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    ; accepted 18 June 2006 Abstract Measurement of the soil fragment size distribution has been found.g. wind and water erosion, infiltration and aeration) crop establishment and productivity (Skidmore et al is inversely related to the amount of applied energy, and does not necessarily reflect the size of aggregates

  10. An Optimization Approach to the Design of Multi-Size Heliostat fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Carrizosa

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    May 28, 2014 ... Maximizing the efficiency of the plant, i.e., optimizing the energy ... Keywords: solar thermal power; multi-size heliostat field; greedy algorithm.

  11. Distributions of Fourier modes of cosmological density fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Z.; Bardeen, J.M. [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1995-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the probability distributions of Fourier modes of cosmological density fields using the central limit theorem is it applies to weighted integrals of random fields. It is shown that if the cosmological principle holds in a certain sense, i.e., the Universe approaches homogeneity and isotropy sufficiently rapidly on very large scales, the one-point distribution of each Fourier mode of the density field is Gaussian whether or not the density field itself is Gaussian. Therefore, one-point distributions of the power spectrum obtained from observational data or from simulations are not a good test of whether the density field is Gaussian.

  12. Solitary dust sound waves in a plasma with two-temperature ions and distributed grain size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prudskikh, V. V. [Southern Federal University, Research Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of weakly nonlinear dust sound waves in a dusty plasma containing two different-temperature ion species is explored. The nonlinear equations describing both the quadratic and cubic plasma nonlinearities are derived. It is shown that the properties of dust sound waves depend substantially on the grain size distribution. In particular, for solitary dust sound waves with a positive potential to exist in a plasma with distributed grain size, it is necessary that the difference between the temperatures of two ion species be larger than that in the case of equal-size grains.

  13. LOAD PROFILING IN DISTRIBUTED REAL-TIME SYSTEMS \\One Size Doesn't Fit All"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LOAD PROFILING IN DISTRIBUTED REAL-TIME SYSTEMS \\One Size Doesn't Fit All" Azer Bestavros (best@cs.bu.edu) Boston University Computer Science Department 111 Cummington street Boston, MA 02215 Abstract Load balancing is often used to ensure that nodes in a distributed systems are equally loaded. In this paper, we

  14. Spatial distribution and size evolution of particles in Asian outflow: Significance of primary and secondary aerosols during ACE-Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    volatility suggested increasing neutralization of the aerosol during growth. Size distribution measurements; KEYWORDS: ACE-Asia, TRACE-P, aerosol size distribution, nucleation, primary and secondary aerosols, condensation and coagulation Citation: Mc Naughton, C. S., et al. (2004), Spatial distribution and size

  15. Measurements of Aerosol Charge and Size Distribution for Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simones, Matthew P.; Gutti, Veera R.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of charge on aerosol evolution and hence the nuclear source term has been an issue of interest, and there is a need for both experimental techniques and modeling for quantifying this role. Our focus here is on further exploration of a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique to simultaneously measure both the size and charge (positive, negative and neutral) dependent aerosol distributions. We have generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles (aerosol) using a spark generator. We measure the electrical mobility-size distributions for these aerosols using a TDMA, and from these data we deduce the full charge-size distributions. We observe asymmetry in the particle size distributions for negative and positive charges. This asymmetry could have a bearing on the dynamics of charged aerosols, indicating that the assumption of symmetry for size distributions of negatively and positively charged particles in source term simulations may not be always appropriate. Also, the experimental technique should find applications in measurements of aerosol rate processes that are affected by both particle charge and size (e.g. coagulation, deposition, resuspension), and hence in modeling and simulation of the nuclear source term.

  16. TIME INTEGRATED MEASUREMENTS OF THE ACTIVITY-WEIGHTED SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF RADON PROGENY by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William C. Tetley P. E; Daniel R. Westcott; Bruce A. Cununings

    The dose to the lung is dependent on the size distribution as well as the concentration of radon progeny. The principal indicator of particle size is the diffusion coefficient. The diffusion coefficient of radon progeny is the most important parameter in determining whether the particle will deposit its alpha energy in the tracheobronchial region of the respiratory tract. Due to the importance of the size distribution of progeny when characterizing health effects, a detector was developed that exploits the difference in diffusion coefficients to provide integrated measurements of the activity-weighted size distribution. Several radon chamber tests were performed in which the diffusion coefficient and unattached fraction of radon progeny were varied by the use of trace gasses and aerosol particles. The technical feasibility of this new detector design was demonstrated in all cases.

  17. Effect of Particle Optical Properties on Size Distribution of Soils Obtained by Laser Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    ) is essential infor- mation for those in the fields of engineering and environmental geosciences, sedimentology, sedimentology, pedology, etc. (Wen et al., 2002). In geotechnical practices, PSD and clay-size fraction of soils

  18. Thermodynamics and Finite size scaling in Scalar Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debasish Banerjee; Saumen Datta; Sourendu Gupta

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we consider the 1-component real scalar $\\phi^4$ theory in 4 space-time dimensions on the lattice and investigate the finite size scaling of thermodynamic quantities to study whether the thermodynamic limit is attained. The results are obtained for the symmetric phase of the theory.

  19. Modeling of Field Distribution and Energy Storage in Diphasic Dielectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koledintseva, Marina Y.

    Modeling of Field Distribution and Energy Storage in Diphasic Dielectrics S. K. Patil, M. Y, USA Modeling of electrostatic field distribution and energy storage in diphasic dielectrics containing to the increased energy storage density. For composites with lower volume fractions of high-permittivity inclusions

  20. Ionization Cluster Size Distributions Created by Low Energy Electrons and Alpha Particles in Nanometric Track Segment in Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bantsar, Aliaksandr

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of ionizing radiation with nanometric targets is a field of interest for many branches of science such as: radiology, oncology, radiation protection and nanoelectronics. A new experimental technique known as nanodosimetry has been developed for the qualitative as well as quantitative description of these types of interactions. The work presented here is a contribution to this development, namely by further improvement of the new experimental technique called the Jet Counter, originally developed at the Andrzej So{\\l}tan Institute for Nuclear Studies. The Jet Counter is a unique device in the world for studying the interaction of low energy electrons with nanometer targets in the range 2-10 nm (in unit density). The basic experimental result is the frequency distribution of ionization cluster size produced by ionizing particles in a gaseous (nitrogen or propane) nanometric track segment. The first experimental data on the frequency distribution of ionization cluster size produced by low energy ...

  1. Method of determining interwell oil field fluid saturation distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donaldson, Erle C. (Bartlesville, OK); Sutterfield, F. Dexter (Bartlesville, OK)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining the oil and brine saturation distribution in an oil field by taking electrical current and potential measurements among a plurality of open-hole wells geometrically distributed throughout the oil field. Poisson's equation is utilized to develop fluid saturation distributions from the electrical current and potential measurement. Both signal generating equipment and chemical means are used to develop current flow among the several open-hole wells.

  2. Particlelike distributions of the Higgs field nonminimally coupled to gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre Fuzfa; Massimiliano Rinaldi; Sandrine Schlogel

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Higgs field is nonminimally coupled to gravity, there exists a family of spherically symmetric particlelike solutions to the field equations. These monopoles are the only globally regular and asymptotically flat distributions with finite energy of the Higgs field around compact objects. Moreover, spontaneous scalarization is strongly amplified for specific values of their mass and compactness.

  3. Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, H.P.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a novel measurement technique for monitoring particle size distributions of industrial colloidal slurries based on ultrasonic spectroscopy and mathematical deconvolution. An on-line sensor prototype has been developed and tested extensively in laboratory and production settings using mineral pigment slurries. Evaluation to date shows that the sensor is capable of providing particle size distributions, without any assumptions regarding their functional form, over diameters ranging from 0.1 to 100 micrometers in slurries with particle concentrations of 10 to 50 volume percents. The newly developed on-line sensor allows one to obtain particle size distributions of commonly encountered inorganic pigment slurries under industrial processing conditions without dilution.

  4. Finite Size Effects on the Real-Space Pair Distribution Function of Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Benjamin

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pair distribution function (PDF) method is a powerful approach for the analysis of the structure of nanoparticles. An important approximation used in nanoparticle PDF simulations is the incorporation of a form factor describing nanoparticle size and shape. The precise effect of the form factor on the PDF is determined by both particle shape and structure if these characteristics are both anisotropic and correlated. The correct incorporation of finite size effects is important for distinguishing and quantifying the structural consequences of small particle size in nanomaterials.

  5. Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries (including shape characterization). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, H.P.; Goetz, P.J.; Sharma, A.; Han, W; Bliss, T.C.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) sensor projects was to develop and commercialize a sensor system capable of particle analysis, in terms of size distributions, using concentrated suspensions at high solids concentrations. The early research was focused on application of ultrasonic spectroscopy of inorganic pigment slurries (e.g. titanium dioxide) commonly encountered on paper industry. During the project prototypes were tested in both academic and industrial laboratories. Work also involved successful field tests of the on-line prototype at a pigment manufacturing facility. Pen Kem continued the work at its cost beyond the initial funded period from March `92 to September `94. The first project (DE- FC05-88CE40684), which began in September 1988, culminated in a commercial laboratory instrument, Pen Kem AcoustoPhor {trademark} 8000, put on the market in June 1993. The follow-on project was aimed at investigation of shape and orientation effects on ultrasonic spectroscopy. A new cooperative agreement was awarded in September 1994 (DE-FC05-94CE40005) to develop shape characterization capabilities deemed critical by the clay industry. This follow-on project achieved following successes: A theoretical model was developed to account for the effects of size-dependent aspect ratios of spheroid particles under different orientations on ultrasound attenuation spectra of concentrated slurries. The theoretical model was confirmed by laboratory tests on kaolin slurries. An algorithm was developed to simulate evolution of particle orientation fields in simple squeezing flows.

  6. Debye size microprobes for electric field measurements in laboratory plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pribyl, P.; Gekelman, W.; Nakamoto, M.; Lawrence, E.; Chiang, F.; Stillman, J.; Judy, J.; Katz, N.; Kintner, P.; Niknejadi, P. [Department of Physics Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, MIT, Cambridge, Massachussetts (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cal Poly, Pomona, California 91768 (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the development of a host of tiny machines and sensors over the past decade. Plasma physics is in great need of small detectors for several reasons. First of all, very small detectors do not disturb a plasma, and secondly some detectors can only work because they are very small. We report on the first of a series of small (sub-Debye length) probes for laboratory plasmas undertaken at the basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA. The goal of the work is to develop robust and sensitive diagnostic probes that can survive in a plasma. The probes must have electronics packages in close proximity. We report on the construction and testing of probes that measure the electric field.

  7. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J. [Département de Physique et Regroupement Québécois sur les Matériaux de Pointe (RQMP), Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S., E-mail: amoruso@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II and CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ?50 fs, 800?nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (?90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (?10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  8. Distribution and direct radiative forcing of carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols in an interactive size-resolving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution and direct radiative forcing of carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols in an interactive size-resolving aerosol­climate model Dongchul Kim,1 Chien Wang,1 Annica M. L. Ekman,2 Mary C. Barth,3 August 2008. [1] A multimode, two-moment aerosol model has been incorporated in the NCAR CAM3 to develop

  9. Measurements of Mexico City nanoparticle size distributions: Observations of new particle formation and growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    Measurements of Mexico City nanoparticle size distributions: Observations of new particle formation diameter range were performed in the Mexico City metropolitan area. These measurements were made during the period 10­20 April 2003 at a ground-based, mountain pass site in the southeast corner of the Mexico City

  10. Computational and experimental study of the cluster size distribution in MAPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    for 300 s (melting temperature of toluene is $178 K). Toluene is selected as the matrix solvent due films deposited in matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Analysis of high-resolution SEM-assisted pulsed laser evaporation; Cluster size distribution; Molecular dynamics; Laser ablation Matrix

  11. Investigation of the relationship between chemical composition and size distribution of airborne particles by partial least

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanier, Charlie

    combustion sources, secondary aerosol, and coal-fired power plants. The size distribution, particle identified: secondary nitrate 1 and 2, remote traffic, secondary sulfate, lead, diesel traffic, coal-fired power plant, steel mill, nucleation, local traffic, and coke plant. Citation: Zhou, L., P. K. Hopke, C

  12. ON CENTRIFUGAL SETTLING OF POLYDISPERSE SUSPENSIONS WITH A CONTINUOUS PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    -density particles [3]. The settling of an N-disperse suspension, including the formation of sediment, can@ucn.cl ABSTRACT Gravity or centrifugal sedimentation of polydisperse suspensions with a continuous particle size distribution (PSD) can be modelled by a kinetic equation, which represents the limit case of a system

  13. A particle size distribution was determined from the image analysis. With more expensive equipment,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    contributes to fines generation during mining operations, the best practice is to replace drill bits Distribution Analysis Overview Kennametal, Incorporated is a major manufacturer of drill bits for mining ideally sized, half-inch pieces of coal. Because dull drill bits on mining machines significantly

  14. The Magnificent Seven: Magnetic fields and surface temperature distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Haberl

    2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Presently seven nearby radio-quiet isolated neutron stars discovered in ROSAT data and characterized by thermal X-ray spectra are known. They exhibit very similar properties and despite intensive searches their number remained constant since 2001 which led to their name ``The Magnificent Seven''. Five of the stars exhibit pulsations in their X-ray flux with periods in the range of 3.4 s to 11.4 s. XMM-Newton observations revealed broad absorption lines in the X-ray spectra which are interpreted as cyclotron resonance absorption lines by protons or heavy ions and / or atomic transitions shifted to X-ray energies by strong magnetic fields of the order of 10^13 G. New XMM-Newton observations indicate more complex X-ray spectra with multiple absorption lines. Pulse-phase spectroscopy of the best studied pulsars RX J0720.4-3125 and RBS 1223 reveals variations in derived emission temperature and absorption line depth with pulse phase. Moreover, RX J0720.4-3125 shows long-term spectral changes which are interpreted as due to free precession of the neutron star. Modeling of the pulse profiles of RX J0720.4-3125 and RBS 1223 provides information about the surface temperature distribution of the neutron stars indicating hot polar caps which have different temperatures, different sizes and are probably not located in antipodal positions.

  15. DVIR, KOPPARTY, SARAF, AND SUDAN ON THE SIZE OF KAKEYA SETS IN FINITE FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lev, Vsevolod F.

    DVIR, KOPPARTY, SARAF, AND SUDAN ON THE SIZE OF KAKEYA SETS IN FINITE FIELDS AN EXPOSITION was made in a subsequent paper by Dvir, Kopparty, Saraf, and Sudan [DKSS], who use what they call

  16. Three-dimensional assemblies built up by quantum dots in size-quantization regime: Band gap shifts due to size-distribution of cadmium selenide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pejova, Biljana, E-mail: biljana@pmf.ukim.mk

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, it is predicted that the band gap energy of a three-dimensional quantum dot assembly exhibits a red shift when the dispersion of the crystal size distribution is enlarged, even at a fixed average value thereof. The effect is manifested when the size quantization regime in individual quantum dots constituting the assembly has been entered. Under the same conditions, the sub-band gap absorption tails are characterized with large Urbach energies, which could be one or two orders of magnitude larger than the value characteristic for the non-quantized case. - Graphical abstract: Band gap shifts due to size-distribution of nanoparticles in 3D assemblies built up by quantum dots in size-quantization regime. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Optical absorption of 3D QD assemblies in size-quantization regime is modeled. • Band gap energy of the QD solid depends on the size-distribution of the nanoparticles. • QD solid samples with same ?R? exhibit band gap shift depending on size distribution. • QD size distribution leads to large Urbach energies.

  17. Probe measurements and numerical model predictions of evolving size distributions in premixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Filippo, A.; Sgro, L.A.; Lanzuolo, G.; D'Alessio, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle size distributions (PSDs), measured with a dilution probe and a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA), and numerical predictions of these PSDs, based on a model that includes only coagulation or alternatively inception and coagulation, are compared to investigate particle growth processes and possible sampling artifacts in the post-flame region of a C/O = 0.65 premixed laminar ethylene-air flame. Inputs to the numerical model are the PSD measured early in the flame (the initial condition for the aerosol population) and the temperature profile measured along the flame's axial centerline. The measured PSDs are initially unimodal, with a modal mobility diameter of 2.2 nm, and become bimodal later in the post-flame region. The smaller mode is best predicted with a size-dependent coagulation model, which allows some fraction of the smallest particles to escape collisions without resulting in coalescence or coagulation through the size-dependent coagulation efficiency ({gamma}{sub SD}). Instead, when {gamma} = 1 and the coagulation rate is equal to the collision rate for all particles regardless of their size, the coagulation model significantly under predicts the number concentration of both modes and over predicts the size of the largest particles in the distribution compared to the measured size distributions at various heights above the burner. The coagulation ({gamma}{sub SD}) model alone is unable to reproduce well the larger particle mode (mode II). Combining persistent nucleation with size-dependent coagulation brings the predicted PSDs to within experimental error of the measurements, which seems to suggest that surface growth processes are relatively insignificant in these flames. Shifting measured PSDs a few mm closer to the burner surface, generally adopted to correct for probe perturbations, does not produce a better matching between the experimental and the numerical results. (author)

  18. Probability Distribution of Curvatures of Isosurfaces in Gaussian Random Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo R. S. Mendonca; Rahul Bhotika; James V. Miller

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An expression for the joint probability distribution of the principal curvatures at an arbitrary point in the ensemble of isosurfaces defined on isotropic Gaussian random fields on Rn is derived. The result is obtained by deriving symmetry properties of the ensemble of second derivative matrices of isotropic Gaussian random fields akin to those of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble.

  19. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from condensation of vaporized material and subsequent rapid formation of aggregates. Particles of larger size, resulting from ejection of melted material or fragments from the cutting zone, were also observed. This study presents data regarding the metal cutting rate, particle size distribution, and their generation rate, while using different cutting tools and metals. The study shows that respirable particles constitute only a small fraction of the released kerf.

  20. Ultrahigh throughput plasma processing of free standing silicon nanocrystals with lognormal size distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, Ilker; Kramer, Nicolaas J.; Westermann, Rene H. J.; Verheijen, Marcel A. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dohnalova, Katerina; Gregorkiewicz, Tom [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smets, Arno H. M. [Photovoltaic Materials and Devices Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Sanden, Mauritius C. M. van de [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER), P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a method for synthesizing free standing silicon nanocrystals in an argon/silane gas mixture by using a remote expanding thermal plasma. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal that the distribution has a bimodal shape consisting of two distinct groups of small and large silicon nanocrystals with sizes in the range 2-10 nm and 50-120 nm, respectively. We also observe that both size distributions are lognormal which is linked with the growth time and transport of nanocrystals in the plasma. Average size control is achieved by tuning the silane flow injected into the vessel. Analyses on morphological features show that nanocrystals are monocrystalline and spherically shaped. These results imply that formation of silicon nanocrystals is based on nucleation, i.e., these large nanocrystals are not the result of coalescence of small nanocrystals. Photoluminescence measurements show that silicon nanocrystals exhibit a broad emission in the visible region peaked at 725 nm. Nanocrystals are produced with ultrahigh throughput of about 100 mg/min and have state of the art properties, such as controlled size distribution, easy handling, and room temperature visible photoluminescence.

  1. Scale-free Universal Spectrum for Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distribution for Davos, Mauna Loa and Izana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric flows exhibit fractal fluctuations and inverse power law form for power spectra indicating an eddy continuum structure for the selfsimilar fluctuations. A general systems theory for fractal fluctuations developed by the author is based on the simple visualisation that large eddies form by space-time integration of enclosed turbulent eddies, a concept analogous to Kinetic Theory of Gases in Classical Statistical Physics. The ordered growth of atmospheric eddy continuum is in dynamical equilibrium and is associated with Maximum Entropy Production. The model predicts universal (scale-free) inverse power law form for fractal fluctuations expressed in terms of the golden mean. Atmospheric particulates are held in suspension in the fractal fluctuations of vertical wind velocity. The mass or radius (size) distribution for homogeneous suspended atmospheric particulates is expressed as a universal scale-independent function of the golden mean, the total number concentration and the mean volume radius. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement (within two standard deviations on either side of the mean) with total averaged radius size spectra for the AERONET (aerosol inversions) stations Davos and Mauna Loa for the year 2010 and Izana for the year 2009 daily averages. The general systems theory model for aerosol size distribution is scale free and is derived directly from atmospheric eddy dynamical concepts. At present empirical models such as the log normal distribution with arbitrary constants for the size distribution of atmospheric suspended particulates are used for quantitative estimation of earth-atmosphere radiation budget related to climate warming/cooling trends. The universal aerosol size spectrum will have applications in computations of radiation balance of earth-atmosphere system in climate models.

  2. Particle Size Distribution Data From Existing Boreholes at the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Martin, Maria B.; Moreno, Jorge R.; Ferri, Rosalie M.; Horton, Duane G.; Reidel, Stephen P.

    2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides particle size distribution data for samples near the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Site that were archived in the Hanford Geotechnical Sample Library. Seventy-nine sediment samples were analyzed from four boreholes. Samples were collected from every ten feet in the boreholes. Eightly percent of the samples were classified as slightly gravelly sand. Fifteen percent were classified as gravelly sand, gravelly silty sand, or sandy gravels. These data indicate that the particle size of the sediment is consistent across the ILAW site and is dominated by sand in the upper part of the Hanford formation with more gravel rich units in the lower part.

  3. 6/10/12 The use of acoustic inversion to estimate the bubble size distribution in pipelines 1/4energy-daily.com/.../The_use_of_acoustic_inversion_to_estimate_the_bubble_size_distribution_in_...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    6/10/12 The use of acoustic inversion to estimate the bubble size distribution in pipelines 1 address ... yes . . . The use of acoustic inversion to estimate the bubble size distribution in pipelines devised a new method to more accurately measure gas bubbles in pipelines. The ability to measure gas

  4. The effect of fuel and engine design on diesel exhaust particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgard, K.J.; Johnson, J.H. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to obtain diesel particle size distributions from a 1988 and a 1991 diesel engine using three different fuels and two exhaust control technologies (a ceramic particle trap and an oxidation catalytic converter). The particle size distributions from both engines were used to develop models to estimate the composition of the individual size particles. Nucleation theory of the H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor is used to predict when nuclei-mode particles will form in the dilution tunnel. Combining the theory with the experimental data, the conditions necessary in the dilution tunnel for particle formation are predicted. The paper also contains a discussion on the differences between the 1988 and 1991 engine`s particle size distributions. The results indicated that nuclei mode particles (0.0075--0.046 {micro}m) are formed in the dilution tunnel and consist of more than 80% H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles when using the 1988 engine and 0.29 wt% sulfur fuel. Nucleation theory indicated that H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles may form during dilution at 0.03 wt% fuel sulfur levels and above. The 1991 engine was designed for lower particulate emissions than the 1988 engine and the 1991 engine`s accumulation mode particles (0.046-1.0 {micro}m) were reduced more than 80% by volume compared to the 1988 engine using the same low sulfur fuel. The particle size composition model indicated that using low sulfur fuel and the 1991 engine, the nuclei mode contained more than 45% of the total solid particles and over 85% of the soluble organic fraction.

  5. Finite-size analysis of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leverrier, Anthony [Institut Telecom / Telecom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, 46 rue Barrault, 75634 Paris Cedex 13, France and ICFO-Institut de Ciences Fotoniques, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Grosshans, Frederic [Laboratoire de Photonique Quantique et Moleculaire, ENS de Cachan, UMR CNRS 8735, F-94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Grangier, Philippe [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d'Optique, CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this paper is to extend the framework of finite-size analysis recently developed for quantum key distribution to continuous-variable protocols. We do not solve this problem completely here, and we mainly consider the finite-size effects on the parameter estimation procedure. Despite the fact that some questions are left open, we are able to give an estimation of the secret key rate for protocols which do not contain a postselection procedure. As expected, these results are significantly more pessimistic than those obtained in the asymptotic regime. However, we show that recent continuous-variable protocols are able to provide fully secure secret keys in the finite-size scenario, over distances larger than 50 km.

  6. Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a,*, Randal J. Southard a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a Soil particle size distribution Soil water content a b s t r a c t Management of soils to reduce earlier work of predicting tillage-generated dust emissions based on soil properties. We focus

  7. Relationship of sunspot magnetic fields to umbral sizes in return flux theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osherovich, V.A.; Garcia, H.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the relative size of a sunspot umbra and the relative magnitude of the magnetic field at the outer edge of the penumbra is studied. It is found that the sunspot magnetic topology is composed of two magnetic regimes, one consisting of open field lines emerging from the core and extending to infinity, and the second consisting of lines returning to the photosphere. The relative quantity of the return magnetic flux is closely associated with the size of the umbra relative to the penumbra. 31 references.

  8. Prediction of the Size Distributions of Methanol-Ethanol Clusters Detected in VUV Laser/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Prediction of the Size Distributions of Methanol-Ethanol Clusters Detected in VUV Laser distributions and geometries of vapor clusters equilibrated with methanol-ethanol (Me-Et) liquid mixtures were distributions of vapor clusters equilibrated with liquids, ranging from neat alcohols1,2 to methanol-ethanol (Me

  9. Pure Geometric Field Theory: Description of Gravity and Material Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. I. Wanas; Nabil L. Youssef; W. El Hanafy

    2015-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A field theory is constructed in the context of parameterized absolute parallelism\\linebreak geometry. The theory is shown to be a pure gravity one. It is capable of describing the gravitational field and a material distribution in terms of the geometric structure of the geometry used (the parallelization vector fields). Three tools are used to attribute physical properties to the geometric objects admitted by the theory. Poisson and Laplace equations are obtained in the linearized version of the theory. The spherically symmetric solution of the theory, in free space, is found to coincide with the Schwarzschild exterior solution of the general theory of relativity. The theory respects the weak equivalence principle in free space only. Gravity and material distribution are not minimally coupled.

  10. Comparison of airborne and surface particulate size distributions in specific Hanford Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ottley, D.B.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Settled dust from nuclear operations may be contaminated with radionuclides and become resuspended and subsequently breathed. This is the predominate radionuclide inhalation hazard scenario in nuclear facilities that have been deactivated and no longer have liquid in their process systems that may become directly airborne in accident situations. Comparisons were made between indoor ambient airborne particulate size distribution and that of resuspended dust that could become contaminated and subsequently airborne during decommissioning operations at selected nuclear facilities on the Hanford Site. Results indicate that only 5% of the particles, by count, above the breathing zone are greater than ten (10) {mu}m in size and that the particulates that could be resuspended into the breathing zone had a mean aerodynamic equivalent diameter of four (4) {mu}m or less.

  11. Matrix multiplication over word-size prime fields using Bini's approximate formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Matrix multiplication over word-size prime fields using Bini's approximate formula Brice Boyer Jean-Guillaume Dumas Abstract Bini's approximate formula (or border rank) for matrix multiplication achieves a better the approximate formula in the special case where the ring is Z/pZ. Besides, we show an implemen- tation à la

  12. Vertical transport and dynamic size distribution of New Bedford Harbor sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Stephanie Carol

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    02? 1000 0 E 0 08 0 0 06- o IO OO. . " 6 Krone 1000 m 530 O. C 2- 120 0~~~1 oOI- Allersma 0 61- 0 I- 06- 06 04 06[ 02 0 0 2 4 8 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 Salinity (ppt) Fig. 8. - Variation of Particle Settling Velocity...VERTICAL ~SPORT AND DYNAMIC SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF NEW BEDFORD HARBOR SEDIMENTS A Thesis STEPHANIE CAROL SANDERS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&:M University in partia! fulfillment of the requuements for the degree...

  13. The effect of dust size distribution on quantum dust acoustic wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Taibany, W. F.; Behery, E. E. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Damietta Branch, Damietta El-Gedida, P.O. 34517 (Egypt); El-Siragy, N. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta, P.O. 31527 (Egypt)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the quantum hydrodynamics theory, a proposed model for quantum dust acoustic waves (QDAWs) is presented including the dust size distribution (DSD) effect. A quantum version of Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived adequate for describing QDAWs. Two different DSD functions are applied. The relevance of the wave velocity, amplitude, and width to the DSD is investigated numerically. The quantum effect changes only the soliton width. A brief conclusion is presented to the current findings and their relevance to astrophysics data is also discussed.

  14. Magnetic field distribution in the plasma flow generated by a plasma focus discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovaiton and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Krauz, V. I., E-mail: krauz_vi@nrcki.ru; Myalton, V. V.; Velikhov, E. P.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Vinogradova, Yu. V. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic field in the plasma jet propagating from the plasma pinch region along the axis of the chamber in a megajoule PF-3 plasma focus facility is studied. The dynamics of plasma with a trapped magnetic flow is analyzed. The spatial sizes of the plasma jet region in which the magnetic field concentrates are determined in the radial and axial directions. The magnetic field configuration in the plasma jet is investigated: the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field inside the jet is determined. It is shown that the magnetic induction vector at a given point in space can change its direction during the plasma flight. Conclusions regarding the symmetry of the plasma flow propagation relative to the chamber axis are drawn.

  15. Polarized light propagation in highly scattering turbid media with a distribution of the particle size: a Monte Carlo study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Wonshill

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The light propagation in highly scattering turbid media composed of the particles with different size distribution is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation model implemented in Standard C. Monte Carlo method has been widely utilized to study...

  16. In situ diagnostic of the size distribution of nanoparticles generated by ultrashort pulsed laser ablation in vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourquard, Florent; Loir, Anne-Sophie; Donnet, Christophe; Garrelie, Florence, E-mail: florence.garrelie@univ-st-etienne.fr [Université de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5516, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, Saint-Étienne (France)] [Université de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5516, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, Saint-Étienne (France)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We aim to characterize the size distribution of nanoparticles located in the ablation plume produced by femtosecond laser interaction. The proposed method relies on the use of white-light extinction spectroscopy setup assisted by ultrafast intensified temporal gating. This method allows measurement of optical absorbance of a nickel nanoparticles cloud. Simulation of the extinction section of nickel nanoparticles size distributions has been developed in order to compare the measured optical absorbance to the optical extinction by theoretical and experimental nanoparticles size distributions (measured by scanning electron microscopy). A good agreement has been found between the in situ measured optical absorbance and the optical extinction cross section calculated from ex situ nanoparticles size distribution measurements.

  17. The effect of sand grain size distribution on the minimum oil saturation necessary to support in-situ combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, William Marvin

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF SAND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION ON THE MINIMUM OIL SATURATION NECESSARY TO SUPPORT IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by WILLIAM MARVIN DANIEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1973 Major Subject: Petroleum. Engineering THE EFFECT OF SAND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION ON THE MINIMUM OIL SATURATION NECESSARY TO SUPPORT IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by WILLIAM MARVIN DANIEL Approved...

  18. Determination of aerosol size distributions at uranium mill tailings remedial action project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, G.J.; Reif, R.H. [CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoover, M.D.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an ongoing program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, to stabilize piles of uranium mill tailings in order to reduce the potential radiological hazards to the public. Protection of workers and the general public against airborne radioactivity during remedial action is a top priority at the UMTRA Project. The primary occupational radionuclides of concern are {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Po, and the short-lived decay products of {sup 222}Rn with {sup 230}Th causing the majority of the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from inhaling uranium mill tailings. Prior to this study, a default particle size of 1.0 {mu}m activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was assumed for airborne radioactive tailings dust. Because of recent changes in DOE requirements, all DOE operations are now required to use the CEDE methodology, instead of the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) methodology, to evaluate internal radiation exposures. Under the transition from AEDE to CEDE, with a 1.0 {mu}m AMAD particle size, lower bioassay action levels would be required for the UMTRA Project. This translates into an expanded internal dosimetry program where significantly more bioassay monitoring would be required at the UMTRA Project sites. However, for situations where the particle size distribution is known to differ significantly from 1.0 {mu}m AMAD, the DOE allows for corrections to be made to both the estimated dose to workers and the derived air concentration (DAC) values. For particle sizes larger than 1.0 {mu}m AMAD, the calculated CEDE from inhaling tailings would be relatively lower.

  19. SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period January 01, 2006 to June 30, 2006 which covers the fourth six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse completed obtaining additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in a previous reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed obtaining raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (Cd/m) information for 9 more biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated before in this project. Results of the mean mass data obtained to date are reported here, and analysis of the raw data collected by REM is in progress.

  20. SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2005 to December 31, 2005 which covers the third six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse continued to obtain additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in the last reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has obtained raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (C{sub d}/m) information for several biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated in the last reporting period. Preliminary results of the mean mass and the shape data obtained are reported here, and more data collection is in progress.

  1. Use of ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy to determine the size distribution of clay tactoids in aqueous suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samim Ali; Ranjini Bandyopadhyay

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The dispersion processes of aqueous samples of clay are studied using ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy. The attenuation spectra that are acquired in the frequency range $10-100$ MHz are used to determine the particle size distributions (PSDs) for different concentrations and ages of the clay suspensions. Our analysis, using equivalent spherical diameter (ESD) for circular discs under Stokes drag in samples of concentrations greater than 1.5\\% w/v, shows that a substantial fraction of the aggregates in suspension are actually tactoids that are composed of more than one platelet. This is in contrast to the general belief that clay disperses into individual platelets in the concentration range where their suspensions exhibit glassy behavior. We conclude that the incomplete fragmentation of the clay tactoids arises from the rapid enhancement of the inter-tactoid Coulombic repulsion.

  2. Field Test of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan-Lin Tang; Hua-Lei Yin; Si-Jing Chen; Yang Liu; Wei-Jun Zhang; Xiao Jiang; Lu Zhang; Jian Wang; Li-Xing You; Jian-Yu Guan; Dong-Xu Yang; Zhen Wang; Hao Liang; Zhen Zhang; Nan Zhou; Xiongfeng Ma; Teng-Yun Chen; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A main type of obstacles of practical applications of quantum key distribution (QKD) network is various attacks on detection. Measurement-device-independent QKD (MDIQKD) protocol is immune to all these attacks and thus a strong candidate for network security. Recently, several proof-of-principle demonstrations of MDIQKD have been performed. Although novel, those experiments are implemented in the laboratory with secure key rates less than 0.1 bps. Besides, they need manual calibration frequently to maintain the system performance. These aspects render these demonstrations far from practicability. Thus, justification is extremely crucial for practical deployment into the field environment. Here, by developing an automatic feedback MDIQKD system operated at a high clock rate, we perform a field test via deployed fiber network of 30 km total length, achieving a 16.9 bps secure key rate. The result lays the foundation for a global quantum network which can shield from all the detection-side attacks.

  3. A General Systems Theory for Atmospheric Flows and Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover pattern and inverse power law form for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as windspeed, temperature, rainfall etc. Inverse power law form for power spectra indicate long-range spacetime correlations or non-local connections and is a signature of selforganised criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature such as river flows, population dynamics, heart beat patterns etc. The author has developed a general systems theory which predicts the observed selforganised criticality as a signature of quantumlike chaos in dynamical systems. The model predictions are (i) The fractal fluctuations can be resolved into an overall logarithmic spiral trajectory with the quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern for the internal structure. (ii) The probability distribution represents the power (variance) spectrum for fractal fluctuations and follows universal inverse power law form incorporating the golden mean. Such a result that the additive amplitudes of eddies when squared represent probability distribution is observed in the subatomic dynamics of quantum systems such as the electron or photon. Therefore the irregular or unpredictable fractal fluctuations exhibit quantumlike chaos. (iii) Atmospheric aerosols are held in suspension by the vertical velocity distribution (spectrum). The atmospheric aerosol size spectrum is derived in terms of the universal inverse power law characterizing atmospheric eddy energy spectrum. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement with the following two experimentally determined atmospheric aerosol data sets, (i) SAFARI 2000 CV-580 Aerosol Data, Dry Season 2000 (CARG) (ii) World Data Centre Aerosols data sets for the three stations Ny {\\AA}lesund, Pallas and Hohenpeissenberg.

  4. Collection strategy, inner morphology, and size distribution of dust particles in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Balden; N. Endstrasser; P. W. Humrickhouse; V. Rohde; M. Rasinski; U. von Toussaint; S. Elgeti; R. Neu

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dust collection and analysis strategy in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is described. During five consecutive operation campaigns (2007–2011), Si collectors were installed, which were supported by filtered vacuum sampling and collection with adhesive tapes in 2009. The outer and inner morphology (e.g. shape) and elemental composition of the collected particles were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The majority of the ~50?000 analysed particles on the Si collectors of campaign 2009 contain tungsten—the plasma-facing material in AUG—and show basically two different types of outer appearance: spheroids and irregularly shaped particles. By far most of the W-dominated spheroids consist of a solid W core, i.e. solidified W droplets. A part of these particles is coated with a low-Z material; a process that seems to happen presumably in the far scrape-off layer plasma. In addition, some conglomerates of B, C and W appear as spherical particles after their contact with plasma. By far most of the particles classified as B-, C- and W-dominated irregularly shaped particles consist of the same conglomerate with varying fraction of embedded W in the B–C matrix and some porosity, which can exceed 50%. The fragile structures of many conglomerates confirm the absence of intensive plasma contact. Both the ablation and mobilization of conglomerate material and the production of W droplets are proposed to be triggered by arcing. The size distribution of each dust particle class is best described by a log-normal distribution allowing an extrapolation of the dust volume and surface area. The maximum in this distribution is observed above the resolution limit of 0.28 µm only for the W-dominated spheroids, at around 1 µm. The amount of W-containing dust is extrapolated to be less than 300 mg on the horizontal areas of AUG.

  5. Performance of underfloor air distribution: Results of a field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas

    2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) is a new method of supplying heated or cooled air throughout a building. Reported advantages of UFAD include easy relocation of air supply diffusers, energy savings, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). We measured several aspects of the performance of an UFAD system installed in a medium-size office building. The measured air change effectiveness was very close to unity, which is comparable to that measured in buildings with typical overhead air distribution. The pollutant removal efficiency for carbon dioxide was 13 percent higher than expected in a space with well-mixed air, suggesting a 13 percent reduction in exposures to occupant generated pollutants. The increase in indoor air temperatures with height above the floor was only 1 to 2 C (2-4 F). This amount of thermal stratification could reduce the sensible energy requirements for cooling of outdoor air by approximately 10 percent. The occupants level of satisfaction with thermal conditions w as well above average and this high satisfaction rating could possibly be due, in all or part, to the use of a UFAD system. The results of this study provide some evidence of moderate energy and IAQ-related benefits of UFAD. Before general conclusions are drawn, the benefits need to be confirmed in other studies.

  6. Combustion of sludge waste in FBC. Distribution of metals and particle sizes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozinski, J.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Rink, K.K.; Lighty, J.S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the increases in the amounts of sludge generated and increasingly stringent regulations regarding its disposal, alternative methods to landfilling are becoming more important. Fluidized bed combustion is one such alternative, providing permanent disposal of the sludge. In this research, metal-solid particle characteristics during combustion of a sludge waste were studied. The sludge was a result of de-inking process. Experiments were carried out using a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed combustion facility (CFB). The fluidized bed was operated in the bubbling mode. The sludge was separately burned with silica sand particles, ultrasorb particles, and alumina particles as bed materials. Major flue gas components (CO{sub 2}, CO, O{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}) were measured continuously. Gas temperature profiles were determined using a water-cooled suction pyrometer. Solid particle samples were collected at multiple locations using a dilution tunnel sampling system. The solid samples were analyzed to determine ash structure, size and composition distributions. Metal analyses were performed using a computer-controlled Electron Probe Microanalyzer (EPMA) equipped with four Wavelength-Dispersive Spectrometers. Analyses of individual fly ash particles indicated that heavy metal elements (Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni) were generally located in regions near the particle`s core. Lighter metals (Si, Al, Ca, Na, K) were present across the entire cross-section of a particle, with the highest concentrations at the particle surface. These distributions were found to be similar regardless of the type of bed material. This suggests that the light metal layers are formed because of the internal rearrangements of a chemical nature as opposed to physical deposition of light metal fragments on particle surfaces.

  7. Impacts of Venturi Turbulent Mixing on the Size Distributions of Sodium Chloride and Dioctyl-Phthalate Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M-D.

    2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal combustion engines are a major source of airborne particulate matter (PM). The size of the engine PM is in the sub-micrometer range. The number of engine particles per unit volume is high, normally in the range of 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 14}. To measure the size distribution of the engine particles dilution of an aerosol sample is required. A diluter utilizing a venturi ejector mixing technique is commercially available and tested. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if turbulence created by the ejector in the mini-dilutor changes the size of particles passing through it. The results of the NaCl aerosol experiments show no discernible difference in the geometric mean diameter and geometric standard deviation of particles passing through the ejector. Similar results were found for the DOP particles. The ratio of the total number concentrations before and after the ejector indicates that a dilution ratio of approximately 20 applies equally for DOP and NaCl particles. This indicates the dilution capability of the ejector is not affected by the particle composition. The statistical analysis results of the first and second moments of a distribution indicate that the ejector may not change the major parameters (e.g., the geometric mean diameter and geometric standard deviation) characterizing the size distributions of NaCl and DOP particles. However, when the skewness was examined, it indicates that the ejector modifies the particle size distribution significantly. The ejector could change the skewness of the distribution in an unpredictable and inconsistent manner. Furthermore, when the variability of particle counts in individual size ranges as a result of the ejector is examined, one finds that the variability is greater for DOP particles in the size range of 40-150 nm than for NaCl particles in the size range of 30 to 350 nm. The numbers or particle counts in this size region are high enough that the Poisson counting errors are small (<10%) compared with the tail regions. This result shows that the ejector device could have a higher bin-to-bin counting uncertainty for ''soft'' particles such as DOP than for a solid dry particle like NaCl. The results suggest that it may be difficult to precisely characterize the size distribution of particles ejected from the mini-dilution system if the particle is not solid.

  8. Solitary Dust--Acoustic Waves in a Plasma with Two-Temperature Ions and Distributed Grain Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Prudskikh

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of weakly nonlinear dust--acoustic waves in a dusty plasma containing two ion species with different temperatures is explored. The nonlinear equations describing both the quadratic and cubic plasma nonlinearities are derived. It is shown that the properties of dust--acoustic waves depend substantially on the grain size distribution. In particular, for solitary dust--acoustic waves with a positive potential to exist in a plasma with distributed grain size, it is necessary that the difference between the temperatures of two ion species be large that that in the case of unusized grains.

  9. Evolution of soot size distribution in premixed ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flames: Experimental and modeling study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echavarria, Carlos A.; Sarofim, Adel F.; Lighty, JoAnn S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); D'Anna, Andrea [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita ''Federico II'' di Napoli, Naples (Italy)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of benzene concentration in the initial fuel on the evolution of soot size distribution in ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flat flames was characterized by experimental measurements and model predictions of size and number concentration within the flames. Experimentally, a scanning mobility particle sizer was used to allow spatially resolved and online measurements of particle concentration and sizes in the nanometer-size range. The model couples a detailed kinetic scheme with a discrete-sectional approach to follow the transition from gas-phase to nascent particles and their coagulation to larger soot particles. The evolution of soot size distribution (experimental and modeled) in pure ethylene and ethylene flames doped with benzene showed a typical nucleation-sized (since particles do not actually nucleate in the classical sense particle inception is often used in place of nucleation) mode close to the burner surface, and a bimodal behavior at greater height above burner (HAB). However, major features were distinguished between the data sets. The growth of nucleation and agglomeration-sized particles was faster for ethylene/benzene/air flames, evidenced by the earlier presence of bimodality in these flames. The most significant changes in size distribution were attributed to an increase in benzene concentration in the initial fuel. However, these changes were more evident for high temperature flames. In agreement with the experimental data, the model also predicted the decrease of nucleation-sized particles in the postflame region for ethylene flames doped with benzene. This behavior was associated with the decrease of soot precursors after the main oxidation zone of the flames. (author)

  10. Effect of Field Dependent Core Size on Reversible Magnetization of High-? Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, V. G. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Prozorov, R. [Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University; Bud'ko, S. L. [Ames Laboratory; Canfield, P. C. [Ames Laboratory; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Karpinski, J. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology; Zhigadlo, N. D. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology; Miranovic, P. [University of Montenegro, Serbia and Montenegro

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field dependence of the vortex core size {zeta}(B) is incorporated in the London model, in order to describe reversible magnetization M(B,T) for a number of materials with large Ginzburg-Landau parameter {kappa}. The dependence {zeta}(B) is directly related to deviations in M(ln B) from linear behavior prescribed by the standard London model. A simple method to extract {zeta}(B) from the magnetization data is proposed. For most materials examined, {zeta}(B) so obtained decreases with increasing field and is in qualitative agreement both with behavior extracted from {micro}SR and small-angle neutron-scattering data and with that predicted theoretically.

  11. Surface Area, Volume, Mass, and Density Distributions for Sized Biomass Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to June 30, 2007 which covers the entire performance period of the project. 25 individual biomass particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546 in the size range of 100-200 microns) were levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and their external surface area, volume, and drag coefficient/mass (C{sub d}/m) ratios were characterized applying highly specialized video based and high-speed diode array imaging systems. Analysis methods were employed using shape and drag information to calculate mass and density distributions for these particles. Results of these measurements and analyses were validated by independent mass measurements using a particle weighing and counting technique. Similar information for 28 PSOC 1451D bituminous coal particles was retrieved from a previously published work. Using these two information, density correlations for coal/biomass blends were developed. These correlations can be used to estimate the density of the blend knowing either the volume fraction or the mass fraction of coal in the blend. The density correlations presented here will be useful in predicting the burning rate of coal/biomass blends in cofiring combustors. Finally, a discussion on technological impacts and economic projections of burning biomass with coal in US power plants is presented.

  12. Characterization of Vertical Velocity and Drop Size Distribution Parameters in Widespread Precipitation at ARM Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giangrande S. E.; Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extended, high-resolution measurements of vertical air motion and median volume drop diameter D0 in widespread precipitation from three diverse Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) locations [Lamont, Oklahoma, Southern Great Plains site (SGP); Niamey, Niger; and Black Forest, Germany] are presented. The analysis indicates a weak (0-10 cm{sup -1}) downward air motion beneath the melting layer for all three regions, a magnitude that is to within the typical uncertainty of the retrieval methods. On average, the hourly estimated standard deviation of the vertical air motion is 0.25 m s{sup -1} with no pronounced vertical structure. Profiles of D0 vary according to region and rainfall rate. The standard deviation of 1-min-averaged D0 profiles for isolated rainfall rate intervals is 0.3-0.4 mm. Additional insights into the form of the raindrop size distribution are provided using available dual-frequency Doppler velocity observations at SGP. The analysis suggests that gamma functions better explain paired velocity observations and radar retrievals for the Oklahoma dataset. This study will be useful in assessing uncertainties introduced in the measurement of precipitation parameters from ground-based and spaceborne remote sensors that are due to small-scale variability.

  13. Impacts of Venturi Turbulent Mixing on the Size Distribution of Sodium Chloride and Dioctyl-Phthalate Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M.-D.; Wainman, T.; Storey, J.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal combustion engines are a major source of airborne particulate matter (PM). The size of the engine PM is in the sub-micrometer range. The number of engine particles per unit volume is high, normally in the range of 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 14}. To measure the size distribution of the engine particles dilution of an aerosol sample is required. A diluter utilizing a venturi ejector mixing technique is commercially available and tested. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if turbulence created by the ejector in the mini-dilutor changes the size of particles passing through it.

  14. Method development and validation for measuring the particle size distribution of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) powders.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Sharissa Gay

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, the critical particle properties of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) that influence deflagration-to-detonation time in exploding bridge wire detonators (EBW) are not known in sufficient detail to allow development of a predictive failure model. The specific surface area (SSA) of many PETN powders has been measured using both permeametry and gas absorption methods and has been found to have a critical effect on EBW detonator performance. The permeametry measure of SSA is a function of particle shape, packed bed pore geometry, and particle size distribution (PSD). Yet there is a general lack of agreement in PSD measurements between laboratories, raising concerns regarding collaboration and complicating efforts to understand changes in EBW performance related to powder properties. Benchmarking of data between laboratories that routinely perform detailed PSD characterization of powder samples and the determination of the most appropriate method to measure each PETN powder are necessary to discern correlations between performance and powder properties and to collaborate with partnering laboratories. To this end, a comparison was made of the PSD measured by three laboratories using their own standard procedures for light scattering instruments. Three PETN powder samples with different surface areas and particle morphologies were characterized. Differences in bulk PSD data generated by each laboratory were found to result from variations in sonication of the samples during preparation. The effect of this sonication was found to depend on particle morphology of the PETN samples, being deleterious to some PETN samples and advantageous for others in moderation. Discrepancies in the submicron-sized particle characterization data were related to an instrument-specific artifact particular to one laboratory. The type of carrier fluid used by each laboratory to suspend the PETN particles for the light scattering measurement had no consistent effect on the resulting PSD data. Finally, the SSA of the three powders was measured using both permeametry and gas absorption methods, enabling the PSD to be linked to the SSA for these PETN powders. Consistent characterization of other PETN powders can be performed using the appropriate sample-specific preparation method, so that future studies can accurately identify the effect of changes in the PSD on the SSA and ultimately model EBW performance.

  15. For economic energy, we need: tritium, large size to obtain hot fusing plasma; high fields and large currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11 For economic energy, we need: tritium, large size to obtain hot fusing plasma; high fields: a Component Test Facility is much needed; ST appears simplest and most economic in tritium: BUT the high cost

  16. Granular Matter 2, 179187 c Springer-Verlag 2000 Effect of particle size distribution on pile tip resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    Granular Matter 2, 179­187 c Springer-Verlag 2000 Effect of particle size distribution on pile tip the specific boundary problem associated with the penetration of a model pile into two different gradings of fine particles on the pile end bearing resistance. The first grading of sand comprised particles

  17. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials Dale P. Bentz* Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute-Jochen Haecker* Wilhelm Dyckerhoff Institut, 65203 Wiesbaden, Germany The influence of cement particle

  18. Size distribution of fine Particles in Stack emissions of a 600-MWe coal-fired Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Size distribution of fine Particles in Stack emissions of a 600-MWe coal-fired Power Plant I coal-fired power plant. Aknowledgements: French environment agency ADEME (Contract number 04-74-C0018 that was carried out in March 2006 at a 600-MWe coal-fired power plant. 51 ineris-00973267,version1-4Apr2014 Author

  19. Three-dimensional Studies of Aerosol Ions and Their Size Distribution in East1 Asia During Spring 20012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandu, Adrian

    2 condensation and gas phase ammonia distribution determine the nitrate size and32 gas observations. The regional27 chemical transport model, STEM-2K3, which includes the on-line gas-aerosol thermodynamic28 module SCAPE II, and explicitly considers chemical aging of dust is used in the analysis. The29

  20. 6/10/12 The use of acoustic inversion to estimate the bubble size distribution in pipelines | Science 5 Senses 1/4...globalproductivityforum.info/.../the-use-of-acoustic-inversion-to-estimate-the-bubble-size-distribu...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    6/10/12 The use of acoustic inversion to estimate the bubble size distribution in pipelines method to more accurately measure gas bubbles in pipelines. The ability to measure gas bubbles in 2010. Currently, the most popular technique for estimating the gas bubble size distribution (BSD

  1. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at higher magnetic fields. On the exit side there is mostly moderate to high skin dose increases for 0.2-3 T with the only exception being large positive angles. Exit bolus of 1 cm thickness will have a significant impact on lowering such exit skin dose increases that occur as a result of the ERE.

  2. Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system X dependence of the thermal stability factor, the width of the thermal energy barrier distribution- ropy energy distribution and the interaction and the thermal energy barrier distribution determined

  3. Comparison of the bubble size distribution in silicate foams using 2-dimensional images and 3-dimensional x-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert, G.; Baker, D.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Allard, E.; Larocque, J. (McGill); (UC)

    2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Three silicate glasses were hydrated at high pressure and then heated at atmospheric pressure to exsolve the water into bubbles and create foams. The bubble size distribution in these foams was measured by x-ray microtomography on the GSECARS BM-13 beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The bubble area distributions were measured in two dimensions using the image slices produced from the microtomography and the software ImageJ. The bubble volume distributions were measured from the three-dimensional tomographic images with the BLOB3D software. We found that careful analysis of the microtomography data in both two and three dimensions was necessary to avoid the physically unrealistic, experimental artifact of identifying and counting many small bubbles whose surfaces were not defined by a septum of glass. When this artifact was avoided the foams demonstrated power-law distributions of bubble sizes in both two and three dimensions. Conversion of the power-law exponents for bubble areas measured in two dimensions to exponents for bubble volumes usually agreed with the measured three dimensional volume exponents. Furthermore, the power-law distributions for bubble volumes typically agree with multiple theories of bubble growth, all of which yield an exponent of 1 for the cumulative bubble volume distribution. The measured bubble volume distributions with exponents near 0.3 can be explained by diffusive growth as proposed by other authors, but distributions with exponents near 1.4 remain to be explained and are the subject of continuing research on the effects of water concentration and melt viscosity on foaming behavior.

  4. The environment of a geomaterial (soil, rock, concrete) determines its susceptibility to failure: grain size distribution and mineralogy, fluid-saturation, pore fluid chemistry, current state of stress, history, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    to failure: grain size distribution and mineralogy, fluid-saturation, pore fluid chemistry, current state

  5. Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relationships for radar hydrology Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 615627 (2001) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relationships for radar hydrology 615 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 615­627 (2001) © EGS Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity­rain rate relationships for radar hydrology* Remko Uijlenhoet1 Sub-department Water Resources

  6. Collapse of non-spherically symmetric scalar field distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koyel Ganguly; Narayan Banerjee

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work the collapse scenario of some exact non-spherical models with a minimally coupled scalar field is studied. Scalar field collapse with planar as well as toroidal, cylindrical and pseudoplanar symmetries have been investigated. It is shown that the scalar field may have collapsing modes even if it has the equation of state corresponding to that of a dark energy.

  7. Method and apparatus for controlled size distribution of gel microspheres formed from aqueous dispersions. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryon, A.D.; Haas, P.A.; Vavruska, J.S.

    1982-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for making a population of dense, closely size-controlled microspheres by sol-gel procedures wherein said microspheres are characterized by a significant percentage of said population being within a predetermined, relatively narrow size range. This is accomplished by subjecting aqueous dispersions of a sol, within a water-immiscible organic liquid to a turbulent flow. Microsphere populations thus provided are useful in vibratory-packed processes for nuclear fuels to be irradiated in LWR- and FBR-type nuclear reactors.

  8. Marine particle dynamics : sinking velocities, size distributions, fluxes, and microbial degradation rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonnell, Andrew M. P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sinking flux of particulate matter into the ocean interior is an oceanographic phenomenon that fuels much of the metabolic demand of the subsurface ocean and affects the distribution of carbon and other elements ...

  9. Field measurements of interactions between furnaces and forced air distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of equipment that provides the heating energy (the furnace, boiler or heat pump) and the method usedLBNL 40587 Field measurements of interactions between furnaces and forced air distribution systems Vol. 104 Part 1 Field measurements of interactions between furnaces and forced air distribution

  10. Importance of Size and Distribution of Ni Nanoparticles for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Microalgae Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Wenji; Zhao, Chen; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved synthetic approaches for preparing small-sized Ni nanoparticles (d=3 nm) supported on HBEA zeolite have been explored and compared with the traditional impregnation method. The formation of surface nickel silicate/aluminate involved in the two precipitation processes are inferred to lead to the stronger interaction between the metal and the support. The lower Brønsted acid concentrations of these two Ni/HBEA catalysts compared with the parent zeolite caused by the partial exchange of Brønsted acid sites by Ni2+ cations do not influence the hydrodeoxygenation rates, but alter the product selectivity. Higher initial rates and higher stability have been achieved with these optimized catalysts for the hydrodeoxygenation of stearic acid and microalgae oil. Small metal particles facilitate high initial catalytic activity in the fresh sample and size uniformity ensures high catalyst stability.

  11. Inhalation toxicology of red and violet mixtures. Chamber concentration and particle-size distribution report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higuchi, M.A.; Davies, D.W.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inhalation exposure facility was developed at the U.S. EPA, RTP, NC to conduct inhalation exposures of rodents and guinea pigs to dye mixtures used by the U.S. Army in the manufacture of smoke munitions. Initially, an evaluation of the prototype chamber aerosol homogeneity was conducted to determine the uniformity and reproducibility of the concentration and particle size of dye aerosol throughout the breathing zone of the test animals. The three dyes, DR11, SR1, and DB3, were chemically analyzed for purity and optically examined for size and shape. All pure dyes appeared to be stable at room temperature except DB3, which decomposes if not stored at 4 C. The particle size ranges varied for each pure dye and structures were either amorphous (azo dye) or crystalline (anthraquinone dyes). The bulk red and violet dye mixtures were analyzed for composition. The chemical analysis of the relative composition of each dye mixture, collected by cascade impactor sampling, revealed fractionation of the mixtures into component dyes.

  12. An Optimization Approach to the Design of Multi-Size Heliostat fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    May 28, 2014 ... Power Tower system with heliostats of different sizes is addressed. Maximizing the effi- ..... URL: http://prod.sandia.gov/techlib/access-control.

  13. EVOLUTION OF DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND AUTOCONVERSION PARAMETERIZATION IN TURBULENT CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscript for publication acknowledges that the United or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government condition (Weibull distribution) determined by the balance between diffusion and drift. Monte Carlo

  14. HII regions in spiral galaxies: Size distribution, luminosity function, and new isochrone diagnostics of density wave kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; J. S. Parker; V. J. Mikles; X. Zhang

    2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the relationship of the HII region luminosity function (HII LF) to the HII region size distribution and density wave triggering in grand-design spiral galaxies. We suggest that the differential nebular size distribution is described by a power law of slope ~ -4, with flattening at radii below ~ 130 pc. This contrasts with the conventional exponential description, but it is physically and quantitatively consistent with the typical observed value of -2 for the HII LF slope. We have developed an interactive code that computes spatial isochrones for the evolving loci of spiral density waves in disk galaxies. This allows comparison of the nebular spatial distribution with the spatial isochrones for simple rotation curve parameters. Our comparisons for four grand-design galaxies suggest that the corotation radius r_co coincides with the outer ends of the star-forming arms. This value for r_co yields the best spatial correspondence between the HII regions and the isochrones, and also appears to yield a coincidence between the Inner Lindblad Resonance with the radial onset of star formation in the arms. Thus, we suggest that isochrones offer a new, simple, and effective technique for determining r_co, and thus the spiral pattern speed. However, application of the isochrones also demonstrates that evolution of the nebular population is difficult to spatially isolate in these galaxies.

  15. When the expansion of finite-size corrections to hydrogen Lamb shift in moments of charge distribution breaks down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, Franziska

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out a limitation of the standard way of accounting the finite-size effects, i.e., when the leading $[(Z\\alpha)^4]$ and subleading $[(Z\\alpha)^5]$ contributions to the Lamb shift are given by the mean-square radius and the third Zemach moment of the charge distribution. This limitation may have profound consequences for the interpretation of the "proton size puzzle". We find, for instance, that the de R\\'ujula toy model of the proton form factor does not resolve the puzzle as claimed, despite the large value of the third Zemach moment. Given the formula which does not rely on the radii expansion, we show how tiny (less than a hundredth of percent) changes in the proton electric form factor at a MeV scale would be able to explain the puzzle.

  16. Monte Carlo modelling of a-Si EPID response: The effect of spectral variations with field size and position

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parent, Laure; Seco, Joao; Evans, Phil M.; Fielding, Andrew; Dance, David R. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Q337 Gardens Point Campus, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Fulham Road, London, SW3 6JJ (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on predicting the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) image of intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields in the absence of attenuation material in the beam with Monte Carlo methods. As IMRT treatments consist of a series of segments of various sizes that are not always delivered on the central axis, large spectral variations may be observed between the segments. The effect of these spectral variations on the EPID response was studied with fields of various sizes and off-axis positions. A detailed description of the EPID was implemented in a Monte Carlo model. The EPID model was validated by comparing the EPID output factors for field sizes between 1x1 and 26x26 cm{sup 2} at the isocenter. The Monte Carlo simulations agreed with the measurements to within 1.5%. The Monte Carlo model succeeded in predicting the EPID response at the center of the fields of various sizes and offsets to within 1% of the measurements. Large variations (up to 29%) of the EPID response were observed between the various offsets. The EPID response increased with field size and with field offset for most cases. The Monte Carlo model was then used to predict the image of a simple test IMRT field delivered on the beam axis and with an offset. A variation of EPID response up to 28% was found between the on- and off-axis delivery. Finally, two clinical IMRT fields were simulated and compared to the measurements. For all IMRT fields, simulations and measurements agreed within 3%--0.2 cm for 98% of the pixels. The spectral variations were quantified by extracting from the spectra at the center of the fields the total photon yield (Y{sub total}), the photon yield below 1 MeV (Y{sub low}), and the percentage of photons below 1 MeV (P{sub low}). For the studied cases, a correlation was shown between the EPID response variation and Y{sub total}, Y{sub low}, and P{sub low}.

  17. Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technology transfer in residential thermal distribution systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, I.; Sherman, M.; Modera, M.; Siegel, J.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field study concentrated on measurement of duct leakage to outside the conditioned space because this is most useful in energy calculations. For room by room load/comfort requirements, the total duct leakage (including leaks to conditioned space) is more appropriate, particularly for additional comfort considerations. The objective of this field study is to help to identify major sources of uncertainty and to quantify the trade offs between different test methods. The identification of the areas requiring significant improvement will aid in future development of duct leakage test methods. For example, during the course of this study a new method for correcting house pressure tests to account for the presence of duct leakage in measured envelope leakage was developed. Each of the measurement techniques investigated has resulted from a different set of priorities and hence compromises. Thus each one of them is measuring a different physical quantity, although they all report the same parameter; duct leakage to outside at operating conditions. Given that real houses do not meet all of the simplifying assumptions that must be made to achieve similarity, the same numbers from each test method are not expected. Potentially these differences can be quite large and one of the benefits of field measurement is that the differences in the measurements helps put a realistic bound on how different some of these leakage diagnostics may be.

  18. The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetter, J; Forster, N; Ghandhi, J; Foster, D

    2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed exhaust emission data have been taken from a Cummins N-14 single cylinder research engine in which the oil consumption was varied by different engine modifications. Low sulfur fuel was used, and oil consumption was varied by modifying the intake valve stem seals, the exhaust valve stem seals, the oil control ring and combinations of these modifications. Detailed measurements of exhaust gas particle size distributions and chemical composition were made for the various oil consumption configurations for a range of engine loads and speeds. The particulate mass was measured with TEOM and traditional gravimetric filter methods. Filter data for EC/OC, sulfates and trace metals have been taken and analyzed. The trace metals in the particulate mass serve as the basis for assessing oil consumption at the different operating conditions. The data indicate that the oil consumption for the steady state testing done here was approximately an order of magnitude below oil consumption values cited in the literature. We did measure changes in the details of the chemical composition of the particulate for the different engine operating conditions, but it did not correlate with changes in the oil consumption. Furthermore, the data indicate that the particle size distribution is not strongly impacted by low level oil consumption variations observed in this work.

  19. Towards a better understanding of dielectric barrier discharges in ferroelectrets: Paschen breakdown fields in micrometer sized voids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Scott, E-mail: harri4s@cmich.edu [Department of Physics and Science of Advanced Materials Program, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan 48859 (United States); Applied Condensed-Matter Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Mellinger, Axel, E-mail: axel.mellinger@cmich.edu [Department of Physics and Science of Advanced Materials Program, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan 48859 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Charged cellular polypropylene foams (i.e., ferro- or piezoelectrets) demonstrate high piezoelectric activity upon being electrically charged. When an external electric field is applied, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) occur, resulting in a separation of charges which are subsequently deposited on dielectric surfaces of internal micrometer sized voids. This deposited space charge is responsible for the piezoelectric activity of the material. Previous studies have indicated charging fields larger than predicted by Townsend's model of Paschen breakdown applied to a multilayered electromechanical model; a discrepancy which prompted the present study. The actual breakdown fields for micrometer sized voids were determined by constructing single cell voids using polypropylene spacers with heights ranging from 8 to 75??m, “sandwiched” between two polypropylene dielectric barriers and glass slides with semi-transparent electrodes. Subsequently, a bipolar triangular charging waveform with a peak voltage of 6?kV was applied to the samples. The breakdown fields were determined by monitoring the emission of light due to the onset of DBDs using an electron multiplying CCD camera. The breakdown fields at absolute pressures from 101 to 251?kPa were found to be in good agreement with the standard Paschen curves. Additionally, the magnitude of the light emission was found to scale linearly with the amount of gas, i.e., the height of the voids. Emissions were homogeneous over the observed regions of the voids for voids with heights of 25??m or less and increasingly inhomogeneous for void heights greater than 40??m at high electric fields.

  20. Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterizations and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers Subfolders inDiscoveryDispersion of Cloud Droplet

  1. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  2. VELOCITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD DISTRIBUTION IN A FORMING PENUMBRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, P.; Guglielmino, S. L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Frasca, D.; Zuccarello, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia-Sezione Astrofisica, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Ermolli, I. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Tritschler, A.; Reardon, K. P., E-mail: prom@oact.inaf.it [National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak, P.O. Box 62, Sunspot, NM 88349-0062 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the analysis of high-resolution spectropolarimetric and spectroscopic observations of the solar photosphere and chromosphere, obtained shortly before the formation of a penumbra in one of the leading polarity sunspots of NOAA active region 11490. The observations were performed at the Dunn Solar Telescope of the National Solar Observatory on 2012 May 28, using the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer. The data set is comprised of a 1 hr time sequence of measurements in the Fe I 617.3 nm and Fe I 630.25 nm lines (full Stokes polarimetry) and in the Ca II 854.2 nm line (Stokes I only). We perform an inversion of the Fe I 630.25 nm Stokes profiles to derive magnetic field parameters and the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity at the photospheric level. We characterize chromospheric LOS velocities by the Doppler shift of the centroid of the Ca II 854.2 nm line. We find that, before the formation of the penumbra, an annular zone of 3''-5'' width is visible around the sunspot. In the photosphere, we find that this zone is characterized by an uncombed structure of the magnetic field although no visible penumbra has formed yet. We also find that the chromospheric LOS velocity field shows several elongated structures characterized by downflow and upflow motions in the inner and outer parts of the annular zone, respectively.

  3. Field investigation of the relationship between battery size and PV system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, J.; Kratochvil, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harrington, S. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four photovoltaic-powered lighting systems were installed in a National Forest Service campground in June of 1991. These systems have identical arrays, loads and charge controllers. The only difference was in the rated capacity of the battery bank for each system. The battery banks all use the same basic battery as a building block with the four systems utilizing either one battery, two batteries, three batteries or four batteries. The purpose of the experiment is to examine the effect of the various battery sizes on the ability of the system to charge the battery, energy available to the load, and battery lifetime. Results show an important trend in system performance concerning the impact of charge controllers on the relation between array size and battery size which results in an inability to achieve the days of battery storage originally designed for.

  4. Distribution of Carbon Impurity Sources Between Low and High Field Side Measured via Zeeman-Spectroscopy in JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of Carbon Impurity Sources Between Low and High Field Side Measured via Zeeman-Spectroscopy in JET

  5. The energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal blackbody radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. V. Prigara

    2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the principle of detailed balance and the assumption on the absorption cross-section consistent with available astrophysical data, we obtain the energy distribution of atoms in the field of thermal blackbody radiation and show that this distribution diverges from the Boltzmann law.

  6. Relation between photospheric flow fields and the magnetic field distribution on the solar surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, G.W.; Title, A.M.; Topka, K.P.; Tarbell, T.D.; Shine, R.A.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the technique of local correlation tracking on a 28 minute time sequence of white-light images of solar granulation, the horizontal flow field on the solar surface is measured. The time series was obtained by the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 (Space Shuttle flight 51-F) and is free from atmospheric blurring and distortion. The SOUP flow fields have been compared with carefully aligned magnetograms taken over a nine hour period at the Big Bear Solar Observatory before, during, and after the SOUP images. The flow field and the magnetic field agree in considerable detail: vectors which define the flow of the white-light intensity pattern (granulation) point toward magnetic field regions, magnetic fields surround flow cells, and magnetic features move along the flow arrows. The projected locations of free particles (corks) in the measured flow field congregate at the same locations where the magnetic field is observed. 31 references.

  7. Millisecond dip events in the 2007 RXTE/PCA data of Sco X-1 and the TNO size distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chih-Yuan Liu; Hsiang-Kuang Chang; Jau-Shian Liang; Sun-Kun King

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Millisecond dips in the RXTE/PCA archival data of Sco X-1 taken from 1996 to 2002 were reported recently. Those dips were found to be most likely caused by instrumental dead time but may also contain some true astronomical events, which were interpreted as the occultation of X-rays from Sco X-1 by Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNO) of 100-m size. Here we report the results of search for millisecond dip events with the new RXTE/PCA data of Sco X-1 taken in year 2007. Adopting the same selection criteria as that in the previous study, we found only 3 dip events in 72-ks data, much fewer than the 107 events found in the 560-ks data taken from 1996 to 2002 reported earlier. The new data provides more detailed information of individual `very large events' (VLEs), which is not available in the old archival data. Although the number of VLEs does not obviously increase during the occurrence of dip events, all the 3 dip events are coincident in time with VLEs that have no flags set for any of the propane or the 6 main xenon anodes. It is a strong indication of instrumental effects. No significant dips which might be real occultation by 60 -- 100 m TNOs were observed. With only 72-ks data, however, the previously proposed possibility that about 10 percent of the dip events might not be instrumental still cannot be strictly excluded. Using the absence of those anomalous VLEs as the criterion for identifying non-instrumental dip events, we found, at a lower confidence level, 4 dip events of duration 8 - 10 ms in the 72-ks data. Upper limits to the size distribution of TNOs at the small size end are suggested.

  8. NEAR-FIELD SCANNING MICROWAVE MICROSCOPY: MEASURING LOCAL MICROWAVE PROPERTIES AND ELECTRIC FIELD DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    WEIF-49 NEAR-FIELD SCANNING MICROWAVE MICROSCOPY: MEASURING LOCAL MICROWAVE PROPERTIES AND ELECTRIC>;ics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 2OY@-4lll, USA Abstract We describe the near-field scanning methods of scanning probe microscopy have been developed. Generally spea- king one can divide

  9. Harmonic propagation on an electric distribution system: Field measurements compared with computer simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, S.M. (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)); Brownfield, G.T. (Union Electric Co., St. Louis, MO (United States)); Duffus, J.W. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Power Electronics Research Center)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power electronic loads are occupying an increasing fraction of the total load on distribution feeders. Coincidentally, there is a greater use of power factor correction capacitors on the distribution system. These two factors can present poor operating conditions in the form of high harmonic levels propagating through a distribution system. Electric utility engineers are facing an ever increasing number of situations which require the analysis of the propagation of harmonics on a distribution system. HARMFLO was developed by EPRI for use in the analysis of harmonics on a power system. However, for a typical analysis of a distribution system, data for some of the parameters required by HARMFLO are not available. Furthermore, exact load information is usually not available. Harmonic levels determined from field tests on a distribution system are compared to results of HARMFLO simulations to determine if this analysis tool can be expected to provide useful results despite the lack of exact information for load modeling and other system parameters.

  10. Determination of lateral size distribution of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe stacked submonolayer quantum dots via spectral analysis of optical signature of the Aharanov-Bohm excitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Haojie; Dhomkar, Siddharth; Roy, Bidisha; Kuskovsky, Igor L. [Department of Physics, Queens College of CUNY, Queens, New York 11367 (United States); The Graduate Center of CUNY, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Shuvayev, Vladimir [Department of Physics, Queens College of CUNY, Queens, New York 11367 (United States); Deligiannakis, Vasilios; Tamargo, Maria C. [The Graduate Center of CUNY, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Department of Chemistry, City College of CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Ludwig, Jonathan [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); Smirnov, Dmitry [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Wang, Alice [Evans Analytical Group, Sunnyvale, California 94086 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    For submonolayer quantum dot (QD) based photonic devices, size and density of QDs are critical parameters, the probing of which requires indirect methods. We report the determination of lateral size distribution of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe stacked submonolayer QDs, based on spectral analysis of the optical signature of Aharanov-Bohm (AB) excitons, complemented by photoluminescence studies, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, and numerical calculations. Numerical calculations are employed to determine the AB transition magnetic field as a function of the type-II QD radius. The study of four samples grown with different tellurium fluxes shows that the lateral size of QDs increases by just 50%, even though tellurium concentration increases 25-fold. Detailed spectral analysis of the emission of the AB exciton shows that the QD radii take on only certain values due to vertical correlation and the stacked nature of the QDs.

  11. Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the retrieved density and refractive index tend to decrease with an increase of the relative humidity.

  12. A simple model for the distribution of quiet Sun magnetic field strengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sanchez Almeida

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a first order linear differential equation describing the shape of the probability density function of magnetic field strengths in the quiet Sun (PDF). The modeling is very schematic. It considers convective motions which continuously supply and withdraw magnetic structures. In addition, a magnetic amplification mechanism increases the field strength up to a threshold that cannot be exceeded. These three basic ingredients provide PDFs in good agreement with the PDFs produced by realistic numerical simulations of magneto convection, as well as with quiet Sun PDFs inferred from observations. In particular, the distribution is approximately lognormal, and it produces an excess of magnetic fields (i.e., a 'hump' in the distribution) right before the maximum field strength. The success of this simple model may indicate that only a few basic ingredients shape the quiet Sun PDF. Our approach provides a concise parametric representation of the PDF, as required to develop automatic methods of diagnostics.

  13. Evaluation of the modified Anderson sampler for determining particle size distributions and respirable concentrations of particulate matter present in the working environment of cottonseed oil mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matlock, Stanley Wayne

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF THE MODIFIED ANDERSON SAMPLER FOR DETERMINING PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS AND RESPIRABLE CONCENTRATIONS OF PARTICULATE MATTER PRESENT IN THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT OF COTTONSEED OIL MILLS A Thesis by STANLEY WAYNE MATLOCK Submitted... to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering FVALUATION OF THE MODIFIED ANDERSON SAMPLER FOR DETERMINING PARTICLE SIZE...

  14. Size dependence of magnetization switching and its dispersion of Co/Pt nanodots under the assistance of radio frequency fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furuta, Masaki, E-mail: furutam@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Okamoto, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Nobuaki; Kitakami, Osamu [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Shimatsu, Takehito [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the dot size dependence of microwave assisted magnetization switching (MAS) on perpendicular magnetic Co/Pt multilayer dot array. The significant microwave assistance effect has been observed over the entire dot size D ranging from 50?nm to 330?nm examined in the present study. The MAS behavior, however, critically depends on D. The excitation frequency dependence of the switching field is well consistent with the spin wave theory, indicating that the magnetization precession in MAS is in accordance with the well defined eigenmodes depending on the dot diameter. The lowest order spin wave is only excited for D???100?nm, and then the MAS effect is well consistent with that of the single macrospin prediction. On the other hand, higher order spin waves are excited for D?>?100?nm, giving rise to the significant enhancement of the MAS effect. The dispersion of MAS effect also depends on D and is significantly reduced for the region of D?>?100?nm. This significant reduction of the dispersion is attributed to the essential feature of the MAS effect which is insensitive to the local fluctuation of anisotropy field, such as defect, damaged layer, and so on.

  15. DTE Energy Technologies With Detroit Edison Co. and Kinectrics Inc.: Distributed Resources Aggregation Modeling and Field Configuration Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the work of DTE Energy Technologies, Detroit Edison, and Kinectrics, under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to develop distributed resources aggregation modeling and field configuration testing.

  16. Current Distribution Models for the Earth's Main Magnetic Field: A Discrete Inverse Theory Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sewards, Terence V

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current source models for the Earth's main geomagnetic field are calculated employing conventional discrete inverse theory methods. Source structures are spherical surfaces placed at the surface of the Earth's core, and at the surface of the Earth. The data set consists of measurements taken by the MAGSAT satellite in 1979. The resulting current distributions are discussed in relation to dipole and current loop models.

  17. Effect of Shock Normal Orientation Fluctuations on Field-Aligned Beam Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    along the interplanetary field lines are ubiquitous upstream of the Earth's quasi-perpendicular bow investigation of FAB thermal energy has been carried out only recently [14]. In a prior study, [13] showed-Maxwellian distributions, found that FAB parallel thermal energy is dependent upon the solar wind speed and weakly

  18. The Canada-France Deep Fields III: Photometric Redshift Distribution to I(AB) ~ 24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brodwin; S. J. Lilly; C. Porciani; H. J. McCracken; O. Le Fevre; S. Foucaud; D. Crampton; Y. Mellier

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute accurate redshift distributions to I(AB) = 24 and R(AB) = 24.5 using photometric redshifts estimated from six-band UBVRIZ photometry in the Canada-France Deep Fields-Photometric Redshift Survey (CFDF-PRS). Our photometric redshift algorithm is calibrated using hundreds of CFRS spectroscopic redshifts in the same fields. The dispersion in redshift is \\sigma/(1+z) \\la 0.04 to the CFRS depth of I(AB) = 22.5, rising to \\sigma/(1+z) \\la 0.06 at our nominal magnitude and redshift limits of I(AB) = 24 and z \\le 1.3, respectively. We describe a new method to compute N(z) that incorporates the full redshift likelihood functions in a Bayesian iterative analysis and we demonstrate in extensive Monte Carlo simulations that it is superior to distributions calculated using simple maximum likelihood redshifts. The field-to-field differences in the redshift distributions, while not unexpected theoretically, are substantial even on 30' scales. We provide I(AB) and R(AB) redshift distributions, median redshifts, and parametrized fits of our results in various magnitude ranges, accounting for both random and systematic errors in the analysis.

  19. Sub-THz Beam-forming using Near-field Coupling of Distributed Active Radiator Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajimiri, Ali

    91125, USA Abstract -- The paper demonstrates Distributed Active Radiator (DAR) arrays as a novel way for mutually locking multiple DARs to beam-form and generate high EIRP. As proofs of concept, 2x1 and 2x2 arrays of DARs, mutually synchronized through near-field coupling, are implemented in 65nm bulk CMOS

  20. Cement and Concrete Research, Vol. 42 (2), 404-409, 2012. Influence of Particle Size Distributions on Yield Stress and Viscosity of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Cement and Concrete Research, Vol. 42 (2), 404-409, 2012. Influence of Particle Size Distributions on Yield Stress and Viscosity of Cement-Fly Ash Pastes Dale P. Bentz Chiara F. Ferraris Michael A. Galler.galler@nist.gov Phone: (301)975-5865 Andrew S. Hansen John M. Guynn Roman Cement LLC andrew@RomanCement.com Abstract

  1. A b s t r a c t. The paper presents a comparison of particle size distributions of 23 mineral soils from SE Poland obtained by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    fraction (sand). K e y w o r d s: mineral soils, particle size distribution, laser diffraction, areometric soils (Orthic Luvisols) and 1 black earth (Mollic Gleysol). Air-dry soil samples were sieved on 2 mm was prepared using distilled water as the liquid phase. To improve the credibility of results, the measurement

  2. Modeling kinetic partitioning of secondary organic aerosol and size distribution dynamics: representing effects of volatility, phase state, and particle-phase reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Shilling, John E.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence is mounting that the majority of the climatically active aerosols are produced through the growth of smaller particles via secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from gas-to-particle conversion of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The timescale of SOA partitioning and the associated size distribution dynamics are expected to depend on the gas-phase oxidation of the precursor VOCs and their products, volatility of these organic solutes, composition and phase state of the pre-existing particles, and diffusivity and reactivity of the solute within the particle phase. This paper describes a new framework for modeling kinetic gas-particle partitioning of SOA, with an analytical treatment for the diffusion-reaction process within the particle phase. The formulation is amenable for eventual use in regional and global climate models, although it currently awaits implementation of the actual particle-phase reactions that are important for SOA formation. In the present work, the model is applied to investigate the competitive growth dynamics of the Aitken and accumulation mode particles while the Kelvin effect and coagulation are neglected for simplicity. The timescale of SOA partitioning and evolution of number and composition size distributions are evaluated for a range of solute volatilities (C*), particle-phase bulk diffusivities (Db), and particle-phase reactivity, as exemplified by a pseudo-first-order rate constant (kc). Results show that irreversible condensation of non-volatile organic vapors (equivalent to ) produces significant narrowing of the size distribution. At the other extreme, non-reactive partitioning of semi-volatile organic vapors is volume-controlled in which the final (equilibrium) size distribution simply shifts to the right on the diameter axis while its shape remains unchanged. However, appreciable narrowing of the size distribution may occur when the pre-existing particles are highly viscous semi-solids such that small particles reach quasi-equilibrium much faster than the large ones. In the case of reactive partitioning (finite ), the size distribution experiences permanent narrowing, which is especially pronounced for Db < 10-13 cm2 s-1 and kc > 0.01 s-1. As a result, both number and composition size distributions are needed to effectively constrain and evaluate the next generation of SOA models that treat phase state thermodynamics, particle-phase diffusion and particle-phase chemical reactions.

  3. Evaluation of Near Field Atmospheric Dispersion Around Nuclear Facilities Using a Lorentzian Distribution Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavin Hawkley

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Atmospheric dispersion modeling within the near field of a nuclear facility typically applies a building wake correction to the Gaussian plume model, whereby a point source is modeled as a plane source. The plane source results in greater near field dilution and reduces the far field effluent concentration. However, the correction does not account for the concentration profile within the near field. Receptors of interest, such as the maximally exposed individual, may exist within the near field and thus the realm of building wake effects. Furthermore, release parameters and displacement characteristics may be unknown, particularly during upset conditions. Therefore, emphasis is placed upon the need to analyze and estimate an enveloping concentration profile within the near field of a release. This investigation included the analysis of 64 air samples collected over 128 wk. Variables of importance were then derived from the measurement data, and a methodology was developed that allowed for the estimation of Lorentzian-based dispersion coefficients along the lateral axis of the near field recirculation cavity; the development of recirculation cavity boundaries; and conservative evaluation of the associated concentration profile. The results evaluated the effectiveness of the Lorentzian distribution methodology for estimating near field releases and emphasized the need to place air-monitoring stations appropriately for complete concentration characterization. Additionally, the importance of the sampling period and operational conditions were discussed to balance operational feedback and the reporting of public dose.

  4. Generalized Pearson distributions for charged particles interacting with an electric and/or a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rossani; A. M. Scarfone

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear Boltzmann equation for elastic and/or inelastic scattering is applied to derive the distribution function of a spatially homogeneous system of charged particles spreading in a host medium of two-level atoms and subjected to external electric and/or magnetic fields. We construct a Fokker-Planck approximation to the kinetic equations and derive the most general class of distributions for the given problem by discussing in detail some physically meaningful cases. The equivalence with the transport theory of electrons in a phonon background is also discussed.

  5. Bimodal switching field distributions in all-perpendicular spin-valve nanopillars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopman, D. B., E-mail: daniel.gopman@physics.nyu.edu; Kent, A. D. [Department of Physics, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States); Bedau, D.; Katine, J. A. [HGST San Jose Research Center, San Jose, California 95135 (United States); Mangin, S. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR CNRS 7198 Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Fullerton, E. E. [CMRR, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Switching field measurements of the free layer element of 75?nm diameter spin-valve nanopillars reveal a bimodal distribution of switching fields at low temperatures (below 100?K). This result is inconsistent with a model of thermal activation over a single perpendicular anisotropy barrier. The correlation between antiparallel to parallel and parallel to antiparallel switching fields increases to nearly 50% at low temperatures. This reflects random fluctuation of the shift of the free layer hysteresis loop between two different magnitudes, which may originate from changes in the dipole field from the polarizing layer. The magnitude of the loop shift changes by 25% and is correlated to transitions of the spin-valve into an antiparallel configuration.

  6. On P_T-distribution of gluon production rate in constant chromoelectric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. G. Pak

    2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete expression for the p_T-distribution of the gluon production rate in the homogeneous chromoelectric field has been obtained. Our result contains a new additional term proportional to the singular function \\delta(p_T^2). We demonstrate that the presence of this term is consistent with the dual symmetry of QCD effective action and allows to reproduce the known result for the total imaginary part of the effective action after integration over transverse momentum.

  7. Inversion of field-scale partitioning tracer response for characterizing oil saturation distribution: a streamline approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliassov, Pavel Alexandrovich

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVERSION OF FIELD-SCALE PARTITIONING TRACER RESPONSE FOR CHARACTERIZING OIL SATURATION DISTRIBUTION: A STREAMLINE APPROACH A Thesis by PAVEL ALEXANDROVICH ILIASSOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... A Thesis by PAVEL ALEXANDROVICH ILIASSOV Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: c 4- Akhil Datta-Gupta (Chair of Committee...

  8. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermann, Robert Michael, E-mail: hermann@strahlentherapie-westerstede.com [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Meyer, Andreas [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Gemeinschaftspraxis für Strahlentherapie Hildesheim/Goslar (Germany); Becker, Alexandra [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Schneider, Michael [Orthopaedic Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Würzburg (Germany); Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Christiansen, Hans [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Klinik für Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Universität Kiel (Germany)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ?6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  9. Final Report: Property Improvement in CZT via Modeling and Processing Innovations – Te-particles in vertical gradient freeze CZT: Size and Spatial Distributions and Constitutional Supercooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Bliss, Mary; Riley, Brian J.; Stave, Jean A.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A section of a vertical gradient freeze CZT boule approximately 2100-mm3 with a planar area of 300-mm2 was prepared and examined using transmitted IR microscopy at various magnifications to determine the three-dimensional spatial and size distributions of Te-particles over large longitudinal and radial length scales. The boule section was approximately 50-mm wide by 60-mm in length by 7-mm thick and was doubly polished for TIR work. Te-particles were imaged through the thickness using extended focal imaging to locate the particles in thickness planes spaced 15-µm apart and then in plane of the image using xy-coordinates of the particle center of mass so that a true three dimensional particle map was assembled for a 1-mm by 45-mm longitudinal strip and for a 1-mm by 50-mm radial strip. Te-particle density distributions were determined as a function of longitudinal and radial positions in these strips, and treating the particles as vertices of a network created a 3D image of the particle spatial distribution. Te-particles exhibited a multi-modal log-normal size density distribution that indicated a slight preference for increasing size with longitudinal growth time, while showing a pronounced cellular network structure throughout the boule that can be correlated to dislocation network sizes in CZT. Higher magnification images revealed a typical Rayleigh-instability pearl string morphology with large and small satellite droplets. This study includes solidification experiments in small crucibles of 30:70 mixtures of Cd:Te to reduce the melting point below 1273 K (1000?C). These solidification experiments were performed over a wide range of cooling rates and clearly demonstrated a growth instability with Te-particle capture that is suggested to be responsible for one of the peaks in the size distribution using size discrimination visualization. The results are discussed with regard to a manifold Te-particle genesis history as 1) Te-particle direct capture from melt-solid growth instabilities, 2) Te-particle formation from dislocation core diffusion and the formation and breakup of Te-tubes, and 3) Te-particle formation due to classical nucleation and growth as precipitates.

  10. Study of catalytic diffusion in coal. Final report for 1983/1984 SOMED Project. [Determination of pore (hole) size and pore shape distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kispert, L.D.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of our studies is to determine the pore (hole) size and pore shape distribution in standard bituminous coal samples from various Alabama coal seams such as that of the Mary Lee, Black Creek and Pratt during and after swelling of the coal with different solvents at various temperatures. These samples come from the Penn State Coal Sample Bank at Pennsylvania State University Coal Research Section and from Alabama's Mineral Industries. Methods have been developed in the laboratory whereby free radical probes of varying sizes can be diffused into the coal under various conditions. These probes can be detected and the environment surrounding the probes can be deduced by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods. To date, we have found that not only can the shape and size of the pores be determined, but that the size distribution varies from one bituminous coal seam to another, even for coal of the same rank, suggesting a different optimal catalyst should be used for each seam. The effect of oxygen on the coal samples during grinding has been studied; however, the free radical technique appears to be insensitive to the presence of oxygen effects. It is our goal to determine the structural differences between various bituminous coals. 9 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  11. 6/10/12 The use of acoustic inversion to estimate the bubble size distribution in pipelines | Global Scientia 1/2globalscientia.com/article/.../use-acoustic-inversion-estimate-bubble-size-distribution-pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    to expand and causes 'blow out'. A blow out is the sudden release of oil and/or gas from a well and issues with the blow out preventer were key in Deepwater Horizon oil spill (also known as the Macondo blowout) in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. Currently, the most popular technique for estimating the gas bubble size

  12. 6/10/12 The use of acoustic inversion to estimate the bubble size distribution in pipelines 1/2www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120515104537.htm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    6/10/12 The use of acoustic inversion to estimate the bubble size distribution in pipelines 1/2www gas bubbles in pipelines. The ability to measure gas bubbles in pipelines is vital technique for estimating the gas bubble size distribution (BSD) is to send sound waves through the bubble

  13. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  14. Determination of High-Frequency Current Distribution Using EMTP-Based Transmission Line Models with Resulting Radiated Electromagnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mork, B; Nelson, R; Kirkendall, B; Stenvig, N

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of BPL technologies to existing overhead high-voltage power lines would benefit greatly from improved simulation tools capable of predicting performance - such as the electromagnetic fields radiated from such lines. Existing EMTP-based frequency-dependent line models are attractive since their parameters are derived from physical design dimensions which are easily obtained. However, to calculate the radiated electromagnetic fields, detailed current distributions need to be determined. This paper presents a method of using EMTP line models to determine the current distribution on the lines, as well as a technique for using these current distributions to determine the radiated electromagnetic fields.

  15. Dislocation structure and crystallite size-distribution in hexagonal nanomaterials from X-ray peak profile analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    profile analysis Tamás Ungár1 and Jen Gubicza1,2 1 Department of General Physics, Eötvös University crystal structure are studied by X-ray diffraction peak profile analysis. The crystallite size, X-ray peak profile analysis, hexagonal crystals, nanostructure. Short title: T. Ungár & J. Gubicza

  16. Using field emission to control the electron energy distribution in high-pressure microdischarges at microscale dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yingjie; Go, David B. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)] [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle simulations of high-pressure microdischarges at gaps below 10 ?m show that the electron energy distribution becomes non-continuous, with discrete peaks corresponding to specific inelastic collisions. The relative magnitude of these peaks and shape of the energy distribution can be directly controlled by the parameter pressure times distance (pd) and the applied potential across the gap. These parameters dictate inelastic collisions experienced by electrons and as both increase the distribution smooths into a Maxwellian-like distribution. By capitalizing on field emission at these dimensions, it is possible to control the energy distribution of free electrons to target specific, energy dependent reactions.

  17. Power law and exponential ejecta size distributions from the dynamic fragmentation of shock-loaded Cu and Sn metals under melt conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study and to model the ejecta production from the dynamic fragmentation of shock-loaded metals under melt conditions. A generic 3D crystal in contact with vacuum containing about 10{sup 8} atoms and with a sinusoidal free surface roughness is shock loaded so as to undergo a solid-liquid phase change on shock. The reflection of the shock wave at the interface metal/vacuum gives rise to the ejection of 2D jets/sheets of atoms (Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in the continuum limit), which develop and break up, forming ejecta (fragments) of different volumes (or mass). The fragmentation process is investigated by analyzing the evolution of the resulting volume distribution of the ejecta as a function of time. Two metals are studied (Cu and Sn) and the amplitude of the roughness is varied. The simulations show that the associated distributions exhibit a generic behavior with the sum of two distinct terms of varying weight, following the expansion rate of the jets: in the small size limit, the distribution obeys a power law dependence with an exponent equal to 1.15?±?0.08; and in the large size limit, it obeys an exponential form. These two components are interpreted, with the help of additional simple simulations, as the signature of two different basic mechanisms of fragmentation. The power law dependence results from the fragmentation of a 2D network of ligaments arranged following a fractal (scale free) geometry and generated when the sheets of liquid metal expand and tear. The exponential distribution results from a 1D Poisson fragmentation process of the largest ligaments previously generated. Unlike the power law distribution, it is governed by a characteristic length scale, which may be provided by energy balance principle.

  18. A method to characterize the influence of air distribution on the composting treatment: monitoring of the thermal fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 A method to characterize the influence of air distribution on the composting treatment of air distribution on the composting treatment: monitoring of the thermal fields Hénon Florent a:anne.tremier@cemagref.fr Abstract In a composting process the monitoring of heat flows is a useful tool in terms of phenomenological

  19. THE IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL MODELS FOR DERIVING DUST MASSES AND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN SUPERNOVA EJECTA. I. RADIATIVELY HEATED DUST IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli, E-mail: tea.temim@nasa.gov [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 M{sub Sun }, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 {mu}m. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in external galaxies.

  20. Influence of Permian salt dissolution on distribution of shallow Niobrara gas fields, eastern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldham, D.W.; Smosna, R.A. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface analysis of Permian salt and related strata in the shallow Niobrara gas area on the eastern flank of the Denver basin reveals that the location of faulted anticlines which produce gas from porous chalk is related to the occurrence of six Nippewalla Group (Leonardian) salt zones. Salt distribution is controlled by the configuration of evaporate basins during the Leonardian, truncation at a sub-Jurassic unconformity (which has completely removed Guadalupian salts), and post-Jurassic subsurface dissolution. Significant dissolution took place in response to Laramide orogeny and subsequent eastward regional groundwater flow within the Lyons (Cedar Hills) Sandstone aquifer. Initially, dissolution occurred along a regional facies change from sandstone to salt. Solution collapse allowed for cross-formational flow and removal of younger salts. Shallow Niobrara gas fields are situated above salt outliers or along regionally updip salt edges. No significant Niobrara production exists in areas where salt is absent. Structural relief across fields is related to Leonardian thickness variations, rather than subsalt offset. Seismic data reveal abrupt Leonardian thinning at the regionally updip limit of Eckley field, which has produced over 33 BCFG. Thickness of residual salt may be important in controlling the amount of gas trapped within the Niobrara. Where thick salts are preserved, structural relief is greater, the gas-water transition zone is thicker, and gas saturation is higher at the crests of faulted anticlines.

  1. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jian (Port Jefferson, NY); Kulkarni, Pramod (Port Jefferson Station, NY)

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  2. Comments on the radial distribution of charged particles in a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backe, H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic guiding fields in combination with energy dispersive semiconductor detectors have been employed already more than 50 years ago for in-beam internal conversion electron spectroscopy. Even then it was recognized that efficiency modulations may appear as function of the electron energy, arising when electrons hit a baffle or miss the sensitive area of the detector. Current high precision beta decay experiments of polarized neutrons with conceptional similar experimental devices resulted in a detailed study of the point spread function (PSF). The latter describes the radial probability distribution of mono-energetic electrons at the detector plane. Singularities occur as function of the radial detector coordinate which have been investigated and discussed by Sjue at al. (Rev. Scient. Instr. 86, 023102 (2015)), and Dubbers (arXiv:1501.05131v1 [physics.ins-det]). In this comment a rather precise numerical representation of the PSF is presented and compared with approximations in the mentioned papers.

  3. DEEPER BY THE DOZEN: UNDERSTANDING THE CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Jenkins, B. S.; Worley, B. T., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic analysis of coronal loops has revealed a variety of cross-field temperature distributions. Some loops appear to be isothermal while others require multithermal plasma. The EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode has the spatial resolution and temperature coverage required for differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of coronal loops. Our results also use data from the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode as a high-temperature constraint. Of our 12 loops, two were post-flare loops with broad temperature distributions, two were narrow but not quite isothermal, and the remaining eight were in the mid range. We consider our DEM methods to be a significant advance over previous work, and it is also reassuring to learn that our findings are consistent with results available in the literature. For the quiescent loops analyzed here, 10 MK plasma, a signature of nanoflares, appears to be absent at a level of approximately two orders of magnitude down from the DEM peak. We find some evidence that warmer loops require broader DEMs. The cross-field temperatures obtained here cannot be modeled as single flux tubes. Rather, the observed loop must be composed of several or many unresolved strands. The plasma contained in each of these strands could be cooling at different rates, contributing to the multithermal nature of the observed loop pixels. An important implication of our DEM results involves observations from future instruments. Once solar telescopes can truly resolve X-ray and EUV coronal structures, these images would have to reveal the loop substructure implied by our multithermal results.

  4. Net Metering Policy Development and Distributed Solar Generation in Minnesota: Overview of Trends in Nationwide Policy Development and Implications of Increasing the Eligible System Size Cap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Busche, S.; Hockett, S.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Minnesota net metering policy is to give the maximum possible encouragement to distributed generation assets, especially solar electric systems (MN 2008). However, according to a published set of best practices (NNEC 2008) that prioritize the maximum development of solar markets within states, the Minnesota policy does not incorporate many of the important best practices that may help other states transform their solar energy markets and increase the amount of grid-connected distributed solar generation assets. Reasons cited include the low system size limit of 40kW (the best practices document recommends a 2 MW limit) and a lack of language protecting generators from additional utility fees. This study was conducted to compare Minnesota's policies to national best practices. It provides an overview of the current Minnesota policy in the context of these best practices and other jurisdictions' net metering policies, as well as a qualitative assessment of the impacts of raising the system size cap within the policy based on the experiences of other states.

  5. Preliminary investigation of the role that DMS (dimethyl sulfide) and cloud cycles play in the formation of the aerosol size distribution. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppel, W.A.; Fitzgerald, J.W.; Frick, G.M.; Larson, R.E.; Wattle, B.J.

    1987-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments designed to study the production of new particulate matter by photolysis of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and the effect that nonprecipitating clouds have on the aerosol size distributions were carried out in Calspan Corporation's 600 cum environmental chamber during January and February 1986. The results show that DMS, the most-abundant natural source of sulfur, is photooxidized to some product of low volatility that can form new particles by homogeneous nucleation or condense on existing aerosols causing them to grow. To explain these observations, a theoretical study of the nucleation properties of methane sulfonic acid (MSA) was undertaken. The nucleation thresholds, calculated using thermodynamic data for MSA, show that at 70% RH, and MSA concentration of only 0.006 ppb will result in a supersaturated environment in which MSA will condense on preexisting particles larger than 0.02-micron radius. If the MSA concentrations increase to 30 ppb, then spontaneous formation of MSA solution droplets occurs by homogeneous binary nucleation. Simulations of the evolution of the size distribution observed for the DMS irradiation experiments with a dynamic aerosol model that includes the effects of coagulation, growth by condensation, and deposition to the walls of the chamber, yield results that are in excellent agreement with the observed evolution.

  6. ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS: CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Jenkins, B. S.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct revised response functions for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) using the new atomic data, ionization equilibria, and coronal abundances available in CHIANTI 7.1. We then use these response functions in multithermal analysis of coronal loops, which allows us to determine a specific cross-field temperature distribution without ad hoc assumptions. Our method uses data from the six coronal filters and the Monte Carlo solutions available from our differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The resulting temperature distributions are not consistent with isothermal plasma. Therefore, the observed loops cannot be modeled as single flux tubes and must be composed of a collection of magnetic strands. This result is now supported by observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager, which show fine-scale braiding of coronal strands that are reconnecting and releasing energy. Multithermal analysis is one of the major scientific goals of AIA, and these results represent an important step toward the successful achievement of that goal. As AIA DEM analysis becomes more straightforward, the solar community will be able to take full advantage of the state-of-the-art spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution of the instrument.

  7. Measuring the rotation period distribution of field M-dwarfs with Kepler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuillan, Amy; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analysed 10 months of public data from the Kepler space mission to measure rotation periods of main-sequence stars with masses between 0.3 and 0.55 M_sun. To derive the rotational period we introduce the autocorrelation function and show that it is robust against phase and amplitude modulation and residual instrumental systematics. Of the 2483 stars examined, we detected rotation periods in 1570 (63.2%), representing an increase of a factor ~ 30 in the number of rotation period determination for field M-dwarfs. The periods range from 0.37-69.7 days, with amplitudes ranging from 1.0-140.8 mmags. The rotation period distribution is clearly bimodal, with peaks at ~ 19 and ~ 33 days, hinting at two distinct waves of star formation, a hypothesis that is supported by the fact that slower rotators tend to have larger proper motions. The two peaks of the rotation period distribution form two distinct sequences in period-temperature space, with the period decreasing with increasing temperature, reminiscent of ...

  8. Millisecond dip events in the 2007 RXTE/PCA data of Sco X-1 and the TNO size distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chih-Yuan; Liang, Jau-Shian; King, Sun-Kun

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Millisecond dips in the RXTE/PCA archival data of Sco X-1 taken from 1996 to 2002 were reported recently. Those dips were found to be most likely caused by instrumental dead time but may also contain some true astronomical events, which were interpreted as the occultation of X-rays from Sco X-1 by Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNO) of 100-m size. Here we report the results of search for millisecond dip events with the new RXTE/PCA data of Sco X-1 taken in year 2007. Adopting the same selection criteria as that in the previous study, we found only 3 dip events in 72-ks data, much fewer than the 107 events found in the 560-ks data taken from 1996 to 2002 reported earlier. The new data provides more detailed information of individual `very large events' (VLEs), which is not available in the old archival data. Although the number of VLEs does not obviously increase during the occurrence of dip events, all the 3 dip events are coincident in time with VLEs that have no flags set for any of the propane or the 6 main xeno...

  9. Scintillation has minimal impact on far-field Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of scintillation, arising from propagation through atmospheric turbulence, on the sift and error probabilities of a quantum key distribution (QKD) system that uses the weak-laser-pulse version of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) protocol is evaluated. Two earth-space scenarios are examined: satellite-to-ground and ground-to-satellite transmission. Both lie in the far-field power-transfer regime. This work complements previous analysis of turbulence effects in near-field terrestrial BB84 QKD [J. H. Shapiro, Phys. Rev. A 67, 022309 (2003)]. More importantly, it shows that scintillation has virtually no impact on the sift and error probabilities in earth-space BB84 QKD, something that has been implicitly assumed in prior analyses for that application. This result contrasts rather sharply with what is known for high-speed laser communications over such paths, in which deep, long-lived scintillation fades present a major challenge to high-reliability operation.

  10. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trattner, Sigal [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York 10032 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Cheng, Bin [Department of Biostatistics, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, New York 10032 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Pieniazek, Radoslaw L. [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York 10032 (United States)] [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Douglas, Pamela S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27715 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27715 (United States); Einstein, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.einstein@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York and Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same precision and confidence.

  11. Updating time-to-failure distributions based on field observations and sensor data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowder, Kelly S.; Briand, Daniel; Shirah, Donald

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enterprise level logistics and prognostics and health management (PHM) modeling efforts use reliability focused failure distributions to characterize the probability of failure over the lifetime of a component. This research characterized the Sandia National Laboratories developed combined lifecycle (CMBL) distribution and explored methods for updating this distribution as systems age and new failure data becomes available. The initial results obtained in applying a Bayesian sequential updating methodology to the CMBL distribution shows promise. This research also resulted in the development of a closed-form full life cycle (CFLC) distribution similar to the CMBL distribution but with slightly different, yet commonly recognized, input parameters. Further research is warranted to provide additional theoretical validation of the distributions, complete the updating methods for the CMBL distribution, evaluate a Bayesian updating methodology for the CFLC distribution, and determine which updating methods would be most appropriate for enterprise level logistics and PHM modeling.

  12. Effect of coal type, residence time, and combustion configuration on the submicron aerosol composition and size distribution from pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linak, W.P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulverized samples of Utah bituminous, Beulah (North Dakota) low Na lignite, Deulah high Na lignite and Texas (San Miguel) lignite coals were burned at a rate of 2.5 kg/hr in a laboratory furnace under various (overall fuel lean) combustion conditions. Particle size distributions (PSD) and size segregated particle filter samples were taken at various positions within the convection section. Temperature and gas concentrations were measured throughout. The evolution of the submicron PSD within the convection section for the four coals was similar, although the location of the initial particle mode at the convection section inlet varied with coal type. While stage combustion of the Utah bituminous coal had a variable effect on the volume of submicron aerosol produced, staged combustion of two of the three lignites (Beulah low Na and Texas) caused a definite increase in the submicron aerosol volume. Chemical analysis of the size segregated particle samples show the trace elements, As, Pb, Zn, and the major elements, Na and K to be enriched in the submicron aerosol. Auger depth profiles show these small particles to be comprised of a core enriched in Fe, Si, Ca and Mg and surface layers enriched in Na and K. These results point to a mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of low vapor pressure species followed by successive layering of progressively more volatile species. Volatile species are enriched in the submicron aerosol due to the large surface areas provided. Modeling efforts show that while coagulation may be the dominant mechanism to describe the aerosol evolving within the convection section, it cannot be used solely to predict the PSD. Another mechanism, presumably surface area dependent growth (condensation) must be included.

  13. Forest impact estimated with NOAA AVHRR and Landsat TM data related to an empirical hurricane wind-field distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, Michael E.

    with Hurricane Andrew in 1992. The wind-field model projected that the highest wind speeds were in the southernForest impact estimated with NOAA AVHRR and Landsat TM data related to an empirical hurricane wind to relate forest type and hurricane-impact distribution with wind speed and duration to explain

  14. ARM - Measurement - Particle size distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwelling irradiancenumber concentration ARM Datasize

  15. Field Test of Room-to-Room Distribution of Outside Air with Two Residential Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.; Anderson, R.; Barley, D.; Rudd, A.; Townsend, A.; Hancock, E.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform distribution of outside air is one way to ensure that residential dilution ventilation systems will provide a known amount of fresh air to all rooms.

  16. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis – Part II: Evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ochoa, Carlos; Baumgardner, Darrel; Grutter, M.; Allan, James D.; Fast, Jerome D.; Rappengluck, B.

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009) in which measurements of trace gases and particles at a remote, high-altitude mountain site 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor, ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), acyl peroxy nitrate (APN) and particle size distributions (PSDs) of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM) were simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. The model prediction of the diurnal trends of the gases were well correlated with the measurements before the regional boundary layer reached the measurement site but underestimated the concentrations after that time. The differences are caused by an overly rapid growth of the boundary layer by the model with too much dilution. There also appears to be more O3 produced by photochemical production, downwind of the emission sources, than predicted by the model. The measured and modeled PSDs compare very well with respect to their general shape and diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are log normally distributed with most of the mass in the accumulation mode and the geometric diameter centered at 200 ±20 nm, with little observed or predicted change with respect to the origin of the air mass or the time when the RBL is above the Altzomoni research. Only the total mass changed with time and air mass origin. The invariability of the average diameter of the accumulation mode suggests that there is very little growth of the particles by condensation or coagulation after six hours of aging downwind of the major sources of anthropogenic emissions in Mexico’s Megapolis.

  17. Maintenance-free Operation of WDM Quantum Key Distribution System through a Field Fiber over 30 Days

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken-ichiro Yoshino; Takao Ochi; Mikio Fujiwara; Masahide Sasaki; Akio Tajima

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintenance-free wavelength-division-multiplexing quantum key distribution for 30 days was achieved through a 22-km field fiber. Using polarization-independent interferometers and stabilization techniques, we attained a quantum bit error rate as low as 1.70% and a key rate as high as 229.8 kbps, making the record of total secure key of 595.6 Gbits accumulated over an uninterrupted operation period.

  18. Concerning effects of low-beta region fringe fields and multipole error distribution on dynamics in LHC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meot, F.; Paris, A.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of fringe fields in separation dipoles D1/D2 and low-{beta} quadrupoles Q1-Q3 of LHC interaction regions in collision optics are investigated by means of stepwise ray-tracing in terms of aberrations, beam envelopes and other detunings. Effects of the longitudinal distribution of b{sub 10} error coefficient are next investigated in a similar way for assessment and comparison.

  19. Scintillation has minimal impact on far-field Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol quantum key distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    The effect of scintillation, arising from propagation through atmospheric turbulence, on the sift and error probabilities of a quantum key distribution (QKD) system that uses the weak-laser-pulse version of the Bennett-Brassard ...

  20. Experimental Investigation of Sphere Slamming to Quiescent Water Surface-Pressure Distribution and Jetting Flow Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Wan-Yi

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Sphere slamming pressures and corresponding jetting flow fields were studied in an experimental approach. Correlations between sphere impacting forces and jetting flow occurrences were explored. Pressure sensor was used to investigate the slamming...

  1. Structure and distribution of abnormal pressures in the Vicksburg Formation (Oligocene), Hinde Field, Starr County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrell, Kirk Arthur

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appear to be abnormally pressured on conductivity plots where the observed conductivity deviates from the normal trend. The first conductivity zone occurs in the Frio section at depths of 4, 000-5, 600 ft (1222-1711 m). Measured pressures... fault systems and the location of Hinde Field (Starr County) and McAllen Ranch Field (Hidalgo County)(Berg and Habeck, 1982). . . . . . . . . . ~ . ~ . . . Page Regional cross section of South Texas showing the location of the Vicksburg and Frio...

  2. Influence of magnet size on magnetically engineered field-induced superconductivity W. Gillijns,1,* M. V. Milosevi,2,3 A. V. Silhanek,1 V. V. Moshchalkov,1, and F. M. Peeters3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    Influence of magnet size on magnetically engineered field-induced superconductivity W. Gillijns,1-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Nanoscale Superconductivity and Magnetism and Pulsed Fields Group, K of Co/Pt magnetic disks with out-of-plane magnetization for different radii of the magnetic disks

  3. Verifying Predictions of Water and Current Distributions in a Serpentine Flow Field Polymer Electrolyte Membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Zee, John W.

    .e., the ribs . The predictions agree with experimental data for various operating cell temperatures at a fixed and allows a two-dimensional 2D spatial distribution in areas outside the flow channel. Experimental these effects as shown in Ref. 15 for a straight channel PEMFC. In contrast to that model, other nu- merical

  4. The Importance of Identifying Different Components of a Mixture Distribution in the Prediction of Field Returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a given date. The power transformer population consists of a mixture of two different designs, an oldThe Importance of Identifying Different Components of a Mixture Distribution in the Prediction, it is important to identify components of the mixture and do statistical inference based on the stratified data

  5. 920 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 62, NO. 4, APRIL 2014 Field Distribution Models of Spiral Coil for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    920 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 62, NO. 4, APRIL 2014 Field of implant that has a much smaller size provides a means to find the optimal location and angle to harvest maximum energy. The analysis method for near-field wireless power transmission can be utilized

  6. Improvement of dose distribution in breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field Linac-MR unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esmaeeli, A. D., E-mail: ali-esmaeeli-d@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Rasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht, 41476-54919 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, S. R. [Department of Medical Physics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14174 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14174 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pouladian, M.; Bagheri, S. [Department of Medical Radiation Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, 14778-93855 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Radiation Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, 14778-93855 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Monfared, A. S. [Department of Medical Physics, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the improvement in dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field that maintains the same direction of Lorentz force between two fields. The investigation has a potential application in future Linac-MR units. Methods: Computed tomography images of four patients and magnetic fields of 0.25–1.5 Tesla (T) were used for Monte Carlo simulation. Two patients had intact breast while the other two had mastectomy. Simulations of planning and chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical process. The direction of superior-inferior magnetic field for the medial treatment beam was reversed for the lateral beam. Results: For the ipsilateral lung and heart mean doses were reduced by a mean (range) of 45.8% (27.6%–58.6%) and 26.0% (20.2%–38.9%), respectively, depending on various treatment plan setups. The mean V{sub 20} for ipsilateral lung was reduced by 55.0% (43.6%–77.3%). In addition acceptable results were shown after simulation of 0.25 T magnetic field demonstrated in dose-volume reductions of the heart, ipsilateral lung, and noninvolved skin. Conclusions: Applying a reversible magnetic field during breast radiotherapy, not only reduces the dose to the lung and heart but also produces a sharp drop dose volume histogram for planning target volume, because of bending of the path of secondary charged particles toward the chest wall by the Lorentz force. The simulations have shown that use of the magnetic field at 1.5 T is not feasible for clinical applications due to the increase of ipsilateral chest wall skin dose in comparison to the conventional planning while 0.25 T is suitable for all patients due to dose reduction to the chest wall skin.

  7. Understanding global secondary organic aerosol amount and size-resolved condensational behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding global secondary organic aerosol amount and size-resolved condensational behavior and Adams, 2009b) ·Condensation, coagulation, nucleation ·40 size bins (1 nm ­ 10 µm) ·Nucleation rates the aerosol mass distribution. However, recent closure studies with field measurements show that a significant

  8. Technical Letter Report Development of Flaw Size Distribution Tables Including Effects of Flaw Depth Sizing Errors for Draft 10CFR 50.61a (Alternate PTS Rule) JCN-N6398, Task 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonen, Fredric A.; Gosselin, Stephen R.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a new method to determine whether the flaws in a particular reactor pressure vessel are consistent with the assumptions regarding the number and sizes of flaws used in the analyses that formed the technical justification basis for the new voluntary alternative Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) rule (Draft 10 CFR 50.61a). The new methodology addresses concerns regarding prior methodology because ASME Code Section XI examinations do not detect all fabrication flaws, they have higher detection performance for some flaw types, and there are flaw sizing errors always present (e.g., significant oversizing of small flaws and systematic under sizing of larger flaws). The new methodology allows direct comparison of ASME Code Section XI examination results with values in the PTS draft rule Tables 2 and 3 in order to determine if the number and sizes of flaws detected by an ASME Code Section XI examination are consistent with those assumed in the probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations performed in support of the development of 10 CFR 50.61a.

  9. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Deployable Inspector Spacecraft for Distributed Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smart, William

    maneuvers in the region near the parent, performs the required measurements, relays the data, and then re field maps of the vehicles RF, magnetic or nuclear emissions. One proposed solution to this inspection problem is a small, low-cost deployable spacecraft that detaches from its parent vehicle, performs its

  10. Distribution of electric field and energy flux around the cracks on the surfaces of Nd-doped phosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Lei; Huang Li; Fan Sijun; Bai Gongxun; Li Kefeng; Chen Wei; Hu Lili

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate and calculate numerically the electromagnetic field and energy flux around a surface crack of an Nd-doped phosphate laser glass by using the finite-difference time-domain method. Because of a strong interference between the incident wave and the total internal reflections from the crack and the glass surface, the electric field is redistributed and enhanced. The results show that the electric-field distribution and corresponding energy flux component depend sensitively on the light polarization and crack geometry, such as orientation and depth. The polarization of the incident laser beam relative to the crack surfaces will determine the profile of the electric field around the crack. Under TE wave incidence, the energy flux peak is always inside the glass. But under TM wave incidence, the energy flux peak will be located inside the glass or inside the air gap. For both incident modes, the light intensification factor increases with the crack depth, especially for energy flux along the surface. Because cracks on the polished surfaces are the same as the roots extending down, the probability for much larger intensification occurring is high. The results suggest that the surface laser-damage threshold of Nd-doped phosphate may decrease dramatically with subsurface damage.

  11. Field distribution and genetic variability of Panicum mosaic virus satellite RNAs in St. Augustine decline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabrera Perez, Over

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Introduction . . Materials and Methods. . . Results. . . . . . . . . . Discussion. . . . 20 . 21 . 24 . 29 111 GENETIC DIVERSITY OF PANICUM MOSAIC VIRUS SATELLITE RNAs IN ST. AUGUSTINEGRASS. . 32 Introduction . . Materials and Methods...RNA is found associated with Australian isolates of BYDV-RPV. This non- coding satRNA is undetectable in the field and becomes perceptible only following greenhouse propagation. This satRNA attenuates the symptoms induced by the helper virus (BYDV-RPV) alone...

  12. Parameters controlling hydrocarbon distribution at Tatums Camp Field, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, P. (Stephen F. Austin State Univ., Nacogdoches, TX (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural setting, stratigraphy, diagenesis, and hydraulic pathways all have played an important role in the development of reservoir at Tatums Camp field in Lamar County, Mississippi. The field is a domal anticline located on the southern flank of Midway Salt Dome within the confines of the Mississippi Salt basin. Production is from the Booth Sandstone of the Lower Cretaceous Hosston Formation. The Booth Sandstone contains productive mouth bar sands that pinch out across the northeast half of the dome, and nonproductive channel sands on the west. The mouth bars appear to have been deposited in a marginal marine, perhaps, estuarine environment. Porosity is secondary in origin, the result of leaching of framework constituents. Diagenetic studies indicate that hydrocarbons migrated into the sands when they were at or close to their present depth of 15,700 15,800 ft (4,785-4,815 m). Hydraulic head estimates within the upper Hosston Formation decrease from north to south. This pattern suggests that fluid movement is to the south away from Midway Salt Dome. It is probable that these hydraulic pathways were established at the time of hydrocarbon migration. The reservoir at Tatums Camp field appears to be the result of hydrocarbon migration from the north into a stratigraphic pinchout lying across a structurally positive feature.

  13. Field Trial of a Low-Cost, Distributed Plug Load Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auchter, B.; Cautley, D.; Ahl, D.; Earle, L.; Jin, X.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers have struggled to inventory and characterize the energy use profiles of the ever-growing category of so-called miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) because plug-load monitoring is cost-prohibitive to the researcher and intrusive to the homeowner. However, these data represent a crucial missing link to our understanding of how homes use energy, and we cannot control what we do not understand. Detailed energy use profiles would enable the nascent automated home energy management (AHEM) industry to develop effective control algorithms that target consumer electronics and other plug loads. If utility and other efficiency programs are to incent AHEM devices, they need large-scale datasets that provide statistically meaningful justification of their investments by quantifying the aggregate energy savings achievable. To address this need, we have investigated a variety of plug-load measuring devices available commercially and tested them in the laboratory to identify the most promising candidates for field applications. The scope of this report centers around the lessons learned from a field validation of one proof-of-concept system, called Smartenit (formerly SimpleHomeNet). The system was evaluated based on the rate of successful data queries, reliability over a period of days to weeks, and accuracy. This system offers good overall performance when deployed with up to ten end nodes in a residential environment, although deployment with more nodes and in a commercial environment is much less robust. We conclude that the current system is useful in selected field research projects, with the recommendation that system behavior is observed over time.

  14. Facies distribution of upper cretaceous Woodbine Sandstones, southern Kurten Field, Brazos County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leethem, John Thomas

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CI EAST TEXAS TYLER FIELD I SABINE - UPLlFT I' 7 ~ Z 1 . '~+ KURTEN'-, g' ?qS+ +POLK TYLER N TEXAS SEVEN OAKS 0 50 mi SUGAR CREEK 0 80 km Figure 1. Nap of northeast Texas showing major structural features and Woodbine oil production..., anticlines and salt domes were the targets of early exploration in east Texas. The Woodbine sandstones are prolific oil and gas producers in the East Texas basin. Although this mature petroleum province has been productive for more than 50 years, new...

  15. Optimum Size of Nanorods for Heating Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshadri, Gowrishankar; Mehra, Anurag

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP's) have become increasingly important in heating applications such as hyperthermia treatment of cancer due to their ability to release heat when a remote external alternating magnetic field is applied. It has been shown that the heating capability of such particles varies significantly with the size of particles used. In this paper, we theoretically evaluate the heating capability of rod-shaped MNP's and identify conditions under which these particles display highest efficiency. For optimally sized monodisperse particles, the power generated by rod-shaped particles is found to be equal to that generated by spherical particles. However, for particles which have a dispersion in size, rod-shaped particles are found to be more effective in heating as a result of the greater spread in the power density distribution curve. Additionally, for rod-shaped particles, a dispersion in the radius of the particle contributes more to the reduction in loss power when compared to a dispersion in the...

  16. Spatial distribution of an uranium-respiring betaproteobacterium at the rifle, CO field research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koribanics, Nicole M.; Tuorto, Steven J.; Lopez-Chiaffarelli, Nora; McGuinness, Lora R.; Häggblom, Max M.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Morais, Paula V

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site (IFRC) at Rifle, Colorado was created to address the gaps in knowledge on the mechanisms and rates of U(VI) bioreduction in alluvial sediments. Previous studies at the Rifle IFRC have linked microbial processes to uranium immobilization during acetate amendment. Several key bacteria believed to be involved in radionuclide containment have been described; however, most of the evidence implicating uranium reduction with specific microbiota has been indirect. Here, we report on the cultivation of a microorganism from the Rifle IFRC that reduces uranium and appears to utilize it as a terminalmore »electron acceptor for respiration with acetate as electron donor. Furthermore, this bacterium constitutes a significant proportion of the subsurface sediment community prior to biostimulation based on TRFLP profiling of 16S rRNA genes. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicates that the microorganism is a betaproteobacterium with a high similarity to Burkholderia fungorum. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a betaproteobacterium capable of uranium respiration. Our results indicate that this microorganism occurs commonly in alluvial sediments located between 3-6 m below ground surface at Rifle and may play a role in the initial reduction of uranium at the site.« less

  17. Spatial distribution of an uranium-respiring betaproteobacterium at the rifle, CO field research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koribanics, Nicole M. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Tuorto, Steven J. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Lopez-Chiaffarelli, Nora [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); McGuinness, Lora R. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Häggblom, Max M. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Long, Philip E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kerkhof, Lee J. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Morais, Paula V [Univ. of Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site (IFRC) at Rifle, Colorado was created to address the gaps in knowledge on the mechanisms and rates of U(VI) bioreduction in alluvial sediments. Previous studies at the Rifle IFRC have linked microbial processes to uranium immobilization during acetate amendment. Several key bacteria believed to be involved in radionuclide containment have been described; however, most of the evidence implicating uranium reduction with specific microbiota has been indirect. Here, we report on the cultivation of a microorganism from the Rifle IFRC that reduces uranium and appears to utilize it as a terminal electron acceptor for respiration with acetate as electron donor. Furthermore, this bacterium constitutes a significant proportion of the subsurface sediment community prior to biostimulation based on TRFLP profiling of 16S rRNA genes. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicates that the microorganism is a betaproteobacterium with a high similarity to Burkholderia fungorum. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a betaproteobacterium capable of uranium respiration. Our results indicate that this microorganism occurs commonly in alluvial sediments located between 3-6 m below ground surface at Rifle and may play a role in the initial reduction of uranium at the site.

  18. 6, 1184511875, 2006 A new SIze REsolved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the aerosol size distribution into sections and solves the GDE by splitting coagulation and condensation Interactive Discussion EGU that affect the aerosol size/composition distribution are therefore crucial. ThreeACPD 6, 11845­11875, 2006 A new SIze REsolved Aerosol Model E. Debry et al. Title Page Abstract

  19. Wide size range fast integrated mobility spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jian

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobility spectrometer to measure a nanometer particle size distribution is disclosed. The mobility spectrometer includes a conduit and a detector. The conduit is configured to receive and provide fluid communication of a fluid stream having a charged nanometer particle mixture. The conduit includes a separator section configured to generate an electrical field of two dimensions transverse to a dimension associated with the flow of the charged nanometer particle mixture through the separator section to spatially separate charged nanometer particles of the charged nanometer particle mixture in said two dimensions. The detector is disposed downstream of the conduit to detect concentration and position of the spatially-separated nanometer particles.

  20. adjustable pore size: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Websites Summary: -size distribution on pore shapedimensionality and sample temperature is predicted using a simple quantum mechanicalDetermination of pore-size...

  1. aerosol size classification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2006 Aerosol size Physics Websites Summary: ACPD 6, 10493-10522, 2006 Aerosol size distribution source identification T. W. Chan and M Esc Printer-friendly Version...

  2. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed pre-processing supply system designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth, Jr.; Matthew H. Langholtz; Eric C. D. Tan; Jacob J. Jacobson; Amy Schwab; May M. Wu; Andrew Argo; Craig C. Brandt; Kara G. Cafferty; Yi-Wen Chiu; Abhijit Dutta; Laurence M. Eaton; Erin M. Searcy

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scale enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to the conversion facility.

  3. Field Study of Performance, Comfort, and Sizing of Two Variable-Speed Heat Pumps Installed in a Single 2-Story Residence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Odukomaiya, Adewale O [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the recent advancements in the application of variable-speed (VS) compressors to residential HVAC systems, opportunities are now available to size heat pumps (HPs) to more effectively meet heating and cooling loads in many of the climate zones in the US with limited use of inefficient resistance heat. This is in contrast to sizing guidance for traditional single-speed HPs that limits the ability to oversize with regard to cooling loads, because of risks of poor dehumidification during the cooling season and increased cycling losses. VS-drive HPs can often run at 30-40% of their rated cooling capacity to reduce cycling losses, and can adjust fan speed to provide better indoor humidity control. Detailed air-side performance data was collected on two VS-drive heat pumps installed in a single unoccupied research house in Knoxville, TN, a mixed-humid climate. One system provided space conditioning for the upstairs, while the other unit provided space conditioning for the downstairs. Occupancy was simulated by operating the lights, shower, appliances, other plug loads, etc. to simulate the sensible and latent loads imposed on the building space by internal electric loads and human occupants according to the Building America Research Benchmark (2008). The seasonal efficiency and energy use of the units are calculated. Annual energy use is compared to that of the single speed minimum efficiency HPs tested in the same house previously. Sizing of the units relative to the measured building load and manual J design load calculations is examined. The impact of the unit sizing with regards to indoor comfort is also evaluated.

  4. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Final report. Part V. Pyrite size/form/microlithotype distribution in western Kentucky prepared coals and in channel samples from western Kentucky and western Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankle, K.A.; Hower, J.C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrite and marcasite distribution has been characterized in several western Kentucky coals, western Pennsylvania coals, and coals from western Kentucky preparation plants using three parameters of size, morphology, and microlithotype association. A classification system was developed to provide a consistent method for recording different pyrite/marcasite types. Sulfides were microscopically measured and placed in one of six size divisions (<5, 5 to 10, 10 to 40, 40 to 75, 75 to 100, or >150..mu..m) rather than absolute size. Five categories (euhedral, framboidal, dendritic, massive, or cleat) describe pyrite/marcasite morphology. The third parameter identifies the microlithotype (vitrite, clarite, inertite, liptite, durite, vitrinertite, trimacerite, or carbominerite) in which the pyrite occurs (not including the measured sulfide). Carbominerite is a mineral/organic association dominated by mineral matter. The percentage of each variable represents the total number of counts per sample and not the volume of pyrite. Throughout the studies, both sulfides are collectively referred to as pyrite unless otherwise specified. This paper describes the different studies which were undertaken to test the usefulness of this pyrite classification system. Systematic trends in pyrite variability were determined for the Springfield coal and Herrin of western Kentucky. Pyrite characterization of the Lower Kittanning coal from western Pennsylvania shows that certain pyrite morphologies can be an expression of the environments deposition of coal bodies. Studies of western Kentucky prepared coals demonstrate that pyrite characterization apparently can provide a method for predicting pyrite behavior and the extent of pyrite removal for specific coals. 77 references, 15 figures, 19 tables.

  5. Structure Optimization of FePt Nanoparticles of Various Sizes for Magnetic Data Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    to a modified reaction route based on Sun et al.[1] Hexane dispersions of nanoparticles were dried increases with particle size and with the temperature in the range 600 °C to 650 °C, being close to unity-assembly over large areas, and a narrow distribution of switching fields. The long storage time and high storage

  6. Predicting spatial distribution of critical pore types and their influence on reservoir quality, Canyon (Pennsylvanian) Reef reservoir, Diamond M field, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Aaron Jay

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Predicting Spatial Distribution of Critical Pore Types and Their Influence on Reservoir Quality, Canyon (Pennsylvanian) Reef Reservoir, Diamond M Field, Texas... scale. Ultimately slice maps of reservoir quality at a 10 ft interval for a 150 ft section of the Canyon Reef reservoir were developed. These iv reservoir quality maps will provide a useful tool for the design and implementation of accurate...

  7. ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor size

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice particleSize Distribution

  8. In-service Inspection Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density and Size Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.; Norris, Wallace

    2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events are system transients in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in which there is a rapid operating temperature cool-down that results in cold vessel temperatures with or without repressurization of the vessel. The rapid cooling of the inside surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) causes thermal stresses that can combine with stresses caused by high pressure. The aggregate effect of these stresses is an increase in the potential for fracture if a pre-existing flaw is present in a material susceptible to brittle failure. The ferritic, low alloy steel of the reactor vessel beltline adjacent to the core, where neutron radiation gradually embrittles the material over the lifetime of the plant, can be susceptible to brittle fracture. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), “Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events,” adopted on July 23, 1985, establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed a rule, §50.61a, published on January 4, 2010, entitled “Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events” (75 FR 13). Use of the new rule by licensees is optional. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants. These analyses are intended to determine if the actual flaw density and size distribution in the licensee’s reactor vessel beltline welds are bounded by the flaw density and size distribution values used in the PTS technical basis. Under a contract with the NRC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been working on a program to assess the ability of current inservice inspection (ISI)-ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques, as qualified through ASME Code, Appendix VIII, Supplements 4 and 6, to detect small fabrication or inservice-induced flaws located in RPV welds and adjacent base materials. As part of this effort, the investigators have pursued an evaluation, based on the available information, of the capability of UT to provide flaw density/distribution inputs for making RPV weld assessments in accordance with §50.61a. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of data from the 1993 Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Unit 3, Spirit of Appendix VIII reactor vessel examination, a comparison of the flaw density/distribution from this data with the distribution in §50.61a, possible reasons for differences, and plans and recommendations for further work in this area.

  9. Cluster size distribution for free molecular agglomeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulholland, G.W.; Samson, R.J.; Mountain, R.D.; Ernst, M.H.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dobbins and Megaridis have observed soot agglomerates in a diffusion flame via thermophoretic sampling. The agglomerates are made up of spherules with a typical diameter of about 30 nm. A characteristic of the agglomerate is the relatively low density of the structure with much open space. This study is concerned with modeling the agglomeration growth process.

  10. ARM - Measurement - Cloud particle size distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice particle ARM Data Discoverysize

  11. Characterizing Uncertainties in Ice Particle Size Distributions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C

  12. Kerr electro-optic measurements for electric field and space charge distributions using similar and dissimilar electrode pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowocin, John Kendall

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical breakdown strength of insulating materials is a major limiting factor of reliability in electric power, medical devices, and other high electric field applications. Electrical breakdown strength increase ...

  13. Sequence stratigraphy of the upper San Andres and Grayburg formations, Waddell Field, Crane County, Texas: implications for hydrocarbon reservoir distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinsonnault, Scott Michael

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper San Andres and Grayburg formations (Guadalupian) were deposited on carbonate platforms around the Permian Basin region and are extensive hydrocarbon reservoirs in the region. The Waddell Field (East Waddell Ranch) on the eastern margin...

  14. Comparison of parameter sensitivities between a laboratory and field scale model of uranium transport in a dual domain, distributed-rate reactive system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Liu, Chongxuan; Post, Vincent; Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zachara, John M.

    2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory-derived conceptual and numerical model for U(VI) transport at the Hanford 300A site, Washington, USA, was applied to a range of field-scale scenarios of different complexity to systematically evaluate model parameter sensitivities. The model, originally developed from column experiment data, included distributed-rate surface complexation kinetics of U(VI), aqueous speciation, and physical non-equilibrium transport processes. A rigorous parameter sensitivity analysis was carried out with respect to different state variables: concentrations, mass fluxes, total mass and spatial moments of dissolved U(VI) for laboratory systems, and various simulation scenarios that represented the field-scale characteristics at the Hanford 300A site. The field-scenarios accounted for transient groundwater flow and variable geochemical conditions driven by frequent water level changes of the nearby Columbia River. Simulations indicated that the transient conditions significantly affected U(VI) plume migration at the site. The parameter sensitivities were largely similar between the laboratory and field scale systems. Where differences existed, they were shown to result from differing degrees of U(VI) adsorption disequilibrium caused by hydraulic or hydrogeochemical conditions. Adorption disequilibrium was found to differ (i) between short duration peak flow events at the field scale and much longer flow events in the laboratory, (ii) for changing groundwater chemical compositions due to river water intrusion, and (iii) for different sampling locations at the field scale. Parameter sensitivities were also found to vary with respect to the different investigated state variables. An approach is demonstrated that elucidates the most important parameters of a laboratory-scale model that must constrained in both the laboratory and field for meaningful field application.

  15. STRUCTURAL AND STRATIGRAPHIC CONTROLS ON MORROW SANDSTONE RESERVOIR DISTRIBUTION FROM 3-D SEISMIC DATA, POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    seismic data provides a useful tool to investigate the structural framework. Time structure maps, isochronSTRUCTURAL AND STRATIGRAPHIC CONTROLS ON MORROW SANDSTONE RESERVOIR DISTRIBUTION FROM 3-D SEISMIC and the thin, discontinuous nature of the reservoir sandstones. Modeling was conducted to investigate

  16. Final Report: Process Models of the Equilibrium Size & State of Organic/Inorganic Aerosols for the Development of Large Scale Atmospheric Models & the Analysis of Field Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wexler, Anthony Stein [UC Davis] [UC Davis; Clegg, Simon Leslie [UC Davis] [UC Davis

    2013-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Our work addressed the following elements of the Call for Proposals: (i) “to improve the theoretical representation of aerosol processes studied in ASP laboratory or field studies”, (ii) “to enhance the incorporation of aerosol process information into modules suitable for large-scale or global atmospheric models”, and (iii) “provide systematic experimental validation of process model predictions ... using data from targeted laboratory and field experiments”. Achievements to the end of 2012 are described in four previous reports, and include: new models of densities and surface tensions of pure (single solute) and mixed aqueous solutions of typical aerosol composition under all atmospheric conditions (0 to 100% RH and T > 150 K); inclusion of these models into the widely used Extended Aerosol Inorganics model (E-AIM, http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/aim.php); the addition of vapor pressure calculators for organic compounds to the E-AIM website; the ability of include user-defined organic compounds and/or lumped surrogates in gas/aerosol partitioning calculations; the development of new equations to represent the properties of soluble aerosols over the entire concentration range (using methods based upon adsorption isotherms, and derived using statistical mechanics), including systems at close to zero RH. These results are described in publications 1-6 at the end of this report, and on the “News” page of the E-AIM website (http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/info/news.html). During 2012 and 2013 we have collaborated in a combined observation and lab-based study of the water uptake of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols (PI Gannet Hallar, of the Desert Research Institute). The aerosol samples were analyzed using several complementary techniques (GC/MS, FT-ICR MS, and ion chromatography) to produce a very complete organic “speciation” including both polar and non-polar compounds. Hygroscopic growth factors of the samples were measured, and we have just completed comparisons of the data with our process model predictions based upon the inorganic and organic composition of the samples.

  17. VARIABILITY SURVEY IN THE CoRoT SRa01 FIELD: IMPLICATIONS OF ECLIPSING BINARY DISTRIBUTION ON CLUSTER FORMATION IN NGC 2264

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klagyivik, P. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest XII, Konkoly Thege ut 15-17. (Hungary); Csizmadia, Sz.; Pasternacki, T.; Fruth, T.; Erikson, A.; Cabrera, J.; Eigmueller, P.; Kirste, S.; Rauer, H.; Titz-Weider, R. [Institut fuer Planetenforschung, Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Rutherfordstrasse 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Chini, R.; Lemke, R. [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Kabath, P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Murphy, M. [Depto. Fisica, Universidad Catolica del Norte, PO 1280, Antofagasta (Chile)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-series photometry of the CoRoT field SRa01 was carried out with the Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope II in 2008/2009. A total of 1161 variable stars were detected, of which 241 were previously known and 920 are newly found. Several new, variable young stellar objects have been discovered. The study of the spatial distribution of eclipsing binaries revealed the higher relative frequency of Algols toward the center of the young open cluster NGC 2264. In general Algol frequency obeys an isotropic distribution of their angular momentum vectors, except inside the cluster, where a specific orientation of the inclinations is the case. We suggest that we see the orbital plane of the binaries almost edge-on.

  18. Population dynamics and within field distribution of the greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), and its parasitoids in Central Texas winter wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kring, T. J

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    throughout the study period. The low greenbug densities prevented descriptton of a meaning- ful szgntficant immigration and/or emigration pattern based on slate p d ' . R. d ' b d h pl p production of the panicle. Primary parasitotds reared from... in the Texas Panhandle. Descriptions of greenbug age distribution as it changes through time on wheat is limited zn the United States to Kieckhefer's (1975) work rn South Dakota. Kieckhefer distinguished density gradients of nymphal, apterous and slate...

  19. Hopper Job Size Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Size Charts Hopper Job Size Charts Fractional Jobs The following charts show the fraction of hours used on Hopper in each of five job-core-size bins: 2014 Usage by Job Size...

  20. Edison Job Size Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Size Charts Edison Job Size Charts Fraction of Hours Used per Job Size This chart shows the fraction of hours used on Edison in each of 5 job-core-size bins. 2015 Usage by Job...

  1. Electrodynamics in the zero-point field: on the equilibrium spectral energy distribution and the origin of inertial mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Ibison

    2003-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts at an electromagnetic explanation of the inertial mass of charged particles have recently been revived within the framework of Stochastic Electrodynamics, characterized by the adoption of a classical version of the electromagnetic zero-point field (ZPF). Recent claims of progress in that area have to some extent received support from related claims that the classical equilibrium spectrum of charged matter is that of the classically conceived ZPF. The purpose of this note is to suggest that some strong qualifications should accompany these claims. It is pointed out that a classical massless charge cannot acquire mass from nothing as a result of immersion in any EM field, and therefore that the ZPF alone cannot provide a full explanation of inertial mass. Of greater concern, it is observed that the peculiar circumstances under which classical matter is in equilibrium with the ZPF do not concur with observation.

  2. Evaluation of electric and magnetic fields distribution and SAR induced in 3D models of water containers by radiofrequency radiation using FDTD and FEM simulation techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelsamie, Maher A A; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Hashim, Dzulkifly

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, two software packages using different numerical techniques FEKO 6.3 with Finite-Element Method (FEM) and XFDTD 7 with Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD) were used to assess exposure of 3D models of square, rectangular, and pyramidal shaped water containers to electromagnetic waves at 300, 900, and 2400 MHz frequencies. Using the FEM simulation technique, the peak electric field of 25, 4.5, and 2 V/m at 300 MHz and 15.75, 1.5, and 1.75 V/m at 900 MHz were observed in pyramidal, rectangular, and square shaped 3D container models, respectively. The FDTD simulation method confirmed a peak electric field of 12.782, 10.907, and 10.625 V/m at 2400 MHz in the pyramidal, square, and rectangular shaped 3D models, respectively. The study demonstrated an exceptionally high level of electric field in the water in the two identical pyramid shaped 3D models analyzed using the two different simulation techniques. Both FEM and FDTD simulation techniques indicated variations in the distribution of elect...

  3. Countering Aging Effects through Field Gate Sizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrichson, Trenton D.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . Using HSPICE and 70nm BPTM process numbers, we simulated the technique on four circuits (a ring oscillator, a fan-out four circuit, an ISCAS c432 and c2670). Over the lifetime of the circuit, our simulations predict a 8.89% and a 13% improvement in power...

  4. A liquid-helium-free superconducting coil system forming a flat minimum-magnetic-field distribution of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi, E-mail: yoshida.kennichi71@jaea.go.jp; Nara, Takayuki; Saitoh, Yuichi; Yokota, Watalu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)] [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat distribution of the minimum magnetic field (flat-B{sub min}) of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) is expected to perform better in highly charged ion production than classical B{sub min}. To form a flat-B{sub min} structure with a liquid helium-free superconducting device, a coil system of seven coils with four current leads has been designed. The lead number was reduced by connecting the plural coils in series to maintain the flat-B{sub min} structure even when the coil currents are changed for adjustment. This coil system can be operated with a helium-free cryostat, since the estimation of heat from the leads to the coils is nearly equivalent to the existing superconducting ECRIS of a similar type.

  5. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Evaluation of Cold Air Distribution Systems. EPRIand J.S. Elleson. 1988. Cold Air Distribution Design Guide.Field Evaluation of a Cold Air Distribution System. EPRI

  6. Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current Distributions of Infrared Optical Antennas: A Near-Field Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current...

  7. FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, W.J.

    size distribution model for estimating oil reserves and for use in forest management under the `natural estimates of oil reserves, and be of use for ecosystem based forest management under the `naturalFOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA. William J. Reed #3; JUNE, 1999. Abstract

  8. atmospheric aerosol size: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Size Distribution Physics (arXiv) Summary: Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover...

  9. algorithm population sizing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CiteSeer Summary: Deciding the appropriate population size and number of islands for distributed island-model genetic algorithms is often critical to the algorithms success. This...

  10. alter perceived size: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of two colliding dust aggregates into a coagulation model that computes the dust size distribution with time. All collisional outcomes -- sticking, fragmentation...

  11. On the Synchronization of Networks with Prescribed Degree Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jost, Jürgen

    On the Synchronization of Networks with Prescribed Degree Distributions Fatihcan M. Atay T for building non-synchronizing networks having a prescribed degree distribution. Index Terms distribution, which converges to a Poisson distribution for large network sizes. The degree distribution

  12. THE DEEP SWIRE FIELD. IV. FIRST PROPERTIES OF THE SUB-mJy GALAXY POPULATION: REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION, AGN ACTIVITY, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strazzullo, Veronica; Pannella, Maurilio; Owen, Frazer N.; Wang, Wei-Hao [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Rd., Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Bender, Ralf [Universitaets-Sternwarte, Scheinerstrasse 1, Munich D-81679 (Germany); Morrison, Glenn E. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Shupe, David L., E-mail: vstrazzu@nrao.ed [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of a 20 cm selected sample in the Deep Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic Legacy Survey Very Large Array Field, reaching a 5{sigma} limiting flux density at the image center of S{sub 1.4{sub GHz}} {approx} 13.5 {mu}Jy. In a 0.6 x 0.6 deg{sup 2} field, we are able to assign an optical/IR counterpart to 97% of the radio sources. Up to 11 passbands from the NUV to 4.5 {mu}m are then used to sample the spectral energy distribution (SED) of these counterparts in order to investigate the nature of the host galaxies. By means of an SED template library and stellar population synthesis models, we estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and stellar population properties, dividing the sample into three sub-classes of quiescent, intermediate, and star-forming galaxies. We focus on the radio sample in the redshift range 0.3 < z < 1.3 where we estimate to have a redshift completeness higher than 90% and study the properties and redshift evolution of these sub-populations. We find that, as expected, the relative contributions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming galaxies to the {mu}Jy population depend on the flux density limit of the sample. At all flux levels, a significant population of 'green-valley' galaxies is observed. While the actual nature of these sources is not definitely understood, the results of this work may suggest that a significant fraction of faint radio sources might be composite (and possibly transition) objects, thus a simple 'AGN versus star-forming' classification might not be appropriate to fully understand what faint radio populations really are.

  13. Usage by Job Size

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage by Job Size Table Usage by Job Size Table page loading animation Usage Query Interface System All Hopper Edison Carver Planck Matgen Franklin Hopper 1 Magellan Dirac Bassi...

  14. Distribution, Magnitudes, Reactivities, Ratios and Diurnal Patterns of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Valley of Mexico During the MCMA 2002 & 2003 Field Campaigns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velasco, E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Westberg, Halvor; Allwine, Eugene J.; Sosa, G.; Arriaga-Colina, J. L.; Jobson, B. T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Prazeller, Peter; Knighton, Walter B.; Rogers, T.; Grutter, M.; Herndon, S.; Kolb, C. E.; Zavala, Mary A.; de Foy, B.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J.

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide array of volatile organic compound (VOC) measurements was conducted in the Valley of Mexico during the MCMA-2002 and 2003 field campaigns. Study sites included locations in the urban core, in a heavily industrial area and at boundary sites in rural landscapes. In addition, a novel mobile-laboratory-based conditional sampling method was used to collect samples dominated by fresh on-road vehicle exhaust to identify those VOCs whose ambient concentrations were primarily due to vehicle emissions. Four distinct analytical techniques were used: whole air canister samples with Gas Chromatography/Flame Ionization Detection (GC-FID), on-line chemical ionization using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), continuous real-time detection of olefins using a Fast Olefin Sensor (FOS), and long path measurements using UV Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometers (DOAS). The simultaneous use of these techniques provided a wide range of individual VOC measurements with different spatial and temporal scales. The VOC data were analyzed to understand concentration and spatial distributions, diurnal patterns, origin and reactivity in the atmosphere of Mexico City. The VOC burden (in ppbC) was dominated by alkanes (60%), followed by aromatics (15%) and olefins (5%). The remaining 20% was a mix of alkynes, halogenated hydrocarbons, oxygenated species (esters, ethers, etc.) and other unidentified VOCs. However, in terms of ozone production, olefins were the most relevant hydrocarbons. Elevated levels of toxic hydrocarbons, such as 1, 3-butadiene, benzene, toluene and xylenes, were also observed. Results from these various analytical techniques showed that vehicle exhaust is the main source of VOCs in Mexico City and that diurnal patterns depend on vehicular traffic in addition to meteorological processes. Finally, examination of the VOC data in terms of lumped modeling VOC classes and its comparison to the VOC lumped emissions reported in other photochemical air quality modeling studies suggests that some alkanes are underestimated in the emissions inventory, while some olefins and aromatics are overestimated.

  15. Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is arguably the most complex system installed in a house and is a substantial component of the total house energy use. A right-sized HVAC system will provide the desired occupant comfort and will run efficiently. This Strategy Guideline discusses the information needed to initially select the equipment for a properly designed HVAC system. Right-sizing of an HVAC system involves the selection of equipment and the design of the air distribution system to meet the accurate predicted heating and cooling loads of the house. Right-sizing the HVAC system begins with an accurate understanding of the heating and cooling loads on a space; however, a full HVAC design involves more than just the load estimate calculation - the load calculation is the first step of the iterative HVAC design procedure. This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, Florida. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

  16. A MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY OF A SAMPLE OF 70 mum SELECTED GALAXIES IN THE COSMOS FIELD. I. SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND LUMINOSITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Sanders, D. B.; Le Floc'h, E.; Ilbert, O. [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Frayer, D. T. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Aussel, H. [CNRS, AIM-Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA-CNRS-Universite Paris VII-UMR 7158, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Arnouts, S. [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, 65-1238 Mamalahoa Hwy, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Capak, P. [California Institute of Technology, MC 105-24, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Surace, J.; Yan, L. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Brusa, M.; Hasinger, G. [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85478 Garching (Germany); Caputi, K.; Carollo, C. M. [Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Civano, F.; Elvis, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Faure, C. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Observatoire de Sauverny, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Koekemoer, A. M., E-mail: jeyhan@ifa.hawaii.ed, E-mail: jeyhan@noao.ed [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a large robust sample of 1503 reliable and unconfused 70 mum selected sources from the multiwavelength data set of the Cosmic Evolution Survey. Using the Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, we estimate the total infrared (IR) luminosity, L{sub IR} (8-1000 mum), by finding the best-fit template from several different template libraries. The long-wavelength 70 and 160 mum data allow us to obtain a reliable estimate of L{sub IR}, accurate to within 0.2 and 0.05 dex, respectively. The 70 mum data point enables a significant improvement over the luminosity estimates possible with only a 24 mum detection. The full sample spans a wide range in IR luminosity, L{sub IR} approx 10{sup 8}-10{sup 14} L{sub sun}, with a median luminosity of 10{sup 11.4} L{sub sun}. We identify a total of 687 luminous, 303 ultraluminous, and 31 hyperluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, ULIRGs, and HyLIRGs) over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 3.5 with a median redshift of 0.5. Presented here are the full spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for each of the sources compiled from the extensive multiwavelength data set from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared. A catalog of the general properties of the sample (including the photometry, redshifts, and L{sub IR}) is included with this paper. We find that the overall shape of the SED and trends with L{sub IR} (e.g., IR color temperatures and optical-IR ratios) are similar to what has been seen in studies of local objects; however, our large sample allows us to see the extreme spread in UV to near-infrared colors spanning nearly 3 orders of magnitude. In addition, using SED fits we find possible evidence for a subset of cooler ultraluminous objects than observed locally. However, until direct observations at longer wavelengths are obtained, the peak of emission and the dust temperature cannot be well constrained. We use these SEDs, along with the deep radio and X-ray coverage of the field, to identify a large sample of candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that the fraction of AGNs increases strongly with L{sub IR}, as it does in the local universe, and that nearly 70% of ULIRGs and all HyLIRGs likely host a powerful AGN.

  17. LBNL -42691 Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL - 42691 1 Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer of or agreement with these findings, nor that of any CIEE sponsor. #12;LBNL - 42691 2 Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant of the Residential Thermal Distribution Systems research done by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL

  18. advanced distributed measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the in situ water distribution within the gas 69 MEASUREMENT OF FLOW FIELD AND WALL TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN Physics Websites Summary: MEASUREMENT OF FLOW FIELD AND WALL...

  19. Distributed Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers SubfoldersU.S. RefiningDistributed EnergyUntapped

  20. What determines cell size?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanism for nuclear positioning in fission yeast based onboth budding and fission yeast that nuclear volume increasesFR, Nurse P: Nuclear size control in fission yeast. J Cell

  1. The distribution of Voronoi cells generated by Southern California earthquake epicenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic P; Barr, Christopher; Jungju Seo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous Univariate Distributions. 2nd ed. Wiley, Newfor the tapered Pareto distribution. Journal of AppliedWoods, J. (2003) On the distribution of wild?re sizes. Envi-

  2. J. Field Ornithol. 79(4):381390, 2008 DOI: 10.1111/j.1557-9263.2008.00195.x Distribution of California Black Rails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beissinger, Steven R.

    en la regi´on del valle de Sacramento para determinar la distribuci´on y residencia del Ralido Negro foothills and Sacramento Valley region to determine the distribution and residency of Black Rails, estimate

  3. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Flow Field Inside a Squeeze Film Damper and the Study of the Effect of Cavitation on the Pressure Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandare, Milind Nandkumar

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of SFDs can be expensive and time consuming. The current work simulates the flow field inside the dynamically deforming annular gap of a SFD using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code Fluent and compares the results to the experimental...

  5. aerosol particle size: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (AD... Dileep, V.R. 2012-06-07 79 Scale-free Universal Spectrum for Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distribution for Davos, Mauna Loa and Izana Physics (arXiv) Summary: Atmospheric flows...

  6. agglomerates sizes approach: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lorenzo Isella; Yannis Drossinos 2010-04-26 52 A fractal-based approach to lake size-distributions David A. Seekell,1 Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

  7. air gaps size: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cars in a number of roads in central London is well represented by the spacing distribution of a Gaussian unitary ensemble. Abul-Magd, A Y 2006-01-01 29 The Role of Size in...

  8. Magnetic agglomeration method for size control in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huber, Dale L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for controlling the size of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles that employs magnetic interaction between particles to control particle size and does not rely on conventional kinetic control of the reaction to control particle size. The particles are caused to reversibly agglomerate and precipitate from solution; the size at which this occurs can be well controlled to provide a very narrow particle size distribution. The size of particles is controllable by the size of the surfactant employed in the process; controlling the size of the surfactant allows magnetic control of the agglomeration and precipitation processes. Agglomeration is used to effectively stop particle growth to provide a very narrow range of particle sizes.

  9. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Lee, Elizabeth (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Kallam, Alekhya (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Majumdar, Partha (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J. (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  10. Exploration of strong-field multiphoton double ionization, rescattering, and electron angular distribution of He atoms in intense long-wavelength laser fields: The coupled coherent-state approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Xue-Shen; Chu, Shih-I

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    distribution, as the initial states of the quantum time-dependent Schr¨odinger equations. The CCS trajectories move over averaged potentials, which can remove the Columbic singularities exactly. The low-energy structure is predicted by our CCS calculation and a...

  11. Size separation in vibrated granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kudrolli

    2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent developments in size separation in vibrated granular materials. Motivated by a need in industry to efficiently handle granular materials and a desire to make fundamental advances in non-equilibrium physics, experimental and theoretical investigations have shown size separation to be a complex phenomena. Large particles in a vibrated granular system invariably rise to the top. However, they may also sink to the bottom, or show other patterns depending on subtle variations in physical conditions. While size ratio is a dominant factor, particle specific properties such as density, inelasticity and friction can play an important role. The nature of the energy input, boundary conditions and interstitial air have been also shown to be significant factors in determining spatial distributions. The presence of convection can enhance mixing or lead to size separation. Experimental techniques including direct visualization and magnetic resonance imaging are being used to investigate these properties. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation techniques have been developed to probe size separation. Analytical methods such as kinetic theory are being used to study the interplay between particle size and density in the vibro-fluidized regime, and geometric models have been proposed to describe size separation for deep beds. Besides discussing these studies, we will also review the impact of inelastic collision and friction on the density and velocity distributions to gain a deeper appreciation of the non-equilibrium nature of the system. While a substantial number of studies have been accomplished, considerable work is still required to achieve a firm description of the phenomena.

  12. Double layer electric fields aiding the production of energetic flat-top distributions and superthermal electrons within the exhausts from magnetic reconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan; Le, Ari; Borg, Anette L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a kinetic simulation of magnetic reconnection it was recently shown that magnetic-field-aligned electric fields (E||) can be present over large spatial scales in reconnection exhausts. The largest values of E|| are observed within double layers. The existence of double layers in the Earth's magnetosphere is well documented. In our simulation their formation is triggered by large parallel streaming of electrons into the reconnection region. These parallel electron fluxes are required for maintaining quasi-neutrality of the reconnection region and increase with decreasing values of the normalized electron pressure upstream of the reconnection region. A threshold normalized pressure is derived for strong double layers to develop. We also document how the electron confinement, provided in part by the structure in E||, allows sustained energization by perpendicular electric fields. The energization is a consequence of the confined electrons' chaotic orbital motion that includes drifts aligned with the reconn...

  13. A note on string size evolution in phantom cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soon-Tae Hong

    2015-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze evolution of string size in higher-dimensional cosmology with phantom field. Assuming that the Universe possesses the phantom field defined in a ten-dimensional spacetime, we predict string size which is claimed to be that of photon in nature at present. The Universe size increases as in the standard inflationary Universe model while the photon size decreases drastically at the early stage of the string evolution after the Big Bang. Moreover, the photon spin in the phantom Universe is analyzed in the framework of the stringy cosmology.

  14. Ice particle size matters | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice particle size matters Ice particle size matters Released: May 04, 2014 Fine-tuning cloud models for improved climate predictions The Science Arctic clouds are widespread and...

  15. A Wide Field Hubble Space Telescope Study of the Cluster Cl0024+1654 at z=0.4 II: The Cluster Mass Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Paul Kneib; Patrick Hudelot; Richard S. Ellis; Tommaso Treu; Graham P. Smith; Phil Marshall; Oliver Czoske; Ian Smail; Priya Natarajan

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (abridged) We present a comprehensive lensing analysis of the rich cluster Cl0024+1654 based on panoramic sparse-sampled imaging conducted with HST. We demonstrate an ability to detect reliably weak lensing signals to a cluster radius of ~5 Mpc where the mean shear is around 1%. The projected mass distribution reveals a secondary concentration representing 30% of the overall cluster mass, which is also visible in the distribution of cluster member galaxies. We normalize the mass profile determined from the shear by assuming that background galaxies selected with I=23-26 have a redshift distribution statistically similar to that in the HDFs. Combining strong and weak constraints, we are able to probe the mass profile of the cluster on scales of 0.1 to 5 Mpc thus providing a valuable test of the universal form proposed by NFW on large scales. A generalized power law fit indicates a asymptotic density distribution with 3D slope larger than 2.4. An isothermal mass profile is therefore strongly rejected, whereas a NFW profile with M_200= 6.1+/-1 10^14 M_sun provides a good fit to the lensing data. We isolate cluster members according to their optical-near infrared colors; the red cluster light closely traces the dark matter with a mean mass-to-light ratio of M/L_K~ 40 M/L_sun. Similar profiles for mass and light on 1-5 Mpc scales are expected if cluster assembly is largely governed by infalling groups.

  16. Predicting spatial distribution of critical pore types and their influence on reservoir quality, Canyon (Pennsylvanian) Reef reservoir, Diamond M field, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Aaron Jay

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    is a result of selective grain and pore-wall dissolution related to burial diagenesis. Additionally, saddle dolomite is irregularly distributed throughout the reservoir, indicating that late burial diagenesis contributed to the complexity... is a hybrid of depositional and diagenetic processes and no fracture porosity was found to be evident. It is evident that at least two early stages of cementation and dissolution have taken place. Dissolution of reservoir rock is a diagenetic...

  17. Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

  18. Collection of Aerosol Particles by a Conducting Sphere in an External Electric Field-Continuum Regime Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Pao K.

    caseswhere some effects are absent. INTRODUCTION The collision and coagulation process of aerosol particles to a consid- erable extent the size distribution and thus the reaction rate of the reactants. In this paper weCollection of Aerosol Particles by a Conducting Sphere in an External Electric Field

  19. Aerosol measurements at a high-elevation site: composition, size, and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, B.

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, single particle composition and size distributions at a high-elevation research site from March 2011 are presented.

  20. Edison Job Size Charts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnet UpdateEarth WeekAlamosEdisonEdisonJob Size

  1. Uniform Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    randomly and equally likely a point in that interval), the uniform distribution ... Roughly speaking, this means that from any distribution we can create the uniform.

  2. Is there a particle-size dependence for the mediation by colloidal redox catalysts of the light-induced hydrogen evolution from water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, P.; Moradpour, A.

    1980-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle-size effects for the catalysis by platinum of the light-induced hydrogen evolution from water, using the (Ru(bpy)/sub 3//sup 2 +//methyl viologen/EDTA) model system, were investigated with widely polydispersed colloidal platinum hydrosols and samples with narrower size distributions obtained from the former hydrosols by centrifugation. The optimum values for the hydrogen-formation rates and yields were found to be very similar for all catalysts studied; this was true for those containing polydispersed or selected small (<100 A) as well as large particles (>1000 A). In fact, no platinum particle-size effects on the methyl viologen mediated hydrogen evolutions were observed in the investigated size range. These results are discussed in relation to studies on catalyst-dispersion effects in the field of heterogeous catalysis.

  3. Population growth, distribution, and size in Latin America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    timber harvesting oil exploration/extraction population growth? degradation of lands in source areas history in Amazonia · Early extractive uses Rubber Forestry #12;Development history in Amazonia forests in the world 2) 45% of all the fresh water on the Earth 3) the planet's largest carbon sink 4

  4. The geographic distribution of mammal body size in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, M A; Lopez-Sanudo, I L; Hawkins, Bradford A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nacionales, Madrid. Peltier, W. (1993) Time dependentlast glacial maximum (Peltier, 1993). This variable measures

  5. The geographic distribution of mammal body size in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, M A; Lopez-Sanudo, I L; Hawkins, Bradford A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cell age), estim- ated by mapped changes in ice coverage at 1-Kyr intervals since the last glacial maximum (Peltier,

  6. aerosol size distributions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Davos, Mauna Loa and Izana Physics (arXiv) Summary: Atmospheric flows exhibit fractal fluctuations and inverse power law form for power spectra indicating an eddy...

  7. aerosol size distribution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Davos, Mauna Loa and Izana Physics (arXiv) Summary: Atmospheric flows exhibit fractal fluctuations and inverse power law form for power spectra indicating an eddy...

  8. Concentrations and Size Distributions of Particulate Matter Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ECD-1 CRT CNG1 CNG2 Carbonyl Compounds (Air Toxics) Formaldehyde Acetaldehyde Acetone Acrolein Propionaldehyde Croton Methyl ethyl Ketone (MEK) Methylacrolein Butanal Benzaldehyde...

  9. Estimating sandstone permeability using network models with pore size distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathews, Alan Ronald

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effects of each parameter on the response of the network lattice. A FoR+RAv source code was written to generate and analyze the response of the network model (see Appendix G for source code description and flow chart). The controlling parameters used... in appearance to empirical data. A network model is developed to simulate the pore geometry of a clean, well-sorted sandstone. Pores were modeled as straight capillaries connected in various lattice configurations. Complex lattice configurations produce more...

  10. Assessing Impact of Shattered Artifacts on Measured Size Distributions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational Management »EnergyHubs | DepartmentCloud

  11. Concentrations and Size Distributions of Particulate Matter Emissions from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the WhiteNational|ofSeptember 3,Bringing youProgram AreasCatalyzed

  12. Quantum size effects in classical hadrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nix, J.R.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author discusses future directions in the development of classical hydrodynamics for extended nucleons, corresponding to nucleons of finite size interacting with massive meson fields. This new theory provides a natural covariant microscopic approach to relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions that includes automatically spacetime nonlocality and retardation, nonequilibrium phenomena, interactions among all nucleons, and particle production. The present version of the theory includes only the neutral scalar ({sigma}) and neutral vector ({omega}) meson fields. In the future, additional isovector pseudoscalar ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup 0}), isovector vector ({rho}{sup +}, {rho}{sup {minus}}, {rho}{sup 0}), and neutral pseudoscalar ({eta}) meson fields should be incorporated. Quantum size effects should be included in the equations of motion by use of the spreading function of Moniz and Sharp, which generates an effective nucleon mass density smeared out over a Compton wavelength. However, unlike the situation in electrodynamics, the Compton wavelength of the nucleon is small compared to its radius, so that effects due to the intrinsic size of the nucleon dominate.

  13. Seeding rate and seed size as management techniques for ryegrass (Lolium Multiflorum, Lam) in winter wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Casey Lee

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher seeding rates and larger seed sizes could enhance the competitiveness of wheat with ryegrass. Growth room and field research evaluated the effects of wheat seeding rates and seed size in competition with Italian ryegrass. Winter wheat seeds...

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Water between Metal Walls under Electric Field: Dielectric Response and Dynamics after Field Reversal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyohei Takae; Akira Onuki

    2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study water between parallel metal walls under applied electric field accounting for the image effect at $T=298$ K. The electric field due to the surface charges serves to attract and orient nearby water molecules, while it tends to a constant determined by the mean surface charge density away from the walls. We find Stern boundary layers with thickness about $5$ $\\rm \\AA$ and a homogeneously polarized bulk region. The molecules in the layers more sensitively respond to the applied field than in the bulk. As a result, the potential drop in the layers is larger than that in the bulk unless the cell length exceeds 10 nm. We also examine the hydrogen bonds, which tend to make small angles with respect to the walls in the layers even without applied field. The average local field considerably deviates from the classical Lorentz field and the local field fluctuations are very large in the bulk. If we suppose a nanometer-size sphere around each molecule, the local field contribution from its exterior is nearly equal to that from the continuum electrostatics and that from its interior yields the deviation from the classical Lorentz field. As a nonequilibrium problem, we investigate the dynamics after a reversal of applied field, where the relaxation is mostly caused by large-angle rotational jumps after 1 ps due to the presence of the hydrogen bond network. The molecules undergoing these jumps themselves form hydrogen-bonded clusters heterogeneously distributed in space.

  15. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Size

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1998 TablesSize of

  16. Modeling and Verification of Distributed Generation and Voltage Regulation Equipment for Unbalanced Distribution Power Systems; Annual Subcontract Report, June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M. W.; Broadwater, R.; Hambrick, J.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the development of models for distributed generation and distribution circuit voltage regulation equipment for unbalanced power systems and their verification through actual field measurements.

  17. A process for the chemical preparation of high-field ZnO varistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, R.A.; Dosch, R.G.; Tuttle, B.A.

    1986-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical preparation techniques involving co-precipitation of metals are used to provide microstructural characteristics necessary in order to produce ZnO varistors and their precursors for high field applications. The varistors produced have homogeneous and/or uniform dopant distributions and a submicron average grain size with a narrow size distribution. Precursor powders are prepared via chemical precipitation techniques and varistors made by sintering uniaxially and/or isostatically pressed pellets. Using these methods, varistors were made which were suitable for high-power applications, having values of breakdown field, E/sub B/, in the 10 to 100 kV/cm range, ..cap alpha.. > 30 and densities in the range of 65 to 99% of theoretical, depending on both composition and sintering temperature.

  18. Blackbody Distribution for Wormholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. González-Díaz

    1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    By assuming that only (i) bilocal vertex operators which are diagonal with respect to the basis for local field operators, and (ii) the convergent elements with nonzero positive energy of the density matrix representing the quantum state of multiply-connected wormholes, contribute the path integral that describes the effects of wormholes on ordinary matter fields at low energy, it is obtained that the probability measure for multiply connected wormholes with nondegenerate energy spectrum is given in terms of a Planckian probability distribution for the momenta of a quantum field $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^ {2}$, where the $\\alpha$'s are the Coleman parameters, rather than a classical gaussian distribution law, and that an observable classical universe can exist if, and only if, such multiply connected wormholes are allowed to occur.

  19. Kinetic-energy-angle differential distribution of photofragments in multiphoton above-threshold dissociation of D{sub 2}{sup +} by linearly polarized 400-nm intense laser fields: Effects of highly excited electronic states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Basir Ahamed; Saha, Samir; Bhattacharyya, S. S. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Section, Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a detailed calculation of the double-differential angular-kinetic-energy distribution of photofragments in above threshold dissociation (ATD) of D{sub 2}{sup +} from initial vibrational-rotational levels v{sub i}=4,5 and J{sub i}=0,1 in an intense linearly polarized laser field of wavelength 400 nm and intensity 3x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. The calculation used a time-independent close-coupling (CC) formalism with eight (ten) electronic states included in the basis-set expansion of the molecular wave function. The molecular electronic states included, apart from the two lowest 1s{sigma}{sub g} and 2p{sigma}{sub u} states, were 2p{pi}{sub u}{sup {+-}}, 2s{sigma}{sub g}, 3p{sigma}{sub u}, 3d{sigma}{sub g}, 3d{pi}{sub g}{sup {+-}}, and 4f{sigma}{sub u}. All the higher electronic states dissociate to the atomic state D(2l). A sufficient number of photon absorption channels, n=0-7, and molecular rotational quantum numbers J=0-11 were taken into account to ensure the convergence of the multiphoton ATD probability. Altogether 198 coupled channels had to be considered in the calculation. The calculations reveal signatures of significant ejection of the photodissociation fragments away from the laser polarization direction due to the inclusion of the higher excited electronic states. The ratio of the photofragments perpendicular to and along the polarization axis shows good quantitative agreement with the experimental result. The angular distributions show considerable structures depending on the relative kinetic energies of the photofragments, and the fragments with different kinetic energies show peaks at different dissociation angles.

  20. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project Profile: Verizon Central Office Building ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project...

  1. Does semantic size affect size constancy scaling using lexical stimuli? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beveridge, Madeleine

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Binocular disparity allows us to perceive the world in 3-dimensions through the process of stereopsis. In this study, we used binocular disparity to induce the size constancy illusion in lexical stimuli. 47 undergraduate ...

  2. METER-SIZED MOONLET POPULATION IN SATURN'S C RING AND CASSINI DIVISION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, Kevin; Colwell, Joshua E. [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Esposito, Larry W. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, 392 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0392 (United States); Lewis, Mark C., E-mail: kevin.baillie@cea.fr [Department of Computer Science, Trinity University, One Trinity Place, San Antonio, TX 78212-7200 (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar occultations observed by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph reveal the presence of transparent holes a few meters to a few tens of meters in radial extent in otherwise optically thick regions of the C ring and the Cassini Division. We attribute the holes to gravitational disturbances generated by a population of {approx}10 m boulders in the rings that is intermediate in size between the background ring particle size distribution and the previously observed {approx}100 m propeller moonlets in the A ring. The size distribution of these boulders is described by a shallower power-law than the one that describes the ring particle size distribution. The number and size distribution of these boulders could be explained by limited accretion processes deep within Saturn's Roche zone.

  3. Size scaling of self gravitating polymers and strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawamoto, Shoichi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a statistical ensemble of a single polymer with self gravitational interaction. This is a model of a gravitating string --- the precursor of a black hole. We analyze averaged sizes by mean field approximations with an effective Hamiltonian a la Edwards with Newtonian potential as well as a contact repulsive interaction. We find that there exists a certain scaling region where the attractive and the repulsive forces balance out. The repulsive interaction pushes the critical gravitational coupling to a larger value, at which the size of a polymer becomes comparable to its Schwarzschild radius, and as a result the size of the corresponding black hole increases considerably.

  4. Size scaling of self gravitating polymers and strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Kawamoto; Toshihiro Matsuo

    2015-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a statistical ensemble of a single polymer with self gravitational interaction. This is a model of a gravitating string --- the precursor of a black hole. We analyze averaged sizes by mean field approximations with an effective Hamiltonian a la Edwards with Newtonian potential as well as a contact repulsive interaction. We find that there exists a certain scaling region where the attractive and the repulsive forces balance out. The repulsive interaction pushes the critical gravitational coupling to a larger value, at which the size of a polymer becomes comparable to its Schwarzschild radius, and as a result the size of the corresponding black hole increases considerably.

  5. Extremal sizes of subspace partitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heden, Olof; Nastase, Esmeralda; Sissokho, Papa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A subspace partition $\\Pi$ of $V=V(n,q)$ is a collection of subspaces of $V$ such that each 1-dimensional subspace of $V$ is in exactly one subspace of $\\Pi$. The size of $\\Pi$ is the number of its subspaces. Let $\\sigma_q(n,t)$ denote the minimum size of a subspace partition of $V$ in which the largest subspace has dimension $t$, and let $\\rho_q(n,t)$ denote the maximum size of a subspace partition of $V$ in which the smallest subspace has dimension $t$. In this paper, we determine the values of $\\sigma_q(n,t)$ and $\\rho_q(n,t)$ for all positive integers $n$ and $t$. Furthermore, we prove that if $n\\geq 2t$, then the minimum size of a maximal partial $t$-spread in $V(n+t-1,q)$ is $\\sigma_q(n,t)$.

  6. Distributed DBMS Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yangjun

    Distributed DBMS Outline Introduction What is a distributed DBMS Problems Current state-of-affairs Background Distributed DBMS Architecture Distributed Database Design Semantic Data Control Distributed Query Processing Distributed Transaction Management Parallel Database Systems Distributed Object DBMS

  7. Children's Clothes - Size and Selection.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderpoorten, Ann; Kerbel, Claudia

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tooe ZTA245.7 8-1303 B873 no ? \\'3J~3L-~=============i1 ? ? ? CHILDREN'S CLOTHES, SIZE AND SELECTION ? ~========================~ Texas Agricultural Extension Service. The Texas A&M University System. Daniel C. pfannstiel, Director.... College Station, Texas ," ? (BIaBk Pa,ge in O'rigjaal Bulletinl ' / I' j '. ":SIZE AND SELECTION Ann Vanderpoorten and Claudia Kerbel* Preschool and school-age children have special...

  8. Lower Bounds on Q for Finite Size Antennas of Arbitrary Shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Oleksiy S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of the lower bound on the radiation Q for an arbitrarily shaped finite size antenna of non-zero volume is formulated in terms of equivalent electric and magnetic currents densities distributed on a closed surface coinciding with antenna exterior surface. When these equivalent currents radiate in free space, the magnetic current augments the electric current, so that the fields interior to the surface vanish. In contrast to approaches based solely on electric currents, the proposed technique ensures no stored energy interior to the antenna exterior surface, and thus, allows the fundamental lower bound on Q to be determined. To facilitate the computation of the bound, new expressions for the stored energy, radiated power, and Q of coupled electric and magnetic source currents in free space are derived.

  9. Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    NORMAL DlSTRlBUTION TABLE. Entries represent the area under the standardized normal distribution from -w to z, Pr(Z

  10. Modeling scattered intensity from microspheres in evanescent field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Suhani Kiran

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of the total scattered light intensity on microsphere size accounts for the scattered intensity distribution in a polydisperse microsphere sample. Understanding this variation in the scattered light with microsphere size will allow improved characterization...

  11. Microgrids: distributed on-site generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    : · Diversity of the load profile as a function of microgrid size; · Feasibility of accurate control of bothMicrogrids: distributed on-site generation Suleiman Abu-Sharkh, Rachel Li, Tom Markvart, Neil Ross for Climate Change Research Technical Report 22 #12;1 Microgrids: distributed on-site generation Tyndall

  12. Strain modification in thin Si1 x yGexCy alloys on ,,100... Si for formation of high density and uniformly sized quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    size, increase the density of islands, and significantly narrow the distribution of island sizes for dislocation generation within the three-dimensional islands, which then limits the maximum height which and the island size distribution becomes broader with the increase of misfit and strain. The optimal growth

  13. Emergence of skew distributions in controlled growth processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segun Goh; H. W. Kwon; M. Y. Choi; Jean-Yves Fortin

    2011-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from a master equation, we derive the evolution equation for the size distribution of elements in an evolving system, where each element can grow, divide into two, and produce new elements. We then probe general solutions of the evolution quation, to obtain such skew distributions as power-law, log-normal, and Weibull distributions, depending on the growth or division and production. Specifically, repeated production of elements of uniform size leads to power-law distributions, whereas production of elements with the size distributed according to the current distribution as well as no production of new elements results in log-normal distributions. Finally, division into two, or binary fission, bears Weibull distributions. Numerical simulations are also carried out, confirming the validity of the obtained solutions.

  14. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 103,NO. D3, PAGES 3419-3435,FEBRUARY 20, 1998 Size-resolvedand chemicallyresolvedmodel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    . An atmospheric aerosol is characterized by both its size and composition distribution.The mostgeneralformParticulateMatter model[Binkowski and Shankar, 1995] assumesthat the aerosol size distribution adheresto a bimodal,includingnucleation,condensation, coagulation,chemicaltransformationin the gas,aerosol,and aqueous(cloud and fog) phases

  15. DISTRIBUTED DATABASES INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chengfei

    D DISTRIBUTED DATABASES INTRODUCTION The development of network and data communication tech- nology distributed database management. Naturally, the decen- tralized approach reflects the distributed aspects in the definition of a distributed database exist. First, a distributed database is distributed

  16. Method and apparatus for sizing and separating warp yarns using acoustical energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.; Kupperman, D.S.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A slashing process is disclosed for preparing warp yarns for weaving operations including the steps of sizing and/or desizing the yarns in an acoustic resonance box and separating the yarns with a leasing apparatus comprised of a set of acoustically agitated lease rods. The sizing step includes immersing the yarns in a size solution contained in an acoustic resonance box. Acoustic transducers are positioned against the exterior of the box for generating an acoustic pressure field within the size solution. Ultrasonic waves that result from the acoustic pressure field continuously agitate the size solution to effect greater mixing and more uniform application and penetration of the size onto the yarns. The sized yarns are then separated by passing the warp yarns over and under lease rods. Electroacoustic transducers generate acoustic waves along the longitudinal axis of the lease rods, creating a shearing motion on the surface of the rods for splitting the yarns. 2 figs.

  17. Calculation of size for bound-state constituents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislaw D. Glazek

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elements are given of a calculation that identifies the size of a proton in the Schroedinger equation for lepton-proton bound states, using the renormalization group procedure for effective particles (RGPEP) in quantum field theory, executed only up to the second order of expansion in powers of the coupling constant. Already in this crude approximation, the extraction of size of a proton from bound-state observables is found to depend on the lepton mass, so that the smaller the lepton mass the larger the proton size extracted from the same observable bound-state energy splitting. In comparison of Hydrogen and muon-proton bound-state dynamics, the crude calculation suggests that the difference between extracted proton sizes in these two cases can be a few percent. Such values would match the order of magnitude of currently discussed proton-size differences in leptonic atoms. Calculations using the RGPEP of higher order than second are required for a precise interpretation of the energy splittings in terms of the proton size in the Schroedinger equation. Such calculations should resolve the conceptual discrepancy between two conditions: that the renormalization group scale required for high accuracy calculations based on the Schroedinger equation is much smaller than the proton mass (on the order of a root of the product of reduced and average masses of constituents) and that the energy splittings due to the physical proton size can be interpreted ignoring corrections due to the effective nature of constituents in the Schr\\"odinger equation.

  18. Control of Transcription by Cell Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Chia-Yung

    Cell size increases significantly with increasing ploidy. Differences in cell size and ploidy are associated with alterations in gene expression, although no direct connection has been made between cell size and transcription. ...

  19. 5, 52235252, 2005 Size-resolved source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , gasoline vehicle, diesel vehicle, copper smelter, and volcano emission. PMF analysis of size% in the fine size range (0.56­2.5 µm). The diesel vehicle source contributed the most in the ultra-fine size

  20. Generation of the longitudinal current by the transversal electromagnetic field in classical and quantum plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latyshev, A V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From Vlasov kinetic equation for collisionless plasmas distribution function in square-law approximation on size of electromagnetic field is received. Formulas for calculation electric current at any temperature (any degree of degeneration of electronic gas) are deduced. The case of small values of the wave numbers is considered. It is shown, that the nonlinearity account leads to occurrence the longitudinal electric current directed along a wave vector. This longitudinal current orthogonal to known transversal classical current, received at the linear analysis. From the kinetic equation with Wigner integral for collisionless quantum plasma distribution function is received in square-law on vector potential approximation. Formulas for calculation electric current at any temperature are deduced. The case of small values of wave number is considered. It is shown, that size of a longitudinal current at small values of wave number and for classical plasma and for quantum plasma coincide. Graphic comparison of dim...

  1. Method for estimating mean particle size from high-frequency fluctuations in beam attenuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    aim of scientists and engineers hoping to improve prediction of the effects of dredging, contaminant. However, the size, cost, ease of use, power, and data requirements of these technologies 1559-128X/13 caused by random distribution of par- ticles. The low cost, moderate size, and widespread deployment

  2. Ground-state magnetic phase diagram of bow-tie graphene nanoflakes in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sza?owski, Karol, E-mail: kszalowski@uni.lodz.pl, E-mail: kszalowski@wp.pl [Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Informatics, University of ?ód?, ul. Pomorska 149/153, 90-236 ?ód? (Poland)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic phase diagram of a ground state is studied theoretically for graphene nanoflakes of bow-tie shape and various sizes in external in-plane magnetic field. The tight-binding Hamiltonian supplemented with Hubbard term is used to model the electronic structure of the systems in question. The existence of the antiferromagnetic phase with magnetic moments localized at the sides of the bow-tie is found for low field and a field-induced spin-flip transition to ferromagnetic state is predicted to occur in charge-undoped structures. For small nanoflake doped with a single charge carrier, the low-field phase is ferrimagnetic and a metamagnetic transition to ferromagnetic ordering can be forced by the field. The critical field is found to decrease with increasing size of the nanoflake. The influence of diagonal and off-diagonal disorder on the mentioned magnetic properties is studied. The effect of off-diagonal disorder is found to be more important than that of diagonal disorder, leading to significantly widened distribution of critical fields for disordered population of nanoflakes.

  3. Sample size for logistic regression with small response probability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, A S

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fisher information matrix for the estimated parameters in a multiple logistic regression can be approximated by the augmented Hessian matrix of the moment generating function for the covariates. The approximation is valid when the probability of response is small. With its use one can obtain a simple closed form estimate of the asymptotic covariance matrix of the maximum likelihood parameter estimates, and thus approximate sample sizes needed to test hypotheses about the parameters. The method is developed for selected distributions of a single covariate, and for a class of exponential-type distributions of several covariates. It is illustrated with an example concerning risk factors for coronary heart disease.

  4. Key distributionKey distribution Key distribution, symmetric encryption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Michael

    COMP 522 Key distributionKey distribution COMP 522 Key distribution, symmetric encryption From in a secure way and must keep the key secure" · Important issue: how to distribute secret keys? COMP 522 Key distribution, manual delivery For two parties A and B: · A key could be created by A and delivered physically

  5. SIZE AND SURFACE AREA OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES AFTER A HEATING EVENT AT A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirono, Sin-iti [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)] [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity of a young star rises abruptly during an FU Orionis outburst. This event causes a temporary temperature increase in the protoplanetary nebula. H{sub 2}O icy grains are sublimated by this event, and silicate cores embedded inside the ice are ejected. During the high-temperature phase, the silicate grains coagulate to form silicate core aggregates. After the heating event, the temperature drops, and the ice recondenses onto the aggregates. I determined numerically the size distribution of the ice-covered aggregates. The size of the aggregates exceeds 10 {mu}m around the snow line. Because of the migration of the ice to large aggregates, only a small fraction of the silicate core aggregate is covered with H{sub 2}O ice. After the heating event, the surface of an ice-covered aggregate is totally covered by silicate core aggregates. This might reduce the fragmentation velocity of aggregates when they collide. It is possible that the covering silicate cores shield the UV radiation field which induces photodissociation of H{sub 2}O ice. This effect may cause the shortage of cold H{sub 2}O vapor observed by Herschel.

  6. Preliminary Phase Field Computational Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Xu, Ke; Suter, Jonathan D.; McCloy, John S.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This interim report presents progress towards the development of meso-scale models of magnetic behavior that incorporate microstructural information. Modeling magnetic signatures in irradiated materials with complex microstructures (such as structural steels) is a significant challenge. The complexity is addressed incrementally, using the monocrystalline Fe (i.e., ferrite) film as model systems to develop and validate initial models, followed by polycrystalline Fe films, and by more complicated and representative alloys. In addition, the modeling incrementally addresses inclusion of other major phases (e.g., martensite, austenite), minor magnetic phases (e.g., carbides, FeCr precipitates), and minor nonmagnetic phases (e.g., Cu precipitates, voids). The focus of the magnetic modeling is on phase-field models. The models are based on the numerical solution to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. From the computational standpoint, phase-field modeling allows the simulation of large enough systems that relevant defect structures and their effects on functional properties like magnetism can be simulated. To date, two phase-field models have been generated in support of this work. First, a bulk iron model with periodic boundary conditions was generated as a proof-of-concept to investigate major loop effects of single versus polycrystalline bulk iron and effects of single non-magnetic defects. More recently, to support the experimental program herein using iron thin films, a new model was generated that uses finite boundary conditions representing surfaces and edges. This model has provided key insights into the domain structures observed in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. Simulation results for single crystal thin-film iron indicate the feasibility of the model for determining magnetic domain wall thickness and mobility in an externally applied field. Because the phase-field model dimensions are limited relative to the size of most specimens used in experiments, special experimental methods were devised to create similar boundary conditions in the iron films. Preliminary MFM studies conducted on single and polycrystalline iron films with small sub-areas created with focused ion beam have correlated quite well qualitatively with phase-field simulations. However, phase-field model dimensions are still small relative to experiments thus far. We are in the process of increasing the size of the models and decreasing specimen size so both have identical dimensions. Ongoing research is focused on validation of the phase-field model. Validation is being accomplished through comparison with experimentally obtained MFM images (in progress), and planned measurements of major hysteresis loops and first order reversal curves. Extrapolation of simulation sizes to represent a more stochastic bulk-like system will require sampling of various simulations (i.e., with single non-magnetic defect, single magnetic defect, single grain boundary, single dislocation, etc.) with distributions of input parameters. These outputs can then be compared to laboratory magnetic measurements and ultimately to simulate magnetic Barkhausen noise signals.

  7. Size and spatial homogeneity of SiGe quantum dots in amorphous silica matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Prague 12116 (Czech Republic); Ruder Boskovic Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Pinto, Sara R. C.; Rolo, Anabela G.; Levichev, Sergey; Gomes, Maria J. M. [Physics Department, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Kashtiban, Reza J.; Bangert, Ursel [Nanostructured Materials Research Group, School of Materials, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester, M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Chahboun, Adil [Physics Department, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Department of Physics, Dhar Mehraz Sciences Faculty, BP 1796, Fes (Morocco); Holy, Vaclav [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Prague 12116 (Czech Republic)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a study of structural properties of SiGe quantum dots formed in amorphous silica matrix by magnetron sputtering technique. We investigate deposition conditions leading to the formation of dense and uniformly sized quantum dots, distributed homogeneously in the matrix. X-ray and Raman spectroscopy were used to estimate the Si content. A detailed analysis based on grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering revealed the influence of the deposition conditions on quantum dot sizes, size distributions, spatial arrangement, and concentration of quantum dots in the matrix, as well as the Si:Ge content.

  8. Pit distribution in the equatorial region of Titan Kimberly A. Adams n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurdy, Donna M.

    distribution and size to characterize these features and understand their formation. Chi-square analysis. However, analysis of the densest cluster of pits, a group of 50, shows a more random distribution. Fractal analysis and comparison with a same-sized random set find only a hint of linearity. A Poisson distribution

  9. Size-dependent same-material tribocharging in insulating grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott R. Waitukaitis; Victor Lee; James M. Pierson; Steven L. Forman; Heinrich M. Jaeger

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of flowing granular matter have suggested that same-material tribocharging de- pends on particle size, rendering large grains positive and small ones negative. Models assuming the transfer of trapped electrons can explain this, but so far have not been validated. Tracking individual grains in an electric field, we show quantitatively that charge is transferred based on size between materially identical grains. However, the surface density of trapped electrons, measured independently by thermoluminescence techniques, is orders of magnitude too small to account for the scale of charge transferred. This suggests that another negatively charged species, such as ions, is responsible.

  10. Introduction to Dynamic Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Introduction to Dynamic Distributed SystemsSystems #12;Outline Introduction Churn Building Applications in Dynamic Distributed Systems RegistersRegisters Eventual Leader election Connectivity in Dynamic Distributed Systems #12;Dynamic Distributed Systems: Context & Motivations Advent of Complex Distributed

  11. Resolving a distribution of charge into intrinsic multipole moments: A rankwise distributed multipole analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourne, Philip E.

    Resolving a distribution of charge into intrinsic multipole moments: A rankwise distributed multipole analysis Apostol Gramada* and Philip E. Bourne Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical multipole analysis of an arbitrary distribution of charge and its surrounding field. Using the superposition

  12. Electric-field-induced flame speed modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcum, S.D. [Department of Physics, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Ganguly, B.N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of pulsed and continuous DC electric fields on the reaction zones of premixed propane-air flames have been investigated using several types of experimental measurements. All observed effects on the flame are dependent on the applied voltage polarity, indicating that negatively charged flame species do not play a role in the perturbation of the reaction zone. Experiments designed to characterize the electric-field-induced modifications of the shape and size of the inner cone, and the concomitant changes in the temperature profiles of flames with equivalence ratios between 0.8 and 1.7, are also reported. High-speed two-dimensional imaging of the flame response to a pulsed DC voltage shows that the unperturbed conical flame front (laminar flow) is driven into a wrinkled laminar flamelet (cellular) geometry on a time scale of the order of 5 ms. Temperature distributions derived from thin filament pyrometry (TFP) measurements in flames perturbed by continuous DC fields show similar large changes in the reaction zone geometry, with no change in maximum flame temperature. All measurements are consistent with the observed flame perturbations being a fluid mechanical response to the applied field brought about by forcing positive flame ions counter to the flow. The resulting electric pressure decreases Lewis numbers of the ionic species and drives the effective flame Lewis number below unity. The observed increases in flame speed and the flame fronts trend toward turbulence can be described in terms of the flame front wrinkling and concomitant increase in reaction sheet area. This effect is a potentially attractive means of controlling flame fluid mechanical characteristics. The observed effects require minimal input electrical power (<1 W for a 1 kW burner) due to the much better electric field coupling achieved in the present experiments compared to the previous studies.

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles for applications in oscillating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeraphatdit, Chorthip

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Enzymatic and thermochemical catalysis are both important industrial processes. However, the thermal requirements for each process often render them mutually exclusive: thermochemical catalysis requires high temperature that denatures enzymes. One of the long-term goals of this project is to design a thermocatalytic system that could be used with enzymatic systems in situ to catalyze reaction sequences in one pot; this system would be useful for numerous applications e.g. conversion of biomass to biofuel and other commodity products. The desired thermocatalytic system would need to supply enough thermal energy to catalyze thermochemical reactions, while keeping the enzymes from high temperature denaturation. Magnetic nanoparticles are known to generate heat in an oscillating magnetic field through mechanisms including hysteresis and relaxational losses. We envisioned using these magnetic nanoparticles as the local heat source embedded in sub-micron size mesoporous support to spatially separate the particles from the enzymes. In this study, we set out to find the magnetic materials and instrumental conditions that are sufficient for this purpose. Magnetite was chosen as the first model magnetic material in this study because of its high magnetization values, synthetic control over particle size, shape, functionalization and proven biocompatibility. Our experimental designs were guided by a series of theoretical calculations, which provided clues to the effects of particle size, size distribution, magnetic field, frequency and reaction medium. Materials of theoretically optimal size were synthesized, functionalized, and their effects in the oscillating magnetic field were subsequently investigated. Under our conditions, the materials that clustered e.g. silica-coated and PNIPAM-coated iron oxides exhibited the highest heat generation, while iron oxides embedded in MSNs and mesoporous iron oxides exhibited the least bulk heating. It is worth noting that the specific loss power of PNIPAM-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was peculiarly high, and the heat loss mechanism of this material remains to be elucidated. Since thermocatalysis is a long-term goal of this project, we also investigated the effects of the oscillating magnetic field system for the synthesis of 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid. Application of an oscillating magnetic field in the presence of magnetic particles with high thermal response was found to effectively increase the reaction rate of the uncatalyzed synthesis of the coumarin derivative compared to the room temperature control.

  14. Nanoparticle size and morphology control using ultrafast laser induced forward transfer of Ni thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Abere, Michael J.; Schrider, Keegan J.; Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a nanoparticle (NP) printing technique using Ni thin film lift-off from glass substrates after ultrafast irradiation in air. Unique interactions of ultrafast laser pulses with thin films allow for control over NP faceting and size distributions. Control is achieved by changing the laser fluence, film thickness, and film-substrate distance. We demonstrate 20 nm Ni film removal from substrates and rapid NP printing, with size distributions centered at a 6 nm diameter. When the Ni film thickness is lowered to 10 nm, NPs are printed with distributions peaked at a 2 nm diameter.

  15. The role of eddy currents and nanoparticle size on AC magnetic fieldinduced reflow in solder/magnetic nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHenry, Michael E.

    The role of eddy currents and nanoparticle size on AC magnetic field­induced reflow in solder://jap.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;The role of eddy currents and nanoparticle size on AC magnetic field­induced reflow in solder be derived from eddy current losses in Cu planes in the substrate board. Eddy current heating in Cu sheets

  16. Calibrating page sized Gafchromic EBT3 films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crijns, W.; Maes, F.; Heide, U. A. van der; Van den Heuvel, F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department ESAT/PSI-Medical Image Computing, Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose is the development of a novel calibration method for dosimetry with Gafchromic EBT3 films. The method should be applicable for pretreatment verification of volumetric modulated arc, and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Because the exposed area on film can be large for such treatments, lateral scan errors must be taken into account. The correction for the lateral scan effect is obtained from the calibration data itself. Methods: In this work, the film measurements were modeled using their relative scan values (Transmittance, T). Inside the transmittance domain a linear combination and a parabolic lateral scan correction described the observed transmittance values. The linear combination model, combined a monomer transmittance state (T{sub 0}) and a polymer transmittance state (T{sub {infinity}}) of the film. The dose domain was associated with the observed effects in the transmittance domain through a rational calibration function. On the calibration film only simple static fields were applied and page sized films were used for calibration and measurements (treatment verification). Four different calibration setups were considered and compared with respect to dose estimation accuracy. The first (I) used a calibration table from 32 regions of interest (ROIs) spread on 4 calibration films, the second (II) used 16 ROIs spread on 2 calibration films, the third (III), and fourth (IV) used 8 ROIs spread on a single calibration film. The calibration tables of the setups I, II, and IV contained eight dose levels delivered to different positions on the films, while for setup III only four dose levels were applied. Validation was performed by irradiating film strips with known doses at two different time points over the course of a week. Accuracy of the dose response and the lateral effect correction was estimated using the dose difference and the root mean squared error (RMSE), respectively. Results: A calibration based on two films was the optimal balance between cost effectiveness and dosimetric accuracy. The validation resulted in dose errors of 1%-2% for the two different time points, with a maximal absolute dose error around 0.05 Gy. The lateral correction reduced the RMSE values on the sides of the film to the RMSE values at the center of the film. Conclusions: EBT3 Gafchromic films were calibrated for large field dosimetry with a limited number of page sized films and simple static calibration fields. The transmittance was modeled as a linear combination of two transmittance states, and associated with dose using a rational calibration function. Additionally, the lateral scan effect was resolved in the calibration function itself. This allows the use of page sized films. Only two calibration films were required to estimate both the dose and the lateral response. The calibration films were used over the course of a week, with residual dose errors Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 2% or Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 0.05 Gy.

  17. The EMC effect in effective field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detmold, William [Department of Physics, Box 351560, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using effective field theory, we investigate nuclear modification of nucleon parton distributions (for example, the EMC effect). We show that the universality of the shape distortion in nuclear parton distributions (the factorisation of the Bjorken x and atomic number (A) dependence) is model independent and emerges naturally in effective field theory. We present simple fits to experimental data that incorporate this factorisation.

  18. Do Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents detect coherent structures?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karrasch, Daniel; Haller, George, E-mail: georgehaller@ethz.ch [Institute of Mechanical Systems, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)] [Institute of Mechanical Systems, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ridges of the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE) field have been used as indicators of hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs). A rigorous mathematical link between the FSLE and LCSs, however, has been missing. Here, we prove that an FSLE ridge satisfying certain conditions does signal a nearby ridge of some Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field, which in turn indicates a hyperbolic LCS under further conditions. Other FSLE ridges violating our conditions, however, are seen to be false positives for LCSs. We also find further limitations of the FSLE in Lagrangian coherence detection, including ill-posedness, artificial jump-discontinuities, and sensitivity with respect to the computational time step.

  19. Finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellemans, V.; Heenen, P.-H.; Bender, M. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, PNTPM, CP229, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France) and CNRS/IN2P3, CENBG, UMR5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The systematic lack of convergence of self-consistent mean-field calculations with certain parameterizations of the Skyrme energy density functional has been attributed to the appearance of finite-size instabilities. In this contribution, we investigate what happens at the instability associated with the C{sub 0}{sup {Delta}s}s{sub 0} Dot-Operator {Delta}s{sub 0} term in a high-spin state of the superdeformed band in {sup 194}Hg.

  20. Probability distribution of the vacuum energy density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duplancic, Goran; Stefancic, Hrvoje [Theoretical Physics Division, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, P.O. Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Glavan, Drazen [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, P.O. Box 331, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As the vacuum state of a quantum field is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian density, the vacuum energy density can be represented as a random variable. We present an analytical calculation of the probability distribution of the vacuum energy density for real and complex massless scalar fields in Minkowski space. The obtained probability distributions are broad and the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian density is not fully representative of the vacuum energy density.

  1. Phase-retrieval X-ray microscopy by Wigner-distribution deconvolution

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chapman, Henry, N.

    64x64 scan of a group of latex spheres with 45 nm step size, used for demonstrating Wigner-distribution deconvolution.

  2. Phase-retrieval X-ray microscopy by Wigner-distribution deconvolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Henry, N.

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    64x64 scan of a group of latex spheres with 45 nm step size, used for demonstrating Wigner-distribution deconvolution.

  3. Genome Size Varaiation in D. melanogaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfrejd, Benjamin

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    in genome size may account for some of the missing heritability. We measured female genome sizes for 34 Drosophila melanogaster inbred strains that derived from isofemale lines established from a natural population in Raleigh, NC, in addition to a group...

  4. P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California...

  5. Distributed DBMS I Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yangjun

    Distributed DBMS Outline I Introduction I Background I Distributed DBMS Architecture I Distributed Data server approach Parallel architectures Parallel DBMS techniques Parallel execution models Parallel Database Systems Distributed Object DBMS Database Interoperability Concluding Remarks #12

  6. Distributed Theorem Proving for Distributed Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platzer, André

    system with a varying number of arbitrarily many cars. 1 Introduction Hybrid systems with joint discrete a multi-agent system, e.g., distributed car control systems. Such systems form distributed hybrid systemsDistributed Theorem Proving for Distributed Hybrid Systems David W. Renshaw, Sarah M. Loos

  7. Software implemented fault-tolernace on distributed-memory MIMD architectures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Gavin D

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large multicomputer systems are inherently unreliable because of their enormous complexity. This has a direct impact on distributed computations performed on these systems. As the size and execution time of these distributed computations grows, so...

  8. Areas of contact and pressure distribution in bolted joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Herbert Hirsch

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When two plates are bolted (or riveted) together these will be in contact in the immediate vicinity of the bolt heads and separated beyond it. The pressure distribution and size of the contact zone is of considerable ...

  9. Impact of dose size in single fraction spatially fractionated (grid) radiotherapy for melanoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hualin, E-mail: hualin.zhang@northwestern.edu, E-mail: hualinzhang@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois 60611 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois 60611 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States); Zhong, Hualiang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Barth, Rolf F. [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Cao, Minsong; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose size in single fraction, spatially fractionated (grid) radiotherapy for selectively killing infiltrated melanoma cancer cells of different tumor sizes, using different radiobiological models. Methods: A Monte Carlo technique was employed to calculate the 3D dose distribution of a commercially available megavoltage grid collimator in a 6 MV beam. The linear-quadratic (LQ) and modified linear quadratic (MLQ) models were used separately to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of a series of single fraction regimens that employed grid therapy to treat both acute and late responding melanomas of varying sizes. The dose prescription point was at the center of the tumor volume. Dose sizes ranging from 1 to 30 Gy at 100% dose line were modeled. Tumors were either touching the skin surface or having their centers at a depth of 3 cm. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to the melanoma cells and the therapeutic ratio (TR) were defined by comparing grid therapy with the traditional open debulking field. The clinical outcomes from recent reports were used to verify the authors’ model. Results: Dose profiles at different depths and 3D dose distributions in a series of 3D melanomas treated with grid therapy were obtained. The EUDs and TRs for all sizes of 3D tumors involved at different doses were derived through the LQ and MLQ models, and a practical equation was derived. The EUD was only one fifth of the prescribed dose. The TR was dependent on the prescribed dose and on the LQ parameters of both the interspersed cancer and normal tissue cells. The results from the LQ model were consistent with those of the MLQ model. At 20 Gy, the EUD and TR by the LQ model were 2.8% higher and 1% lower than by the MLQ, while at 10 Gy, the EUD and TR as defined by the LQ model were only 1.4% higher and 0.8% lower, respectively. The dose volume histograms of grid therapy for a 10 cm tumor showed different dosimetric characteristics from those of conventional radiotherapy. A significant portion of the tumor volume received a very large dose in grid therapy, which ensures significant tumor cell killing in these regions. Conversely, some areas received a relatively small dose, thereby sparing interspersed normal cells and increasing radiation tolerance. The radiobiology modeling results indicated that grid therapy could be useful for treating acutely responding melanomas infiltrating radiosensitive normal tissues. The theoretical model predictions were supported by the clinical outcomes. Conclusions: Grid therapy functions by selectively killing infiltrating tumor cells and concomitantly sparing interspersed normal cells. The TR depends on the radiosensitivity of the cell population, dose, tumor size, and location. Because the volumes of very high dose regions are small, the LQ model can be used safely to predict the clinical outcomes of grid therapy. When treating melanomas with a dose of 15 Gy or higher, single fraction grid therapy is clearly advantageous for sparing interspersed normal cells. The existence of a threshold fraction dose, which was found in the authors’ theoretical simulations, was confirmed by clinical observations.

  10. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

  11. Size and Crystallinity in Protein-Templated Inorganic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolley, Craig C.; Uchida, Masaki; Reichhardt, Courtney; Harrington, Richard; Kang, Sebyung; Klem, Michael T.; Parise, John B.; Douglas, Trevor (SBU); (Montana)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein cages such as ferritins and virus capsids have been used as containers to synthesize a wide variety of protein-templated inorganic nanoparticles. While identification of the inorganic crystal phase has been successful in some cases, very little is known about the detailed nanoscale structure of the inorganic component. We have used pair distribution function analysis of total X-ray scattering to measure the crystalline domain size in nanoparticles of ferrihydrite, {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, CoPt, and FePt grown inside 24-meric ferritin cages from H. sapiens and P. furiosus. The material properties of these protein-templated nanoparticles are influenced by processes at a variety of length scales: the chemistry of the material determines the precise arrangement of atoms at very short distances, while the interior volume of the protein cage constrains the maximum nanoparticle size attainable. At intermediate length scales, the size of coherent crystalline domains appears to be constrained by the arrangement of crystal nucleation sites on the interior of the cage. On the basis of these observations, some potential synthetic strategies for the control of crystalline domain size in protein-templated nanoparticles are suggested.

  12. DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Mark L. (Angier, NC); Jett, James H. (Los Alamos, NM); Keller, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM); Marrone, Babetta L. (Los Alamos, NM); Martin, John C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for sizing DNA fragments using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA piece or the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is linearly related to the fragment length. The distribution of DNA fragment sizes forms a characterization of the DNA piece for use in forensic and research applications.

  13. Comparison of the Coulter Multisizer and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer for obtaining the aerodynamic particle size of irregularly shaped dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, Joshua Wayne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When studying air quality it is often necessary to measure the aerodynamic size distribution of particles. True aerodynamic diameter must be measured using a gravitational settling method, which is impractical. Other methods exist that use other...

  14. Fabrication of size-selected Pd nanoclusters using a magnetron plasma sputtering source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayesh, A. I.; Qamhieh, N.; Ghamlouche, H.; Thaker, S.; El-Shaer, M. [Department of Physics, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, P.O. Box 17551 (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the fabrication of palladium (Pd) nanoclusters using a dc magnetron sputtering source. Plasma sputtering vaporizes the target's material forming nanoclusters by inert gas condensation. The sputtering source produces ionized nanoclusters that enable the study of the nanoclusters' size distribution using a quadrupole mass filter. In this work, the dependence of Pd nanoclusters' size distribution on various source parameters, such as the sputtering discharge power, inert gas flow rate, and aggregation length have been investigated. This work demonstrates the ability of tuning the palladium nanoclusters' size by proper optimization of the source operation conditions. The experimental nanocluster sizes are compared with a theoretical model that reveals the growth of large nanoclusters from 'embryos' by a two-body collision. The model is valid for a specific range of deposition parameters (low inert gas flow rates and aggregation lengths equal or below 70 mm).

  15. THE MASSIVE SATELLITE POPULATION OF MILKY-WAY-SIZED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Aldo; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Drory, Niv, E-mail: apuebla@astro.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Several occupational distributions for satellite galaxies more massive than m{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} around Milky-Way (MW)-sized hosts are presented and used to predict the internal dynamics of these satellites as a function of m{sub *}. For the analysis, a large galaxy group mock catalog is constructed on the basis of (sub)halo-to-stellar mass relations fully constrained with currently available observations, namely the galaxy stellar mass function decomposed into centrals and satellites, and the two-point correlation functions at different masses. We find that 6.6% of MW-sized galaxies host two satellites in the mass range of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC, respectively). The probabilities of the MW-sized galaxies having one satellite equal to or larger than the LMC, two satellites equal to or larger than the SMC, or three satellites equal to or larger than Sagittarius (Sgr) are Almost-Equal-To 0.26, 0.14, and 0.14, respectively. The cumulative satellite mass function of the MW, N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}) , down to the mass of the Fornax dwarf is within the 1{sigma} distribution of all the MW-sized galaxies. We find that MW-sized hosts with three satellites more massive than Sgr (as the MW) are among the most common cases. However, the most and second most massive satellites in these systems are smaller than the LMC and SMC by roughly 0.7 and 0.8 dex, respectively. We conclude that the distribution N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}) for MW-sized galaxies is quite broad, the particular case of the MW being of low frequency but not an outlier. The halo mass of MW-sized galaxies correlates only weakly with N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}). Then, it is not possible to accurately determine the MW halo mass by means of its N{sub s} ({>=}m{sub *}); from our catalog, we constrain a lower limit of 1.38 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} at the 1{sigma} level. Our analysis strongly suggests that the abundance of massive subhalos should agree with the abundance of massive satellites in all MW-sized hosts, i.e., there is not a missing (massive) satellite problem for the {Lambda}CDM cosmology. However, we confirm that the maximum circular velocity, v{sub max}, of the subhalos of satellites smaller than m{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is systematically larger than the v{sub max} inferred from current observational studies of the MW bright dwarf satellites; different from previous works, this conclusion is based on an analysis of the overall population of MW-sized galaxies. Some pieces of evidence suggest that the issue could refer only to satellite dwarfs but not to central dwarfs, then environmental processes associated with dwarfs inside host halos combined with supernova-driven core expansion should be on the basis of the lowering of v{sub max}.

  16. Localized parallel parametric generation of spin waves in a Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} waveguide by spatial variation of the pumping field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brächer, T. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Graduate School Materials Science in Mainz, Gottlieb-Daimler-Strasse 47, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Pirro, P.; Heussner, F.; Serga, A. A.; Hillebrands, B. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the experimental observation of localized parallel parametric generation of spin waves in a transversally in-plane magnetized Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} magnonic waveguide. The localization is realized by combining the threshold character of parametric generation with a spatially confined enhancement of the amplifying microwave field. The latter is achieved by modulating the width of the microstrip transmission line which is used to provide the pumping field. By employing microfocussed Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy, we analyze the spatial distribution of the generated spin waves and compare it with numerical calculations of the field distribution along the Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} waveguide. This provides a local spin-wave excitation in transversally in-plane magnetized waveguides for a wide wave-vector range which is not restricted by the size of the generation area.

  17. One-Step Synthesis of FePt Nanoparticles with Tunable Size Min Chen,, J. P. Liu, and Shouheng Sun*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J. Ping

    One-Step Synthesis of FePt Nanoparticles with Tunable Size Min Chen,, J. P. Liu, and Shouheng SunPt is coated over the seeds. Although size distribution of the particles prepared from all these methods can of the stabilizers and metal precursors, heating rate, heating temperature, and heating duration. Further, core

  18. ON A POSSIBLE SIZE/COLOR RELATIONSHIP IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, R. E.; Kavelaars, J. J., E-mail: repike@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Color measurements and albedo distributions introduce non-intuitive observational biases in size-color relationships among Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that cannot be disentangled without a well characterized sample population with systematic photometry. Peixinho et al. report that the form of the KBO color distribution varies with absolute magnitude, H. However, Tegler et al. find that KBO color distributions are a property of object classification. We construct synthetic models of observed KBO colors based on two B-R color distribution scenarios: color distribution dependent on H magnitude (H-Model) and color distribution based on object classification (Class-Model). These synthetic B-R color distributions were modified to account for observational flux biases. We compare our synthetic B-R distributions to the observed ''Hot'' and ''Cold'' detected objects from the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey and the Meudon Multicolor Survey. For both surveys, the Hot population color distribution rejects the H-Model, but is well described by the Class-Model. The Cold objects reject the H-Model, but the Class-Model (while not statistically rejected) also does not provide a compelling match for data. Although we formally reject models where the structure of the color distribution is a strong function of H magnitude, we also do not find that a simple dependence of color distribution on orbit classification is sufficient to describe the color distribution of classical KBOs.

  19. CONSTRAINING THE STRING GAUGE FIELD BY GALAXY ROTATION CURVES AND PERIHELION PRECESSION OF PLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E.; Xu Feng, E-mail: cheung@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a cosmological model in which the string gauge field coupled universally to matter gives rise to an extra centripetal force and will have observable signatures on cosmological and astronomical observations. Several tests are performed using data including galaxy rotation curves of 22 spiral galaxies of varied luminosities and sizes and perihelion precessions of planets in the solar system. The rotation curves of the same group of galaxies are independently fit using a dark matter model with the generalized Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile and the string model. A remarkable fit of galaxy rotation curves is achieved using the one-parameter string model as compared to the three-parameter dark matter model with the NFW profile. The average {chi}{sup 2} value of the NFW fit is 9% better than that of the string model at a price of two more free parameters. Furthermore, from the string model, we can give a dynamical explanation for the phenomenological Tully-Fisher relation. We are able to derive a relation between field strength, galaxy size, and luminosity, which can be verified with data from the 22 galaxies. To further test the hypothesis of the universal existence of the string gauge field, we apply our string model to the solar system. Constraint on the magnitude of the string field in the solar system is deduced from the current ranges for any anomalous perihelion precession of planets allowed by the latest observations. The field distribution resembles a dipole field originating from the Sun. The string field strength deduced from the solar system observations is of a similar magnitude as the field strength needed to sustain the rotational speed of the Sun inside the Milky Way. This hypothesis can be tested further by future observations with higher precision.

  20. Generalized measurement on size of set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua-Rong Peng; Da-Hai Li; Qiong-Hua Wang

    2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize the measurement using an expanded concept of cover, in order to provide a new approach to size of set other than cardinality. The generalized measurement has application backgrounds such as a generalized problem in dimension reduction, and has reasons from the existence of the minimum of both the positive size and the positive graduation, i.e., both the minimum is the size of the set ${0}$. The minimum of positive graduation in actual measurement provides the possibility that an object cannot be partitioned arbitrarily, e.g., an interval $[0, 1]$ cannot be partitioned by arbitrarily infinite times to keep compatible with the minimum of positive size. For the measurement on size of set, it can be assumed that this minimum is the size of ${0}$, in symbols $|{0}|$ or graduation 1. For a set $S$, we generalize any graduation as the size of a set $C_i$ where $\\exists x \\in S (x \\in C_i)$, and $|S|$ is represented by a pair, in symbols $(C, N(C))$, where ${C} = \\cup {C_i}$ and $N(C)$ is a set function on $C_i$, with $C_i$ independent of the order $i$ and $N(C)$ reflecting the quantity of $C_i$. This pair is a generalized form of box-counting dimension. The yielded size satisfies the properties of outer measure in general cases, and satisfies the properties of measure in the case of graduation 1; while in the reverse view, measure is a size using the graduation of size of an interval. As for cardinality, the yielded size is a one-to-one correspondence where only addition is allowable, a weak form of cardinality, and rewrites Continuum Hypothesis using dimension as $\\omega \\dot |{0,1}| = 1$. In the reverse view, cardinality of a set is a size in the graduation of the set. The generalized measurement provides a unified approach to dimension, measure, cardinality and hence infinity.

  1. Energy Spectrum of the Electrons Accelerated by a Reconnection Electric Field: Exponential or Power Law?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Liu; P. F. Chen; M. D. Ding; C. Fang

    2009-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct current (DC) electric field near the reconnection region has been proposed as an effective mechanism to accelerate protons and electrons in solar flares. A power-law energy spectrum was generally claimed in the simulations of electron acceleration by the reconnection electric field. However in most of the literature, the electric and magnetic fields were chosen independently. In this paper, we perform test-particle simulations of electron acceleration in a reconnecting magnetic field, where both the electric and magnetic fields are adopted from numerical simulations of the MHD equations. It is found that the accelerated electrons present a truncated power-law energy spectrum with an exponential tail at high energies, which is analogous to the case of diffusive shock acceleration. The influences of reconnection parameters on the spectral feature are also investigated, such as the longitudinal and transverse components of the magnetic field and the size of the current sheet. It is suggested that the DC electric field alone might not be able to reproduce the observed single or double power-law distributions.

  2. Integrated Transmission and Distribution Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Wei; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Fisher, Andrew R.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Hauer, Matthew L.

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed, generation, demand response, distributed storage, smart appliances, electric vehicles and renewable energy resources are expected to play a key part in the transformation of the American power system. Control, coordination and compensation of these smart grid assets are inherently interlinked. Advanced control strategies to warrant large-scale penetration of distributed smart grid assets do not currently exist. While many of the smart grid technologies proposed involve assets being deployed at the distribution level, most of the significant benefits accrue at the transmission level. The development of advanced smart grid simulation tools, such as GridLAB-D, has led to a dramatic improvement in the models of smart grid assets available for design and evaluation of smart grid technology. However, one of the main challenges to quantifying the benefits of smart grid assets at the transmission level is the lack of tools and framework for integrating transmission and distribution technologies into a single simulation environment. Furthermore, given the size and complexity of the distribution system, it is crucial to be able to represent the behavior of distributed smart grid assets using reduced-order controllable models and to analyze their impacts on the bulk power system in terms of stability and reliability. The objectives of the project were to: • Develop a simulation environment for integrating transmission and distribution control, • Construct reduced-order controllable models for smart grid assets at the distribution level, • Design and validate closed-loop control strategies for distributed smart grid assets, and • Demonstrate impact of integrating thousands of smart grid assets under closed-loop control demand response strategies on the transmission system. More specifically, GridLAB-D, a distribution system tool, and PowerWorld, a transmission planning tool, are integrated into a single simulation environment. The integrated environment allows the load flow interactions between the bulk power system and end-use loads to be explicitly modeled. Power system interactions are modeled down to time intervals as short as 1-second. Another practical issue is that the size and complexity of typical distribution systems makes direct integration with transmission models computationally intractable. Hence, the focus of the next main task is to develop reduced-order controllable models for some of the smart grid assets. In particular, HVAC units, which are a type of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs), are considered. The reduced-order modeling approach can be extended to other smart grid assets, like water heaters, PVs and PHEVs. Closed-loop control strategies are designed for a population of HVAC units under realistic conditions. The proposed load controller is fully responsive and achieves the control objective without sacrificing the end-use performance. Finally, using the T&D simulation platform, the benefits to the bulk power system are demonstrated by controlling smart grid assets under different demand response closed-loop control strategies.

  3. Optimization Online - Lot sizing with inventory gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamish Waterer

    2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 27, 2006 ... Abstract: This paper introduces the single item lot sizing problem with inventory gains. This problem is a generalization of the classical single ...

  4. Generation of longitudinal electric current by the transversal electromagnetic field in collisional plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latyshev, A V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From kinetic Vlasov equation for collisional plasmas distribution function is received in square-law approximation on size of electromagnetic field. The formula for calculation electric current is deduced at any temperature (any degree of degeneration electronic gas). This formula contains one-dimension quadrature. It is shown, that the nonlinearity account leads to occurrence the longitudinal electric current directed along a wave vector. This longitudinal current is perpendicular to the known transversal classical current, received at the linear analysis. When frequency of collisions tends to zero, all received results for collisional plasma pass in known corresponding formulas for collisionless plasma. The case of small values of wave number is considered. It is shown, that the received quantity of longitudinal current at tendency of frequency of collisions to zero also passes in known corresponding expression of current for collisionless plasmas. Graphic comparison of dimensionless size of current is spen...

  5. Block Bootstrap Estimation of the Distribution of Cumulative Outdoor Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block Bootstrap Estimation of the Distribution of Cumulative Outdoor Degradation Victor Chan University Ames, IA 50011 October 28, 2003 Abstract An interesting prediction problem involving degradation cumulative degrada- tion using small- to moderate-size degradation data sets. This distribution, which

  6. The Thermal Phase Transition in Nuclear Multifragmentation: The Role of Coulomb Energy and Finite Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EOS Collaboration; B. K. Srivastava

    2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic analysis of the moments of the fragment size distribution has been carried out for the multifragmentation (MF)of 1A GeV Au, La, and Kr on carbon. The breakup of Au and La is consistent with a continuous thermal phase transition. The data indicate that the excitation energy per nucleon and isotopic temperature at the critical point decrease with increasing system size. This trend is attributed primarily to the increasing Coulomb energy with finite size effects playing a smaller role.

  7. Pretzelosity distribution function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Avakian; A. V. Efremov; P. Schweitzer; F. Yuan

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'pretzelosity' distribution is discussed. Theoretical properties, model results, and perspectives to access experimental information on this leading twist, transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function are reviewed. Its relation to helicity and transversity distributions is highlighted.

  8. Learning poisson binomial distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daskalakis, Constantinos

    We consider a basic problem in unsupervised learning: learning an unknown Poisson Binomial Distribution. A Poisson Binomial Distribution (PBD) over {0,1,...,n} is the distribution of a sum of n independent Bernoulli random ...

  9. Plasma Production via Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  10. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13,Conservation BillingFieldField

  11. Effect of a uniform electric field on soot in laminar premixed ethylene/air flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.; Yao, Q. [Key Laboratory of Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Nathan, G.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, S.A. 5005 (Australia); Alwahabi, Z.T.; King, K.D.; Ho, K. [School of Chemical Engineering, Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, S.A. 5005 (Australia)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of a nominally uniform electric field on the initially uniform distribution of soot has been assessed for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames from a McKenna burner. An electrophoretic influence on charged soot particles was measured through changes to the deposition rate of soot on the McKenna plug, using laser extinction (LE). Soot volume fraction was measured in situ using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Particle size and morphologies were assessed through ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using thermophoretic sampling particle diagnostics (TSPD). The results show that the majority of these soot particles are positively charged. The presence of a negatively charged plug was found to decrease the particle residence times in the flame and to influence the formation and oxidation progress. A positively charged plug has the opposite effect. The effect on soot volume fraction, particles size and morphology with electric field strength is also reported. Flame stability was also found to be affected by the presence of the electric field, with the balance of the electrophoretic force and drag force controlling the transition to unstable flame flicker. The presence of charged species generated by the flame was found to reduce the dielectric field strength to one seventh that of air. (author)

  12. Abstract--This paper presents the impact of different types of load models in distribution network with distributed wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    as a major enabler of the smart grid for the integration of small and medium sized renewable energy based that modeling of loads has a significant impact on the voltage dynamics of the distribution systemAbstract--This paper presents the impact of different types of load models in distribution network

  13. About Industrial Distributed Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Manufacturing Office's (AMO's) Industrial Distributed Energy activities build on the success of predecessor DOE programs on distributed energy and combined heat and power (CHP) while...

  14. Tachyonic field interacting with Scalar (Phantom) Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  15. Sequential Constant Size Compressors for Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidhuber, Juergen

    Sequential Constant Size Compressors for Reinforcement Learning Linus Gissl´en, Matt Luciw, Vincent with this problem: standard RL techniques using as input the hidden layer output of a Sequential Constant-Size Compressor (SCSC). The SCSC takes the form of a sequential Recurrent Auto-Associative Mem- ory, trained

  16. A Theory of Objective Sizing Ricardo Valerdi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    1 A Theory of Objective Sizing Ricardo Valerdi Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA, we build on a concept from psychology known as the moon illusion to develop a theory of objective sizing. This theory has two main benefits: it helps explain why stakeholders have different views

  17. 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Optical sizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, Norbert H.

    mining operation, from the drilling and blasting to the final product; the material size dictates all- disruptive and practical for sizing any material that could be successfully imaged, including blastedWares's WipFrag system work best under controlled conditions like over moving conveyor belts, where camera

  18. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and market assessment Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size2008. “The Size of the U.S. Energy Efficiency Market. Reportmarket spending Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size

  19. Alabama's Hatter's Pond called a classic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCaslin, J.C.

    1981-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Delineation of the combination (structural-stratigraphic) hydrocarbon traps in southern Alabama's Hatter's Pond field demands a thorough understanding of the facies distribution, diagenesis, and structural relations of the area. The field's trapping mechanism is highly complex. In addition to the salt movement associated with normal faulting, the porosity distribution - and hence reservoir development - is facies-selective and is significantly altered by the field's diagenetic changes. Hatter's Pond is one of the most important fields in the Smackover and Norphlet producing areas. The Jurassic section of southwest Alabama probably holds most of that state's oil and gas.

  20. Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Sextro, Richard G.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides--in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors--estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange-rate 20 m{sup 3} chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes.

  1. Introduction to Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pous, Damien

    1 Introduction to Distributed Systems Fabienne Boyer, LIG, fabienne.boyer@inria.fr Sources: Cours d'Olivier Gruber, Sacha Krakowiak, Sara Bouchenak, UJF Fabienne Boyer, Distributed Programming 2 Objectives Study conceptual and practical aspects of distributed systems l Client-server model l Distributed protocols l

  2. Distributed Paging Yair Bartal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartal, Yair

    . We survey distributed data management problems including distributed paging, file allocation fantastically on an annual basis. This survey deals with distributed data management problems. Such prob­ lems in distributed data management is the de­ sign of a dynamic allocation of file copies in a network in order

  3. Aerodynamic size associations of natural radioactivity with ambient aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bondietti, E.A.; Papastefanou, C.; Rangarajan, C.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aerodynamic size of /sup 214/Pb, /sup 212/Pb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 7/Be, /sup 32/P, /sup 35/S (as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and stable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was measured using cascade impactors. The activity distribution of /sup 212/Pb and /sup 214/Pb, measured by alpha spectroscopy, was largely associated with aerosols smaller than 0.52 ..mu..m. Based on 46 measurements, the activity median aerodynamic diameter of /sup 212/Pb averaged 0.13 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.97), while /sup 214/Pb averaged 0.16 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.86). The larger median size of /sup 214/Pb was attributed to ..cap alpha..-recoil depletion of smaller aerosols following decay of aerosol-associated /sup 218/Po. Subsequent /sup 214/Pb condensation on all aerosols effectively enriches larger aerosols. /sup 212/Pb does not undergo this recoil-driven redistribution. Low-pressure impactor measurements indicated that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was about three times larger than the activity median diameter /sup 212/Pb, reflecting differences in atmospheric residence times as well as the differences in surface area and volume distributions of the atmospheric aerosol. Cosmogenic radionuclides, especially /sup 7/Be, were associated with smaller aerosols than SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ regardless of season, while /sup 210/Pb distributions in summer measurements were similar to sulfate but smaller in winter measurements. Even considering recoil following /sup 214/Po ..cap alpha..-decay, the avervage /sup 210/Pb labeled aerosol grows by about a factor of two during its atmospheric lifetime. The presence of 5 to 10% of the /sup 7/Be on aerosols greater than 1 ..mu..m was indicative of post-condensation growth, probably either in the upper atmosphere or after mixing into the boundary layer.

  4. Larmor radius size density holes discovered in the solar wind upstream of Earth's bow shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Larmor radius size density holes discovered in the solar wind upstream of Earth's bow shock G. K. Cao Key Laboratory for Space Weather, CSSAR, CAS, Beijing, China K. Meziane Physics Department that are five or more times the solar wind density. Particle distributions show the steepened edge can behave

  5. Source apportionment of time-and size-resolved ambient particulate matter , Philip K. Hopke b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navasca, Carmeliza

    , analyses of particle size distribution data have also been performed to identify air pollution sources of Mathematics, Clarkson University, Box 5815, Potsdam, NY 13699, USA b Center for Air Resource Engineering and Science, Clarkson University, Box 5708, Potsdam, NY 13699, USA c Air Quality Research Center, University

  6. ORIGINAL PAPER On the effects of grid size and shape when mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    shape and size. The estimated distribution range (EDR) is the spatial union of the CAUs over the area ) on the changes in EDR. EDR increased with time and a saturating phase was noticed by the end of the period. We assessed the effects of the year and the type of CAU on EDR using exploratory data analysis. Larger CAUs

  7. Distributed Parallel Particle Advection using Work Requesting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, Cornelius; Camp, David; Hentschel, Bernd; Garth, Christoph

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle advection is an important vector field visualization technique that is difficult to apply to very large data sets in a distributed setting due to scalability limitations in existing algorithms. In this paper, we report on several experiments using work requesting dynamic scheduling which achieves balanced work distribution on arbitrary problems with minimal communication overhead. We present a corresponding prototype implementation, provide and analyze benchmark results, and compare our results to an existing algorithm.

  8. Modification of the GS LT Paired-end Library Protocol for Constructing Longer Insert Size Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Ze; Peng, Ze; Hamilton, Matthew; Ting, Sara; Tu, Hank; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Paired-end library sequencing has been proven useful in scaffold construction during de novo assembly of genomic sequences. The ability of generating mate pairs with 8 Kb or greater insert sizes is especially important for genomes containing long repeats. While the current 454 GS LT Paired-end library preparation protocol can successfully construct libraries with 3 Kb insert size, it fails to generate longer insert sizes because the protocol is optimized to purify shorter fragments. We have made several changes in the protocol in order to increase the fragment length. These changes include the use of Promega column to increase the yield of large size DNA fragments, two gel purification steps to remove contaminated short fragments, and a large reaction volume in the circularization step to decrease the formation of chimeras. We have also made additional changes in the protocol to increase the overall quality of the libraries. The quality of the libraries are measured by a set of metrics, which include levels of redundant reads, linker positive, linker negative, half linker reads, and driver DNA contamination, and read length distribution, were used to measure the primary quality of these libraries. We have also assessed the quality of the resulted mate pairs including levels of chimera, distribution of insert sizes, and genome coverage after the assemblies are completed. Our data indicated that all these changes have improved the quality of the longer insert size libraries.

  9. Infrastructure for distributed enterprise simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.M.; Yoshimura, A.S.; Goldsby, M.E. [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional discrete-event simulations employ an inherently sequential algorithm and are run on a single computer. However, the demands of many real-world problems exceed the capabilities of sequential simulation systems. Often the capacity of a computer`s primary memory limits the size of the models that can be handled, and in some cases parallel execution on multiple processors could significantly reduce the simulation time. This paper describes the development of an Infrastructure for Distributed Enterprise Simulation (IDES) - a large-scale portable parallel simulation framework developed to support Sandia National Laboratories` mission in stockpile stewardship. IDES is based on the Breathing-Time-Buckets synchronization protocol, and maps a message-based model of distributed computing onto an object-oriented programming model. IDES is portable across heterogeneous computing architectures, including single-processor systems, networks of workstations and multi-processor computers with shared or distributed memory. The system provides a simple and sufficient application programming interface that can be used by scientists to quickly model large-scale, complex enterprise systems. In the background and without involving the user, IDES is capable of making dynamic use of idle processing power available throughout the enterprise network. 16 refs., 14 figs.

  10. Radiation thermometer size-of-source effect testing using aperture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebmann, F.; Kolat, T. [Fluke Corporation, 799 E Utah Valley Dr., American Fork, Utah, USA, 84003 (United States)] [Fluke Corporation, 799 E Utah Valley Dr., American Fork, Utah, USA, 84003 (United States)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Size-of-source effect is an important attribute of any radiation thermometer. The effects of this attribute may be quantified in a number of different ways to include field-of-view, distance ratio, or size-of-source effect. These parameters provide needed information for the user of a radiation thermometer, as they aid in determining whether the measured object is large enough for adequate radiation thermometry measurement. Just as important, these parameters provide needed information for calibration. This information helps to determine calibration geometry, and it is needed for calibration uncertainty determination. For determination of size-of-source effect, there are a limited number of test methods furnished by the standards available today. The test methods available may be cumbersome to perform due to the cost of the required equipment and the time needed to set-up and perform the test. Other methods have been proposed. This paper discusses one such method. This method uses a circular aperture such as that used in radiation thermometer calibration. It describes the method both theoretically and mechanically. It then discusses testing done to verify this method comparing the results to those obtained while performing steps in current standards. Finally, based on this testing, the basis for a new standard test method is presented.

  11. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  12. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were performed enhanced oil recovery field pilot was performed in Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Studies were performed to determine a nutrient system to encourage growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria an inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient material were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor an additional production well in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicated the additional production well monitored during the field trial was also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels of tertiary oil was recovered. Microbial activity increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulphide concentration was experienced. These observations indicate that an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. The three production wells monitored in the pilot area demonstrated significant permeability reduction indicated by interwell pressure interference tests. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform (15 md maximum difference between post-treatment permeability values) indicating that preferential plugging had occurred.

  13. Size Matters. Eat Your Heart Out.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    Size Matters. Eat Your Heart Out. Party of One? Does it seem like all students drink? While and couples therapy, group therapy, medication management, 24-hour crisis service, consultation

  14. Control of gene expression by cell size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Chia-Yung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyploidy, increased copy number of whole chromosome sets in the genome, is a common cellular state in evolution, development and disease. Polyploidy enlarges cell size and alters gene expression, producing novel phenotypes ...

  15. Temperature dependence of the indentation size effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Oliver

    The influence of temperature on the indentation size effect is explored experimentally. Copper is indented on a custom-built high-temperature nanoindenter at temperatures between ambient and 200 °C, in an inert atmosphere ...

  16. Lot Sizing with Piecewise Concave Production Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 14, 2013 ... solve this problem and answer an open question in the literature: we ..... Let ei be a unit vector of size m in which the ith component is one and ...

  17. Overview of nonintercepting beam-size monitoring with optical diffraction radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumpkin, Alex H.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial demonstrations over the last several years of the use of optical diffraction radiation (ODR) as nonintercepting electron-beam-parameter monitors are reviewed. Developments in both far-field imaging and near-field imaging are addressed for ODR generated by a metal plane with a slit aperture, a single metal plane, and two-plane interferences. Polarization effects and sensitivities to beam size, divergence, and position will be discussed as well as a proposed path towards monitoring 10-micron beam sizes at 25 GeV.

  18. Galaxy sizes as a function of environment at intermediate redshift from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelkar, Kshitija; Gray, Meghan E; Maltby, David; Vulcani, Benedetta; De Lucia, Gabriella; Poggianti, Bianca M; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to assess whether the environment has a significant effect on galaxy sizes, we compare the mass--size relations of cluster and field galaxies in the $0.4 1$), with early-type/passive galaxies in higher density environments growing earlier. Such dependence disappears at lower redshifts. Therefore, if the reported difference at higher-$z$ is real, the growth of field galaxies has caught up with that of cluster galaxies by $z\\sim1$. Any putative mechanism responsible for galaxy growth has to account for the existence of environmental differences at high redshift and their absence (or weakening) at lower redshifts.

  19. Semi-empirical model for depth dose distributions of megavoltage x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahuja, S.D.; Stroup, S.L.; Bolin, M.G.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dose distribution due to absorption of photon energy fluence in a homogeneous water phantom irradiated by megavoltage x-ray beams has been analyzed with a semiempirical model. The method generalizes an analytical formalism for the scattering component of dose within a water phantom which was developed recently for monoenergetic photon beams. Contributions to dose via Compton interaction and pair creation form the essential structure of the secondary component formula. Both the central-axis percent depth dose and off-central-axis ratios can be determined for beams of different sizes, used at any value of source to surface distance. The input data include the values of linear attenuation and energy-absorption coefficients in water at energies between 10 keV and the equivalent energy of the beam. Predicted values of the central-axis percent depth dose and the off-central-axis ratios are compared with the measured data for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 20, 35, 45, and 70 MVp x-ray beams. For the central-axis percent depth dose, agreement is within 3% for fields of sizes between 5 x 5 and 20 x 20 cm/sup 2/, and 5% for larger fields, for beams of MVp up to 20. For higher energy beams, comparison was made only for the 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ fields and the discrepancies were within 3%. For the off-central-axis ratios, agreement between the predicted and measured values is within 5% over the umbra region but worsens in the penumbra region and geometrical shadow. This formalism requires large computer storage for generating data for all realistic beams irradiating normal-size phantoms.

  20. Power-law of Aggregate-size Spectra in Natural Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Convertino; Filippo Simini; Filippo Catani; Igor Linkov; Gregory A. Kiker

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Patterns of animate and inanimate systems show remarkable similarities in their aggregation. One similarity is the double-Pareto distribution of the aggregate-size of system components. Different models have been developed to predict aggregates of system components. However, not many models have been developed to describe probabilistically the aggregate-size distribution of any system regardless of the intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of the aggregation process. Here we consider natural animate systems, from one of the greatest mammals - the African elephant (\\textit{Loxodonta africana}) - to the \\textit{Escherichia coli} bacteria, and natural inanimate systems in river basins. Considering aggregates as islands and their perimeter as a curve mirroring the sculpting network of the system, the probability of exceedence of the drainage area, and the Hack's law are shown to be the the Kor\\v{c}ak's law and the perimeter-area relationship for river basins. The perimeter-area relationship, and the probability of exceedence of the aggregate-size provide a meaningful estimate of the same fractal dimension. Systems aggregate because of the influence exerted by a physical or processes network within the system domain. The aggregate-size distribution is accurately derived using the null-method of box-counting on the occurrences of system components. The importance of the aggregate-size spectrum relies on its ability to reveal system form, function, and dynamics also as a function of other coupled systems. Variations of the fractal dimension and of the aggregate-size distribution are related to changes of systems that are meaningful to monitor because potentially critical for these systems.

  1. Expanding and Collapsing Scalar Field Thin Shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; G. Abbas

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the dynamics of scalar field thin shell in the Reissner-Nordstr$\\ddot{o}$m geometry. The Israel junction conditions between Reissner-Nordstr$\\ddot{o}$m spacetimes are derived, which lead to the equation of motion of scalar field shell and Klien-Gordon equation. These equations are solved numerically by taking scalar field model with the quadratic scalar potential. It is found that solution represents the expanding and collapsing scalar field shell. For the better understanding of this problem, we investigate the case of massless scalar field (by taking the scalar field potential zero). Also, we evaluate the scalar field potential when $p$ is an explicit function of $R$. We conclude that both massless as well as massive scalar field shell can expand to infinity at constant rate or collapse to zero size forming a curvature singularity or bounce under suitable conditions.

  2. Net quark number probability distribution near the chiral crossover transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Morita; Bengt Friman; Krzysztof Redlich; Vladimir Skokov

    2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate properties of the probability distribution of the net quark number near the chiral crossover transition in the quark-meson model. The calculations are performed within the functional renormalization group approach, as well as in the mean-field approximation. We find, that there is a substantial influence of the underlying chiral phase transition on the properties of the probability distribution. In particular, for a physical pion mass, the distribution which includes the effect of mesonic fluctuations, differs considerably from both, the mean-field and Skellam distributions. The latter is considered as a reference for a non-critical behavior. A characteristic feature of the net quark number probability distribution is that, in the vicinity of the chiral crossover transition in the O(4) universality class, it is narrower than the corresponding mean-field and Skellam function. We study the volume dependence of the probability distribution, as well as the resulting cumulants, and discuss their approximate scaling properties.

  3. Smooth Field Theories and Homotopy Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Alan Cameron

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 . . . . . . . . 4 Categories of Field Theories 4.1 Functorto super symmetric field theories. CRM Proceedings and0-dimensional super symmetric field theories. preprint 2008.

  4. Cross-field diffusion of energetic (100 keV to 2 MeV) protons in interplanetary space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa Jr, Edio da [Instituto Federal de Minas Gerais-IFMG, Ouro Preto, MG, 35400-000 (Brazil); Tsurutani, Bruce T. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Alves, Maria Virgínia; Echer, Ezequiel [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais-INPE, São José dos Campos, SP, 12227-010 (Brazil); Lakhina, Gurbax S., E-mail: edio.junior@ifmg.edu.br, E-mail: costajr.e@gmail.com [Indian Institute for Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai 410 218 (India)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic field magnitude decreases (MDs) are observed in several regions of the interplanetary medium. In this paper, we characterize MDs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft instrumentation over the solar south pole by using magnetic field data to obtain the empirical size, magnetic field MD, and frequency of occurrence distribution functions. The interaction of energetic (100 keV to 2 MeV) protons with these MDs is investigated. Charged particle and MD interactions can be described by a geometrical model allowing the calculation of the guiding center shift after each interaction. Using the distribution functions for the MD characteristics, Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain the cross-field diffusion coefficients as a function of particle kinetic energy. It is found that the protons under consideration cross-field diffuse at a rate of up to ?11% of the Bohm rate. The same method used in this paper can be applied to other space regions where MDs are observed, once their local features are well known.

  5. Short- and long-lived radionuclide particle size measurements in a uranium mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, Keng-Wu; Fisenne, I.M.; Hutter, A.R.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radon-222 progeny and long-lived radionuclide measurements were done in a wet underground uranium mine in Saskatchewan, Canada, on Nov. 8-12, 1995. Radon-222 in the mine varied from 2 kBq/m{sup 3} at 90 m below surface to 12 kBq/m{sup 3} in the mining areas, 240 m below surface. Radon-222 progeny activity and potential alpha energy concentration appear affected by the airborne particle number concentration and size distribution. Particle number was up to 200x10{sup 3}/cm{sup 3}. Only an accumulation mode (30-1000 nm) and some bimodal size distributions in this accumulation size range were significant. Diesel particles and combustion particles from burning propane caused a major modal diameter shift to a smaller size range (50-85 nm) compared with previous values (100-200 nm). The high particle number reduced the unattached progeny (0.5-2 nm) to >5%. The nuclei mode (2-30 nm) in this test was nonexistent, and the coarse mode (>1000 nm), except from the drilling areas and on the stopes, was mostly not measurable. Airborne particle total mass and long- lived radionuclide alpha activity concentrations were very low (80- 100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and 4-5 mBq/m{sup 3}) owing to high ventilation rates. Mass-weighted size distributions were trimodal, with the major mode at the accumulation size region, which accounts for 45-50% of the mass. The coarse model contains the the least mass, about 20%. The size spectra from gross alpha activities were bimodal with major mode in the coarse region (>1000 nm) and a minor accumulation mode in the 50-900 nm size range. These size spectra were different from the {sup 222}Rn progeny that showed a single accumulation mode in the 50- 85 nm size region. The accumulation mode in the long-lived radionuclide size spectrum was not found in previous studies in other uranium mines.

  6. Depositional environment of the "stringer sand" member, Lower Tuscaloosa Formation (Cretaceous), Mallalieu field, Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Billy Charles

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resi- due deposits are found around a number of these domes, indicating that at one time there were accumulations of oil. The cause of the volatile material escaping and leaving these "fossil oil fields" has not been definitely established... showing the location of Mallalieu field and other nearby oil fields . 14 Structure ma. p of Mallalieu field Mallalieu field electric log correlation secrion. Legend for grain size and lithology logs. 40 49 Quartz grain size, electric log...

  7. Comparison of particle size of cracking catalyst determined by laser light scattering and dry sieve methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dishman, K.L.; Doolin, P.K.; Hoffman, J.F. (Ashland Petroleum Co., Ashland, KY (United States))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of interconversion of dry sieve and laser light scattering particle size values has been developed for cracking catalysts. Values obtained by light scattering techniques were consistently larger than those obtained by dry sieve analysis. The differences were primarily due to lack of sphericity of the particles. The particle size distribution determined by light scattering techniques was based on an average particle diameter. Conversely, the sieve measured the smallest diameter of the particle which can pass through the opening. Microscopic examination of commercial cracking catalysts confirmed their nonuniformity. The sphericity of the catalyst particles decreased as particle size increased. Therefore, the divergence between the laser light scattering and dry sieving value became greater as the catalyst particle size increased.

  8. Unifying power-law behaviour, functionality and defect distribution in general software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatton, Les

    Unifying power-law behaviour, functionality and defect distribution in general software systems Les between power-law distribution of component sizes and defect growth in maturing software systems. It was further noted that power-law distributions appear to be present in software systems from the beginning

  9. Geothermal: Distributed Search

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information Network (STINET) Select All Enter one or more search terms to search the following fields: Searches for the following specific fields are...

  10. Size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrographic study of Fe in bitumens derived from tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (US)); Biggs, W.R. (Chevron Research Co., Richmond, CA (US))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on bitumens extracted from tar sands from various locations (Utah, California, Kentucky, and Alberta) that were examined by size exclusion chromatography with on-line element-specific detection to study the Fe concentration as a function of size. In most cases, the resulting profiles exhibit unimodal distributions at relatively large molecular size with very similar times for maximum elution. specifically, Sunnyside (Utah) and McKittrick (California) tar-sand bitumens exhibited very intense maxima consistent with extremely high bulk Fe contents. Arroyo Grande (California) exhibited an additional maximum at very large molecular size. This size behavior of the Fe appears to correlate with the large molecular size Ni and V components eluted under the same conditions.

  11. Analysis and optimization of gas pipeline networks and surface production facilities for the Waskom Field--Harrison County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Jason Ui-Yong

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in these simulation Surface facilities for the Waskom field include pipelines of varying, sizes, separators, compressors, valves, and production manifolds. After creating and verifying the field model, we determined that the field possesses greater compressor...

  12. Distributed Basis Pursuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Index Terms—Basis pursuit, distributed optimization, sensor networks, augmented ... and image denoising and restoration [1], [2], compression, fitting and ...

  13. Transversity Parton Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Prokudin

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transversity distribution is one of the three fundamental parton distributions that completely describe polarized spin 1/2 nucleon. Its chiral odd nature prevented for many years its experimental exploration, however presently we have obtained great deal of information about this distribution. This includes experimental data from Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering, knowledge of scale dependence and phenomenological extractions. I will discuss main features of this distribution and indicate the future improvements of our knowledge.

  14. Entomology 489 Field Entomology Field Project Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    with information, people, materials). Field Projects (your project should...) FEntomology 489 ­ Field Entomology Field Project Guide A small-group field project is required for ENTO 489 ­ Field Entomology. This guide provides general information about the field-project

  15. Influence of core size on the upconversion luminescence properties of spherical Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2} particles with core-shell structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Kezhi; Liu, Zhenyu; Liu, Ye; Song, Weiye; Qin, Weiping, E-mail: wpqin@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical SiO{sub 2} particles with different sizes (30, 80, 120, and 180?nm) have been coated with Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} layers by a heterogeneous precipitation method, leading to the formation of core-shell structural Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2} particles. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, upconversion (UC) emission spectra, and fluorescent dynamical analysis. The obtained core-shell particles have perfect spherical shape with narrow size distribution. Under the excitation of 980?nm diode laser, the core-shell samples showed size-dependent upconversion luminescence (UCL) properties. The inner SiO{sub 2} cores in core-shell samples were proved to have limited effect on the total UCL intensities of Er{sup 3+} ions. The UCL intensities of core-shell particles were demonstrated much higher than the values obtained in pure Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} with the same phosphor volume. The dependence of the specific area of a UCL shell on the size of its inner SiO{sub 2} particle was calculated and analyzed for the first time. It was confirmed that the surface effect came from the outer surfaces of emitting shells is dominant in influencing the UCL property in the core-shell samples. Three-photon UC processes for the green emissions were observed in the samples with small sizes of SiO{sub 2} cores. The results of dynamical analysis illustrated that more nonradiative relaxation occurred in the core-shell samples with smaller SiO{sub 2} core sizes.

  16. Pore size of FCC pretreat catalyst important

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyse, B.M.; Cooper, B.H.

    1985-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion of sulfur, nitrogen, and polynuclear aromatics can be optimized by varying catalyst pore dimensions and/or particle size. Increased workload and more exacting performance are demanded from today's fluid catalytic cracking feed pretreat catalysts. The desire to process heavier crudes and the inclusion of visbreaker gas oil, unsaturated fractions like coker gas oils, and even resid, have placed greater emphasis on the importance of selection of those catalysts. Also, some older plants are limited to process conditions and equipment designed for easier feedstocks. Data show that the optimum catalyst pore size for a given application depends not only on the reactivity of the feed, but also on the catalyst's diffusional properties. These properties are also factors which determine whether or not a change in catalyst particle size would be advantageous.

  17. Ionic field effect and memristive phenomena in single-point ferroelectric domain switching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ievlev, Anton [ORNL] [ORNL; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine] [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine] [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Shur, Vladimir Ya. [Ural Federal University, Russia] [Ural Federal University, Russia; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric field induced polarization switching underpins most functional applications of ferroelectric materials in information technology, materials science, and optoelectronics. In the last 20 years, much attention has been focused on the switching of individual domains using scanning probe microscopy, both as model of ferroelectric data storage and approach to explore fundamental physics of ferroelectric switching. The classical picture of tip induced switching includes formation of cylindrical domain oriented along the tip field, with the domain size is largely determined by the tip-induced field distribution and domain wall motion kinetics. The polarization screening is recognized as a necessary precondition to the stability of ferroelectric phase; however, screening processes are generally considered to be uniformly efficient and not leading to changes in switching behavior. Here, we demonstrate that single-point tip-induced polarization switching can give rise to a surprisingly broad range of domain morphologies, including radial and angular instabilities. These behaviors are traced to the surface screening charge dynamics, which in some cases can even give rise to anomalous switching against the electric field (ionic field effect). The implications of these behaviors for ferroelectric materials and devices are discussed.

  18. Size-dependent structure of silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, Kristie Jo

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Silver noble metal nanoparticles that are<10 nm often possess multiply twinned grains allowing them to adopt shapes and atomic structures not observed in bulk materials. The properties exhibited by particles with multiply twinned polycrystalline structures are often far different from those of single-crystalline particles and from the bulk. I will present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles<10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. Results for nanoparticles in the intermediate size range of 5 to 10 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. I propose a mechanism for this transitiion that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. Results for nanoparticles of 3.9 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent orthorhombic distortion. This distortion is interpreted in the context of idealized decahedral particles. In addition, given these size-dependent measurements of silver nanoparticle compression with pressure, we have constructed a pressure calibration curve. Encapsulating these silver nanoparticles in hollow metal oxide nanospheres then allows us to measure the pressure inside a nanoshell using x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate the measurement of pressure gradients across nanoshells and show that these nanoshells have maximum resolved shear strengths on the order of 500 MPa to IGPa.

  19. Size dependent crush analysis of lithium orthosilicate pebbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratna Kumar Annabattula; Matthias Kolb; Yixiang Gan; Rolf Rolli; Marc Kamlah

    2014-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Crushing strength of the breeder materials (lithium orthosilicate, $\\rm{Li_4SiO_4}$ or OSi) in the form of pebbles to be used for EU solid breeder concept is investigated. The pebbles are fabricated using a melt-spray method and hence a size variation in the pebbles produced is expected. The knowledge of the mechanical integrity (crush strength) of the pebbles is important for a successful design of breeder blanket. In this paper, we present the experimental results of the crush (failure) loads for spherical OSi pebbles of different diameters ranging from $250~\\mu$m to $800~\\mu$m. The ultimate failure load for each size shows a Weibull distribution. Furthermore, the mean crush load increases with increase in pebble diameter. It is also observed that the level of opacity of the pebble influences the crush load significantly. The experimental data presented in this paper and the associated analysis could possibly help us to develop a framework for simulating a crushable polydisperse pebble assembly using discrete element method.

  20. Measurement and characterization of x-ray spot size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, K.H.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In planning an x-ray imaging experiment one must have an accurate model of the imaging system to obtain optimum results. The blurring caused by the finite size of the x-ray source is often the least understood element in the system. We have developed experimental and analytical methods permitting accurate measurement and modeling of the x-ray source. The model offers a simple and accurate way to optimize the radiographic geometry for any given experimental requirement (i.e., resolution and dose at detector). Any text on radiography will mention the effects of the finite size of the x-ray source on image quality and how one can minimize this influence by the choice of a small radiographic magnification. The film blur (independent of the source blur) is often treated as a single number and combined with an effective blur dimension for the x-ray source to give a total blur on the film. In this paper, we will develop a treatment of x-ray sources based on the modulation transfer function (MTF). This approach allows us to infer the spatial distribution function of the electron beam that produces the bremsstrahlung x-rays and to predict the performance of an x-ray imaging system if we know the MTF of the detector. This treatment is much more accurate than a single number characterization. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Particle size reduction of propellants by cryocycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whinnery, L.; Griffiths, S.; Lipkin, J. [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Repeated exposure of a propellant to liquid nitrogen causes thermal stress gradients within the material resulting in cracking and particle size reduction. This process is termed cryocycling. The authors conducted a feasibility study, combining experiments on both inert and live propellants with three modeling approaches. These models provided optimized cycle times, predicted ultimate particle size, and allowed crack behavior to be explored. Process safety evaluations conducted separately indicated that cryocycling does not increase the sensitivity of the propellants examined. The results of this study suggest that cryocycling is a promising technology for the demilitarization of tactical rocket motors.

  2. Can amphiphile architecture directly control vesicle size?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Greenall; C. M. Marques

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Bilayer membranes self-assembled from simple amphiphiles in solution always have a planar ground-state shape. This is a consequence of several internal relaxation mechanisms of the membrane and prevents the straightforward control of vesicle size. Here, we show that this principle can be circumvented and that direct size control by molecular design is a realistic possibility. Using coarse-grained calculations, we design tetrablock copolymers that form membranes with a preferred curvature, and demonstrate how to form low-polydispersity vesicles while suppressing micellization.

  3. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Barrios, M.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, F. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  4. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, Venkatarao [JLAB; Dixon, Kelly D. [JLAB; Laverdure, Nathaniel A. [JLAB; Knudsen, Peter N. [JLAB; Arenius, Dana M. [JLAB; Barrios, Matthew N. [Michigan State; Jones, S. [Michigan State; Johnson, M. [Michigan State; Casagrande, Fabio [Michigan State

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  5. Brachistochrone of a Spherical Uniform Mass Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David R. Mitchell

    2008-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We solve the brachistochrone problem for a particle travelling through a spherical mass distribution of uniform density. We examine the connection between this problem and the popular "gravity elevator" result. The solution is compared to the well known brachistochrone problem of a particle in a uniform gravitational field.

  6. Test of two hypotheses explaining the size of populations in a system of cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitanov, Nikolay K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two classical hypotheses are examined about the population growth in a system of cities: Hypothesis 1 pertains to Gibrat's and Zipf's theory which states that the city growth-decay process is size independent; Hypothesis 2 pertains to the so called Yule process which states that the growth of populations in cities happens when (i) the distribution of the city population initial size obeys a log-normal function, (ii) the growth of the settlements follows a stochastic process. The basis for the test is some official data on Bulgarian cities at various times. This system was chosen because (i) Bulgaria is a country for which one does not expect biased theoretical conditions; (ii) the city populations were determined rather precisely. The present results show that: (i) the population size growth of the Bulgarian cities is size dependent, whence Hypothesis 1 is not confirmed for Bulgaria; (ii) the population size growth of Bulgarian cities can be described by a double Pareto log-normal distribution, whence Hypothe...

  7. book review: Species distribution models for species distribution modellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormann, Carsten F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mapping  species  distributions:  spa? tial inference and news and update  book review  Species distribution models for species distribution modellers  Ecological niches and 

  8. Developing models of aerosol representation to investigate composition, evolution, optical properties, and CCN spectra using measurements of size-resolved hygroscopicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasparini, Roberto

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A Differential Mobility Analyzer/Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA/TDMA) was used to measure size distributions, hygroscopicity, and volatility during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operational Period at the Central Facility...

  9. Developing models of aerosol representation to investigate composition, evolution, optical properties, and CCN spectra using measurements of size-resolved hygroscopicity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasparini, Roberto

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A Differential Mobility Analyzer/Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA/TDMA) was used to measure size distributions, hygroscopicity, and volatility during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operational Period at the Central ...

  10. Cooling rate and size effects on the medium-range structure of multicomponent oxide glasses simulated by molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilocca, Antonio [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of cooling rate and system size on the medium-range structure of melt-derived multicomponent silicate glasses, represented by the quaternary 45S5 Bioglass composition. Given the significant impact of the glass degradation on applications of these materials in biomedicine and nuclear waste disposal, bulk structural features which directly affect the glass dissolution process are of particular interest. Connectivity of the silicate matrix, ion clustering and nanosegregation, distribution of ring and chain structural patterns represent critical features in this context, which can be directly extracted from the models. A key issue is represented by the effect of the computational approach on the corresponding glass models, especially in light of recent indications questioning the suitability of conventional MD approaches (that is, involving melt-and-quench of systems containing ?10{sup 3} atoms at cooling rates of 5-10 K/ps) when applied to model these glasses. The analysis presented here compares MD models obtained with conventional and nonconventional cooling rates and system sizes, highlighting the trend and range of convergence of specific structural features in the medium range. The present results show that time-consuming computational approaches involving much lower cooling rates and/or significantly larger system sizes are in most cases not necessary in order to obtain a reliable description of the medium-range structure of multicomponent glasses. We identify the convergence range for specific properties and use them to discuss models of several glass compositions for which a possible influence of cooling-rate or size effects had been previously hypothesized. The trends highlighted here represent an important reference to obtain reliable models of multicomponent glasses and extract converged medium-range structural features which affect the glass degradation and thus their application in different fields. In addition, as a first application of the present findings, the fully converged structure of the 45S5 glass was further analyzed to shed new light on several dissolution-related features whose interpretation has been rather controversial in the past.

  11. Productivity and Firm Size Distribution: Evidence from India's Organized and Unorganized Manufacturing Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nataraj, Shanthi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arvind Panagariya, eds. , India Policy Forum 2008/09, Vol.Industrial and Trade Policies in India,” February 2008.s (1996) argument that India’s tariff policy was largely set

  12. Problems with determining the particle size distribution of chalk soil and some of their implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Young University, 690 SWKT, Provo, UT, USA b British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, UK c the properties of chalk soil, psd analyses should be based on the original material (including carbonates Edinburgh 1823, Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. © 2009 Natural Environment Research Council

  13. Comparing tropical forest tree size distributions with the predictions of metabolic ecology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Kassim,13 David Kenfack,14 James V. LaFrankie,15 Daniel Lagunzad,16 Hua Seng Lee,17 Elizabeth Losos,18 0948, APO AA 34002-0948, Miami, FL, USA 3 Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University

  14. Drop-size distribution for crosscurrent breakup of a liquid jet in a convective airstream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyn, Gregory Michael

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental investigations have been completed in the study of a simulated fuel injector system implementing an airblast atomization process called a jet in a crossflow as the primary means of fuel atomization. To complete these studies...

  15. Discovery of oscillatory dynamics of city-size distributions in world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    of pdf thru Skype you can ask questions, thru Humberto he will have a chat box to relay questions I test) China leads by 50 years in its Q values ­ up to 1850 PART III: Scaling Examples: Chinese-results are very similar, as reported for the 1- factor test. Q1 Q3 Q5 Q2 Q4 Q6 #12;7 Multiple measures of Q

  16. On the Scalability of Monitoring and Debugging Distributed Computations: Vector-Clock Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    1: Sample POET Process-Time Diagram that provides such a display is POET [29, 18]. An example of a POET display, presenting a portion of a point-to-point broadcast, is shown in Figure 1. There is a significant limitation in POET and in any similar system. Such sys- tems are limited to displaying only

  17. On the Scalability of Monitoring and Debugging Distributed Computations: VectorClock Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Paul A.S.

    1: Sample POET Process­Time Diagram that provides such a display is POET [29, 18]. An example of a POET display, presenting a portion of a point­to­point broadcast, is shown in Figure 1. There is a significant limitation in POET and in any similar system. Such sys­ tems are limited to displaying only

  18. A predictive model for particle size distribution and yield for Bayer precipitation and classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapraun, Christopher Michael

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOg= NaC1 Org-C = Temp Liquor density Total caustic Dissolved alumina Total alkali Sodium sulfate Sodium chloride Organic carbon Temperature (gtL) (g/L) (gtL) (gti ) (gtL) (gtL) (gtl-) ('C) 22 In this same study, Langa also supplied...

  19. 9 Oscillatory dynamics of city-size distributions in world historical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    , on the marcher or boundary polities that re- sist the encroachment of expanding empires. Marcher states up here. We approach the problems of the rise and fall of commercial trade net- works, regional city

  20. SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL Characteristics of Size Distributions at Urban and Rural Locations in New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    York Min-Suk Bae1 , James J. Schwab1 , Olga Hogrefe1 , Brian P. Frank2 , G. Garland Lala1 , Kenneth L Originally all data was analyzed after the four measurement campaigns using TSI software available recalculated with the updated software (Aerosol Instrument Manager Software Version 8.0) to compensate

  1. Productivity and Firm Size Distribution: Evidence from India's Organized and Unorganized Manufacturing Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nataraj, Shanthi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic Fibers Jute and Vegetable Fibers Textile Products Wood Paper Leather Basic Chemicals Rubber,Synthetic Textiles Jute, Vegetable Fiber Textile Products Wood, Furniture, Fixtures Paper, Printing, Finishing Leather Basic Chemicals Rubber,Synthetic Textiles Jute, Vegetable Fiber Textile Products Wood, Furniture, Fixtures Paper, Printing, Finishing Leather Basic Chemicals Rubber,

  2. Optimal Placement and Sizing of Distributed Generator Units using Genetic Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -scale production units (e.g. fuel cells, micro-CHPs, photovoltaic panels) and the liberalization of the energy reliability, etc. This optimization problem can be solved in different ways like exhaustive searches [14

  3. Finite Size Effects on the Real-Space Pair Distribution Function of Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Benjamin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chupas, P. J. , Lee, P.L. , Parise, J. B. & Schoonen, M. A.A. A. , Phillips, B. L. & Parise, J. B. (2007) Science 316,

  4. animal group-size distributions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    major contribution of this paper is that for the first time, it is possible for computer graphics animators, to specify and control a three dimensional fluid animation, without...

  5. On the Role of Farm Size Distribution in Explaining Cross-Country Variation in Agricultural Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Productivity Oleg Firsin August 2014 Abstract In this paper, we seek to test a hypothesis regarding sources of international agricultural productivity differences that recently emerged in the literature. In accordance-level taxes and subsidies­account for a large part of the agricultural labor productivity gap between the rich

  6. Drop-size distribution for crosscurrent breakup of a liquid jet in a convective airstream 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyn, Gregory Michael

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental investigations have been completed in the study of a simulated fuel injector system implementing an airblast atomization process called a jet in a crossflow as the primary means of fuel atomization. To complete these studies...

  7. Size distribution measurement of fine and ultrafine particle emission from cooking Evelyne Ghina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) for particle with diameter between d and (d+dd) including emission rate of the source, nucleation, re-suspension meat or fish lead to a total mean equivalent emission rate of (9±6)×1010 s-1 while cooking meat or fish in an oven lead to total mean equivalent emission rate of (9±4)×1010 s-1 . Cooking pasta or heat the stove

  8. Lattice model for kinetics and grain-size distribution in crystallization Mario Castro*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, Angel "Anxo"

    and thin-film solar cells.2 With these and similar applications in mind, the capability to en- gineer deposition has been driven by the technological development of active matrix addressed flat-panel displays1

  9. Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 49084919 Particle size and composition distribution analysis of automotive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of automotive brake abrasion dusts for the evaluation of antimony sources of airborne particulate matter Akihiro

  10. On the Limiting Distribution of Program Sizes in Tree-Based Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poli, Riccardo

    in a tree and pa is a constant. This result generalises the result previously reported for the case a = 1. 1 understood for mutation and crossover in the case of fixed-length representations (e.g., binary GAs) [4 in which each individual in a generation produces some random number of descendants, and where

  11. Effect of Engine-Out NOx Control Strategies on PM Size Distribution in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributionsreduction systemParticulate

  12. Measuring the Raindrop Size Distribution, ARM's Efforts at Darwin and SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneo Matthew1, 20121+ CrossMeasuring the

  13. The Dependence of Cirrus Cloud-Property Retrievals on Size-Distribution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,Audit Report The

  14. Size of nanoobjects in oil and gas species and materials with positron annihilation spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grafutin, V I; Elnikova, L V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical method to determine geometry and size of nano-scale defects in oil and gas species and materials is proposed. The modeling is carried out with the parameters of the positron spectra in the angular distribution method of positron annihilation spectroscopy, and is based on the 'free electron' approximation. From the annihilation decay kinetics, it is possible to express the trapping velocity of parapositronium in pores via intensities of the positronium components and to define the concentration and radii of pores in a porous layer. As the result, size and the concentration of micro-porous cylindrical nano-objects in the silicon samples are estimated.

  15. Slide 1Mapping Rail Seat Pressure Distributions Matthew J. Greve, J. Riley Edwards, Marcus S. Dersch,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Distributions Outline · RSD Background · Pressure Distribution Relation to RSD · Equipment Overview · Field Data problems associated with concrete crosstie and fastening system performance · Potential RSD mechanisms as determined through research at UIUC: - Abrasion - Crushing - Freeze-thaw - Hydraulic pressure cracking

  16. Cell-size maintenance: universal strategy revealed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Suckjoon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How cells maintain a stable size has fascinated scientists since the beginning of modern biology, but has remained largely mysterious. Recently, however, the ability to analyze single bacteria in real time has provided new, important quantitative insights into this long-standing question in cell biology.

  17. Size reduction of complex networks preserving modularity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenas, A.; Duch, J.; Fernandez, A.; Gomez, S.

    2008-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ubiquity of modular structure in real-world complex networks is being the focus of attention in many trials to understand the interplay between network topology and functionality. The best approaches to the identification of modular structure are based on the optimization of a quality function known as modularity. However this optimization is a hard task provided that the computational complexity of the problem is in the NP-hard class. Here we propose an exact method for reducing the size of weighted (directed and undirected) complex networks while maintaining invariant its modularity. This size reduction allows the heuristic algorithms that optimize modularity for a better exploration of the modularity landscape. We compare the modularity obtained in several real complex-networks by using the Extremal Optimization algorithm, before and after the size reduction, showing the improvement obtained. We speculate that the proposed analytical size reduction could be extended to an exact coarse graining of the network in the scope of real-space renormalization.

  18. Unwinding of circular helicoidal molecules versus size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Zoli

    2015-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamical stability of a set of circular double helical molecules is analyzed by path integral techniques. The minicircles differ only in \\textit{i)} the radius and \\textit{ii)} the number of base pairs ($N$) arranged along the molecule axis. Instead, the rise distance is kept constant. For any molecule size, the computational method simulates a broad ensemble of possible helicoidal configurations while the partition function is a sum over the path trajectories describing the base pair fluctuational states. The stablest helical repeat of every minicircle is determined by free energy minimization. We find that, for molecules with $N$ larger than $100$, the helical repeat grows linearly with the size and the twist number is constant. On the other hand, by reducing the size below $100$ base pairs, the double helices sharply unwind and the twist number drops to one for $N=\\,20$. This is predicted as the minimum size for the existence of helicoidal molecules in the closed form. The helix unwinding appears as a strategy to release the bending stress associated to the circularization of the molecules.

  19. Firm Size And Higher Education Graduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Firm Size And Higher Education Graduate Employment In West Virginia 2010 Summary Results For Work 2012 Prepared for the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission By George W. Hammond, Associate Corporation Funding for this research was provided by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission

  20. Corium droplet size in direct containment heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For those light water reactor severe accident sequences in which molten corium is postulated to melt through the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head at elevated primary system pressure and enter the cavity region beneath the vessel, the flow of corium from the RPV will be followed by a sustained high-pressure blowdown of steam and hydrogen through the breach remaining in the vessel. The gases flowing from the breached vessel constitute a source of driving forces capable of dispersing corium from the cavity as droplets into other parts of the containment. An important issue is the fraction of the dispersed corium thermal and chemical energy which may be transferred directly to the containment atmosphere. An important determinant of the extent of direct containment heating is the size of the corium droplets which are dispersed into the containment atmosphere. An analysis is presented here of the mass median droplet sizes in the Argonne National Laboratory CWTI-13 and CWTI-14 reactor material-direct containment heating experiments as well as the Sandia National Laboratory SPIT-19 thermite test. The observed median droplet diameters are shown to be in good agreement with a correlation for the drop size in ordinary annular flow, and a droplet size prediction is carried out for the reactor system.

  1. Right-Size Heating and Cooling Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is one of a series of technology fact sheets created to help housing designers and builders adopt a whole-house design approach and energy efficient design practices. The fact sheet helps people choose the correct equipment size for heating and cooling to improve comfort and reduce costs, maintenance, and energy use.

  2. Spherically symmetric scalar field collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koyel Ganguly; Narayan Banerjee

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a scalar field, minimally coupled to gravity may have collapsing modes even when the energy condition is violated, that is, for $(\\rho+3p)<0$. This result may be useful in the investigation of the possible clustering of dark energy. All the examples dealt with have apparent horizons which form before the formation of the singularity. The singularities formed are shell focusing in nature. The density of the scalar field distribution is seen to diverge at singularity. The Ricci scalar also diverges at the singularity. The interior spherically symmetric metric is matched with exterior Vaidya metric at the hypersurface and the appropriate junction conditions are obtained.

  3. Distribution of the spacing between two adjacent avoided crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manabu Machida; Keiji Saito

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the frequency at which avoided crossings appear in an energy level structure when an external field is applied to a quantum chaotic system. The distribution of the spacing in the parameter between two adjacent avoided crossings is investigated. Using a random matrix model, we find that the distribution of these spacings is well fitted by a power-law distribution for small spacings. The powers are 2 and 3 for the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble and Gaussian unitary ensemble, respectively. We also find that the distributions decay exponentially for large spacings. The distributions in concrete quantum chaotic systems agree with those of the random matrix model.

  4. Maerz, N. H., Germain, P., 1996. Block size determination around underground openings using simulations. Proceedings of the FRAGBLAST 5 Workshop on Measurement of Blast Fragmentation, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 23-24 Aug., 1996, pp. 215-223.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, Norbert H.

    -strength classification. The actual block size distribution is the product of the interaction between the joint Designation (RQD), Volumetric Joint Count (Jv), and Block Size Index (Ib). These, being index properties do, block size may be considered simply the product of three simple rock mass parameters: joint set

  5. On Field Constraint Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wies, Thomas

    2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce field constraint analysis, a new technique for verifying data structure invariants. A field constraint for a field is a formula specifying a set of objects to which the field can point. Field constraints ...

  6. Numerical Analysis of a Cold Air Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, L.; Li, R.; Yuan, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold air distribution systems may reduce the operating energy consumption of air-conditioned air supply system and improve the outside air volume percentages and indoor air quality. However, indoor temperature patterns and velocity field are easily...

  7. Adaptive Distributed Resource Allocation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hock Beng

    Wireless sensor networks have emerged as a promising technology for a wide range of important applications. A major research challenge in this field is the distributed resource allocation problem, which concerns how the ...

  8. Synthesis and optical properties of quantum-size metal sulfide particles in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nedeljkovic, J.M.; Patel, R.C.; Kaufman, P.; Joyce-Pruden, C.; O'Leary, N. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade, small-particle' research has become quite popular in various fields of chemistry and physics. The recognition of quantum-size effects in very small colloidal particles has led to renewed interest in this area. Small particles' are clusters of atoms or molecules ranging in size from 1 nm to almost 10 nm or having agglomeration numbers from 10 up to a few hundred. In other words, small particles fall in size between single atoms or molecules and bulk materials. The agglomeration number specifies the number of individual atoms or molecules in a given cluster. The research in this area is interdisciplinary, and it links colloidal science and molecular chemistry. The symbiosis of these two areas of research has revealed some intriguing characteristics of small particles. This experiment illustrates the following: simple colloidal techniques for the preparation of two different types of quantum-size metal sulfide particles; the blue shift of the measured optical absorption spectra when the particle size is decreased in the quantum-size regime; and use of a simple quantum mechanical model to calculate the particle size from the absorption onset measured for CdS.

  9. Computer Stochastics in Scalar Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. B. Lang

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a series of lectures on Monte Carlo results on the non-perturbative, lattice formulation approach to quantum field theory. Emphasis is put on 4D scalar quantum field theory. I discuss real space renormalization group, fixed point properties and logarithmic corrections, partition function zeroes, the triviality bound on the Higgs mass, finite size effects, Goldstone bosons and chiral perturbation theory, and the determination of scattering phase shifts for some scalar models.

  10. The Size of Compact Extra Dimensions from Blackbody Radiation Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaton Ramos; Henrique Boschi-Filho

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we generalize the Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws for a $D$-dimensional manifold composed by 4 non-compact dimensions and $D-4$ compact dimensions, $ R^{1,3}$ x $T^{D-4} $. The electromagnetic field is assumed to pervade all compact and non-compact dimensions. In particular, the total radiated power becomes $ R(T) = \\sigma_B T^4 + \\sigma_D (a) \\, T^D $, where $a$ is the size of the compact extra dimensions. For $D=10$, predicted from String Theory, and $D=11$, from M-Theory, the outcomes agree with available experimental data for $a$ as high as 2 x $10^{-7}$m.

  11. Distribution of phylogenetic diversity under random extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beata Faller; Fabio Pardi; Mike Steel

    2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Phylogenetic diversity is a measure for describing how much of an evolutionary tree is spanned by a subset of species. If one applies this to the (unknown) subset of current species that will still be present at some future time, then this `future phylogenetic diversity' provides a measure of the impact of various extinction scenarios in biodiversity conservation. In this paper we study the distribution of future phylogenetic diversity under a simple model of extinction (a generalized `field of bullets' model). We show that the distribution of future phylogenetic diversity converges to a normal distribution as the number of species grows (under mild conditions, which are necessary). We also describe an algorithm to compute the distribution efficiently, provided the edge lengths are integral, and briefly outline the significance of our findings for biodiversity conservation.

  12. Surface Plasmon-Driven Water Reduction: Gold Nanoparticle Size...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasmon-Driven Water Reduction: Gold Nanoparticle Size Matters. Surface Plasmon-Driven Water Reduction: Gold Nanoparticle Size Matters. Abstract: Water reduction under two visible...

  13. Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System Needs: Scoping Study Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System Needs: Scoping Study Emerging...

  14. Specific Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass Substrate Surface Area and Enzymatic Digestibility. Specific Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass Substrate...

  15. Versatile Diesel Particulate Filter Cartridge Any Size, Any Shape...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Versatile Diesel Particulate Filter Cartridge Any Size, Any Shape Versatile Diesel Particulate Filter Cartridge Any Size, Any Shape Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

  16. Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating Loads Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating Loads During this webinar, Building America Research Team IBACOS...

  17. A maximum entropy framework for non-exponential distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Jack; Dill, Ken A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probability distributions having power-law tails are observed in a broad range of social, economic, and biological systems. We describe here a potentially useful common framework. We derive distribution functions $\\{p_k\\}$ for situations in which a `joiner particle' $k$ pays some form of price to enter a `community' of size $k-1$, where costs are subject to economies-of-scale (EOS). Maximizing the Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy subject to this energy-like constraint predicts a distribution having a power-law tail; it reduces to the Boltzmann distribution in the absence of EOS. We show that the predicted function gives excellent fits to 13 different distribution functions, ranging from friendship links in social networks, to protein-protein interactions, to the severity of terrorist attacks. This approach may give useful insights into when to expect power-law distributions in the natural and social sciences.

  18. Analysis of Voltage Rise Effect on Distribution Network with Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Analysis of Voltage Rise Effect on Distribution Network with Distributed Generation M. A. Mahmud.hossain@adfa.edu.au, and H.Pota@adfa.edu.au). Abstract: Connections of distributed generation (DG) in distribution networks are increasing. These connections of distributed generation cause voltage rise in the distribution network

  19. Morphology and structure of BzK-selected galaxies at z~2 in the CANDELS-COSMOS field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Guan-Wen; Chen, Yang; Kong, Xu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing a BzK-selected technique, we obtain 14550 star-forming galaxies (sBzKs) and 1763 passive galaxies (pBzKs) at z~2 from the K-selected (K<22.5) catalog in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. The differential number counts of sBzKs and pBzKs are consistent with the results from the literature. Compared to the observed results, semi-analytic models of galaxy formation and evolution provide too few (many) galaxies at high (low)-mass end. Moreover, we find that the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass of sBzKs follow the relation of main sequence. Based on the HST/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) F160W imaging, we find a wide range of morphological diversities for sBzKs, from diffuse to early-type spiral structures, with relatively high M20, large size and low G, while pBzKs are elliptical-like compact morphologies with lower M20, smaller size and higher G, indicating the more concentrated and symmetric spatial extent of stellar population distribution in pBzKs than sBzKs. Furthermore, the sizes of pBzKs (sBz...

  20. DIGITAL VISION & PHOTODISC Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simeone, Osvaldo

    of scalability and energy efficiency and offers new opportunities through the interplay with specific distributed, to the advances in telegraphy and, later, wireless transmission. Railroad transportation, geodesy (measurement