Sample records for field production 1949-2012

  1. Plasma Production via Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  2. Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneller, Tricia; Salas, Jose

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1999, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Halliburton Energy Services cooperated on a field test of Halliburton's new Production Hydraulic Packer technology on Well 46-TPX-10 at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 near Casper, WY. Performance of the packer was evaluated in set and unset operations. The packer's ability to seal the annulus between the casing and tubing was hydraulically tested and the results were recorded.

  3. Particle Production and Dissipative Cosmic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Fujisaki; K. Kumekawa; M. Yamaguchi; M. Yoshimura

    1995-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Large amplitude oscillation of cosmic field that may occur right after inflation and in the decay process of weakly interacting fields gives rise to violent particle production via the parametric resonance. In the large amplitude limit the problem of back reaction against the field oscillation is solved and the energy spectrum of created particles is determined in a semi-classical approximation. For large enough coupling or large enough amplitude the resulting energy spectrum is broadly distributed, implying larger production of high energy particles than what a simple estimate of the reheating temperature due to the Born formula would suggest.

  4. Schwinger Pair Production in Pulsed Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim; Hyung Won Lee; Remo Ruffini

    2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically investigate the temporal behavior and the structure of longitudinal momentum spectrum and the field polarity effect on pair production in pulsed electric fields in scalar quantum electrodynamics (QED). Using the evolution operator expressed in terms of the particle and antiparticle operators, we find the exact quantum states under the influence of electric pulses and measure the number of pairs of the Minkowski particle and antiparticle. The number of pairs, depending on the configuration of electric pulses, exhibits rich structures in the longitudinal momentum spectrum and undergoes diverse dynamical behaviors at the onset of the interaction but always either converges to a momentum-dependent constant or oscillates around a momentum-dependent time average after the completion of fields.

  5. Gas plants, new fields spark production rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenzini, D.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas plant construction is welcomed by operators in the Williston Basin, North Dakota. Petroleum and gas production has increased. The Montana portion of the Williston Basin shows new discoveries. Some secondary recovery efforts are in operation. Industrial officials share the same enthusiasm and optimism for rising production as they do for exploration potential in the basin. 5 tables.

  6. Remote control of off-shore oil field production equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sissom, Alton Wayne

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    REMOTE CONTROL OF OFF-SHORE OIL FIELD PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT A Thesis Alton W. Sissom 1949 Approve as to style and on n by Cha1rman of omm1ttee REMOTE CONTROL OF OFFSHORE OIL FIELD PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT A Thesis Alton W. Oissom 1949 REMOTE...-Carrier Channel 26 PZNOTE CONTROL OF OFF-SHORE OIL FIELD PRODUCTION K, 'UIPMENT I GENERAL IiPOPPUi TION Since the beginning of the exploitation of the under-sea oil deposits in the Gulf' of qexico, most, of the territory off the shores of Texas and Louisiana...

  7. Surface Light Field Rendering for Virtual Product Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    Surface Light Field Rendering for Virtual Product Design Jan MESETH, Gero MĂ?LLER, Reinhard KLEIN illumination solution including accurate materials, which is stored as an outgoing Surface Light Field (SLF-facto standard in manufacturing industries like the automotive industry. They are used, e.g., for performing

  8. PRODUCTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  9. Semiclassical pair production rate for rotating electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckhard Strobel; She-Sheng Xue

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We semiclassically investigate Schwinger pair production for pulsed rotating electric fields depending on time. To do so we solve the Dirac equation for two-component fields in a WKB-like approximation. The result shows that for two-component fields the spin distribution of produced pairs is generally not $1:1$. As a result the pair creation rates of spinor and scalar quantum electro dynamics (QED) are different even for one pair of turning points. For rotating electric fields the pair creation rate is dominated by particles with a specific spin depending on the sense of rotation for a certain range of pulse lengths and frequencies. We present an analytical solution for the momentum spectrum of the constant rotating field. We find interference effects not only in the momentum spectrum but also in the total particle number of rotating electric fields.

  10. Vorticity and magnetic field production in relativistic ideal fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Hua Gao; Bin Qi; Shou-Yu Wang

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of relativistic ideal hydrodynamics, we study the production mechanism for vorticity and magnetic field in relativistic ideal fluids. It is demonstrated that in the uncharged fluids the thermal vorticity will always satisfy the Kelvin's theorem and the circulation must be conserved. However, in the charged fluids, the vorticity and magnetic field can be produced by the interaction between the entropy gradients and the fluid velocity gradients. Especially, in the multiple charged fluids, the vorticity and magnetic field can be produced by the interaction between the inhomogenous charge density ratio and the fluid velocity gradients even if the entropy distribution is homogeneous, which provides another mechanism for the production of vorticity and magnetic field in relativistic plasmas or in the early universe.

  11. Improved Approximations for Fermion Pair Production in Inhomogeneous Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim; Don N. Page

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reformulating the instantons in a complex plane for tunneling or transmitting states, we calculate the pair-production rate of charged fermions in a spatially localized electric field, illustrated by the Sauter electric field E_0 sech^2 (z/L), and in a temporally localized electric field such as E_0 sech^2 (t/T). The integration of the quadratic part of WKB instanton actions over the frequency and transverse momentum leads to the pair-production rate obtained by the worldline instanton method, including the prefactor, of Phys. Rev. D72, 105004 (2005) and D73, 065028 (2006). It is further shown that the WKB instanton action plus the next-to-leading order contribution in spinor QED equals the WKB instanton action in scalar QED, thus justifying why the WKB instanton in scalar QED can work for the pair production of fermions. Finally we obtain the pair-production rate in a spatially localized electric field together with a constant magnetic field in the same direction.

  12. Using Accelerated Life Tests Results to Predict Product Field Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Accelerated Life Tests Results to Predict Product Field Reliability William Q. Meeker Dept State University Ames, IA 50011 June 22, 2008 Abstract Accelerated life tests (ALTs) provide timely, invariably, accelerated life tests (ALTs) to assess the effect of the change is accompanied by a question

  13. New concepts used in the Murchison field submerged production system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, A.W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New concepts were used to install three satellite subsea wells at Conoco's Murchison field, located in 510 feet of water in the North Sea. Originally drilled as exploratory wells, they were re-entered and completed. The sequence of events in bringing the wells to production incorporate the following concepts: Completion with dual 3/one-half/sub d/ouble prime/ tubing retrievable safety valves inside 9 5/8/double prime/-47 pound casing; subsea controllers were not used; flowline bundles were constructed onshore and towed below the surface 264 miles to the field; six high-pressure lines were connected at one time using metal to metal gaskets while the flowline bundle was buoyant nine feet off the seafloor. Production from two satellite subsea wells demonstrated the viability of using exploratory wells for field development.

  14. Usefulness of effective field theory for boosted Higgs production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dawson; I. M. Lewis; Mao Zeng

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs + jet channel at the LHC is sensitive to the effects of new physics both in the total rate and in the transverse momentum distribution at high p_T. We examine the production process using an effective field theory (EFT) language and discuss the possibility of determining the nature of the underlying high scale physics from boosted Higgs production. The effects of heavy color triplet scalars and top partner fermions with TeV scale masses are considered as examples and Higgs-gluon couplings of dimension-5 and dimension-7 are included in the EFT. As a by-product of our study, we examine the region of validity of the EFT. Dimension-7 contributions in realistic new physics models give effects in the high p_T tail of the Higgs signal which are so tiny that they are likely to be unobservable.

  15. Topologically Stratified Energy Minimizers in a Product Abelian Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Xiaosen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently developed product Abelian gauge field theory by Tong and Wong hosting magnetic impurities is reformulated into an extended model that allows the coexistence of vortices and anti-vortices. The two Abelian gauge fields in the model induce two species of magnetic vortex-lines resulting from $N_s$ vortices and $P_s$ anti-vortices ($s=1,2$) realized as the zeros and poles of two complex-valued Higgs fields, respectively. An existence theorem is established for the governing equations over a compact Riemann surface $S$ which states that a solution with prescribed $N_1, N_2$ vortices and $P_1,P_2$ anti-vortices of two designated species exists if and only if the inequalities \\[ \\left|N_1+N_2-(P_1+P_2)\\right|area of $S$. The minimum energy of these solutions is shown to assume the explicit value \\...

  16. Field Testing of Pre-Production Prototype Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides and overview of field testing of 18 pre-production prototype residential heat pump water heaters

  17. Study of fusion product effects in field-reversed mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driemeyer, D.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of fusion products (fps) on Field-Reversed Mirror (FRM) reactor concepts has been evaluated through the development of two new computer models. The first code (MCFRM) treats fps as test particles in a fixed background plasma, which is represented as a fluid. MCFRM includes a Monte Carlo treatment of Coulomb scattering and thus provides an accurate treatment of fp behavior even at lower energies where pitch-angle scattering becomes important. The second code (FRMOD) is a steady-state, globally averaged, two-fluid (ion and electron), point model of the FRM plasma that incorporates fp heating and ash buildup values which are consistent with the MCFRM calculations. These codes have been used extensively in the development of an advanced-fuel FRM reactor design (SAFFIRE). A Catalyzed-D version of the plant is also discussed along with an investigation of the steady-state energy distribution of fps in the FRM. User guides for the two computer codes are also included.

  18. Development of an Enhanced Two-Phase Production System at the Geysers Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Enedy

    2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method was developed to enhance geothermal steam production from two-phase wells at THE Geysers Geothermal Field. The beneficial result was increased geothermal production that was easily and economically delivered to the power plant.

  19. Electron-Positron Pair Production in Space- or Time-Dependent Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagen Kleinert; Remo Ruffini; She-Sheng Xue

    2008-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Treating the production of electron and positron pairs by a strong electric field from the vacuum as a quantum tunneling process we derive, in semiclassical approximation, a general expression for the pair production rate in a $z$-dependent electric field $E(z)$ pointing in the $z$-direction. We also allow for a smoothly varying magnetic field parallel to $E(z)$. The result is applied to a confined field $E(z)\

  20. A study of production/injection data from slim holes and production wells at the Oguni Geothermal Field, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Abe, M.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production and injection data from slim holes and large-diameter wells at the Oguni Geothermal Field, Japan, were examined in an effort to establish relationships (1) between productivity of large-diameter wells and slim holes, (2) between injectivity and productivity indices and (3) between productivity index and borehole diameter. The production data from Oguni boreholes imply that the mass production from large-diameter wells may be estimated based on data from slim holes. Test data from both large- and small-diameter boreholes indicate that to first order the productivity and the injectivity indices are equal. Somewhat surprisingly, the productivity index was found to be a strong function of borehole diameter; the cause for this phenomenon is not understood at this time.

  1. Steamflood production mechanism in an edge pattern Duri field, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuwono, Ipung Punto

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Duri field, located in Riau Province in Central Sumatra, Indonesia, is currently the site of the largest steamflood project in the world. Roughly half of the field is being flooded in eight project areas. Low oil rate has been encountered...

  2. Asymmetric neutrino production in magnetized proto-neutron stars in fully relativistic mean-field approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki [College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Fujisawa 252-8510 (Japan); Kajino, Toshitaka; Hidaka, Jun; Takiwaki, Tomoya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yasutake, Nobutoshi [Department of Physics, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino 275-0023 (Japan); Kuroda, Takami [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul, 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Chung-Yeol [General Education Curriculum Center, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, Grant J. [Center of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the neutrino production cross-section in the proto-neutron-star matter under a strong magnetic field in the relativistic mean-field approach. We introduce a new parameter-set which can reproduce the 1.96 solar mass neutron star. We find that the production process increases emitted neutrinos along the direction parallel to the magnetic field and decrease those along its opposite direction. It means that resultant asymmetry due to the neutrino absorption and scattering process in the magnetic field becomes larger by the addition of the neutrino production process.

  3. Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Dudley

    Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles Dudley Stark School.S.A. would occur between 1965 and 1970. Oil production in the U.S.A. actually peaked in 1970 and has been declining since then. Hubbert used a logistic curve to approximate the rate of oil production. Deffeyes [2

  4. Defect production in tungsten: A comparison between field-ion microscopy and molecular-dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    Defect production in tungsten: A comparison between field-ion microscopy and molecular defect production efficiencies obtained by FIM are a consequence of a surface effect, which greatly enhances defect production compared to that in the crystal interior. Comparison of clustering of vacancies

  5. Particle production of vector fields: Scale invariance is attractive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagstaff, Jacques M.; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a model of an Abelian vector boson with a Maxwell kinetic term and non-negative mass-squared it is demonstrated that, under fairly general conditions during inflation, a scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations for the components of a vector field, massive or not, whose kinetic function (and mass) is modulated by the inflaton field is an attractor solution. If the field is massless, or if it remains light until the end of inflation, this attractor solution also generates anisotropic stress, which can render inflation weakly anisotropic. The above two characteristics of the attractor solution can source (independently or combined together) significant statistical anisotropy in the curvature perturbation, which may well be observable in the near future.

  6. Fermion production by a dependent of time electric field in de Sitter universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosmin Crucean

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermion production by the electric field of a charge on de Sitter expanding universe is analyzed. The amplitude and probability of pair production are computed. We obtain from our calculations that the modulus of the momentum is no longer conserved and that there are probabilities for production processes where the helicity is no longer conserved. The rate of pair production in an electric field is found to be important in the early universe when the expansion factor was large comparatively with the particle mass.

  7. Field Labeling to Ensure the Electrical Safety of Production Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Todd

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    not including equipment that is designed for use in hazardous locations. This publication provides compressive information on how to apply electrical components, wiring and control systems to both ensure safety of personnel and aid in the delivery..., by delivering safe products at a reasonable price a company will not be eliminated as a potential equipment supplier by being viewed in a negative light as a result of a poor safety evaluation. OSHA posts information on their website detailing the number...

  8. Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 WeekMarketProduct:

  9. Aboveground biomass production in an irrigation and fer-tilization field experiment with Eucalyptus globulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Aboveground biomass production in an irrigation and fer- tilization field experiment). To assess optimum biomass production of Eucalyp- tus globulus in Portugal and to study the physiological in March 1986 (Pereira et al., 1988). In this paper, we present the results of aboveground biomass

  10. On the kinetic equation approach to pair production by time-dependent electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Fedotov; E. G. Gelfer; K. Yu. Korolev; S. A. Smolyansky

    2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the quantum kinetic approach to pair production from vacuum by time-dependent electric field. Equivalence between this approach and the more familiar S-matrix approach is explicitly established for both scalar and fermion cases. For the particular case of a constant electric field exact solution for kinetic equations is provided and the accuracy of low-density approximation is estimated.

  11. Electron Production and Collective Field Generation in Intense Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lee, E; Verboncoeur, J; Covo, M K

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cloud effects (ECEs) are increasingly recognized as important, but incompletely understood, dynamical phenomena, which can severely limit the performance of present electron colliders, the next generation of high-intensity rings, such as PEP-II upgrade, LHC, and the SNS, the SIS 100/200, or future high-intensity heavy ion accelerators such as envisioned in Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF). Deleterious effects include ion-electron instabilities, emittance growth, particle loss, increase in vacuum pressure, added heat load at the vacuum chamber walls, and interference with certain beam diagnostics. Extrapolation of present experience to significantly higher beam intensities is uncertain given the present level of understanding. With coordinated LDRD projects at LLNL and LBNL, we undertook a comprehensive R&D program including experiments, theory and simulations to better understand the phenomena, establish the essential parameters, and develop mitigating mechanisms. This LDRD project laid the essential groundwork for such a program. We developed insights into the essential processes, modeled the relevant physics, and implemented these models in computational production tools that can be used for self-consistent study of the effect on ion beams. We validated the models and tools through comparison with experimental data, including data from new diagnostics that we developed as part of this work and validated on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. We applied these models to High-Energy Physics (HEP) and other advanced accelerators. This project was highly successful, as evidenced by the two paragraphs above, and six paragraphs following that are taken from our 2003 proposal with minor editing that mostly consisted of changing the tense. Further benchmarks of outstanding performance are: we had 13 publications with 8 of them in refereed journals, our work was recognized by the accelerator and plasma physics communities by 8 invited papers and we have 5 additional invitations for invited papers at upcoming conferences, we attracted collaborators who had SBIR funding, we are collaborating with scientists at CERN and GSI Darmstadt on gas desorption physics for submission to Physical Review Letters, and another PRL on absolute measurements of electron cloud density and Phys. Rev. ST-AB on electron emission physics are also being readied for submission.

  12. Geometric Origin of Pair Production by Electric Field in de Sitter Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle production in a de Sitter space provides an interesting model to understand the curvature effect on Schwinger pair production by a constant electric field or Schwinger mechanism on the de Sitter radiation. For that purpose, we employ the recently introduced complex analysis method, in which the quantum evolution in the complex time explains the pair production via the geometric transition amplitude and gives the pair-production rate as the contour integral. We compare the result by the contour integral with that of the phase-integral method.

  13. A novel approach to particle production in an uniform electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Srinivasan; T. Padmanabhan

    1999-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline a different method of describing scalar field particle production in a uniform electric field. In the standard approach, the (analytically continued) harmonic oscillator paradigm is important in describing particle production. However, there is another gauge in which the particle production process has striking similarities with the one used to describe Hawking radiation in black holes. The gauge we use to describe the electric field in is the lightcone gauge, so named because the mode functions for a scalar field are found to be singular on the lightcone. We use these modes in evaluating the effective Lagrangian using the proper time technique. The key feature of this analysis is that these modes can be explicitly "normalized" by using the criterion that they reduce to the usual flat space modes in the limit of the electric field tending to zero. We find that the proper time kernel is not the same as the analytically continued oscillator kernel though the effective Lagrangian is the standard result as it should be. We also consider an example of a confined electric field system using the lightcone gauge modes. Our analysis indicates that the Bogolubov coefficients, in taking the limit to the uniform electric field case, are multiplied by energy dependent boundary factors that have not been taken into account before.

  14. Controls of coal fabric on coalbed gas production and compositional shift in both field production and canister desorption tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The production rates of coalbed gas wells commonly vary significantly, even in the same field with similar reservoir permeability and gas content. The compositional variation in produced gas is also not everywhere predictable, although in most fields produced gas becomes progressively enriched in CO, through the production life of a reservoir, such as parts of the San Juan basin. In contrast, it is generally observed that the ratio of CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} declines with time during field and laboratory desorption testing of coal cores. In this study, we investigate numerically the importance of coal fabric, namely cleat spacing and aperture width, on the performance of coalbed gas wells and gas compositional shifts during production. Because of the cubic relationship between fracture permeability and fracture aperture width (and thus fracture porosity) for a given cleat permeability, the production profile of coal seams varies depending on whether the permeability is distributed among closely spaced fractures (cleat) with narrower apertures or more widely spaced fractures (cleat) with wider apertures. There is a lower fracture porosity for coal with widely spaced fractures than for coal with closely spaced fractures. Therefore, the relative permeability to gas increases more rapidly for coals with more widely spaced cleats as less dewatering from fractures is required, assuming that the fractures are initially water saturated. The enrichment of CO{sub 2} in the production gas with time occurs because of the stronger adsorption of coals for CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 4}. However, during desorption of coal cores, CO{sub 2} desorbs more rapidly than methane because desorption rate is governed more by diffusion than by sorption affinity, and CO{sub 2} has much higher effective diffusivity in microporous coals than CH{sub 4}.

  15. Field-induced decay of quantum vacuum: visualizing pair production in a classical photonic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Longhi

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon of vacuum decay, i.e. electron-positron pair production due to the instability of the quantum electrodynamics vacuum in an external field, is a remarkable prediction of Dirac theory whose experimental observation is still lacking. Here a classic wave optics analogue of vacuum decay, based on light propagation in curved waveguide superlattices, is proposed. Our photonic analogue enables a simple and experimentally-accessible visualization in space of the process of pair production as break up of an initially negative-energy Gaussian wave packet, representing an electron in the Dirac sea, under the influence of an oscillating electric field.

  16. Matrix Product State and mean field solutions for one-dimensional systems can be found efficiently

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norbert Schuch; J. Ignacio Cirac

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of approximating ground states of one-dimensional quantum systems within the two most common variational ansatzes, namely the mean field ansatz and Matrix Product States. We show that both for mean field and for Matrix Product States of fixed bond dimension, the optimal solutions can be found in a way which is provably efficient (i.e., scales polynomially). This implies that the corresponding variational methods can be in principle recast in a way which scales provably polynomially. Moreover, our findings imply that ground states of one-dimensional commuting Hamiltonians can be found efficiently.

  17. Dobson Butte field, Williston basin, Stark County, North Dakota: nontypical oil production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guy, W.J.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dobson Butte field (T139N, R96W), Stark County, North Dakota, was discovered in 1982 following a detailed seismic program. Production is primarily from a structural trap in the Interlake Formation of Silurian age. Three oil wells are presently producing from a dolomite reservoir at about 11,000 ft in depth. Primary recoverable reserves of these three producing wells is calculated to be about 2 million bbl of oil. Additional reserves will come from further development of the Interlake reservoir as well as from the deeper Red River (Ordovician) Formation. The Dobson Butte field is a nontypical oil field within the Williston basin as to its high pour point oil (90/sup 0/F), high production water cuts (85-95%), lack of good oil shows in samples, unpredictable noncontinuous oil-producing reservoirs throughout the entire 600-ft Interlake Formation, difficulty in log interpretations, and difficulty in determining the source bed. The interpretation of these nontypical characteristics of Interlake oil production in the Dobson Butte field compared to other Interlake oil production within the Williston basin will have a profound effect upon future Interlake exploration.

  18. Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

  19. Mass shift effects in nonperturbative multiphoton pair production for arbitrary polarized electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. L. Li; D. Lu; B. F. Shen; L. B. Fu; J. Liu; B. S. Xie

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass shift effects in multiphoton pair production of a nonperturbative nature for arbitrary polarized electric fields are investigated numerically by employing the real-time Dirac-Heisenberg-Wigner formalism, and theoretically by proposing an effective energy concept. It is found that the theoretical results are agreement with the numerical ones very well. It is the first time to consider the roles of the momenta of created particles and the polarizations of external fields played in the mass shift effects. These results can deepen the understanding of pair production in the nonperturbative threshold regime. Moreover, the distinct mass shift effects are observable in the forthcoming experiments and can be used as a probe to distinguish the electron-positron pair production from other background events.

  20. Schwinger Mechanism for Fermion Pair Production in the Presence of Arbitrary Time Dependent Background Electric Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred Cooper; Gouranga C. Nayak

    2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Schwinger mechanism for the pair production of fermions in the presence of an arbitrary time-dependent background electric field E(t) by directly evaluating the path integral. We obtain an exact non-perturbative result for the probability of fermion-antifermion pair production per unit time per unit volume per unit transverse momentum (of the fermion or antifermion) from the arbitrary time dependent electric field E(t) via Schwinger mechanism. We find that the exact non-perturbative result is independent of all the time derivatives d^nE(t)/dt^n, where n=1,2,....\\infty. This result has the same functional dependence on E as the Schwinger's constant electric field E result with the replacement: E -> E(t).

  1. Quantum field theory in curved spacetime, the operator product expansion, and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Hollands; R. M. Wald

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To make sense of quantum field theory in an arbitrary (globally hyperbolic) curved spacetime, the theory must be formulated in a local and covariant manner in terms of locally measureable field observables. Since a generic curved spacetime does not possess symmetries or a unique notion of a vacuum state, the theory also must be formulated in a manner that does not require symmetries or a preferred notion of a ``vacuum state'' and ``particles''. We propose such a formulation of quantum field theory, wherein the operator product expansion (OPE) of the quantum fields is elevated to a fundamental status, and the quantum field theory is viewed as being defined by its OPE. Since the OPE coefficients may be better behaved than any quantities having to do with states, we suggest that it may be possible to perturbatively construct the OPE coefficients--and, thus, the quantum field theory. By contrast, ground/vacuum states--in spacetimes, such as Minkowski spacetime, where they may be defined--cannot vary analytically with the parameters of the theory. We argue that this implies that composite fields may acquire nonvanishing vacuum state expectation values due to nonperturbative effects. We speculate that this could account for the existence of a nonvanishing vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor of a quantum field occurring at a scale much smaller than the natural scales of the theory.

  2. Vacuum pair production of charged scalar bosons in time-dependent electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zi-Liang Li; Ding Lu; Bai-Song Xie

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the quantum mechanical scattering model, the dynamical assist effect and the multiple-slit interference effect in electron-positron pair production from vacuum are generalized to vacuum pair production of charged scalar bosons. For the former effect some combinations of a strong but slowly varying electric field and a weak but rapidly varying one with different time delay are studied. Results indicate that the oscillation intensity of momentum spectrum and the number density of created bosons reduce with increasing of the time delay. Obviously, they achieve the maximum if the time delay equals zero. For the latter effect, it is shown that this effect does not exist for equal-sign $N$-pulse electric field in contrast to its existence for alternating-sign $N$-pulse. An approximate solution of boson momentum spectrum is got and it is agreeable well with the exact numerical one in alternating-sign $N$-pulse electric field, especially for $2$-pulse field and for small longitudinal momentum. The difference of vacuum pair production between bosons and fermions are also compared for their longitudinal momentum spectra.

  3. The South Atlantic Magnetic Field Anomaly and Its Effect on the Calculated Production of Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Poirier

    2000-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical calculations of the production of neutrinos via cosmic rays incident upon the earth's atmosphere (Barr et al., 1989; Becker-Szendy et al., 1992; Bugaev & Naumov, 1989; Gaisser et al, 1988; Honda et al., 1995) are examined. These calculations use a one-dimensional approximation in the production, transport, and decay of the produced particles. Examined are various additional effects of the earth's magnetic field and the three-dimensional nature of the problem which have the effect of decreasing the calulated ratio of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos.

  4. Matrix product states and variational methods applied to critical quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley Milsted; Jutho Haegeman; Tobias J. Osborne

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the second-order quantum phase-transition of massive real scalar field theory with a quartic interaction ($\\phi^4$ theory) in (1+1) dimensions on an infinite spatial lattice using matrix product states (MPS). We introduce and apply a naive variational conjugate gradient method, based on the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP) for imaginary time, to obtain approximate ground states, using a related ansatz for excitations to calculate the particle and soliton masses and to obtain the spectral density. We also estimate the central charge using finite-entanglement scaling. Our value for the critical parameter agrees well with recent Monte Carlo results, improving on an earlier study which used the related DMRG method, verifying that these techniques are well-suited to studying critical field systems. We also obtain critical exponents that agree, as expected, with those of the transverse Ising model. Additionally, we treat the special case of uniform product states (mean field theory) separately, showing that they may be used to investigate non-critical quantum field theories under certain conditions.

  5. Fusion in conformal field theory as the tensor product of the symmetry algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gaberdiel

    1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a recent proposal of Richard Borcherds to regard fusion as the ring-like tensor product of modules of a {\\em quantum ring}, a generalization of rings and vertex operators, we define fusion as a certain quotient of the (vector space) tensor product of representations of the symmetry algebra ${\\cal A}$. We prove that this tensor product is associative and symmetric up to equivalence. We also determine explicitly the action of ${\\cal A}$ on it, under which the central extension is preserved. \\\\ Having given a precise meaning to fusion, determining the fusion rules is now a well-posed algebraic problem, namely to decompose the tensor product into irreducible representations. We demonstrate how to solve it for the case of the WZW- and the minimal models and recover thereby the well-known fusion rules. \\\\ The action of the symmetry algebra on the tensor product is given in terms of a comultiplication. We calculate the $R$-matrix of this comultiplication and find that it is triangular. This seems to shed some new light on the possible r\\^{o}le of the quantum group in conformal field theory.

  6. Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

  7. Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO[sub 2] flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

  8. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

  9. Polarization Effects In The Charged Lepton Pair Production By A Neutrino (Antineutrino) In A Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huseynov, Vali A. [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Nakhchivan State University, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan); Laboratory of Physical Research, Nakhchivan Division of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan); Ahmad, Ali S. [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Nakhchivan State University, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan)

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The probability of the process of the charged lepton pair production by a neutrino (an antineutrino) with allowance for the longitudinal and transverse polarizations of the charged leptons in a magnetic field is presented. The dependence of the probability of the process on the spin variables of the charged leptons and on the azimuthal and polar angles of the initial and final neutrinos (antineutrinos) are investigated. It is shown that the probability of the process is sensitive to the spin variables of the charged leptons and to the direction of the neutrino (antineutrino) momentum. It is determined that the neutrino (antineutrino) energy and momentum loss through the production of a charged lepton pair happens asymmetrically.

  10. Spectral representation of the particle production out of equilibrium - Schwinger mechanism in pulsed electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukushima

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a formalism to describe the particle production out of equilibrium in terms of dynamical spectral functions, i.e. Wigner transformed Pauli-Jordan's and Hadamard's functions. We take an explicit example of a spatially homogeneous scalar theory under pulsed electric fields and investigate the time evolution of the spectral functions. In the out-state we find an oscillatory peak in Hadamard's function as a result of the mixing between positive- and negative-energy waves. The strength of this peak is of the linear order of the Bogoliubov mixing coefficient, whereas the peak corresponding to the Schwinger mechanism is of the quadratic order. Between the in- and the out-states we observe a continuous flow of the spectral peaks together with two transient oscillatory peaks. We also discuss the medium effect at finite temperature and density. We emphasise that the entire structure of the spectral functions conveys rich information on real-time dynamics including the particle production.

  11. Neutron production using a pyroelectric driven target coupled with a gated field ionization source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellsworth, J. L.; Tang, V.; Falabella, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Naranjo, B.; Putterman, S. [University of California Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A palm sized, portable neutron source would be useful for widespread implementation of detection systems for shielded, special nuclear material. We present progress towards the development of the components for an ultracompact neutron generator using a pulsed, meso-scale field ionization source, a deuterated (or tritiated) titanium target driven by a negative high voltage lithium tantalate crystal. Neutron production from integrated tests using an ion source with a single, biased tungsten tip and a 3 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm, vacuum insulated crystal with a plastic deuterated target are presented. Component testing of the ion source with a single tip produces up to 3 nA of current. Dielectric insulation of the lithium tantalate crystals appears to reduce flashover, which should improve the robustness. The field emission losses from a 3 cm diameter crystal with a plastic target and 6 cm diameter crystal with a metal target are compared.

  12. Fermion Pair Production From an Electric Field Varying in Two Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Seger; A. B. Balantekin

    1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hamiltonian describing fermion pair production from an arbitrarily time-varying electric field in two dimensions is studied using a group-theoretic approach. We show that this Hamiltonian can be encompassed by two, commuting SU(2) algebras, and that the two-dimensional problem can therefore be reduced to two one-dimensional problems. We compare the group structure for the two-dimensional problem with that previously derived for the one-dimensional problem, and verify that the Schwinger result is obtained under the appropriate conditions.

  13. Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

  14. Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

  15. Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

  16. Uniqueness of Herndon's Georeactor: Energy Source and Production Mechanism for Earth's Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2009-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Herndon's georeactor at the center of Earth is immune to meltdown, which is not the case for recently published copy-cat georeactors, which would necessarily be subject to hot nuclear fuel, prevailing high temperature environments, and high confining pressures. Herndon's georeactor uniquely is expected to be self-regulating through establishing a balance between heat production and actinide settling out. The seventy year old idea of convection in the Earth's fluid core is refuted because thermal expansion cannot overcome the 23 percent higher density at the core's bottom than at its top. The dimensionless Rayleigh Number is an inappropriate indicator of convection in the Earth's core and mantle as a consequence of the assumptions under which it was derived. Implications bearing on the origin of the geomagnetic field, the physical impossibility of mantle convection, and the concomitant refutation of plate tectonics theory are briefly described.

  17. Increasing Well Productivity in Gas Condensate Wells in Qatar's North Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Nathan

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensate blockage negatively impacts large natural gas condensate reservoirs all over the world; examples include Arun Field in Indonesia, Karachaganak Field in Kazakhstan, Cupiagua Field in Colombia,Shtokmanovskoye Field in Russian Barents Sea...

  18. Research and development of energy-efficient appliance motor-compressors. Volume IV. Production demonstration and field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, M.G.; Sauber, R.S.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two models of a high-efficiency compressor were manufactured in a pilot production run. These compressors were for low back-pressure applications. While based on a production compressor, there were many changes that required production process changes. Some changes were performed within our company and others were made by outside vendors. The compressors were used in top mount refrigerator-freezers and sold in normal distribution channels. Forty units were placed in residences for a one-year field test. Additional compressors were built so that a life test program could be performed. The results of the field test reveal a 27.0% improvement in energy consumption for the 18 ft/sup 3/ high-efficiency model and a 15.6% improvement in the 21 ft/sup 3/ improvement in the 21 ft/sup 3/ high-efficiency model as compared to the standard production unit.

  19. Soft-Gluon Production Due to a Gluon Loop in a Constant Chromo-Electric Background Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouranga C. Nayak; Peter van Nieuwenhuizen

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain an exact result for the soft gluon production and its p_T distribution due to a gluon loop in a constant chromo-electric background field E^a with arbitrary color. Unlike Schwinger's result for e^+e^- pair production in QED which depends only on one gauge invariant quantity, the Electric field E, we find that the p_T distribution of the gluons depend on two gauge invariant quantities, E^aE^a and [d_{abc}E^aE^bE^c]^2.

  20. Non-Perturbative Quark-Antiquark Production From a Constant Chromo-Electric Field via the Schwinger Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouranga C. Nayak

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain an exact result for the non-perturbative quark (antiquark) production rate and its p_T distribution from a constant SU(3) chromo-electric field E^a with arbitary color index $a$ by directly evaluating the path integral. Unlike the WKB tunneling result, which depends only on one gauge invariant quantity |E|, the strength of the chromo-electric field, we find that the exact result for the p_T distribution for quark (antiquark) production rate depends on two independent Casimir (gauge) invariants, E^aE^a and [d_{abc}E^aE^bE^c]^2.

  1. Optimized production strategies for improved oil recovery in a caronate oil field.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, Quan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??LCC field is a conventional oil field producing from the Smackover carbonate formation at a depth around 12,000 ft and was discovered in the state… (more)

  2. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  3. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  4. Effective field theory analysis of double Higgs production via gluon fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Panico, Giuliano; Son, Minho

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a detailed study of double Higgs production via gluon fusion in the Effective Field Theory (EFT) framework where effects from new physics are parametrized by local operators. Our analysis provides a perspective broader than the one followed in most of the previous analyses, where this process was merely considered as a way to extract the Higgs trilinear coupling. We focus on the $hh \\to b\\bar b\\gamma\\gamma$ channel and perform a thorough simulation of signal and background at the 14 TeV LHC and a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider. We make use of invariant mass distributions to enhance the sensitivity on the EFT coefficients and give a first assessment of the impact of jet substructure techniques on the results. The range of validity of the EFT description is estimated, as required to consistently exploit the high-energy range of distributions, pointing out the potential relevance of dimension-8 operators. Our analysis contains a few important improvements over previous studies and identifies so...

  5. Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column heights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column that the CO2 is in a dense phase (either liquid or supercritical). Accurate assessment of the storage capacity also requires an estimation of the amount of CO2 that can be safely stored beneath the reservoir seal

  6. Field evaluation of cotton near-isogenic lines introgressed with QTLs for productivity and drought related traits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chee, Peng W.

    Field evaluation of cotton near-isogenic lines introgressed with QTLs for productivity and drought) between elite cultivars of the two cotton species Gossypium barbadense cv. F-177 and G. hirsutum cv. Siv, in order to (1) evaluate the potential to improve cotton drought resistance by MAS and (2) test the role

  7. Seismic response to fluid injection and production in two Salton Trough geothermal fields, southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajoie, Lia Joyce

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D I P IPPO , R. (2012). Geothermal Power Plants: Principles,in the vicinity of geothermal power plants worldwide, it isregional effects of geothermal power production. This study

  8. Schwinger Mechanism for Gluon Pair Production in the Presence of Arbitrary Time Dependent Chromo-Electric Field in Arbitrary Gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouranga C Nayak

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study non-perturbative gluon pair production from arbitrary time dependent chromo-electric field E^a(t) with arbitrary color index a =1,2,...8 via Schwinger mechanism in arbitrary covariant background gauge \\alpha. We show that the probability of non-perturbative gluon pair production per unit time per unit volume per unit transverse momentum \\frac{dW}{d^4xd^2p_T} is independent of gauge fixing parameter \\alpha. Hence the result obtained in the Fynman-'t Hooft gauge, \\alpha=1, is the correct gauge invariant and gauge parameter \\alpha independent result.

  9. Neutrino absorption by W production in the presence of a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaushik Bhattacharya; Sarira Sahu

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we calculate the decay rate of the electron type neutrinos into $W$ bosons and electrons in presence of an external uniform magnetic field. The decay rate is calculated from the imaginary part of the $W$ exchange neutrino self-energy diagram but in the weak field limit and compare our result with the existing one.

  10. Magnetic Field Effect on Charmonium Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Xingyu; Xu, Nu; Xu, Zhe; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to understand the strong external magnetic field generated at the very beginning of high energy nuclear collisions. We study the effect of the magnetic field on the charmonium yield and anisotropic distribution in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC energy. The time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation is employed to describe the motion of $c\\bar{c}$ pairs. We compare our model prediction of non- collective anisotropic parameter $v_2$ of $J/\\psi$s with CMS data at high transverse momentum. This is the first attempt to measure the magnetic field in high energy nuclear collisions.

  11. Gas productivity related to cleat volumes derived from focused resistivity tools in coalbed methane (CBM) fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.H.; Peeters, M.; Cloud, T.A.; Van Kirk, C.W. [Kerr McGee Rocky Mountain Corporation, Denver, CO (United States)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleats are critical for coal-bed methane (CBM) production, but operators usually lack a viable method to determine productivity except for costly well tests. Wireline logs, run over the CBM deposits of the Drunkards Wash Unit located in the Uinta Basin of Utah, were used to develop a new method to relate productivity to the cleat volume. The latter is derived from a focused resistivity log and the wellbore-fluid resistivity. Induction tools are unsuitable for this method, because they are dominated by borehole effects in high resistivity coals and low resistivity mud. Moreover, they read too deep to be significantly affected by the substitution of formation fluid by borehole fluid in the cleats on which the method is based. The method was demonstrated by relating cleat volume to CBM gas productivity in 24 wells, an exercise that clearly separated good from poor producers.

  12. The Impact of Farmer-Field-Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers in the Peruvian Andes1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    1 The Impact of Farmer-Field-Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers-school (FFS) program on farmers' knowledge of integrated pest management (IPM) practices related to potato practices has the potential to significantly improve productivity in potato production. U.S. General

  13. Field-project designs for carbon dioxide sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Neal Sams; Grant Bromhal; Sinisha Jikich; Turgay Ertekin; Duane H. Smith [EG& amp; G Technical Services, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide concerns about global warming and possible contributions to it from anthropogenic carbon dioxide have become important during the past several years. Coal seams may make excellent candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration; coal-seam sequestration could enhance methane production and improve sequestration economics. Reservoir-simulation computations are an important component of any engineering design before carbon dioxide is injected underground. We have performed such simulations for a hypothetical pilot-scale project in representative coal seams. In these simulations we assume four horizontal production wells that form a square, that is, two wells drilled at right angles to each other forming two sides of a square, with another pair of horizontal wells similarly drilled to form the other two sides. Four shorter horizontal wells are drilled from a vertical well at the center of the square, forming two straight lines orthogonal to each other. By modifying coal properties, especially sorption rate, we have approximated different types of coals. By varying operational parameters, such as injector length, injection well pressure, time to injection, and production well pressure, we can evaluate different production schemes to determine an optimum for each coal type. Any optimization requires considering a tradeoff between total CO{sub 2} sequestered and the rate of methane production. Values of total CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced are presented for multiple coal types and different operational designs. 30 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

  15. On the Vlasov equation for Schwinger pair production in a time-dependent electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adolfo Huet; Sang Pyo Kim; Christian Schubert

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Schwinger pair creation in a purely time-dependent electric field can be described through a quantum Vlasov equation describing the time evolution of the single-particle momentum distribution function. This equation exists in two versions, both of which can be derived by a Bogoliubov transformation, but whose equivalence is not obvious. For the spinless case, we show here that the difference between these two evolution equations corresponds to the one between the "in-out" and "in-in" formalisms. We give a simple relation between the asymptotic distribution functions generated by the two Vlasov equations. As examples we discuss the Sauter and single-soliton field cases.

  16. Schwinger Mechanism for Quark-Antiquark Production in the Presence of Arbitrary Time Dependent Chromo-Electric Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouranga C. Nayak

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Schwinger mechanism in QCD in the presence of an arbitrary time-dependent chromo-electric background field $E^a(t)$ with arbitrary color index $a$=1,2,...8 in SU(3). We obtain an exact result for the non-perturbative quark (antiquark) production from an arbitrary $E^a(t)$ by directly evaluating the path integral. We find that the exact result is independent of all the time derivatives $\\frac{d^nE^a(t)}{dt^n}$ where $n=1,2,...\\infty$. This result has the same functional dependence on two Casimir invariants $[E^a(t)E^a(t)]$ and $[d_{abc}E^a(t)E^b(t)E^c(t)]^2$ as the constant chromo-electric field $E^a$ result with the replacement: $E^a \\rightarrow E^a(t)$. This result relies crucially on the validity of the shift conjecture, which has not yet been established.

  17. Production of large volume, strongly magnetized laser-produced plasmas by use of pulsed external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albertazzi, B. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); INRS-EMT, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Beard, J.; Billette, J.; Portugall, O. [LNCMI, UPR 3228, CNRS-UFJ-UPS-INSA, 31400 Toulouse (France); Ciardi, A. [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Superieure, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS UMR 8112, Paris (France); Vinci, T.; Albrecht, J.; Chen, S. N.; Da Silva, D.; Hirardin, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnagni, L.; Simond, S.; Veuillot, E.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Burris-Mog, T.; Dittrich, S.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Kroll, F.; Nitsche, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); and others

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of strongly magnetized laser plasmas, of interest for laboratory astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion studies, is presented. This is achieved by coupling a 16 kV pulse-power system. This is achieved by coupling a 16 kV pulse-power system, which generates a magnetic field by means of a split coil, with the ELFIE laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique. In order to influence the plasma dynamics in a significant manner, the system can generate, repetitively and without debris, high amplitude magnetic fields (40 T) in a manner compatible with a high-energy laser environment. A description of the system and preliminary results demonstrating the possibility to magnetically collimate plasma jets are given.

  18. Non-Perturbative Gluon pair production from a Constant Chromo-Electric Field via the Schwinger Mechanism in Arbitrary Gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred Cooper; Gouranga C. Nayak

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the non-perturbative production of gluon pairs from a constant SU(3) chromo-electric background field via the Schwinger mechanism. We fix the covariant background gauge with an arbitrary gauge parameter \\alpha. We determine the transverse momentum distribution of the gluons, as well as the total probability of creating pairs per unit space time volume. We find that the result is independent of the covariant gauge parameter \\alpha used to define arbitrary covariant background gauges. We find that our non-perturbative result is both gauge invariant and gauge parameter \\alpha independent.

  19. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  20. ,"Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbedShale Proved ReservesField

  1. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

  2. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

  3. The MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco, Ersan Demiralp, Tahir Cagin, and William A. Goddard, III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ă?agin, Tahir

    in studying oil production chemicals, including corrosion inhibitors,11 scale inhibitors,12 and dissolvers.13 and corrosion inhibition). Among the minerals present in the walls of oil reservoirs, clay minerals are believedThe MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco

  4. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

    1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

  5. Bar Mar field Point field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Bone Spring Seay Nance Regional Study (Cimarex Energy) West Texas (Various Counties) West Texas Yates Seay Nance Regional Study (Lynx Production) West Texas (Various Counties) #12;Bar Mar field Umbrella Point field Nuare field East Texas field Copano Bay Bar Mar field Umbrella

  6. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  7. SUPERGLASS. Engineering field tests - Phase 3. Production, market planning, and product evaluation for a high-thermal-performance insulating glass design utilizing HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilford, C L

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT MIRROR transparent window insulation consists of a clear polyester film two mils (.002'') thick with a thin, clear low-emissivity (.15) coating deposited on one side by state-of-the-art vacuum deposition processes. This neutral-colored invisible coating reflects long-wave infrared energy (heat). When mounted by being stretched with a 1/2'' air-gap on each side of the film, the resulting unit reduces heat loss by 60% compared to dual insulating glass. Southwall Corporation produces HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation and markets it to manufacturers of sealed insulating glass (I.G.) units and window and building manufacturers who make their own I.G. These companies build and sell the SUPERGLASS sealed glazing units. Units made and installed in buildings by six customers were visited. These units were located in many geographic regions, including the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountains, New England, Southeast, and West Coast. As much as could be obtained of their history was recorded, as was their current condition and performance. These units had been in place from two weeks to over a year. All of the units were performing thermally very well, as measured by taking temperature profiles through them and through adjacent conventional I.G. units. Some units had minor visual defects (attributed to I.G. assembly techniques) which are discussed in detail. Overall occupant acceptance was enthusiastically positive. In addition to saving energy, without compromise of optical quality or appearance, the product makes rooms with large glazing areas comfortable to be in in cold weather. All defects observed were present when built; there appears to be no in-field degradation of quality at this time.

  8. Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foxall, B.; Vasco, D.W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    site and the Okuaizu geothermal field, Japan", Geothermics,at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California,and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County,

  9. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

  10. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

  11. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pat Fort; Don L. Hanosh

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. Resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain oil fields located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP), determine if this system can reduce lift costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improved the economics. Three Phases of work have been defined in the DOE Form 4600.1 Notice of Financial Assistance Award for this project, in which the project objectives are to be attained through a joint venture between Enerdyne LLC (Enerdyne), owner and operator of the fields and Pumping Solutions Inc. (PSI), developer of the submersible pumping system. Upon analysis of the results of each Phase, the DOE will determine if the results justify the continuation of the project and approve the next Phase to proceed or terminate the project and request that the wells be plugged. This topical report shall provide the DOE with Phase I results and conclusions reached by Enerdyne and PSI.

  12. Modeling of CBM production, CO{sub 2} injection, and tracer movement at a field CO{sub 2} sequestration site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siriwardane, Hema J.; Bowes, Benjamin D.; Bromhal, Grant S.; Gondle, Raj K.; Wells, Arthur W.; Strazisar, Brian R.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide in unmineable coal seams is a potential technology mainly because of the potential for simultaneous enhanced coalbed methane production (ECBM). Several pilot tests have been performed around the globe leading to mixed results. Numerous modeling efforts have been carried out successfully to model methane production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Sensitivity analyses and history matching along with several optimization tools were used to estimate reservoir properties and to investigate reservoir performance. Geological and geophysical techniques have also been used to characterize field sequestration sites and to inspect reservoir heterogeneity. The fate and movement of injected CO{sub 2} can be determined by using several monitoring techniques. Monitoring of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers is one of these monitoring technologies. As a part of this monitoring technique, a small fraction of a traceable fluid is added to the injection wellhead along with the CO{sub 2} stream at different times to monitor the timing and location of the breakthrough in nearby monitoring wells or offset production wells. A reservoir modeling study was performed to simulate a pilot sequestration site located in the San Juan coal basin of northern New Mexico. Several unknown reservoir properties at the field site were estimated by modeling the coal seam as a dual porosity formation and by history matching the methane production and CO{sub 2} injection. In addition to reservoir modeling of methane production and CO{sub 2} injection, tracer injection was modeled. Tracers serve as a surrogate for determining potential leakage of CO{sub 2}. The tracer was modeled as a non-reactive gas and was injected into the reservoir as a mixture along with CO{sub 2}. Geologic and geometric details of the field site, numerical modeling details of methane production, CO{sub 2} injection, and tracer injection are presented in this paper. Moreover, the numerical predictions of the tracer arrival times were compared with the measured field data. Results show that tracer modeling is useful in investigating movement of injected CO{sub 2} into the coal seam at the field site. Also, such new modeling techniques can be utilized to determine potential leakage pathways, and to investigate reservoir anisotropy and heterogeneity.

  13. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAM JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps.

  14. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

  15. A cooperation model and demand-oriented ICT Infrastructure for SME Development and Production Networks in the field of Microsystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A cooperation model and demand-oriented ICT Infrastructure for SME Development and Production of Small Medium Enterprises (SME) in this branch refers to organizational issues, arising from the specific SME´s lack of sufficient human resources and an effective management of cross company knowledge about

  16. Production management teachniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 3. Offshore gulf coast normally pressured, dry gas reservoir. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Uttley, S.J.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoir, the study conducted on an offshore, normally pressured, dry gas reservoir is reported. The strategies that were particularly effective in increasing both the ultimate recovery and the net present value of the field are high volume water production from strategically located downdip wells and the recompletion of an upstructure well to recover trapped attic gas. High volume water production lowered the average reservoir pressure, which liberated residual gas trapped in the invaded region. Recompleting a new well into the reservoir also lowered the pressure and improved the volumetric displacement efficiency by recovering trapped attic gas. Ultimate recovery is predicted to increase 5-12% of the original gas-in-place.

  17. Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

  18. Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Annual report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The project involves implementing thermal recovery in the southern half of the Fault Block II-A Tar zone. The existing steamflood in Fault Block II-A has been relatively inefficient due to several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery efficiency and reduce operating costs.

  19. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential, Conoco MCA unit well No. 358, Maljamar Field, Lea County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Marlow, R.E.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes part of the work done to fulfill a contract awarded to Gruy Federal, Inc., by the Department of Energy (DOE) on Feburary 12, 1979. The work includes pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report details the second such project. Core porosities agreed well with computed log porosities. Core water saturation and computed log porosities agree fairly well from 3692 to 3712 feet, poorly from 3712 to 3820 feet and in a general way from 4035 to 4107 feet. Computer log analysis techniques incorporating the a, m, and n values obtained from Core Laboratories analysis did not improve the agreement of log versus core derived water saturations. However, both core and log analysis indicated the ninth zone had the highest residual hydrocarbon saturations and production data confirmed the validity of oil saturation determinations. Residual oil saturation, for the perforated and tested intervals were 259 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 4035 to 4055 feet, and 150 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 3692 to 3718 feet. Nine BOPD was produced from the interval 4035 to 4055 feet and no oil was produced from interval 3692 to 3718 feet, qualitatively confirming the relative oil saturations as calculated. The low oil production in the zone from 4022 to 4055 and the lack of production from 3692 to 3718 feet indicated the zone to be at or near residual waterflood conditions as determined by log analysis. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log, and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood.

  20. Comparative laboratory selection and field testing of polymers for selective control of water production in gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranjbar, M. [Technical Univ., Clausthal (Germany); Czolbe, P. [DBI-GUT, Freiberg (Germany); Kohler, N. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive comparative feasibility studies were performed in different laboratories in order to select the most promising polymer based technology for water control in gas production and storage wells exhibiting low matrix permeability, high temperature and high produced brine salinity. Core flow experiments performed under reservoir conditions with different commercially available chemical systems have pointed to the superiority of two relatively low-molecular-weight vinyl sulfonated/vinyl amide/acrylamide terpolymers over other polymers to decrease selectively and effectively the water permeability without affecting the gas flow. These polymers have excellent compatibility with all types of reservoir brines and good thermal stability up to 150 C. Furthermore, because of their high shear resistance, and excellent injectability even in low permeability cores, solutions of these polymers can be pumped at high injection rates with a moderate wellhead pressure.

  1. Using Cable Suspended Submersible Pumps to Reduce Production Costs to Increase Ultimate Recovery in the Red Mountain Field of the San Juan Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells, installing cable suspended submersible pumps ( Phase I ) and operating the oil field for approximately one year ( Phase II ). Upon the completion of Phases I and II ( Budget Period I ), Enerdyne LLC commenced work on Phase III which required additional drilling in an attempt to improve field economics ( Budget Period II ). The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for the two Budget Periods, of the Agreement, was $1,205,008.00 as detailed in Phase I, II & III Authorization for Expenditures (AFE). This report describes tasks performed and results experienced by Enerdyne LLC during the three phases of the cooperative agreement.

  2. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

  3. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

  4. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for this first phase of the agreement was $386,385.00 as detailed in Phase I Authorization For Expenditure (AFE). This report describes the tasks performed, the results, and conclusions for the first phase (Phase I) of the cooperative agreement.

  5. Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)], Casteel, J. [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

    1997-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  6. Experimental studies of steam and steam-propane injection using a novel smart horizontal producer to enhance oil production in the San Ardo field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivero Diaz, Jose Antonio

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    in an attempt to mitigate the effects of steam override. The experimental model was scaled using the conditions in the San Ardo field in California and crude oil from the same field was used for the tests. Superheated steam at 190 â�� 200�ºC was injected...

  7. Peluchi : product development of a programmable robotic toy to stimulate interest in the fields of science and technology amongst young girls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vu, My (My H.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistically speaking, science, technology, and engineering are male dominated fields. Peluchi is a second-generation prototype of a programmable robotic toy targeted towards young girls in hope of promoting more interest ...

  8. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 2, offshore gulf coast over-pressured, dry gas reservoirs. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.E.; Jirik, L.A.; Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of reservoir management strategies for optimization of ultimate hydrocarbon recovery and net present value from an overpressured, high yield gas condensate reservoir with water influx is reported. This field evaluation was based on a reservoir simulation. Volumetric and performance-derived original gas-in-place estimates did not agree: the performance-derived values were significantly lower than those predicted from volumetric analysis. Predicted field gas recovery was improved significantly by methods which accelerated gas withdrawals. Recovery was also influenced by well location. Accelerated withdrawals from wells near the aquifer tended to reduce sweep by cusping and coning water. This offset any benefits of increased gas rates.

  9. Field-to-Fuel Performance Testing of Various Biomass Feedstocks: Production and Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oil to Refinery Blendstocks (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, D.; Westover, T.; Howe, D.; Evans, R.; French, R.; Kutnyakov, I.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale, cost-competitive deployment of thermochemical technologies to replace petroleum oil with domestic biofuels will require inclusion of high volumes of low-cost, diverse biomass types into the supply chain. However, a comprehensive understanding of the impacts of feedstock thermo-physical and chemical variability, particularly inorganic matter (ash), on the yield and product distribution

  10. Production Analysis of a Niobrara Field Using Intelligent Top-Down S. Alireza Haghighat, Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Vida Gholami, David Moreno, West Virginia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Unconventional hydrocarbon resources are going to play an important role in the US energy strategy. Conventional tools and techniques that are used for analysis of unconventional resources include decline curve of unconventional resources. This technology is completely data-driven, incorporating field measurements (drilling

  11. Semiclassical pair production rate for time-dependent electrical fields with more than one component: -WKB-approach and world-line instantons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckhard Strobel; She-Sheng Xue

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analytic calculation of the semiclassical electron-positron pair creation rate by time-dependent electrical fields. We use two methods, first the imaginary time method in the WKB-approximation and second the world-line instanton approach. The analytic tools for both methods are generalized to time-dependent electric fields with more than one component. For the WKB method an expansion of the momentum spectrum of produced pairs around the canonical momentum $\\vec{P}=0$ is presented which simplifies the computation of the pair creation rate. We argue that the world-line instanton method of [Dunne et al., Phys. Rev. D73, 065028 (2006)] implicitly performs this expansion of the momentum spectrum around $\\vec{P}=0$. Accordingly the generalization to more than one component is shown to agree with the WKB result obtained via this expansion. However the expansion is only a good approximation for the cases where the momentum spectrum is peaked around $\\vec{P}=0$. Thus the expanded WKB result and the world-line instanton method of [Dunne et al., Phys. Rev. D73, 065028 (2006)] as well as the generalized method presented here are only applicable in these cases. We study the two component case of a rotating electric field and find a new analytic closed form for the momentum spectrum using the generalized WKB method. The momentum spectrum for this field is not peaked around $\\vec{P}=0$.

  12. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field number 1, onshore gulf coast over-pressured, high yield condensate reservoir. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoirs, the study conducted on an overpressured high yield gas condensate reservoir is reported. The base recovery factor for the field was projected to be only 47.8%, due to high residual gas saturation and a relatively strong aquifer which maintained reservoir pressure.

  13. Practice Field Practice Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courts Soccer Field Swimming pool Bandeen Hall Mountain House # 3 # 2 Golf Course Security Patterson Hall.B. Scott Arena Library Centennial Theater Mc Greer Hall Pollack Hall New Johnson Science Building Dewhurst Dining Hall Champlain Regional College # 4 Mackinnon Hall Residence # 6 Memorial House Retired Faculty

  14. Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, March 30, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, D. [Long Beach City Dept. of Oil Properties, CA (United States); Ershaghi, I. [Southern California, CA (United States); Davies, D. [Davies (David K.) and Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Phillips, C.; Mondragon, J. [Tidelands Oil Production Company (United States)

    1995-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first quarterly technical progress report for the project. Although the contract was awarded on March 30, 1995 and Pre-Award Approval was given on January 26, 1995, the partners of this project initiated work on October 1, 1994. As such, this progress report summarizes the work performed from project inception. The production and injection data, reservoir engineering data, and digitized and normalized log data were all completed sufficiently by the end of the quarter to start work on the basic reservoir engineering and geologic stochastic models. Basic reservoir engineering analysis began June 1 and will continue to March, 1996. Design work for the 5 observation/core holes, oil finger printing of the cored oil sands, and tracers surveys began in January, 1995. The wells will be drilled from July--August, 1995 and tracer injection work is projected to start in October, 1995. A preliminary deterministic 3-D geologic model was completed in June which is sufficient to start work on the stochastic 3-D geologic model. The four proposed horizontal wells (two injectors and two producers) have been designed, equipment has been ordered, and the wells will be drilled from mid-August through September. Four existing steam injection wells were converted to hot water injection in March, 1995. Initial rates were kept low to minimize operational problems. Injection rates will be increased significantly in July.

  15. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were performed enhanced oil recovery field pilot was performed in Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Studies were performed to determine a nutrient system to encourage growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria an inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient material were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor an additional production well in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicated the additional production well monitored during the field trial was also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels of tertiary oil was recovered. Microbial activity increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulphide concentration was experienced. These observations indicate that an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. The three production wells monitored in the pilot area demonstrated significant permeability reduction indicated by interwell pressure interference tests. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform (15 md maximum difference between post-treatment permeability values) indicating that preferential plugging had occurred.

  16. RMOTC - Field Information - Wells and Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001Data sets Notice: As ofOnlineWells

  17. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  18. Entanglement Generation by Electric Field Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahra Ebadi; Behrouz Mirza

    2014-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum vacuum is unstable under the influence of an external electric field and decays into pairs of charged particles, a process which is known as the Schwinger pair production. We propose and demonstrate that this electric field can generate entanglement. Using the Schwinger pair production for constant and pulsed electric fields, we study entanglement for scalar particles with zero spins and Dirac fermions. One can observe the variation of the entanglement produced for bosonic and fermionic modes with respect to different parameters.

  19. Entanglement Generation by Electric Field Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebadi, Zahra

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum vacuum is unstable under the influence of an external electric field and decays into pairs of charged particles, a process which is known as the Schwinger pair production. We propose and demonstrate that this electric field can generate entanglement. Using the Schwinger pair production for constant and pulsed electric fields, we study entanglement for scalar particles with zero spins and Dirac fermions. One can observe the variation of the entanglement produced for bosonic and fermionic modes with respect to different parameters.

  20. Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Producer profits are for oil production from known fields,Actual Prudhoe Bay Oil Production, Historical and ModeledKaufmann, R. (1991) “Oil production in the Lower 48 States:

  1. Information Basic to Adjustments in Rice Production in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred); Magee, A. C. (Aden Combs)

    1945-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ................... Usual Practices in the Production of Rice. ...................... Rice Varieties. .......................................... Usual Field Operations. .................................. ............. Labor and Power Requirements for Rice Production... and Production Requirements of Beef Cattle on Rice Farms. Farm Power ..................................................... Cost of Tractor Work. ........................................ Power Costs for Pumping. ..................................... Cost...

  2. Quantum fields in curved spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Hollands; Robert M. Wald

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the theory of quantum fields propagating in an arbitrary, classical, globally hyperbolic spacetime. Our review emphasizes the conceptual issues arising in the formulation of the theory and presents known results in a mathematically precise way. Particular attention is paid to the distributional nature of quantum fields, to their local and covariant character, and to microlocal spectrum conditions satisfied by physically reasonable states. We review the Unruh and Hawking effects for free fields, as well as the behavior of free fields in deSitter spacetime and FLRW spacetimes with an exponential phase of expansion. We review how nonlinear observables of a free field, such as the stress-energy tensor, are defined, as well as time-ordered-products. The "renormalization ambiguities" involved in the definition of time-ordered products are fully characterized. Interacting fields are then perturbatively constructed. Our main focus is on the theory of a scalar field, but a brief discussion of gauge fields is included. We conclude with a brief discussion of a possible approach towards a nonperturbative formulation of quantum field theory in curved spacetime and some remarks on the formulation of quantum gravity.

  3. Product Demonstrations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Consortium will pursue a number of demonstrations following the general procedure used by DOE's GATEWAY demonstration program. Specific products to be featured in a demonstration may be...

  4. A Quantum Production Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luís Tarrataca; Andreas Wichert

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The production system is a theoretical model of computation relevant to the artificial intelligence field allowing for problem solving procedures such as hierarchical tree search. In this work we explore some of the connections between artificial intelligence and quantum computation by presenting a model for a quantum production system. Our approach focuses on initially developing a model for a reversible production system which is a simple mapping of Bennett's reversible Turing machine. We then expand on this result in order to accommodate for the requirements of quantum computation. We present the details of how our proposition can be used alongside Grover's algorithm in order to yield a speedup comparatively to its classical counterpart. We discuss the requirements associated with such a speedup and how it compares against a similar quantum hierarchical search approach.

  5. Field test of microemulsion flooding, Chateaurenard Field, France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putz, A.; Chevalier, J.P.; Stock, G.; Philippot, J.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot test of microemulsion flooding was conducted in a single five-spot pattern in the Chateaurenard field in France. The test had to accommodate a 40-mPa*s (40-cp) oil viscosity and a regional pressure gradient across the pattern. A very clear oil bank was observed, resulting in a substantial increase in oil production. 9 refs.

  6. Entomology 489 Field Entomology Field Project Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    with information, people, materials). Field Projects (your project should...) FEntomology 489 ­ Field Entomology Field Project Guide A small-group field project is required for ENTO 489 ­ Field Entomology. This guide provides general information about the field-project

  7. Hydrogen Production

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

  8. Transporting Produce SafelyTransporting Produce Safely etting fresh produce from the field to the market is another step where care must be taken to keep the product safe.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    points for microorganisms that cause disease or hasten spoilage. Ice used in the transport of produceTransporting Produce SafelyTransporting Produce Safely G etting fresh produce from the field contamination of the produce with microorganisms that could cause foodborne illness and also to hold the produce

  9. On Field Constraint Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wies, Thomas

    2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce field constraint analysis, a new technique for verifying data structure invariants. A field constraint for a field is a formula specifying a set of objects to which the field can point. Field constraints ...

  10. Methane hydrate potential and development of a shallow gas field in the arctic: The Walakpa Field North Slope Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, R.K.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the North Slope Hydrate Study is to evaluate the methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa gas field, a shallow gas field located near Barrow, Alaska. Observing, understanding, and predicting the production characteristics of the Walakpa field will be accomplished by the analysis of the reservoir geology, and of the individual well production data, derived from reservoir engineering studies conducted in the field.

  11. Methane hydrate potential and development of a shallow gas field in the arctic: The Walakpa Field North Slope Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, R.K.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the North Slope Hydrate Study is to evaluate the methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa gas field, a shallow gas field located near Barrow, Alaska. Observing, understanding, and predicting the production characteristics of the Walakpa field will be accomplished by the analysis of the reservoir geology, and of the individual well production data, derived from reservoir engineering studies conducted in the field.

  12. Lucky Mound field: A new Mississippian Sherwood shoreline field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.W. (Balcron Oil, Billings, MT (United States)); Hendricks, M.L. (Hendricks and Associates, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lucky Mound field produces oil and gas from the Sherwood interval of the Mississippian Mission Canyon Formation. Presently, eight wells are producing with development ongoing. Extensive coring, testing, logging, and petrographic evaluations throughout the field have allowed for detailed analysis of reservoir characteristics and paleoenvironmental interpretation. Sherwood shoreline fields typically produce from reservoir-quality packstones and grainstones trapped by a lateral facies changes into impermeable dolomite and anhydrite. At Lucky Mound, packstones, grainstones, and a productive dolomite facies all contribute to the producing interval. The productive dolomite facies is generally found in the upper portion of the Sherwood along the eastern margin of the field. Porosity as high as 22% and permeability values up to 16 md are present in the dolomite facies. These dolomites are the result of complete to partial replacement of micrite. In addition, the dolomitization process has enhanced intercrystalline and intraparticle porosity throughout the Sherwood interval. Pore types present include vuggy, intergranular, intraparticle, and intercrystalline. Pore occluding and replacive cements include fibrous calcite, prismatic calcite spar, baroque dolomite, anhydrite, celestite, pyrite, and chert. An understanding of carbonate depositional environments, diagenetic processes, Williston basin structural development, and Sherwood reservoir behavior is essential in the exploration for new Sherwood fields.

  13. Development of a Sorption Enhanced Steam Hydrogasification Process for In-situ Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Removal and Enhanced Synthetic Fuel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Zhongzhe

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sequestration during energy production is an efficient wayemissions and get higher energy production simultaneously. Aapplied to the energy production field. The following

  14. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    price for a condensing commercial water heater is $1,579.For condensing commercial water heaters with a thermalFound products for water heater in any product field and gas

  15. Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

  16. Production Economics of Potential Perennial and Annual Biomass Feedstocks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The first essay determines the lowest cost lignocellulosic biomass feedstock production system for western Oklahoma from among seven alternatives at each of two locations. Field… (more)

  17. Internal split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat; Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  18. RMOTC - Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNewsCenter forQuality AssuranceProduction RMOTC

  19. Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L

    2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from the detonation of condensed explosives in air. In typical applications, the pressure of expanded detonation products gases is modeled by a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function: P{sub JWL} = f(v,s{sub CJ}); constants in that function are fit to cylinder test data. This function provides a specification of pressure as a function of specific volume, v, along the expansion isentrope (s = constant = s{sub CJ}) starting at the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state. However, the JWL function is not a fundamental equation of thermodynamics, and therefore gives an incomplete specification of states. For example, explosions inherently involve shock reflections from surfaces; this changes the entropy of the products, and in such situations the JWL function provides no information on the products states. In addition, most explosives are not oxygen balanced, so if hot detonation products mix with air, they after-burn, releasing the heat of reaction via a turbulent combustion process. This raises the temperature of explosion products cloud to the adiabatic flame temperature ({approx}3,000K). Again, the JWL function provides no information on the combustion products states.

  20. ProductSpecifications Fit. Form. Function.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    elevated our x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technology and product design to a totally new level. The Niton® FXL field x-ray lab offers our highest XRF-based performance and lowest levels of detection for up to 40 Niton FXL field x-ray lab delivers XRF-based elemental analysis with lab-quality performance

  1. Noncommutative Gauge Theory with Covariant Star Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zet, G. [Physics Department, 'Gh. Asachi' Technical University, 700050 Iasi (Romania)

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a noncommutative gauge theory with covariant star product on a space-time with torsion. In order to obtain the covariant star product one imposes some restrictions on the connection of the space-time. Then, a noncommutative gauge theory is developed applying this product to the case of differential forms. Some comments on the advantages of using a space-time with torsion to describe the gravitational field are also given.

  2. Variability in the Stability and Productivity of Transfected Genes in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Say Kong

    In the field of biologics production, productivity and stability of the transfected gene of interest are two very important attributes that dictate if a production process is viable. To further understand and improve these ...

  3. Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and 76 Field, Clinton Co., KY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and enhanced recovery, production operations in fracture- dominated oil and gas reservoirs. Borehole geophonesSPE 36651 Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX-fault fracture zones above and below a producing zone. Associations with depleted production intervals indicated

  4. Nulljob product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughart, N.; Ritchie, D.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ever increasing demand for more CPU cycles for data analysis on the authors' Central VAX Cluster led them to investigate new ways to utilize more fully the resources that were available. A review of the experiment and software development VAX systems on site revealed many unused computing cycles. Furthermore, these systems were all connected by DECnet which would allow easy file transfer and remote batch job submission. A product was developed to allow jobs to be submitted on the Central VAX Cluster but actually to be run on one of the remote systems. The processing of the jobs was arranged, to the greatest extent possible, to be transparent to the user and to have minimal impact on both the Central VAX Cluster and remote systems.

  5. NULLJOB product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughart, N.; Ritchie, D.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ever increasing demand for more CPU cycles for data analysis on our Central VAX Cluster led us to investigate new ways to utilize more fully the resources that were available. A review of the experiment and software development VAX systems on site revealed many unused computing cycles. Furthermore, these systems were all connected by DECnet which would allow easy file transfer and remote batch job submission. A product was developed to allow jobs to be submitted on the Central VAX Cluster but actually to be run on one of the remote systems. The processing of the jobs was arranged, to the greatest extent possible, to be transparent to the user and to have minimal impact on both the Central VAX Cluster and remote systems.

  6. Chemical Impact of Elevated CO2on Geothermal Energy Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a two phase project to assess the geochemical impact of CO2on geothermal energy production by: analyzing the geochemistry of existing geothermal fields with elevated natural CO2; measuring realistic rock-water rates for geothermal systems using laboratory and field-based experiments to simulate production scale impacts.

  7. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

  8. subsurface geological field | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    field subsurface geological field Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

  9. Quantum Field Theory & Gravity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field Theory & Gravity Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email...

  10. External split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  11. Language Production General Points about Speech Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulson, Seana

    Language Production #12;General Points about Speech Production 15 speech sounds per second => 2, shall I say `t' or `d'' (Levelt) Production side has gotten less attention in Psycholinguistics than the comprehension side. Evidence for speech production behaviour has until recently relied heavily on speech errors

  12. The MSW Effect in Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Y. Cardall; Daniel J. H. Chung

    1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We show in detail the general relationship between the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation approach to calculating the MSW effect and the quantum field theoretical S-matrix approach. We show the precise form a generic neutrino propagator must have to allow a physically meaningful ``oscillation probability'' to be decoupled from neutrino production fluxes and detection cross-sections, and explicitly list the conditions---not realized in cases of current experimental interest---in which the field theory approach would be useful.

  13. Azerbaijan field to step up oil flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that a unit of Pennzoil Co., Houston, is scheduled to operate a development program that could more than double oil production from Guneshli field off Azerbaijan in the southern Caspian Sea. Under agreements signed in Baku, Pennzoil Caspian Corp., Ramco Energy Ltd. of Aberdeen, Scotland, and state oil company Azerneft will have exclusive right to jointly develop the field. Partners' shares and other project details are to be laid out in the final development plan, expected by yearend.

  14. Maps between Deformed and Ordinary Gauge Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Mesref

    2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce a map between the q-deformed gauge fields defined on the GL$_{q}(N) $-covariant quantum hyperplane and the ordinary gauge fields. Perturbative analysis of the q-deformed QED at the classical level is presented and gauge fixing $\\grave{a} $ la BRST is discussed. An other star product defined on the hybrid $(q,h) $% -plane is explicitly constructed .

  15. High volume production of nanostructured materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

  16. Electromagnetic Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Electromagnetic Field Theory BO THID� UPSILON BOOKS #12;#12;ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD THEORY #12;#12;Electromagnetic Field Theory BO THID� Swedish Institute of Space Physics and Department of Astronomy and Space, Sweden UPSILON BOOKS · COMMUNA AB · UPPSALA · SWEDEN #12;Also available ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD THEORY

  17. Synthesis of Polycyclic Natural Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuan Hoang Nguyen

    2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With the continuous advancements in molecular biology and modern medicine, organic synthesis has become vital to the support and extension of those discoveries. The isolations of new natural products allow for the understanding of their biological activities and therapeutic value. Organic synthesis is employed to aid in the determination of the relationship between structure and function of these natural products. The development of synthetic methodologies in the course of total syntheses is imperative for the expansion of this highly interdisciplinary field of science. In addition to the practical applications of total syntheses, the structural complexity of natural products represents a worthwhile challenge in itself. The pursuit of concise and efficient syntheses of complex molecules is both gratifying and enjoyable.

  18. Ultra-Deepwater Production Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken L. Smith; Marc E. Leveque

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report herein is a summary of the work performed on three projects to demonstrate hydrocarbon drilling and production methods applicable to deep and ultra deepwater field developments in the Gulf of Mexico and other like applications around the world. This work advances technology that could lead to more economic development and exploitation of reserves in ultra-deep water or remote areas. The first project is Subsea Processing. Its scope includes a review of the ''state of the art'' in subsea components to enable primary production process functions such as first stage liquids and gas separation, flow boosting, chemical treatment, flow metering, etc. These components are then combined to allow for the elimination of costly surface production facilities at the well site. A number of studies were then performed on proposed field development projects to validate the economic potential of this technology. The second project involved the design and testing of a light weight production riser made of composite material. The proposed design was to meet an actual Gulf of Mexico deepwater development project. The various engineering and testing work is reviewed, including test results. The third project described in this report encompasses the development and testing of a close tolerance liner drilling system, a new technology aimed at reducing deepwater drilling costs. The design and prototype testing in a test well are described in detail.

  19. PRODUCT SYSTEMS OF HILBERT SPACES B V RAJARAMA BHAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SchĂĽrmann, Michael

    PRODUCT SYSTEMS OF HILBERT SPACES B V RAJARAMA BHAT Indian Statistical Institute, Bangalore. We wish to cover the basics of the theory of tensor product systems of Hilbert spaces. Concrete tensor product systems of Hilbert spaces have appeared in various fields of Mathematics and Mathematical Physics

  20. Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav.ntnu.no) Abstract: The information content in measurements of offshore oil and gas production is often low, and when in the context of offshore oil and gas fields, can be considered the total output of production wells, a mass

  1. Minimizing casing corrosion in Kuwait oil fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agiza, M.N.; Awar, S.A.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion in production strings is a well known problem in Kuwait oil fields. Failure to remedy the affected wells results mainly in undesirable dump flooding of the oil reservoirs, or in oil seepage and hydrocarbon contamination in shallow water bearing strata. Any of these situations (unless properly handled) leads to a disastrous waste of oil resources. This study discusses casing leaks in Kuwait oil fields, the nature of the formations opposite the leaks and their contained fluids, and the field measures that can be adopted in order to avoid casing leak problems.

  2. ARM - Historical Field Campaign Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [FacilityIndiaGVAX News Outreach HomeField Campaign

  3. Productivity index and field behavior: a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Marianne

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Reservoir Simulation Group at Texas A&M University for their friendship and technical discussions. The author would especially thanks PhD candidates Bryan Maggard and Wael Helmy and Drs. Ahmed El- Banbi and Mauricio Villegas for explaining many...

  4. Field Quality Analysis as a Tool to Monitor Magnet Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Press Case I Age Difference between Upper and Lower Coils (Days) Figure 4: A correlation plot with a least square fit

  5. Fair Trade in the fields : outcomes for Peruvian coffee products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Jean Marie, 1969-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accessing specialty coffee markets is recognized as a way for some small-scale coffee farmers to earn higher prices, counteract unequal distributions of market power, and achieve a better quality of life. Members of CEPICAFE, ...

  6. TENSOR PRODUCTS OF VALUED FIELDS ITA BEN YAACOV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Yaacov, ItaĂŻ

    a KĂ? , where st denotes the standard part map (so in particular, |a| RU lies in the convex hull of R

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinter 2013-14Deliveries (NumberYear JanYear Jan2009

  8. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c :0.17.1Year Jan Feb MarYear Jan FebYearSep-14

  9. Biological production of products from waste gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

    2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  10. Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  11. Aesculap, Inc. Air Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Terrence

    Aesculap, Inc. Air Products Air Products Foundation Alaric Compliance Services, LLC Alvin H. Butz & Herger, Inc. Sodexo Campus Services Sodexo Inc. and Affiliates Stupp Bros., Inc. Sugarbush Products, Inc

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    in a variety of rubber and plastic products, thermal incineration of waste tires for production of electricity rubber in asphalt mixes, (ii) thermal incineration of worn-out tires for the production of electricity

  13. Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current Distributions of Infrared Optical Antennas: A Near-Field Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current...

  14. Three-dimensional anatomy of a geothermal field, Coso, Southeast...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    distribution. The anomalies also correlate with high heat flow in the field and the termination of geothermal production to the south. I speculate that an intrusion is present in...

  15. Three-Dimensional Anatomy of a Geothermal Field Coso Southeast...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    distribution. The anomalies also correlate with high heat flow in the field and the termination of geothermal production to the south. I speculate that an intrusion is present in...

  16. ARM KAZR-ARSCL Value Added Product

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Michael

    The Ka-band ARM Zenith Radars (KAZRs) have replaced the long-serving Millimeter Cloud Radars, or MMCRs. Accordingly, the primary MMCR Value Added Product (VAP), the Active Remote Sensing of CLouds (ARSCL) product, is being replaced by a KAZR-based version, the KAZR-ARSCL VAP. KAZR-ARSCL provides cloud boundaries and best-estimate time-height fields of radar moments.

  17. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  18. from Isotope Production Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

  19. Neutron Production from the Fracture of Piezoelectric Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical explanation is provided for the experimental evidence that fracturing piezoelectric rocks produces neutrons. The elastic energy micro-crack production ultimately yields the macroscopic fracture. The mechanical energy is converted by the piezoelectric effect into electric field energy. The electric field energy decays via radio frequency (microwave) electric field oscillations. The radio frequency electric fields accelerate the condensed matter electrons which then collide with protons producing neutrons and neutrinos.

  20. Field scale history matching and assisted history matching using streamline simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharghoria, Arun

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we apply the streamline-based production data integration method to condition a multimillion cell geologic model to historical production response for a giant Saudi Arabian reservoir. The field has been under peripheral water...

  1. Production-systems analysis for fractured wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, J.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production-systems analysis has been in use for many years to design completion configurations on the basis of an expected reservoir capacity. The most common equations used for the reservoir calculations are for steady-state radial flow. Most hydraulically fractured wells require the use of an unsteady-state production simulator to predict the higher flow rates associated with the stimulated well. These high flow rates may present problems with excessive pressure drops through production tubing designed for radial-flow production. Therefore, the unsteady-state nature of fractured-well production precludes the use of steady-state radial-flow inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to calculate reservoir performance. An accurate prediction of fractured-well production must be made to design the most economically efficient production configuration. It has been suggested in the literature that a normalized reference curve can be used to generate the IPR's necessary for production-systems analysis. However, this work shows that the reference curve for fractured-well response becomes time-dependent when reservoir boundaries are considered. A general approach for constructing IPR curves is presented, and the use of an unsteady-state fractured-well-production simulator coupled with the production-systems-analysis approach is described. A field case demonstrates the application of this method to fractured wells.

  2. Integrated reservoir study of the Monument Northwest field: a waterflood performance evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nduonyi, Moses Asuquo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    methodology for a deterministic approach. The data history of the wells in the field beginning from spud date were gathered and analyzed into information necessary for building an upscaled reservoir model of the field. Means of increasing production...

  3. Integrated reservoir study of the Monument Northwest field: a waterflood performance evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nduonyi, Moses Asuquo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    methodology for a deterministic approach. The data history of the wells in the field beginning from spud date were gathered and analyzed into information necessary for building an upscaled reservoir model of the field. Means of increasing production...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural fields based Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 18 Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy Summary: of agricultural production on every field in Yolo...

  5. Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing Idaho B20 C C B Meats and Livestock Products Index to agriculture? Legend Overall weighted grade Weighted rank Northwest Midwest Southwest East Meats & ProductsProcessingessing Maine B11 B A A Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing New York F49 F F F soductsoducts

  6. On the defect induced gauge and Yukawa fields in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corneliu Sochichiu

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider lattice deformations (both continuous and topological) in the hexagonal lattice Hubbard model in the tight binding approximation to graphene, involving operators with the range up to next-to-neighbor. In the low energy limit, we find that these deformations give rise to couplings of the electronic Dirac field to an external scalar (Yukawa) and gauge fields. The fields are expressed in terms of original defects. As a by-product we establish that the next-to-nearest order is the minimal range of deformations which produces the complete gauge and scalar fields. We consider an example of Stone--Wales defect, and find the associated gauge field.

  7. Gravitational radiation from preheating with many fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jr, John T. Giblin [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, 201 North College Road, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States); Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu, E-mail: larry@gravity.phys.uwm.edu, E-mail: siemens@gravity.phys.uwm.edu [Center for Gravitation and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric resonances provide a mechanism by which particles can be created just after inflation. Thus far, attention has focused on a single or many inflaton fields coupled to a single scalar field. However, generically we expect the inflaton to couple to many other relativistic degrees of freedom present in the early universe. Using simulations in an expanding Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime, in this paper we show how preheating is affected by the addition of multiple fields coupled to the inflaton. We focus our attention on gravitational wave production — an important potential observational signature of the preheating stage. We find that preheating and its gravitational wave signature is robust to the coupling of the inflaton to more matter fields.

  8. An improved environmental TLD field package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, B.D. (Southern California Edison Co., San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, San Clemente, CA (US))

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the design of an environmental TAD field package which can have a significant impact on the accuracy and reliability of an environmental monitoring program. Ideally, a field package should protect its TAD(s) from light and moisture, but it should not expose the TAD(s) to elevated temperatures that could increase fading and invalidate calibration factors. Furthermore, a field package must be relatively strong and tamper-proof, while at the same time maintaining an open, unshielded configuration to minimize attenuation of incident radiation. These conflicting goals - protection without interference - can be satisfied with the improved field package design described her. This package has been tested with considerable success at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, and a U.S. Patent Application has been filed in preparation for marketing the package as a commercial product.

  9. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  10. Hot Pot Field Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  11. EMSL - subsurface geological field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsurface-geological-field en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-s...

  12. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  13. Theory of electromagnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the theory of electromagnetic fields, with an emphasis on aspects relevant to radiofrequency systems in particle accelerators. We begin by reviewing Maxwell's equations and their physical significance. We show that in free space, there are solutions to Maxwell's equations representing the propagation of electromagnetic fields as waves. We introduce electromagnetic potentials, and show how they can be used to simplify the calculation of the fields in the presence of sources. We derive Poynting's theorem, which leads to expressions for the energy density and energy flux in an electromagnetic field. We discuss the properties of electromagnetic waves in cavities, waveguides and transmission lines.

  14. Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    #12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

  15. PRODUCT REPRESENTATION IN LIGHTWEIGHT FORMATS FOR PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT (PLM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    PRODUCT REPRESENTATION IN LIGHTWEIGHT FORMATS FOR PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT (PLM) Lian Ding environments and the entire product lifecycle. There are new requirements for product representations, including: platform/application independence, support for the product lifecycle, rapidly sharing information

  16. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B. (Wilmington, DE); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Devlin, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Eaton, David F. (Wilmington, DE); Silzars, Aris K. (Landenburg, PA); Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  17. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization DRAFT REPORT CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS-MILWAUKEE #12;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS PRODUCTS Progress Report by Tarun R. Naik, Rakesh of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Technologies

  18. Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L

    2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from condensed explosive charges. These states are often modeled with a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function. However, the JWL function is not a Fundamental Equation of Thermodynamics, and therefore cannot give a complete specification of such states. We use the Cheetah code of Fried to study the loci of states of the expanded detonation products gases from C-4 charges, and their combustion products air. In the Le Chatelier Plane of specific-internal-energy versus temperature, these loci are fit with a Quadratic Model function u(T), which has been shown to be valid for T < 3,000 K and p < 1k-bar. This model is used to derive a Fundamental Equation u(v,s) for C-4. Given u(v,s), one can use Maxwell's Relations to derive all other thermodynamic functions, such as temperature: T(v,s), pressure: p(v,s), enthalpy: h(v,s), Gibbs free energy: g(v,s) and Helmholz free energy: f(v,s); these loci are displayed in figures for C-4. Such complete equations of state are needed for numerical simulations of blast waves from explosive charges, and their reflections from surfaces.

  19. Productivity & Energy Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Randall J.

    1 Productivity & Energy Flow Ecosystem approach, focuses: on flow of energy, water, and nutrients (capture) of energy by autotrophs Gross (total) Net (total ­ costs) Secondary productivity- capture of energy by herbivores http://sciencebitz.com/?page_id=204 What Controls the Primary Productivity

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    combustion by-products #12;3 generated by using both conventional and clean-coal technologies. A clean-coal that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocksCenter for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik

  1. Hydrogen Production CODES & STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS for 2010 · Reduce the cost of distributed production of hydrogen from natural gas and/or liquid fuels to $1 SYSTEMS INTEGRATION / ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy Pete Devlin #12;Hydrogen

  2. Strangeness Production at COSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Hinterberger; Hartmut Machner; Regina Siudak

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper gives an overview of strangeness-production experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. Results on kaon-pair and phi meson production in pp, pd and dd collisions, hyperon-production experiments and Lambda p final-state interaction studies are presented.

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH combustion by-products (such as clean-coal ash) from power plants. Maximum recycling of such by- products

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLYASHAND CLEAN-COAL ASHBLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: TarunR.Naik, Director, Center,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research Associate, UWM Center forBy-Products Utilization Shiw S

  5. Product Designation Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The process for designating products was developed to maximize energy savings within Federal agencies, which are required by law to purchase products designated by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) or qualified by ENERGY STAR. Products that meet FEMP-designated efficiency requirements are in the upper 25% of their class in energy efficiency.

  6. Covered Product Categories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal agencies are required by law to purchase products that are designated by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP-designated) or qualified by ENERGY STAR. Choose a product category for information about purchasing, installing, and using energy-efficient products.

  7. MECO Production Target Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    be reoptimized Tungsten target Simulations of design parameters with GEANT3 indicate that both production targetMECO Production Target Developments James L. Popp University of California, Irvine NuFact'03 Columbia, June, 2003 #12;June, 2003J.L.Popp, UCI MECO Production Target 2 MECO Collaboration Institute

  8. CROSS SECTIONS AND FIELD MAPS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  9. Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Dudley

    Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark School of Mathematical Sciences Queen;Abstract The normal curve has been used to fit the rate of both world and U.S.A. oil production. In this paper we give the first theoretical basis for these curve fittings. It is well known that oil field

  10. THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  11. Microbial-enhanced waterflood field experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, R.S.; Burchfield, T.E.; Hitzman, D.O.; Porter, R.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbial-enhanced waterflood field project sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Microbial Systems Corp. (MSC), and INJECTECH, Inc., and being conducted in cooperation with the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) was initiated in October of 1986. The purpose of the project was to determine if injection of a microbial formulation could increase oil production in a mature waterflood. The site selected for the project is in the Mink Unit of the Delaware-Childers field in Nowata County, Oklahoma. The pilot area consists of four adjacent inverted five-spot patterns drilled on five-acre spacing. Baseline monitoring was conducted to establish pretest conditions from October 28, 1986, to March 17, 1987. Fluid samples were collected on a weekly basis from producing wells and analyzed for microbial populations, total dissolved solids (TDS), trace mineral analyses, pH, and oil viscosities. Other parameters measured included total oil production (Mink unit); total water production (Mink unit); injection well pressures and fluid rates from each well; and water-oil ratio from each well. Laboratory studies were conducted to screen microbes for the test. Several different microbial formulations were tested in Berea sandstone cores with Mink Unit water and crude oil to determine oil recovery efficiency. A core from the Delaware-Childers field was flooded with the microbial formulation selected for the project. The microbial system recovered 28% of the residual crude oil remaining in the core after waterflooding.

  12. Radiation Field on Superspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    1994-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

  13. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar [Advanced Design Consulting USA, 126 Ridge Road, P.O. Box 187, Lansing, NY 14882 (United States); Dunn, Jonathan Hunter [MAX-lab, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  14. Forensic Proteomics of Poxvirus Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wunschel, David S.; Tulman, Edan; Engelmann, Heather E.; Clowers, Brian H.; Geary, Steven J.; Robinson, Aaron C.; Liao, Xiaofen

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of microbial forensics has recently sought to develop methods to discern biological signatures to indicate production methods for biological agents. Viral agents have received less attention to date. Their obligate propagation in living cells makes purification from cellular material a challenge. This leads to potential carryover of protein-rich signature of their production system. Here we have explored a proteomic analysis of Vaccinia virus as a model poxvirus system in which to compare samples of virus propagated in different cell lines and subjected to different purification schemes. The proteomic data sets indicated viral, host cell and culture medium proteins, and several layers of data analysis were applied to build confidence in the peptide identification and capture information on the taxonomic utility of each. The analysis showed clear shifts in protein profiles with virus purification, with successive gradient purification steps showing different levels of viral protein enrichment. Peptides from cellular proteins, including those present in purified virus preparations, provided signatures which enabled discrimination of cell line substrates, including distinguishing between cells derived from different primate species. The ability to discern multiple aspects of viral production demonstrates the potential value of proteomic analysis as tool for microbial forensics.

  15. Photovoltaic product directory and buyers guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic information on photovoltaic conversion technology is provided for those unfamiliar with the field. Various types of photovoltaic products and systems currently available off-the-shelf are described. These include products without batteries, battery chargers, power packages, home electric systems, and partial systems. Procedures are given for designing a photovoltaic system from scratch. A few custom photovoltaic systems are described, and a list is compiled of photovoltaic firms which can provide custom systems. Guidance is offered for deciding whether or not to use photovoltaic products. A variety of installations are described and their performance is appraised by the owners. Information is given on various financial incentives available from state and federal governments. Sources of additional information on photovoltaics are listed. A matrix is provided indicating the sources of various types of photovoltaic products. The addresses of suppliers are listed. (LEW)

  16. Iran outlines oil productive capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    National Iranian Oil Co. (NIOC) tested production limits last month to prove a claim of 4 million bd capacity made at September's meeting of the organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Onshore fields account for 3.6 million bd of the total, with offshore fields providing the rest. NIOC plans to expand total capacity to 4.5 million bd by April 1993, consisting of 4 million b/d onshore and 500,000 b/d offshore. Middle East Economic Survey says questions remain about completion dates for gas injection, drilling, and offshore projects, but expansion targets are attainable within the scheduled time. NIOC said some slippage may be unavoidable, but it is confident the objective will be reached by third quarter 1993 at the latest. More than 60 rigs are working or about to be taken under contract to boost development drilling in onshore fields and provide gas injection in some. NIOC has spent $3.2 billion in foreign exchange on the drilling program in the last 2 1/2 years.

  17. Sports Field Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duble, Richard L.

    1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coaches are often more concerned with injuries, personnel problems and opponents than with the condition of the turf on their playing fields. This publication discusses management strategies, including mowing, fertilizing, watering and renovating...

  18. Temporary Hourly Archaeological Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , conduct applied research, and offer career development and learning opportunities to support resource carpooled. RESPONSIBILITIES Under the general direction of the CEMML archaeological Crew Chief, conduct archaeological field work involving archaeological inventory survey operations on various tracts of military

  19. Intelligent field emission arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Ching-yin, 1973-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field emission arrays (FEAs) have been studied extensively as potential electron sources for a number of vacuum microelectronic device applications. For most applications, temporal current stability and spatial current ...

  20. Reversed field pinch diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, P.G.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a toroidal, axisymmetric magnetic confinement configuration characterized by a magnetic field configuration in which the toroidal magnetic field is of similar strength to the poloidal field, and is reversed at the edge compared to the center. The RFP routinely operates at high beta, and is a strong candidate for a compact fusion device. Relevant attributes of the configuration will be presented, together with an overview of present and planned experiments and their diagnostics. RFP diagnostics are in many ways similar to those of other magnetic confinement devices (such as tokamaks); these lectures will point out pertinent differences, and will present some diagnostics which provide special insights into unique attributes of the RFP.

  1. Salt Wash Field, Grand Country, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, C.D. (Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Wash field is located 15 miles southeast of Green River, Utah, in the Paradox fold and fault belt. The field was discovered in 1961 and has produced over 1.3 million bbl of oil and 11.6 billion ft[sup 3] of gas from the Mississippian Leadville LImestone. The average surface elevation is 4389 ft above sea level, and the depth to the top of the oil production is form 8500 to 8914 ft. Salt Wash field is an anticline with over 200 ft of closure on top of the Leadville. The producing zone is in the lower Leadville with intercrystalline and vuggy porosity developed in limestone and crystalline dolomitic limestone. The produced oil is a 50 to 53 API gravity crude with a 40[degrees]F pour point. The gas, a mixture of two sources, is predominately nitrogen (>70[sup [approximately

  2. HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlapentokh, Alexandra

    HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields Alexandra Shlapentokh East Carolina University AMS-ASL-MAA Panel on Hilberts Tenth Problem San Francisco January 14, 2010 #12;HTP over Function's known about HTP over Function Fields. Field Results for Characteristic 0 Field Results for Positive

  3. Product development practices that matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nisheeth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Product Development consists of activities to transforms a market opportunity and technological innovation into successful products. Several waves of improvements in technological innovation and product development have ...

  4. Wood Products 201213 Student Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Wood Products 201213 Student Handbook Ecosystem Science and Management College ........................................................................................................................... 2 Wood Products Undergraduate Program ...................................................................................................................................................... 3 Careers for Wood Products Majors

  5. Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff, James Leudtke SILO Seminars: Feb 1, 2012 #12;One slide summary Problem Description Production process involves desirable & undesirable products. Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff Linderoth, James Leudtke SILO Seminars

  6. Multi-Period Production Capacity Planning for Integrated Product and Production System Design*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saitou, Kazuhiro "Kazu"

    Multi-Period Production Capacity Planning for Integrated Product and Production System Design* Emre.ac.uk kazu@umich.edu .Abstract ­ This paper presents a simulation-based method to aid multi-period production capacity planning by quantifying the trade-off between product quality and production cost. The product

  7. Dictionary of petroleum exploration, drilling, and production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyne, N.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains more than 20,000 definitions of oil exploration, drilling, and production terms, making this dictionary mandatory for both the experienced industry professional and the nontechnical person. Completing this comprehensive reference are more than 500 detailed illustrations. Appendices include a rotary rig diagram, a cable tool drilling rig, a beam pumping unit, giant oil fields of the world, giant oil, and gas fields of the United States and Canada, a geological time chart, geological map symbols, conversion factors, the Greek alphabet atomic weights and numbers, charts of the geological features of the United States and Canada, plus much, much more.

  8. FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC-DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC- DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER By Richard F. Topping and manufacture pre-production units for home usage tests. The purpose of the field test and the associated market been promising. The first five months of field test data have shown an average 57% decrease in energy

  9. LENNOX HEARTH PRODUCTS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LENNOX HEARTH PRODUCTS April 1, 2011 Mr. Daniel Cohen U.S. Department of Energy Assistant General Council for Legislation, Regulation and Energy Efficiency Office of the General...

  10. Furfuryl alcohol cellular product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1982-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-extinguishing rigid foam products are formed by polymerization of furfuryl alcohol in the presence of a lightweight, particulate, filler, zinc chloride and selected catalysts.

  11. Sustainable hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

  12. Microsystem product development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polosky, Marc A.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade the successful design and fabrication of complex MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), optical circuits and ASICs have been demonstrated. Packaging and integration processes have lagged behind MEMS research but are rapidly maturing. As packaging processes evolve, a new challenge presents itself, microsystem product development. Product development entails the maturation of the design and all the processes needed to successfully produce a product. Elements such as tooling design, fixtures, gages, testers, inspection, work instructions, process planning, etc., are often overlooked as MEMS engineers concentrate on design, fabrication and packaging processes. Thorough, up-front planning of product development efforts is crucial to the success of any project.

  13. Biogas Production Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biogas Production Technologies Ruihong Zhang, Professor Biological and Agricultural Engineering University of California, Davis Email: rhzhang@ucdavis.edu Biogas and Fuel Cell...

  14. Unit II-1 Inner products 1 Inner product and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkett, Stephen

    Unit II-1 Inner products 1 Unit II-1 Inner product and orthogonality Unit II-1 Inner products 2 Real inner product · V is a real vector space · for u,vV define a scalar satisfying: linear: symmetric: positive definite: · is called an inner product of u and v · V with an inner product defined is called

  15. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  16. Understanding and Improving Software Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    Understanding and Improving Software Productivity Walt Scacchi Institute for Software Research;2 Introduction · What affects software productivity? ­ Software productivity has been one of the most studied aspects of software engineering ­ Goal: review sample of empirical studies of software productivity

  17. Fields and Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn Eric Johnson

    2014-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum field theories (QFT) constructed in [1,2] include phenomenology of interest. The constructions approximate: scattering by $1/r$ and Yukawa potentials in non-relativistic approximations; and the first contributing order of the Feynman series for Compton scattering. To have a semi-norm, photon states are constrained to transverse polarizations and for Compton scattering, the constructed cross section deviates at large momentum exchanges from the cross section prediction of the Feynman rules. Discussion includes the incompatibility of canonical quantization with the constructed interacting fields, and the role of interpretations of quantum mechanics in realizing QFT.

  18. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

  19. Integrated reservoir management in the Carpinteria Offshore Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, E.M.; Pawar, R.J.; Kendall, R.P.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carpinteria Offshore Field is located near Santa Barbara, California. The State of California owns the portion of the field nearest the coast, and the US Federal Government the portion of the field that lies beyond a statutory three-mile coastal water limit. This mature reservoir has yielded more than 100 million barrels of oil from five platforms in its 30 years of production. The US Department of Energy`s Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California) has joined with the State Lands Commission of California, the US Department of Interior`s Minerals Management Service, and the independent operator of the field, Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc., in a unique collaboration to redevelop the field. The reservoir management strategy for the Carpinteria Field relies on a long-term investment in simulation tools and expertise. These technologies and expertise are available to all project participants through a virtual enterprise business model.

  20. Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAlpine, J.L. (White Buffalo Petroleum Co., Tulsa, OK (US)); Joshi, S.D. (Joshi Technologies International Inc., Tulsa, OK (US))

    1991-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years, and presently no wells are producing in the field. In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, wells were drilled on 10-acre spacing, and the last well was plugged in 1961. The field was produced only on primary production and produced approximately 1 million bbl of oil. Because the field was not waterflooded, a large potential exists to produce from the field using secondary methods. To improve the economics for the secondary process, a combination of horizontal and vertical wells was considered.

  1. Production of mesoscopic superpositions with ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. T. Ng

    2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study mesoscopic superpositions of two component Bose-Einstein condensates. Atomic condensates, with long coherence times, are good systems in which to study such quantum phenomenon. We show that the mesoscopic superposition states can be rapidly generated in which the atoms dispersively interact with the photon field in a cavity. We also discuss the production of compass states which are generalized Schr\\"{o}dinger cat states. The physical realization of mesoscopic states is important in studying decoherence and precision measurement.

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -first Century, Hyderabad, India, February 1999. Department of Civil EngineeringandMechanics College) of foundry by-products, including foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    include workability, water requirement, bleeding, segregation, air content, time of set, and temperature with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -strength materials (CLSM); and, future research needs. The fresh concrete properties discussed are workability, water with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    clean coal technology, are not extensively utilized in the cast concrete masonry products (bricks both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ash or CFAs. Based on these properties, a number of constructive use options such as #12;pollution by saw mills, pulp mills, and the wood-products industry, by burning a combination of wood products control [3], land application [9,10,11], construction materials [13,14], have been reported. However, most

  7. WOOD PRODUCTS AND UTILIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    WOOD PRODUCTS AND UTILIZATION V #12;#12;443USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Section Overview Wood Products and Utilization1 John R. Shelly2 Forests are obviously a very important asset to California, and their economic and social value to the state is well documented. Wood

  8. & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY PRODUCTION & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION In the United States hydropower supplies 12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity

  9. Phenomenology of ``Onium'' Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Cacciari

    1995-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenology of heavy quarkonia production in hadron collisions is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared to data. Commonly used production models are shown to fail in explaining all the experimental findings. The shortcomings of these models are analysed and possible improvements are discussed.

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    . Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Shiw S. Singh, Lori- Lynn C. Pennock, and Bruce Ramme Report No. CBU-2001 with numerous projects on the use of by-product materials including utilization of used foundry sand and fly ash;2 INTRODUCTION Wood FA is generated due to combustion of wood for energy production at pulp and paper mills, saw

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu as setting time regulator for portland cement production. In this paper a source of clean coal ash (CCA

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce for manufacture of cement-based products using ashes generated from combustion of high-sulfur coals. A clean coal

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CLEAN COAL BY-PRODUCTS UTILIZATION IN ROADWAY, EMBANKMENTS-fueled plants, particularly use of eastern coals, has lead to the use of clean coal and using advanced sulfur dioxide control technologies. Figure 1 shows clean coal technology benefits(2) . In 1977, the concept

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much products that utilize clean coal ash. With increasing federal regulations on power plant emissions, finding

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, and Yoon-moon Chun Report No. CBU-2004 of Limestone Quarry By-Products for Developing Economical Self-Compacting Concrete Principle Investigator Name. For this proposed project, self-compacting concrete mixtures will be developed for prototype production that utilize

  16. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik and Rakesh Kumar Report No. CBU-2003-15 REP-509 April 2003 CONCRETE April 2003 REP-509 #12;ii Use of Limestone Quarry By-Products for Developing Economical Self-Compacting in the production of economical self-compacting concrete. OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this project

  17. Methods for high volume production of nanostructured materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerald M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

  18. Integrated modeling and field study of potential mechanisms forinduced seismicity at The Geysers Goethermal Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Majer, Ernie; Oldenburg, Curt; Peterson, John; Vasco, Don

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present progress made in a study aimed atincreasing the understanding of the relative contributions of differentmechanisms that may be causing the seismicity occurring at The Geysersgeothermal field, California. The approach we take is to integrate: (1)coupled reservoir geomechanical numerical modeling, (2) data fromrecently upgraded and expanded NCPA/Calpine/LBNL seismic arrays, and (3)tens of years of archival InSAR data from monthly satellite passes. Wehave conducted a coupled reservoir geomechanical analysis to studypotential mechanisms induced by steam production. Our simulation resultscorroborate co-locations of hypocenter field observations of inducedseismicity and their correlation with steam production as reported in theliterature. Seismic and InSAR data are being collected and processed foruse in constraining the coupled reservoir geomechanicalmodel.

  19. Maxwell field with Torsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Fresneda; M. C. Baldiotti; T. S. Pereira

    2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a generalizing gauge-invariant model of propagating torsion which couples to the Maxwell field and to charged particles. As a result we have an Abelian gauge invariant action which leads to a theory with nonzero torsion and which is consistent with available experimental data.

  20. Facilities Management Field Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    that have gone on there in 2006. My department, Geological Sciences, makes use of all of the field stations the geology of the Australian Plate. Stakeholders who employ geoscience graduates tell use loud and clear of Earth Sciences, ANU, Canberra, to determine the crystallization ages of rocks and minerals using uranium

  1. The imaginary quadratic fields of class number two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merritt, Michael Henry

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    number 1 or 2 is still an unsolved problem~ However? if h denotes the class num'her of the imaginary quadratic field R(~+m) (m ~0)? Heilbronn [5j has shown that = ~? Hence the number of imaginary quadratic fields with given class num'her h is 1'inite... by the induction hypothesis& 'Y and E can each be expressed as a product of prime integers Thus 4 is expressible as a product of prime integers? In general, unique factoriaatiou into primes does not exist in R(~ For exampIe, in R(?/-5) we have 6 = 2? 3? (1 + ~5...

  2. Oil-field equipment in Romania. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinis, R.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Industry Sector Analyses (I.S.A.) for oil field equipment contains statistical and narrative information on projected market demand, end-users, receptivity of Romanian consumers to U.S. products, the competitive situation - Romanian production, total import market, U.S. market position, foreign competition, and competitive factors, and market access - Romanian tariffs, non-tariff barriers, standards, taxes and distribution channels. The I.S.A. provides the United States industry with meaningful information regarding the Romanian market for oil field equipment.

  3. Reservoir and stimulation analysis of a Devonian Shale gas field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, James Stanley

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The Gas Research Institute (GRI) which sponsored this work under GRI Contract No. 5084-213-0980, "Analysis of Eastern Devonian Gas Shales Production Data;" 2. Doug Terry and Joe Petty with Union Drilling, Inc. who showed great interest in this study... and enhance productivity. ~St h The Devonian Shales in the Mason County Field study area can be subdivided using gamma ray logs as follows (in descending order): Upper Devonian Undivided, Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, Java Formation, Angola Shale...

  4. A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Surface Products over the Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in Air–Sea Boundary Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

    This paper investigates the uncertainties related to atmospheric fields from reanalysis products used in forcing ocean models. Four reanalysis products, namely from 1) the interim ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) version ...

  5. Wayne field: A horizontal drilling case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, J.B. [GeoResources, Inc., Williston, ND (United States); Johnson, R.P. [Harris, Brown, & Kiemer, Inc., Bismarck, ND (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in the spring of 1994, studies of Wayne field located on the northeastern flank of the Williston Basin were initiated to determine the feasibility of using horizontal drilling to increase recoverable reserves in the field. The Wayne subinterval is one of several shoaling-upwards cycles within the Mission Canyon Formation of the Mississippian Madison Group. The reservoir pay averages 24% porosity, 100 millidarcys permeability, and 50% water saturation. Vertical wells, since field discovery in 1957, typically IP for 70 bopd and 20% water with a rapid decline within a few months to 10 bopd and 90% water. This type of well performance is characteristic of severe water coning for which horizontal development can help to minimize. In late 1994 and early 1995 the Ballantyne Hedges No.7H and GeoResources O. Fossum No.H1 were drilled. The wells recorded IP`s of 280 bopd/5 bwpd and 390 bopd/80 bwpd respectively. After six months of production both wells stabilized at approximately 110 bopd with a 35% water cut. Projections indicate that each horizontal well will recover 250,000 bbls of oil as compared to 115,000 bbls for an average vertical well and will do so in half the time. These early results provide a significant improvement over the vertical production and would seem to be reducing water coning. Three more horizontal wells are planned for the fourth quarter of 1995.

  6. Test Functions Space in Noncommutative Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Chaichian; M. Mnatsakanova; A. Tureanu; Yu. Vernov

    2008-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proven that the $\\star$-product of field operators implies that the space of test functions in the Wightman approach to noncommutative quantum field theory is one of the Gel'fand-Shilov spaces $S^{\\beta}$ with $\\beta test functions smears the noncommutative Wightman functions, which are in this case generalized distributions, sometimes called hyperfunctions. The existence and determination of the class of the test function spaces in NC QFT is important for any rigorous treatment in the Wightman approach.

  7. A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Products for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in Air–Sea Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

    The uncertainties related to atmospheric fields in the Arctic Ocean from commonly used and recently available reanalysis products are investigated. Fields from the 1) ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) Common ...

  8. Heavy oil production from Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S.M.; Olsen, D.K. [NIPER/BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Thomas, C.P. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    North Slope of Alaska has an estimated 40 billion barrels of heavy oil and bitumen in the shallow formations of West Sak and Ugnu. Recovering this resource economically is a technical challenge for two reasons: (1) the geophysical environment is unique, and (2) the expected recovery is a low percentage of the oil in place. The optimum advanced recovery process is still undetermined. Thermal methods would be applicable if the risks of thawing the permafrost can be minimized and the enormous heat losses reduced. Use of enriched natural gas is a probable recovery process for West Sak. Nearby Prudhoe Bay field is using its huge natural gas resources for pressure maintenance and enriched gas improved oil recovery (IOR). Use of carbon dioxide is unlikely because of dynamic miscibility problems. Major concerns for any IOR include close well spacing and its impact on the environment, asphaltene precipitation, sand production, and fines migration, in addition to other more common production problems. Studies have indicated that recovering West Sak and Lower Ugnu heavy oil is technically feasible, but its development has not been economically viable so far. Remoteness from markets and harsh Arctic climate increase production costs relative to California heavy oil or Central/South American heavy crude delivered to the U.S. Gulf Coast. A positive change in any of the key economic factors could provide the impetus for future development. Cooperation between the federal government, state of Alaska, and industry on taxation, leasing, and permitting, and an aggressive support for development of technology to improve economics is needed for these heavy oil resources to be developed.

  9. Accelerating Cosmologies with Extended Product Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han Siong Ch'ng

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerating cosmologies in extra dimensional spaces have been studied. These extra dimensional spaces are products of many spaces. The physical behaviors of accelerating cosmologies are investigated from Einstein's field equation in higher dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe and superstring/M theory points of view. It is found that if some assumptions of flatness are made for sector of the FRW universe, the remaining sector needs to be hyperbolic. These properties are in parallel with those found in the model of superstring/M theory. The extended product made for the superstring model did not show any more new features other than those already found. A similar accelerating phase of this product space cosmology was found with difference in numerical values of the accelerating period.

  10. Tax policy can change the production path: A model of optimal oil extraction in Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    production units (fields) on Alaska's North Slope. We use adjustment cost and discount rate to calibrate approach was to simulate economically optimal production paths for units on the Alaska North Slope, compare production for the seven individual units on Alaska's North Slope: Prudhoe Bay, Kuparuk River, Milne Point

  11. HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOK GEOLOGY 143A ­ Field Geology of Northern Arizona 27 March University Geology 143A Northern Arizona Field Course, 27 March ­ 03 April 2010 Field Trip Guidebook by: Prof. Charles Merguerian 2010 Arizona ­ a Macro View Physically, he was not what you would call an imposing

  12. Indecomposable Fusion Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias R. Gaberdiel; Horst G. Kausch

    1996-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse the fusion products of certain representations of the Virasoro algebra for c=-2 and c=-7 which are not completely reducible. We introduce a new algorithm which allows us to study the fusion product level by level, and we use this algorithm to analyse the indecomposable components of these fusion products. They form novel representations of the Virasoro algebra which we describe in detail. We also show that a suitably extended set of representations closes under fusion, and indicate how our results generalise to all (1,q) models.

  13. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  14. Biomass-Derived Energy Products and Co-Products Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass-Derived Energy Products and Co-Products Market This report identifies the bio-fuels and co & Earth Science & Technology ­ University of Hawai`i at Manoa #12;Biomass-Derived Energy Products and Co agency thereof. #12;Biomass Derived Energy Products and Co- Products Market and Off-take Study Hawaii

  15. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  16. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  18. Stratigraphic relationships in Woodbine-Eagleford and Sub-Clarksville sandstones, IDS field, Brazos County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brogdon, Ron Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Clarksville Sandstones, IDS Field, Brazos County, Texas. (August 1990) Ron Lee Brogdon, B. A. , Harvard University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robert R. Berg Sandstones of the Upper-Cretaceous Woodbine-Eagleford interval produce oil and gas from a small... no influence as a hydrocarbon trap. Production from IDS field, like the extent of the reservoir, is small. Nine years of production from 13 wells have yielded only 584 MBBLS of oil. Production is not uniform across the field, but defines a trend which...

  19. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  20. Well performance graph simplifies field calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Ghetto, G.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphic Methods are widely employed in order to understand overall well behavior using only surface parameters. The authors propose a new graphic method, used successfully by Agip for oil and gas wells in Italy, Libya, Nigeria and Tunisia. The well performance graph helps solve many production problems, including estimation of: inflow performance relationship; causes of rate decline throughout well life; and production rate and bottomhole flowing pressure for various pressures upstream of the surface choke, and vice-versa. This method differs from others by using flow behavior through the choke for both critical and subcritical conditions. Equations describing flow through the formation, string and surface choke are also used. Results are quite reliable when these theoretical equations are calibrated with field data, either from the well concerned or from nearby wells producing the same fluid. This article describes the technique as it applies to oil wells. The methodology for gas wells is similar.

  1. Texas Alfalfa Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stichler, Charles

    1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    With proper management, alfalfa will produce forage with the highest protein and total digestible nutrient of any hay crop. To aid in alfalfa production, this publication provides information on pre-plant factors, planting and stand establishment...

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    %) were used in producing the concrete mixtures. The water to cementitious materials ratio was kept with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI

  3. Composite production riser assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Won Ki

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of a deep water composite production riser from a system perspective is presented, and its advantages are articulated through comparisons with a typical steel riser under identical service conditions. The composite riser joints...

  4. Biomass Energy Production Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007 South Carolina enacted the ''Energy Freedom and Rural Development Act'', which provides production incentives for certain biomass-energy facilities. Eligible systems earn $0.01 per kilowatt...

  5. Power production and ADS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the power production process in Accelerator Driven Sub-critical systems employing Thorium-232 and Uranium-238 as fuel and examine the demands on the power of the accelerator required.

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -Products Utilization E-mail: ymchun@uwm.edu and F. D. Botha Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute 5776 Coal, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute

  7. Production of Shale Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loper, R. D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

  8. BPA Power Products Catalog (pbl/products)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusA t iBudget2/4/139/4/2012 BnotMeteringProducts

  9. Transmission Losses Product (pbl/products)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: AnTraining andfordefault Sign In AboutProducts

  10. Pairs Emission in a Uniform Background Field: an Algebraic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Soldati

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully algebraic general approach is developed to treat the pairs emission and absorption in the presence of some uniform external background field. In particular, it is shown that the pairs production and annihilation operators, together with the pairs number operator, do actually fulfill the SU(2) functional Lie algebra. As an example of application, the celebrated Schwinger formula is consistently and nicely recovered, within this novel approach, for a Dirac spinor field in the presence of a constant and homogeneous electric field in four spacetime dimensions.

  11. Chateaurenard field test recovery mechanisms and interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourdarot, G.; Putz, A.; Sardin, M.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chateaurenard micellar/polymer field test was conducted between 1976 and 1980 in the south part of the Paris Bassin. Pilot design, operations and oil production results have already been presented. We present a detailled analysis of the effluents. It appears that surfactant, most of wich remained trapped in the reservoir, is associated with calcium in the oil when produced, as a result of sodium exchange with the calcium associated with the clay in the reservoir sand. Supporting phase studies and floods through sandpacks are presented to quantify this cation exchange and investigate its influence on oil recovery and phase trapping.

  12. Pretreated densified biomass products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Bruce E; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A product comprising at least one densified biomass particulate of a given mass having no added binder and comprised of a plurality of lignin-coated plant biomass fibers is provided, wherein the at least one densified biomass particulate has an intrinsic density substantially equivalent to a binder-containing densified biomass particulate of the same given mass and h a substantially smooth, non-flakey outer surface. Methods for using and making the product are also described.

  13. Ethyl Alcohol Production.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, Henry

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    +------.-----.------.------.-----.------.-- o 2 3 4 5 6 Time (hrs.) Batch 29 Cooking and Fermenting Log Corn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 682 pounds (12.2 bushels) Natural gas used Meter measures in increments of 100 cubic feet. Cooking.... The following general production steps are the ones presently used and may change with future production experience. 1. The grain is ground in a hammermill with a 1/8- inch screen. Each of the 350 gallon cooker fermenter tanks normally handles a 12...

  14. Ethanol production from lignocellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    is carried in the flue gas, separated by electrostatic precipitators, and collected in a field of hoppers in the dry form or mixed with water and discharged as slurry into locations called ash pond - wet method

  16. Generalized Gravitational Entropy of Interacting Scalar Field and Maxwell Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized gravitational entropy proposed by Lewkowycz and Maldacena in recent is extended to the interacting real scalar field and Maxwell field system. Using the BTZ geometry we first investigate the case of free real scalar field and then show a possible way to calculate the entropy of the interacting scalar field. Next, we investigate the Maxwell field system. We exactly solve the wave equation and calculate the analytic value of the generalized gravitational entropy. We also use the Einstein equation to find the effect of backreaction of the Maxwell field on the area of horizon. The associated modified area law is consistent with the generalized gravitational entropy.

  17. Productivity prediction model based on Bayesian analysis and productivity console

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Seok Jun

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    in poor planning and defies effective control of time and budgets in project management. In this research, we have built a productivity prediction model which uses productivity data from an ongoing project to reevaluate the initial productivity estimate...

  18. Conformal field theories with infinitely many conservation laws

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todorov, Ivan [Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques F-91440, Bures-sur-Yvette (France)] [Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques F-91440, Bures-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally conformal invariant quantum field theories in a D-dimensional space-time (D even) have rational correlation functions and admit an infinite number of conserved (symmetric traceless) tensor currents. In a theory of a scalar field of dimension D-2 they were demonstrated to be generated by bilocal normal products of free massless scalar fields with an O(N), U(N), or Sp(2N) (global) gauge symmetry [B. Bakalov, N. M. Nikolov, K.-H. Rehren, and I. Todorov, 'Unitary positive energy representations of scalar bilocal fields,' Commun. Math. Phys. 271, 223-246 (2007); e-print arXiv:math-ph/0604069v3; and 'Infinite dimensional Lie algebras in 4D conformal quantum field theory,' J. Phys. A Math Theor. 41, 194002 (2008); e-print arXiv:0711.0627v2 [hep-th

  19. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degrande, Céline, E-mail: cdegrand@illinois.edu [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Greiner, Nicolas [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Kilian, Wolfgang [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Mattelaer, Olivier [Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)] [Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Zhang, Cen [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: •We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. •We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. •We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  20. Classifying forest productivity at different scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. ARM - Field Participants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]JanuarygovCampaignsYear of

  2. Innovative production system goes in off Ivory Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childers, M. [Oceaneering Production Systems, Houston, TX (United States); Barnes, J. [Paragon Engineering Services Inc., Houston, TX (United States)]|[UMC Petroleum Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The phased field development of the Lion and Panthere fields, offshore the Ivory Coast, includes a small floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) tanker with minimal processing capability as an early oil production system (EPS). For the long-term production scheme, the FPSO will be replaced by a converted jack up mobile offshore production system (MOPS) with full process equipment. The development also includes guyed-caisson well platforms, pipeline export for natural gas to fuel an onshore power plant, and a floating storage and offloading (FSO) tanker for oil export. Pipeline export for oil is a future possibility. This array of innovative strategies and techniques seldom has been brought together in a single project. The paper describes the development plan, early oil, jack up MOPS, and transport and installation.

  3. HYDROLOGIC CONTROLS ON THE SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF OIL-FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROLOGIC CONTROLS ON THE SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT OF OIL-FIELD BRINE AT THE OSAGE-SKIATOOK PETROLEUM production on the environment, we are investigating the hydrology and the fate and transport of contaminants tank batteries have contaminated soil, ground water, and surface water at this site. Based on soil

  4. STRING LOOPS IN BACKGROUND FIELDS Scott Alan Yost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yost, Scott

    excellent collaborators. They have made my stay at Princeton very productive and enjoyable. I thank E. LiebSTRING LOOPS IN BACKGROUND FIELDS Scott Alan Yost A dissertation presented to the faculty formalism. ii #12;Acknowledgements I would like to thank my advisor, Chiara Nappi, for her support, advice

  5. Eubank Field, Kansas: a formation evaluation and secondary recovery project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dexheimer, Dominique

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of the wells in this field have well logs, five wells were cored, and a 26 square-mile, 3-D seismic survey was performed in 1995. I have summarized all of the data available to date-well logs, production data, core data, PVT data, pressure transient tests...

  6. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Results are reported on the isolation/characterization of anaerobic bacteria; bacterial mobility and the importance of chemotaxis; careflood experiments; microbial modeling; and surface facilities design. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Progress is reported on growth/activity in porous media; coreflooding; and microbial modeling. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  8. ARM - AMIE Field Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2AP-XPSAPS50 -IssuegovFieldOverview

  9. Design of product development systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre Granados, Adrian

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of successful new products in less time and using fewer resources is key to the financial success of most consumer product companies. In this thesis we have studied the development of new products and how ...

  10. Adding Value to Agricultural Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David P.; Hanselka, Daniel

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    You can significantly increase farm income by adding value to agricultural products and marketing those products effectively. This publication explains how to design a value-added product based on consumer preferences and how to build a business...

  11. JGI Lab Ergo Products Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre, Melanie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    35 Page 1 of 35 Laboratory Ergonomics Product Arm Supports/Page 2 of 35 Laboratory Ergonomics Product Features/OptionsPage 3 of 35 Laboratory Ergonomics Product SoftEdge Corners

  12. Natural gas hydrates - issues for gas production and geomechanical stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Tarun

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    occurring at the field. Further, the controlling parameters for hydrate dissociation in porous media are quantified and a sensitivity study is presented. Chapter VI presents the results of a simulation experiment done to evaluate the performance of a..., the location iv of perforations and the gas hydrate saturation to be important parameters for gas production at the Messoyakha. Second, I simulated the gas production using a hydraulic fracture in hydrate bearing sediments. The simulation results showed...

  13. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field Early development of quantum mechanics was led by the fact that electro- magnetic radiation (electric current den- sity) jµ = (, j/c). For a point particle of charge e, the charge density is = e

  14. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field Early development of quantum mechanics was led by the fact that electro- magnetic radiation (electric current den- sity) jµ = (, j/c). For a point particle of charge e, the charge density is = e

  15. Technology's Impact on Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

  16. Covered Product Categories (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program Energy-Efficient Product Procurement Program and its designated product category list.

  17. GMP- Biomass Electricity Production Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Green Mountain Power Corporation (GMP), Vermont's largest electric utility, offers a production incentive to farmers who own systems utilizing anaerobic digestion of agricultural products,...

  18. Simulating Potential Switchgrass Production in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, T. O.; Parrish, David J.; Tyler, Donald D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using results from field trials of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) in the United States, the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) process-level agroecosystem model was calibrated, validated, and applied to simulate potential productivity of switchgrass for use as a biofuel feedstock. The model was calibrated with a regional study of 10-yr switchgrass field trials and subsequently tested against a separate compiled dataset of field trials from across the eastern half of the country. An application of the model in a national database using 8-digit watersheds as the primary modeling unit produces 30-yr average switchgrass yield estimates that can be aggregated to 18 major watersheds. The model projects average annual switchgrass productivity of greater than 7 Mg ha-1 in the Upper Mississippi, Lower Mississippi, and Ohio watersheds. The major factors limiting simulated production vary by region; low precipitation is the primary limiting factor across the western half of the country, while moderately acidic soils limit yields on lands east of the Mississippi River. Average projected switchgrass production on all crop land in the continental US is 5.6 Mg ha-1. At this level of productivity, 28.6 million hectares of crop land would be required to produce the 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol called for by 2022 in the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act. The model described here can be applied as a tool to inform the land-use and environmental consequences of switchgrass production.

  19. Athletic Fields and Water Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gene R.; White, Richard; Abernathy, Scott; Smith, David

    1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Following an 18-step procedure for performing an irrigation audit will help athletic field managers conserve water while maintaining a pleasing facility for recreational use. To perform the audit correctly, a field manager must determine the answers...

  20. BOUNDLESSLEARNING EXPLORERS FIELD EDUCATION FUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    FOR FIELD EDUCATION The Department of Earth Sciences is expanding the field study components of our programs account. · Claim charitable donations up to 75 per cent of your net income (a five-year carry forward

  1. Fermions in spherical field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the spherical field formalism for fermions. We find that the spherical field method is free from certain difficulties which complicate lattice calculations, such as fermion doubling, missing axial anomalies, and computational problems regarding internal fermion loops.

  2. Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iouri Balachov, PhD

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to DOE's Solicitation for Grant Applications DE-PS36-03GO93007, 'Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research', SRI International (SRI) proposed to conduct work under Technical Topic Area 5, Advanced Electrolysis Systems; Sub-Topic 5B, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis. We proposed to develop a prototype of a modular industrial system for low-cost generation of H{sub 2} (<$2/kg) by steam electrolysis with anodic depolarization by CO. Water will be decomposed electrochemically into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} on the cathode side of a high-temperature electrolyzer. Oxygen ions will migrate through an oxygen-ion-conductive solid oxide electrolyte. Gas mixtures on the cathode side (H{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O) and on the anode side (CO + CO{sub 2}) will be reliably separated by the solid electrolyte. Depolarization of the anodic process will decrease the electrolysis voltage, and thus the electricity required for H{sub 2} generation and the cost of produced H{sub 2}. The process is expected to be at least 10 times more energy-efficient than low-temperature electrolysis and will generate H{sub 2} at a cost of approximately $1-$1.5/kg. The operating economics of the system can be made even more attractive by deploying it at locations where waste heat is available; using waste heat would reduce the electricity required for heating the system. Two critical targets must be achieved: an H{sub 2} production cost below $2/kg, and scalable design of the pilot H{sub 2} generation system. The project deliverables would be (1) a pilot electrolysis system for H{sub 2} generation, (2) an economic analysis, (3) a market analysis, and (4) recommendations and technical documentation for field deployment. DOE was able to provide only 200K out of 1.8M (or about 10% of awarded budget), so project was stopped abruptly.

  3. Application of geostatistical reservoir description for maximizing waterflood infill drilling recovery from La Cira Field, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubillos Gutierrez, Helber

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the prospective ways to increase the oil production is to maximize the oil recovery from mature oil fields. In this study we apply an integrated approach that combines geostatistical reservoir description and reservoir simulation to evaluate...

  4. Optimal Waterflood Management under Geologic Uncertainty Using Rate Control: Theory and Field Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alhuthali, Ahmed Humaid H.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflood optimization via rate control is receiving increased interest because of rapid developments in the smart well completions and I-field technology. The use of inflow control valves (ICV) allows us to optimize the production/injection rates...

  5. Reservoir characterization and development opportunities in Jacob Field, South-Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez Depaz, Mirko Joshoe

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the study, determine the oil potential, and make recommendations to improve production. Since no previous reservoir study was performed in this field, the original oil in place and the current status of depletion was unknown. Therefore a complete integrated...

  6. Diamond-graphite field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

  7. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  8. Introduction to spherical field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical field theory is a new non-perturbative method for studying quantum field theories. It uses the spherical partial wave expansion to reduce a general d-dimensional Euclidean field theory into a set of coupled one-dimensional systems. The coupled one-dimensional systems are then converted to partial differential equations and solved numerically. We demonstrate the methods of spherical field theory by analyzing Euclidean phi^4 theory in two dimensions.

  9. Home Fruit Production - Figs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Calvin G.; McEachern, George Ray

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TDOC Z TA245.7 B873 NO.1591 B-1591 Texas Agricultural Extension Service HOM? FRUIT PRODUCTION FIGS LIBRARY SEP 2 7 1988 ( A&M Univer it Texas Agricultural Extension Service. Zerle L. Carpenter, Director. The Texas A&M University System.... College Station, Texas / (Blank Pa.ge -ill Original BBDetial . r .. ; :.' l , ::; .: .? HOME FRUIT PRODUCTION - FIGS Calvin G. Lyons and George Ray McEachern* Figs have been a part of Texas homesteads since the early development of the state...

  10. Barley Production in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, I. M.; Gardenshire, J. H.; McDaniel, M. E.; Porter, K. B.

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nutrients. It is lower in nitrogenh extract and productive energy per I00 pounds lr feed, Table 4. Research Extension I] area sts 1-1 I" I uv I I - Y Barley is an excellent winter pasture, Figure ; While the total seasonal production for barley... from C.I. 7404, a Korean barley Wintex x Texan Sunrise x Bolivia Comfort, Purdue 1101, Wisconsin barbless, Chevron, Bolivia, Kentucky 1, Purdue 400-17 Texas x Ludwig [(Hooded 16 x Sunrise) x Tenwase] x Wong-Jet Juliaca x Peatland Selection from...

  11. 15 Software Product Line Engineering with the UML: Deriving Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    15 Software Product Line Engineering with the UML: Deriving Products T. Ziadi and J.-M. Jézéquel Abstract Software product line engineering introduces two new dimensions into the traditional engineering of software-based systems: the variability modeling and the product derivation. The variability gathers

  12. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  13. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: We have audited

  14. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31 Auditors' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 Expenditures 22­23 #12;INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History

  15. Oil field management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  16. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings evaluated three newly released heat pump water heater products in order to provide publicly available field data on these products.

  17. Sonde Adjust Value-Added Product Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troyan, D

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sonde Adjust (SONDEADJUST) value-added product (VAP) creates a file that includes all fields from original Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM Facility) radiosonde files and contains several value-added fields that provide adjustments related to well-known humidity issues. SONDEADJUST produces data that correct documented biases in radiosonde humidity measurements. Previous efforts towards applying some of these corrections are available via the discontinued PI product sgpsondecorr1miloC1. Unique fields contained within this datastream include smoothed original relative humidity, dry bias corrected relative humidity, and final corrected relative humidity. The smoothed RH field refines the relative humidity from integers-the resolution of the instrument-to fractions of a percent. This profile is then used to calculate the dry bias corrected field. The final correction fixes the time-lag problem and uses the dry-bias field as input into the algorithm. In addition to dry bias, solar heating is another correction that is encompassed in the final corrected RH field. Output from SONDEADJUST differs from the previous RH-corrected datastreams in important ways. First, all three types of ARM radiosondes-Vaisala RS-80, RS-90, and RS-92-are corrected using dedicated procedures and/or parameters. Second, the output variables include all of those found in the original radiosonde file: dry bulb temperature, dewpoint temperature, wind speed, wind direction, eastward wind component, northward wind component, wind status (a Vaisala-produced field used in conjunction with the Loran system), ascent rate, and original relative humidity. Additional humidity fields are smoothed relative humidity, dry biased corrected relative humidity, final ambient relative humidity, and scaled adjusted relative humidity. Third, quality control (QC) flags of the fields from the original radiosonde datastream are brought into the SONDEADJUST output file. Additional QC variables are created for the new fields.

  18. Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This final project report presents the activities and accomplishments of the ''Coal Combustion Products Extension Program'' conducted at The Ohio State University from August 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to advance the beneficial uses of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highway and construction, mine reclamation, agricultural, and manufacturing sectors. The objective of this technology transfer/research program at The Ohio State University was to promote the increased use of Ohio CCPs (fly ash, FGD material, bottom ash, and boiler slag) in applications that are technically sound, environmentally benign, and commercially competitive. The project objective was accomplished by housing the CCP Extension Program within The Ohio State University College of Engineering with support from the university Extension Service and The Ohio State University Research Foundation. Dr. Tarunjit S. Butalia, an internationally reputed CCP expert and registered professional engineer, was the program coordinator. The program coordinator acted as liaison among CCP stakeholders in the state, produced information sheets, provided expertise in the field to those who desired it, sponsored and co-sponsored seminars, meetings, and speaking at these events, and generally worked to promote knowledge about the productive and proper application of CCPs as useful raw materials. The major accomplishments of the program were: (1) Increase in FGD material utilization rate from 8% in 1997 to more than 20% in 2005, and an increase in overall CCP utilization rate of 21% in 1997 to just under 30% in 2005 for the State of Ohio. (2) Recognition as a ''voice of trust'' among Ohio and national CCP stakeholders (particularly regulatory agencies). (3) Establishment of a national and international reputation, especially for the use of FGD materials and fly ash in construction applications. It is recommended that to increase Ohio's CCP utilization rate from 30% in 2005 to 40% by 2010, the CCP Extension Program be expanded at OSU, with support from state and federal agencies, utilities, trade groups, and the university, to focus on the following four specific areas of promise: (a) Expanding use in proven areas (such as use of fly ash in concrete); (b) Removing or reducing regulatory and perceptual barriers to use (by working in collaboration with regulatory agencies); (c) Developing new or under-used large-volume market applications (such as structural fills); and (d) Placing greater emphasis on FGD byproducts utilization.

  19. Michigan Basin. Secondary recovery in reef trends yields more production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary recovery practices in reef trends in Michigan are described. Waterflooding in the Chester 18 Unit began in 1978; it currently has 6 injection wells and 11 production wells. The production wells use a submersible pumping unit, and current production levels are estimated at 3800 bopd. The present level of injection is ca. 17,000 bpd of water. The company operating the field has concluded that more barrels can be produced from a reef if a waterflood is started early. There are 55 to 60 such reefs with potential for supplemental recovery.

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    wood with supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke by pulp and paper mills and wood, knots, chips, etc. with other supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke to generateCenter for By-Products Utilization DEVELOPMENT OF CLSM USING COAL ASH AND WOOD ASH, A SOURCE OF NEW

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    in a combination with a number of fuels including coal, petroleum coke, natural gas, etc. In the mid 1990s, the unit was firing a combination of coal and petroleum coke to generate energy. It has been established;1 PROJECT 1 - COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS: CHARACTERIZATION AND USE OPTIONS Introduction An AFBC system

  2. Air Products effective way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PE O A e s a b O T A O ENNST Overview Air Products effective way standard me Departm Shipping has recently y of shipping eans. Air Pro ontainer that es of this pro onduct mark eep accelera eep the cost tilize widely a earch and m m visited Air er needs wer model was cr m approache ms

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    different types of compressed gases, compressed air, carbon dioxide, and a mixed gas. This mixed gas the compressive strength and binding the carbon dioxide in the carbonation-reaction products. The carbonation-reaction of the CLSM would also have the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at a coal-fired power plant

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Presentationand Publicationat the CBIP International Conference onFly Ash Disposal & Utilization,New Delhi, India, January 1998 foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option because it not only causes huge

  5. Productivity increases in science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.E. [ed.; Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today`s scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

  6. Productivity increases in science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.E. (ed.); Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today's scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

  7. Lithium Ion Production NDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations David Wood, Debasish Mohanty, Jianlin Li, and Claus Daniel 12/9/13 EERE Quality Control Workshop #12;2 Presentation name Lithium Ion Electrode to be meaningful and provide electrode and cell QC. #12;3 Presentation name New Directions in Lithium Ion Electrode

  8. Covered Product Category: Displays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including displays, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  9. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project 02-1/3.1D-2 Department of Civil Engineering of technology and market development for controlled low-strength material (CLSM) slurry using Illinois coal ashCenter for By-Products Utilization IMPLEMENTATION OF FLOWABLE SLURRY TECHNOLOGY IN ILLINOIS

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    technologies. A clean-coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SOxand NOxcontrol technologies, and FBC that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocks conventional and clean-coal technologies. Fifteen high-sulfur coal ash samples were obtained from eight

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    and paper mills in concrete. INTRODUCTION Concrete is a porous solid that is created by combining four basicCenter for By-Products Utilization CURING TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON HIGH-PERFORMANCE CONCRETE By Tarun For presentation and publication at the symposium entitled "High-Performance Concrete and Concrete for Marine

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -burning electricity gene-ration is the current principal energy source. The total amounts of fly ash and bottom ash, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee #12;The bar graph (Fig. 1) compares the production and utilization of fly shows the percentage of various usage of fly ash in China in 1988 [1]. Fig. 2 Percentage of Fly Ash

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -Products Utilization University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee ABSTRACT This project consisted of performance testing at a typical electric power plant. One of the goals of this project was to determine the feasibility of using. The carbonation reaction of the CLSM would also have the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at a coal-fired

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLY ASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL #12;-1- CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLYASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL ASHFOR CEMENT -Milwaukee (UWM) Daniel D.Banerjee, Project Manager,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Manager at the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI). He is involved in implementing and monitoring) coal-ash and by replacing up to 9% of aggregates with wet-collected, low-lime, coarse coal-ash. Cast of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry sand in concrete and cast-concrete products

  16. MAIL DISTRIBUTION MAIL PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    permit. The use of this permit has numerous restrictions. 2. Any use of the special permit-profit organization postage rate and bulk mailing permit and may result in revocation of said permit. University of the University non-profit permit. 3. All bulk mailings must be coordinated with Mail Production at the earliest

  17. Product Information Transparent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    , transformers, amplifiers, high voltage resistor packs, and relays; adhesive/encapsulant for solar cellsProduct Information Solar FEATURES · Transparent · Cures to flexible elastomer · Constant cure rate elastomer, which is suited for the protection of electrical/electronic devices in solar applications. HOW

  18. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE By Tarun R;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE ABSTRACT By Tarun, R. Naik, Yoon-moon Chun, Rudolph N. Kraus, and Fethullah Canpolat This paper presents a detailed experimental study on the sequestration

  19. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of coal in conventional and/ or advanced clean coal technology combustors. These include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products from advanced clean coal technology clean coal technology combustors. Over 60% of the CCBs are generated as fly ash. An estimate

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ­ Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI and Ronald H. Carty Director Illinois Clean Coal Institute Carterville, IL ABSTRACT, Naik and Singh [16] summarized various applications of fly ash generated from conventional and clean coal technologies. Uses of coal combustion by- products can be categorized into three classes: high-volum

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat #12;USE OF FLY ASH AND LIMESTONE QUARRY BY-PRODUCTS FOR DEVELOPING ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE material in the development of economical self-compacting concrete (SCC). Class C fly ash was also used

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE (SCC) OR SELF- LEVELING CONCRETE (SLC - MILWAUKEE #12;2 SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE (SCC) OR SELF ­LEVELING CONCRETE (SLC) INTRODUCTION Self-compacting as the concrete which can be placed and compacted into every corner of a form work, purely by means of its self

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE by Tarun R. Naik* , Rudolph N. Kraus** , Yoon-moon Chun*** , Fethullah of limestone-quarry by-product material in the development of economical self-compacting concrete (SCC). Class

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ash. Paving applications, such as Roller Compacted Concrete for industrial plants, parking lots be used in Self-Consolidating Concrete applications. This type of concrete requires additional fines that concrete Bricks, Blocks, and Paving Stones can also be made with the Corn Products' coal ash. Additionally

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    , compressive strength, concrete testing, fly ash, high-performance concrete, hot weather, permeability, silica Testing of Concrete", Committee 214, "Evaluation of Results of Strength Tests of Concrete", and CommitteeCenter for By-Products Utilization STRENGTH AND DURABILITY OF HIGH- PERFORMANCE CONCRETE SUBJECTED

  6. Field practice internship final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, T.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

  7. Chiral-field microwave antennas (Chiral microwave near fields for far-field radiation)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamenetskii, E O; Shavit, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a single-element structure we obtain a radiation pattern with a squint due to chiral microwave near fields originated from a magnetostatic-mode ferrite disk. At the magnetostatic resonances, one has strong subwavelength localization of energy of microwave radiation. Magnetostatic oscillations in a thin ferrite disk are characterized by unique topological properties: the Poynting-vector vortices and the field helicity. The chiral-topology near fields allow obtaining unique phase structure distribution for far-field microwave radiation.

  8. MSENGR Product Design Program Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    MSENGR Product Design Program Proposal Rev 6/2007 p. 1 New Proposal Revision First graduate Language 3 ME216A Advanced Product Design: Need Finding 4 ME312 Advanced Product Design: Form Giving 4 ARTSTUDI160 Design II: The Bridge 3 ME216B Advanced Product Design: Implementation 4 ME316

  9. Bima field, Indonesia: a sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prior, S.W.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent Pertamina-ARCO Bima field discovery is 50 mi north of Jakarta, Indonesia, on the east flank of the Sunda basin. More than 1 billion bbl of oil are trapped in the Oligocene-Miocene Batu Raja Limestone within a productive area exceeding 25 mi/sup 2/. Additional oil is trapped in Oligocene Talang Akar sandstone reservoirs. The ZZZ-1 wildcat well drilled into the northern featheredge of the field in October 1974. A drill-stem test of the Batu Raja flowed 87 BOPD of heavy oil, and ZZZ-1 was plugged and abandoned as a noncommercial discovery. Postdrilling assessment suggested that the accumulation was stratigraphically controlled, and no delineation wells were drilled for 9 years. A second test of this trend was finally made in November 1983, to evaluate what was considered a separate Batu Raja closure updip from ZZZ-1. The ZU-1 well found a common oil-water contact with ZZZ-1 that suggested a structurally controlled giant field had been discovered. A series of step-out wells based on a seismic reinterpretation proved this hypothesis to be true. Phase one development drilling began in November 1985, and 57 wells should be completed within the next year. About 60 million bbl of reserves will be developed at an initial rate of about 50,000 BOPD. Phase two plans now in progress could develop an additional 40 million bbl of reserves.

  10. 1 LOST PRODUCTION AS CONSEQUENSE OF SILICA SCALING IN CERRO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieto Geothermal; Wells Mexico; Juan De; Dios Ocampo; Díaz Sara; Lilia Moya; Jesús De; León Vivar

    Mineral scale depositation occurs in many of the Cerro Prieto wells, but the main problems occurs by silica (SiO2) scale both pipes and reservoir zones close to the downhole. In Cerro Prieto geothermal field three types of scales are found; calcium carbonate (calcite), amorphous silica (SiO2), and metallic sulfides (mainly iron, and lesser lead and cooper). The scale causes lost production and it is necessary to make around 12 workover each year to recover the steam lost. When scaling problems occurred inside casing production is more easier to recover the production that scaling occurred in the reservoir zones, because it caused a skin damage (permeability decrease) in the reservoir zones close to the bottomhole. This paper analyze and discus the scaling problems and discuss the task developed to avoid and minimized the decline wells production, as to recover the production using workover alternatives.

  11. Optical pumping production of spin polarized hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knize, R.J.; Happer, W.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been much interest recently in the production of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen in various fields, including controlled fusion, quantum fluids, high energy, and nuclear physics. One promising method for the development of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen is the utilization of optical pumping with a laser. Optical pumping is a process in which photon angular momentum is converted into electron and nuclear spin. The advent of tunable CW dye lasers (approx. 1 watt) allows the production of greater than 10/sup 18/ polarized atoms/sec. We have begun a program at Princeton to investigate the physics and technology of using optical pumping to produce large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen. Initial experiments have been done in small closed glass cells. Eventually, a flowing system, open target, or polarized ion source could be constructed.

  12. Kuwait pressing toward preinvasion oil production capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tippee, B.

    1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil field reconstruction is shifting focus in Kuwait as the country races toward prewar production capacity of 2 million b/d. Oil flow last month reached 1.7 million b/d, thanks largely to a massive workover program that has accomplished about as much as it can. By midyear, most of the 19 rigs in Kuwait will be drilling rather than working over wells vandalized by retreating Iraqi troops in February 1991. Seventeen gathering centers are at work, with capacities totaling 2.4 million b/d, according to state-owned Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC). This article describes current work, the production infrastructure, facilities strategy, oil recovery, well repairs, a horizontal pilot project, the drilling program, the constant reminders of war, and heightened tensions.

  13. Locally-smeared operator product expansions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostantinos

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a "locally-smeared Operator Product Expansion" (sOPE) to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of locally-smeared operators. The sOPE formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements of smeared degrees of freedom, determined numerically using the gradient flow, to non-local operators in the continuum. The nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale prevents a simple connection to the standard operator product expansion and therefore requires the construction of a two-scale formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach using the example of real scalar field theory.

  14. Forest Products (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" |beamtheForForeignForest Products

  15. High-Energy Neutrino Production through Photopion Processes in Blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Dermer; A. Atoyan

    2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The measured spectral energy distribution and variability time scale are used to determine the radiation and magnetic-field energy densities in the relativistic plasma that forms the gamma-ray emitting jet in the blazar 3C 279. Assuming that protons are accelerated as efficiently as electrons to a maximum energy determined by the size and magnetic field of the emitting region, we calculate the emissivity of neutrinos produced by protons that interact with the external radiation field intercepted by the jet. The external radiation field provides the most important target photons for photomeson production of high-energy neutrinos in flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Because of photomeson interactions with this field, km^2 neutrino telescopes are predicted to detect > 0.1-1 neutrinos per year from blazars such as 3C 279. BL Lac objects are weaker neutrino sources if, as widely thought, their gamma-ray emission is due to Compton-scattered synchrotron (SSC) radiation.

  16. Bridging Political Ecology and STS: A Field Analysis of the Rosgen Wars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Rebecca

    Bridging Political Ecology and STS: A Field Analysis of the Rosgen Wars Rebecca Lave Geography been ontological, political economy is another productive area for conversation between the two fields framework can bridge political ecology and STS, revealing the political economic relations central

  17. The simulation and analysis of continuous single product manufacturing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Theodore Robert

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    there was insufficient time to develop new methods or concepts in ammunition production, even though more ad- vanced techn1ques were being employed by private 1ndustry in similar fields. After the war the Government Owned Contractor Operated (GOCO) Plants were either...

  18. BOOK REVIEW Cold War Social Science: Knowledge Production,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solovey, Mark

    BOOK REVIEW Cold War Social Science: Knowledge Production, Liberal Democracy, and Human Nature, 2012. Reviewed by Paul Erickson, Wesleyan University Taken together, these two important books make intriguing statements about the way to write the histories of fields like psychology, sociology, anthropology

  19. Instruction Guide Shopping Using the Product Keyword Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    and add them to your cart. The Product Search is a very powerful search engine. Start with by entering in the flyout menu. 3. To start searching for an item, enter the item in the search field. Include specific search terms, such as "latex-free gloves" instead of just "gloves". The system is flexible with search

  20. Higher Rank Conformal Fields in the $Sp(2M)$ Symmetric Generalized Space-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. A. Gelfond; M. A. Vasiliev

    2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study various $Sp(2M)$ invariant field equations corresponding to rank $r$ tensor products of the Fock (singleton) representation of $Sp(2M)$. These equations are shown to describe localization on ``branes'' of different dimensions embedded into the generalized space-time $\\M_M$ with matrix (i.e., ``central charge'') coordinates. The case of bilinear tensor product is considered in detail. The conserved currents built from bilinears of rank 1 fields in $\\M_M$ are shown to satisfy the field equations of the rank 2 fields in $\\M_M$. Also, the rank 2 fields in $\\M_M$ are shown to be equivalent to the rank 1 fields in $\\M_{2M}$.

  1. Quarkonium Production in PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abigail Bickley; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Quarkonia provide a sensitive probe of the properties of the hot dense medium created in high energy heavy ion collisions. Hard scattering processes result in the production of heavy quark pairs that interact with the collision medium during hadronization. These in medium interactions convey information about the fundamental properties of the medium itself and can be used to examine the modification of the QCD confining potential in the collision environment. Baseline measurements from the d+Au and p+p collision systems can be used to distinguish cold nuclear matter effects while measurements from heavy ion collision systems, Au+Au and Cu+Cu, can be used to quantify in-medium effects. PHENIX results for the production of the $J/\\psi$ for a diverse set of collision systems and energies and for the $\\Upsilon$ in p+p collisions are presented.

  2. Joined ceramic product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles W [Kennewick, WA; Brimhall, John L. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA

    2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the present invention, a joined product is at least two ceramic parts, specifically bi-element carbide parts with a bond joint therebetween, wherein the bond joint has a metal silicon phase. The bi-element carbide refers to compounds of MC, M.sub.2 C, M.sub.4 C and combinations thereof, where M is a first element and C is carbon. The metal silicon phase may be a metal silicon carbide ternary phase, or a metal silicide.

  3. Apparatus and method for generating a magnetic field by rotation of a charge holding object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Vukovic, Lela (Westchester, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glenn, IL)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and a method for the production of a magnetic field using a Charge Holding Object that is mechanically rotated. In a preferred embodiment, a Charge Holding Object surrounding a sample rotates and subjects the sample to one or more magnetic fields. The one or more magnetic fields are used by NMR Electronics connected to an NMR Conductor positioned within the Charge Holding Object to perform NMR analysis of the sample.

  4. Torsion and the Electromagnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. C. de Andrade; J. G. Pereira

    1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity, we study the dynamics of a gravitationally coupled electromagnetic field. It is shown that the electromagnetic field is able not only to couple to torsion, but also, through its energy-momentum tensor, to produce torsion. Furthermore, it is shown that the coupling of the electromagnetic field with torsion preserves the local gauge invariance of Maxwell's theory.

  5. Thermal extraction analysis of five Los Azufres production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Paul; Quijano, Luis

    1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal energy extraction from five wells supplying 5-MWe wellhead generators in three zones of the Los Azufres geothermal field has been examined from production and chemical data compiled over 14-years of operation. The data, as annual means, are useful in observing small-scale changes in reservoir performance with continuous production. The chemical components are chloride for quality control and the geothermometer elements for reservoir temperatures. The flowrate and fluid enthalpy data are used to calculate the thermal extraction rates. Integration of these data provides an estimate of the total energy extracted from the zone surrounding the well. The combined production and chemical geothermometer data are used to model the produced fluid as coming from just-penetrating wells for which the annual produced mass originates from a series of concentric hemispheric shells moving out into the reservoir. Estimates are made of the drawdown distance into the reservoir and the far-field conditions.

  6. Seismic imaging of oil production rate Valeri A. Korneev, Dmitry Silin, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    1 Seismic imaging of oil production rate Valeri A. Korneev, Dmitry Silin, Lawrence Berkeley to the square root of the product of frequency of the signal and the mobility of the fluid in the reservoir. This provides an opportunity for locating the most productive zones of the field before drilling

  7. EPA's designated products in eight categories: Construction Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation Products Channelizers Delineators Flexible delineators Parking stops Traffic barricades Traffic Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is required for the purchase of chemicals or products containing chemicals" program and Comprehensive Procurement Guideline (CPG), designates items that MUST contain recycled

  8. field emission electron microprobe | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    field emission electron microprobe Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

  9. EMSL - field emission electron microprobe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    field-emission-electron-microprobe en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

  10. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  11. Tular Lake Field, Kings County, California - a significant onshore development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindblom, R.G.; Waldron, J.M.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tulare Lake field is located in Kings County, California, on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley and 10 mi east of the Kettleman Hills (North Dome) field and 30 mi souuheast of the city of Coalinga. The field was discovered by Husky Oil Co. (Marathon) in October 1981 with the completion of the Boswell 22-16, Sec. 16, T22S, R20E from sands in the Burbank formation of Oligocene geologic age. Chevron USA offset the Husky discovery well with the completion of the Salyer 678X, Sec. 8, T22S, R20E, in May 1983. Both Chevron and Husky have continued an orderly development of the field, and to date Chevron has 9 producing wells and Husky 10 producing wells. Production is found in the Burbank formation at a vertical depth below 12,800 ft. The entrapment of hydrocarbons is caused by a low amplitude, seismically subtle, anticlinal fold trending northwest/southeast. Isochore maps of the Burbank formation show that stratigraphy is important in the distribution of the four producing sand intervals. Oil gravities form the sands vary 39/sup 0/ API to 51/sup 0/ API and the GOR ranges from 1050 to over 5500. As of January 1, 1984, the field has a cumulative production of 1.7 million bbl of oil and 3.5 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas.

  12. Reservoir class field demonstration. Publication and presentation bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reservoir Class Field Demonstration Program was initiated in FY92 in response to rapidly declining domestic production and the realization that huge volumes of oil are being abandoned in reservoirs because of uneconomic production techniques. This program is just one of the critical elements of the National Oil Program necessary to move Improved Oil Recovery (IOR) technology from the conceptual stage through research, pilot scale field experiments, and full-scale field demonstrations to industry acceptance and commercialization. Both the successful results and failures of the field demonstrations will provide focus to concurrent research programs. Elements of the field demonstrations that are suitable for broad industry application are being communicated to the industry through the oil program`s technology transfer effort. As part of the technology transfer effort, this listing of publications and presentations by the project operators has been compiled by the US Department of energy`s (DOE) National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO). The bibliography contains 240 citations for publications and a similar number of citations for presentations.

  13. Electromagnetic field with induced massive term: Case with scalar field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. P. Rybakov; G. N. Shikin; Yu. A. Popov; Bijan Saha

    2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an interacting system of massless scalar and electromagnetic field, with the Lagrangian explicitly depending on the electromagnetic potentials, i.e., interaction with broken gauge invariance. The Lagrangian for interaction is chosen in such a way that the electromagnetic field equation acquires an additional term, which in some cases is proportional to the vector potential of the electromagnetic field. This equation can be interpreted as the equation of motion of photon with induced nonzero rest-mass. This system of interacting fields is considered within the scope of Bianchi type-I (BI) cosmological model. It is shown that, as a result of interaction the electromagnetic field vanishes at $t \\to \\infty$ and the isotropization process of the expansion takes place.

  14. Electromagnetic field with induced massive term: Case with spinor field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. P. Rybakov; G. N. Shikin; Yu. A. Popov; Bijan Saha

    2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an interacting system of spinor and electromagnetic field, explicitly depending on the electromagnetic potentials, i.e., interaction with broken gauge invariance. The Lagrangian for interaction is chosen in such a way that the electromagnetic field equation acquires an additional term, which in some cases is proportional to the vector potential of the electromagnetic field. This equation can be interpreted as the equation of motion of photon with induced non-trivial rest-mass. This system of interacting spinor and scalar fields is considered within the scope of Bianchi type-I (BI) cosmological model. It is shown that, as a result of interaction the electromagnetic field vanishes at $t \\to \\infty$ and the isotropization process of the expansion takes place.

  15. Second Quantized Scalar QED in Homogeneous Time-Dependent Electromagnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate the second quantization of a charged scalar field in homogeneous, time-dependent electromagnetic fields, in which the Hamiltonian is an infinite system of decoupled, time-dependent oscillators for electric fields, but it is another infinite system of coupled, time-dependent oscillators for magnetic fields. We then employ the quantum invariant method to find various quantum states for the charged field. For time-dependent electric fields, a pair of quantum invariant operators for each oscillator with the given momentum plays the role of the time-dependent annihilation and the creation operators, constructs the exact quantum states, and gives the vacuum persistence amplitude as well as the pair-production rate. We also find the quantum invariants for the coupled oscillators for the charged field in time-dependent magnetic fields and advance a perturbation method when the magnetic fields change adiabatically. Finally, the quantum state and the pair production are discussed when a time-dependent electric field is present in parallel to the magnetic field.

  16. Essays on Product Recalls, New Product Preannouncements, and Shareholder Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Wonjoo

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................................... 1 CHAPTER II DETERMINANTS OF THE LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF PRODUCT RECALLS ON SHAREHOLDER VALUE: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF THE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY ................................................ 4 Introduction... ............................................................................... 101 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Companies increasingly face crises involving harm created by their products, ranging from defective automobile recalls, lead paint in toys, faulty medical devices, and contaminated food products, which often...

  17. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dady Dadyburjor; Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop technologies for carbon products from coal-derived feed-stocks. Carbon products can include precursor materials such as solvent extracted carbon ore (SECO) and synthetic pitch (Synpitch). In addition, derived products include carbon composites, fibers, foams and others.

  18. Noncommutative scalar field minimally coupled to nonsymmetric gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouadik, S.; Sefai, D. [Laboratory of Mechanic, Physics and Mathematical Modeling Medea University (Algeria)

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a non-commutative non symmetric gravity minimally coupled model (the star product only couples matter). We introduce the action for the system considered namely a non-commutative scalar field propagating in a nontrivial gravitational background. We expand the action in powers of the anti-symmetric field and the graviton to second order adopting the assumption that the scalar is weekly coupled to the graviton. We compute the one loop radiative corrections to the self-energy of a scalar particle.

  19. Relativistic Dynamical Collapse Model for a Scalar Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Pearle

    2014-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A natural generalization of the CSL (Continuous Spontaneous Localization) theory of dynamical collapse is applied to a relativistic quantum scalar field $\\phi({\\bf x},t)$. It is shown that the modified Schr\\"odinger equation is relativistically invariant, that the probabilities associated to all possible values of the classical scalar random field $w({\\bf x},t)$ (which determines the eventual state of collapse) add up to 1, that there is no energy production out of the vacuum and, in the limit of large time, the collapse is toward eigenstates of $\\phi({\\bf x},0)$.

  20. An Ion Guide for the Production of a Low Energy Ion Beam of Daughter Products of $?$-Emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tordoff; T. Eronen; V. V. Elomaa; S. Gulick; U. Hager; P. Karvonen; T. Kessler; J. Lee; I. Moore; A. Popov; S. Rahaman; S. Rinta-Antila; T. Sonoda; J. Aysto

    2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A new ion guide has been modeled and tested for the production of a low energy ($\\approx$ 40 kV) ion beam of daughter products of alpha-emitting isotopes. The guide is designed to evacuate daughter recoils originating from the $\\alpha$-decay of a $^{233}$U source. The source is electroplated onto stainless steel strips and mounted along the inner walls of an ion guide chamber. A combination of electric fields and helium gas flow transport the ions through an exit hole for injection into a mass separator. Ion guide efficiencies for the extraction of $^{229}$Th$^{+}$ (0.06%), $^{221}$Fr$^{+}$ (6%), and $^{217}$At$^{+}$ (6%) beams have been measured. A detailed study of the electric field and gas flow influence on the ion guide efficiency is described for two differing electric field configurations.

  1. APT radionuclide production experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullmann, J.L.; Gavron, A.; King, J.D. [and others

    1994-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Tritium ({sup 3}H, a heavy isotope of hydrogen) is produced by low energy neutron-induced reactions on various elements. One such reaction is n+{sup 3}He {yields}>{sup 3}H+{sup 1}H in which {sup 3}He is transmuted to tritium. Another reaction, which has been used in reactor production of tritium, is the n+{sup 6}Li {yields}> {sup 3}H+{sup 4}He reaction. Accelerator Production of Tritium relies on a high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy protons reacting with a heavy nucleus produce a shower of low-energy neutrons and a lower-mass residual nucleus. It is important to quantify the residual radionuclides produced in the spallation target for two reasons. From an engineering point of view, one must understand short-lived isotopes that may contribute to decay heat. From a safety viewpoint, one must understand what nuclei and decay gammas are produced in order to design adequate shielding, to estimate ultimate waste disposal problems, and to predict possible effects due to accidental dispersion during operation. The authors have performed an experiment to measure the production of radioisotopes in stopping-length W and Pb targets irradiated by a 800 MeV proton beam, and are comparing the results to values obtained from calculations using LAHET and MCNP. The experiment was designed to pay particular attention to the short half-life radionuclides, which have not been previously measured. In the following, they present details of the experiment, explain how they analyzed the data and obtain the results, how they perform the calculations, and finally, how the experimental data agree with the calculations.

  2. Challenges facing production grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

  3. Slaughter Calf Production.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Uel D.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    slaughter calves. The most effective tool for selecting and improving a breeding herd is a set of records Figure 1. Quality in sire and dam is passed on to the calf. -. of production on every cow in the herd. To be profitable, a breeding herd of beef..., isolation accination are parts of this phase of man- ent. Although slaughter calves are pro- principaily on pastures, some cleanup ,nes need attention. Sanitation is the most important factor in the control of animal diseases. Muddy areas around...

  4. Barley Production in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunkle, P. B. (Paul Burtch); Atkins, Irvin Milburn

    1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inclusive, an average of 14 6,O 0 0 acres of barley was planted, producing an average annual production of 2,445,000 bushels. The acreage and pro- duction fluctuate widely, being influenced by spring moisture conditions in west Texas and by winterkilling... the winter months, than on un- protected land. In west Texas it also may aid in reducing soil blowing. Barley may be used for hay or green manure crops, and in other sec- tions is used extensively in the brewing industry. At present very little barley...

  5. Procurable Products, Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentationsSRS RespondsLift PlanProcurable Products,

  6. Weekly Blender Net Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:short version) Themonthly4Blender Net Production

  7. Shale Gas Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. Natural GasquestionnairesquestionnairesGasA.San JuanGas Production

  8. Productivity Achievement Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16Hamada wins Gerald Hahn Quality and Productivity

  9. Covered Product Categories (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal mandates require that Federal agencies purchase energy-efficient products. To help agency buyers meet these requirements, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) maintains a list of FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified product categories.

  10. The Productivity Dilemma in Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrer, T. G.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industry's needs, improve productivity, and reduce costs is known, but the technology transfer needed to impact our industrial productivity has not taken place. A key factor in accomplishing technology transfer and implementation is the availability...

  11. Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi-Attribute System Design Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi of Science in Engineering and Management February 2005 ABSTRACT Automotive industry is facing a tough period

  12. Enabling effective product launch decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akamphon, Sappinandana

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work looks into the question of optimizing the performance of product launch decisions-in particular, the decisions of product development duration and manufacturing ramp-up. It presents an innovative model for ...

  13. Case study of a horizontal well in a layered Rotliegendes gas field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catterall, S.J.A.; Yaliz, A. (Hamilton Oil Co. Ltd., London (United Kingdom))

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A horizontal well was drilled in the Ravenspurn North field to drain a thin gas column above the aquifer. The field has a significant variation in reservoir quality, with most of the wells requiring stimulation by hydraulic fracturing. The reservoir is formed from a stacked sequence of aeolian dune and fluvial sandstones with a wide permeability range. The horizontal well was chosen as an alternative to stimulation by hydraulic fracturing to avoid water production from the aquifer. The well was successful, flowing at higher gas rates than expected with no water production. Production, core, and production logging data were used to demonstrate greater than expected lateral heterogeneity in the field. The horizontal well was found to be appropriate for the very specific conditions found in one part of the reservoir; however, the overall development strategy of using hydraulic fracture remains the preferred technique.

  14. FIELD RELIABILITY OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I Ww i 1 i FIELD RELIABILITY OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS wcwotoias R I S 0 - M - 2 4 1 8 An analytical study of in-the fiald axparlanca of electronics reliability Tag© Elm Rise National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark February 1 0 8 4 #12;RIS�-M-2418 FIELD RELIABILITY OP ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS An analytical

  15. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  16. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  17. IMPROVED APPROACHES TO DESIGN OF POLYMER GEL TREATMENTS IN MATURE OIL FIELDS: FIELD DEMONSTRATION IN DICKMAN FIELD, NESS COUNTY, KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Fowler

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of the one-year project entitled ''Improved Approaches to Design of Polymer Gel Treatments in Mature Oil Fields: Field Demonstration in Dickman Field, Ness County, Kansas''. The project was a 12-month collaboration of Grand Mesa Operating Company (a small independent), TIORCO Inc. (a company focused on improved recovery technology) and the University of Kansas. The study undertook tasks to determine an optimum polymer gel treatment design in Mississippian reservoirs, demonstrate application, and evaluate the success of the program. The project investigated geologic and engineering parameters and cost-effective technologies required for design and implementation of effective polymer gel treatment programs in the Mississippian reservoir in the Midcontinent. The majority of Mississippian production in Kansas occurs at or near the top of the Mississippian section just below the regional sub-Pennsylvanian unconformity and karst surface. Dickman Field with the extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors is typical of Mississippian reservoirs. Producibility problems in these reservoirs include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, and most significantly extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors that place continued operations at or near their economic limits. Geologic, geophysical and engineering data were integrated to provide a technical foundation for candidate selection and treatment design. Data includes core, engineering data, and 3D seismic data. Based on technical and economic considerations a well was selected for gel-polymer treatment (Grand Mesa Operating Company Tilley No.2). The treatment was not successful due to the small amount of polymer that could be injected. Data from the initial well and other candidates in the demonstration area was analyzed using geologic, geophysical and engineering data. Based on the results of the treatment and the integrated reservoir characterization it was determined that a second polymer-gel treatment could not be justified. The Mississippian reservoir at Dickman Field is much more complex than originally anticipated with numerous reservoir compartments and potential attic oil beneath the irregular Mississippian karst. It appears that remaining oil in place could be best recovered using improved oil recovery techniques such as target infill drilling and horizontal wells.

  18. Small Power Production Facilities (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that:...

  19. Fossil-Based Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Fossil-Based Hydrogen Production Praxair Praxair SNL TIAX · Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for H2

  20. Covered Product Categories (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    List of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)-designated product categories for energy-efficient procurement requirements.

  1. Are Cluster Magnetic Fields Primordial ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robi Banerjee; Karsten Jedamzik

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of a detailed and fully non-linear numerical and analytical investigation of magnetic field evolution from the very earliest cosmic epochs to the present. We find that, under reasonable assumptions concerning the efficiency of a putative magnetogenesis era during cosmic phase transitions, surprisingly strong magnetic fields 10^{-13} - 10^{-11} Gauss, on comparatively small scales 100 pc - 10 kpc may survive to the present. Building on prior work on the evolution of magnetic fields during the course of gravitational collapse of a cluster, which indicates that pre-collapse fields of 4\\times 10^{-12} Gauss extant on small scales may suffice to produce clusters with acceptable Faraday rotation measures, we question the widely hold view that cluster magnetic fields may not be entirely of primordial origin.

  2. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  3. Mississippian Ratcliffe and Nesson reservoirs, Rosebud field, Williams County, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, K.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rosebud is a Ratcliffe and Nesson field, located in the central part of the Williston basin. The field has five producing wells, but is not completely defined. Rosebud field may have 5 to 15 additional locations and the potential for recoverable reserves in excess of one million barrels of oil. Production is controlled by a combination of structure and stratigraphic pinchout of porosity. Ratcliffe production is from an algal buildup and is the primary reservoir in the field. Nesson production is from a carbonate shoal facies. Rosebud field is located on an east plunging structural nose with 13 ft of closure at the Nesson level. Both Ratcliffe and Nesson porosity are best developed along the crest of the structure. A fairway of Ratcliffe algal buildups and Nesson shoals offer additional exploration opportunities in a relatively undrilled area of the Williston basin. The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the characteristics related to production in Rosebud field and to suggest that similar fields may be discovered by exploration of the surrounding area.

  4. Atmospheric science and power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randerson, D. (ed.)

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  5. WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN FISH MEAL AND OIL UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR · FISH ON OF FISH MEAL AND OIL , ESPECIALLY DUR ING 1953 TO 1959, THE PRI NC IPAL MARKET S FOR THE PRODUCTS- DICATE WHAT IS INCLUDED BESIDES FISHMEAL AND FISH BODY OIL. #12;WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN FISH MEAL

  6. Creating Value Wood Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisiana Forest Products Development Center #12;2 Louisiana is blessed with quality timberland for the Wood Products Industry The forest industry contributes more than 50 percent of the total value of all for quality information, research and education in forest products in Louisiana, recognized regionally

  7. Upsilon Productions at STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Hamed

    2010-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\Upsilon(1S+2S+3S)\\to e^{+}e^{-}$ cross section is measured at mid-rapidity ($y$) in $p+p$ collisions and in d$+Au$ collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. In $p+p$, the measured cross section is found to be consistent with the world data trend as a function of $\\sqrt{s}$, in agreement with the Color Evaportaion Model (CEM), and underestimated by the Color Singlet Model (CSM) up to the Next-to-Leading-Order Quantum Chromodynamics (NLO QCD) calculations. In d+$Au$, the measured cross section is in agreement with the CEM prediction with anti-shadowing effects, and the nuclear modification factor indicates that $\\Upsilon(1S+2S+3S)$ production follows binary scaling within the current uncertainties. These measurements provide a benchmark for the future measurements of $\\Upsilon$ production in $Au+Au$ collisions.

  8. Homological Product Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Bravyi; Matthew B. Hastings

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum codes with low-weight stabilizers known as LDPC codes have been actively studied recently due to their simple syndrome readout circuits and potential applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing. However, all families of quantum LDPC codes known to this date suffer from a poor distance scaling limited by the square-root of the code length. This is in a sharp contrast with the classical case where good families of LDPC codes are known that combine constant encoding rate and linear distance. Here we propose the first family of good quantum codes with low-weight stabilizers. The new codes have a constant encoding rate, linear distance, and stabilizers acting on at most $\\sqrt{n}$ qubits, where $n$ is the code length. For comparison, all previously known families of good quantum codes have stabilizers of linear weight. Our proof combines two techniques: randomized constructions of good quantum codes and the homological product operation from algebraic topology. We conjecture that similar methods can produce good stabilizer codes with stabilizer weight $n^a$ for any $a>0$. Finally, we apply the homological product to construct new small codes with low-weight stabilizers.

  9. GEOPHYSICAL WELL LOG/CORE DESCRIPTIONS, CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  10. POROSITY/PERMEABILITY CROSS-PLOTS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  11. Reversed field pinch current drive with oscillating helical fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farengo, Ricardo; Clemente, Roberto Antonio [Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, S.C. de Bariloche (8400), RN (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of oscillating helical magnetic fields to produce and sustain the toroidal and poloidal currents in a reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated. A simple physical model that assumes fixed ions, massless electrons, and uniform density and resistivity is employed. Thermal effects are neglected in Ohm's law and helical coordinates are introduced to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear equations that must be advanced in time. The results show that it is possible to produce RFP-like magnetic field profiles with pinch parameters close to the experimental values. The efficiencies obtained for moderate resistivity, and the observed scaling, indicate that this could be a very attractive method for high temperature plasmas.

  12. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state`s total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation`s energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska`s 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  13. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state's total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation's energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska's 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  14. fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM #12;The Field Museum | Field Trip Planning Guide for Educators 2 Welcome to The Field Museum! The Field Museum is an exciting place to explore and learn time. Taking a field trip to the Museum o ers students and teachers an opportunity to interact

  15. fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM #12;The Field Museum | Field Trip Planning Guide for Educators 2 Welcome to The Field Museum! The Field Museum is an exciting place to explore and learn. Taking a field trip to the Museum o ers students and teachers an opportunity to interact with real

  16. Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opilla, R.; Dale, L.; Surles, T.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of carbohydrate sources can be used as raw material for the production of ethanol. Section 1 is a review of technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. Section 2 is a review of the use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. Section 3 deals with the environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

  17. The non chiral fusion rules in rational conformal field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rida; T. Sami

    2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a general method in order to construct the non chiral fusion rules which determine the operator content of the operator product algebra for rational conformal field theories. We are particularly interested in the models of the complementary D-like solutions of modular invariant partition functions with cyclic center Zn. We find that the non chiral fusion rules have a Zn-grading structure.

  18. Performance of electroless nickel coated steel in oil field environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, R.N.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Details of test programs to establish the corrosion and erosion resistance of electroless nickel coating in saline/CO/sub 2//H/sub 2/S petroleum production environments at temperatures up to 180/sup 0/C (350 F) are presented, together with actual experience with their use. Data on heat treatment and deposit composition effects on electroless nickel corrosion in oil field services are given.

  19. Performance of Electroless Nickel coatings in oil field environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, R.N.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experience has shown functional Electroless Nickel to have outstanding resistance to corrosion and erosion in petroleum production facilities. Details of test programs to establish the performance of this coating in saline/CO/sub 2//H/sub 2/S environments at temperatures up to 180 C (350 F) are reported, together with actual experience with their use. Data also are presented on the effect of heat treatment and of deposit composition on the corrosion of Electroless Nickel in oil field services.

  20. Beta Field history: Submersible pumps in heavy crude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, D.E.; McCrea, A.A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Beta Field, offshore Long Beach, was developed in 1981 with electric submersible pumps as its primary artificial lift. The produced oil gravity ranges from 10--19 API. The wells had low initial water cuts, which increased as the waterflood matured. The impact of viscous production and increased water cuts on the ESP run times are presented here. Despite these challenges, equipment life is currently at 594 days. Equipment sizing techniques and the failure history are also shared.

  1. Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: • Laboratory studies • Mathematical modeling • Sonic tool design and development • Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40°C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale-up purposes was limited due to funding constraints. The overall plan for this task was to perlorm field trials with the sonication tooL These trials were to be performed in production and/or injection wells located in Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia. Four new wells were drilled in preparation for the field demonstration. Baseline production data were collected and reservoir simulator tuned to simulate these oil reservoirs. The sonication tools were designed for these wells. However, actual field testing could not be carried out because of premature termination of the project.

  2. Method for production of magnesium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diaz, A.F.; Howard, J.B.; Modestino, A.J.; Peters, W.A.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400 C or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products. 12 figs.

  3. Method for production of magnesium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diaz, Alexander F. (Cambridge, MA); Howard, Jack B. (Winchester, MA); Modestino, Anthony J. (Hanson, MA); Peters, William A. (Lexington, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400.degree. C. or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products.

  4. An overview of craniospinal axis fields and field matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Robin L., E-mail: robinscott631@gmail.com

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many methods are implemented for craniospinal axis (CSA) radiation treatment (RT). This paper’s goal is to define correctly matched CSA RT fields. Overlap or a space between matched RT fields can create variances of dose and the possibility of negative side effects or disease recurrence, respectively. An accurate CSA RT match procedure is created with localization markers, immobilization devices, equations, feathered matches, safety gap, and portal imaging. A CS match angle is predetermined to optimize patient position before immobilization device fabrication. Various central axis (CA) placements within the brain and spine fields that effect gantry, table, and collimator rotation are described. An overview of the methods used to create CSA RT fields and matches is presented for optimal CSA RT implementation. In addition, to the author’s knowledge, this is the first time that a prone CSA RT with anesthesia has been described.

  5. Stewart Morrow Field - DOE Class 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchardt, P.; Reynolds, R.R.; Watney, L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two demonstration cost-share projects are being conducted in Kansas under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Class 1 Oil Program for fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs. These projects are one of fourteen awards granted by DOE nationwide for projects in this reservoir classification. The projects are conducted in a cooperative manner, involving University of Kansas scientists, engineers, and geologists and independent oil operators. The Stewart Field project is located in Finney County, Kansas. This project involves a Morrow reservoir located in the southwestern part of the State. Morrow reservoirs of western Kansas are still actively being explored and constitute an important resource in Kansas. Cumulative oil production from the Marrow in Kansas is over 174,308,000 bbls. Much of the production from the Morrow is still in the primary stage and has not reached the mature declining stage. The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. The general topics addressed are (1) reservoir management and primary drive performance evaluation, and (2) the demonstration of a recovery process involving off-the-shelf technology which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery and increase reserves. Future plans consist of the design, construction and operation of a waterflood installation incorporated fieldwide utilizing state-of-the art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. Production and reservoir data will be analyzed using reservoir characterization techniques and by updating the existing reservoir simulation. The analysis of results will be utilized to optimize the waterflood plan and flooding techniques to maximize the secondary oil recovery.

  6. Little Knife field - US Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittstrom, M.D.; Lindsay, R.F. (Chevron USA, Inc., Midland, TX (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Little Knife field is a combination structural and stratigraphic trap located near the structural center of the Williston basin, North Dakota. The field is approximately 12 mi (19.3 km) long and 2.5 to 5.5 mi (4 to 8.9 km) wide. Little Knife was discovered by Gulf Oil in 1976 as part of a regional exploration play involving a transition from impermeable to porous carbonate rocks. In 1987, ultimate recovery from the Mission Canyon (Mississippian) reservoir was estimated to be 97.5 MMBO. This included 57.5 MMBO primary, 27 MMBO secondary, and 13 MMBO tertiary (CO{sub 2}) oil. At present the field is still under primary recovery, since utilization efforts have not been successful. Approximately one-third of Little Knife's 130 ft (39.6 m) oil column is trapped by structural closure beneath a regional anhydrite seal in a north-south-trending anticline. The remaining two-thirds of the oil column is trapped where the reservoir beds change facies from porous dolostones and dolomitic limestones to nonporous limestones. Structural entrapment accounts for approximately 50% (127 MMBO) of the OOIP, but covers only 30% of the producing area. Production is from the upper portions of the Mission Canyon Formation, a regressive, shoaling-upward carbonate-anhydrite sequence deposited in a slowly shrinking epeiric sea. The Mission Canyon in the Little Knife area is divided into six zones that record predominantly cyclic, subtidal deposition. These are overlain by prograding lagoonal, tidal flat, and sabkha beds. The source of Mission Canyon oil is thought to be the Bakken Formation, an organic-rich shale at the base of the Mississippian.

  7. Production of zinc pellets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

  8. Production of zinc pellets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, J.F.

    1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

  9. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, Matthew B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  10. Production of magnesium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN) [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA) [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  11. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  12. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, John A. (Ithaca, NY); Greenwald, Shlomo (Haifa, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  13. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Generation of Gaussian Density Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugo Martel

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes analytical and numerical techniques for the generation of Gaussian density fields, which represent cosmological density perturbations. The mathematical techniques involved in the generation of density harmonics in k-space, the filtering of the density fields, and the normalization of the power spectrum to the measured temperature fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background, are presented in details. These techniques are well-known amongst experts, but the current literature lacks a formal description. I hope that this technical report will prove useful to new researchers moving into this field, sparing them the task of reinventing the wheel.

  15. Mass Operator and Gauge Field Theory with Five-variable Field Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ChiYi Chen

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the mass generating problem without Higgs mechanism we present a model in which a new scalar gauge coupling is naturally introduced. Because of the existence of production and annihilation for particles in quantum field theory, we extend the number of independent variables from conventional four space-time dimensions to five ones in order to describe all degrees of freedom for field functions while the conventional space-time is still retained to be the background. The potential fifth variable is nothing but the proper time of particles. In response, a mass operator $(\\hat{m}=-i\\hbar \\frac{\\partial}{\\partial\\tau})$ should be introduced. After that, the lagrangian for free fermion fields in terms of five independent variables and mass operator is written down. By applying the gauge principle, three kinds of vector gauge couplings and one kind of scalar gauge coupling are naturally introduced. In the current scenario, the mass spectrum for all fundamental particles is accounted for in principle by solving the eigenvalue of mass operator under the function of all kinds of interactions. Moreover, there no any auxiliary mechanism including spontaneous symmetry breaking get involved in the model. Therefore, traditional problems in the standard model such as the vacuum energy problem are removed from our model, as well as the hierarchy problem on the mass spectrum for fundamental particles.

  16. Magnetic Fields of Uranus and Neptune: Metallic Fluid Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nellis, W J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic fields of the Ice Giant Planets Uranus and Neptune (U/N) are unique in the solar system. Based on a substantial database measured on Earth for representative planetary fluids at representative dynamic pressures up to 200 GPa (2 Mbar) and a few 1000 K, the complex magnetic fields of U/N are (i) probably made primarily by degenerate metallic fluid H (MFH) at or near the crossover from the H-He envelopes to Ice cores at ~100 GPa (Mbar) pressures and normalized radii of ~90% of the radii of U/N; (ii) because those magnetic fields are made relatively close to the surfaces of U/N, non-dipolar fields can be expected; (iii) the Ice cores are most probably a heterogeneous fluid mixture of H, N, O, C, Fe/Ni and silicate-oxides and their mutual reaction products at high pressures and temperatures; (iv) the shapes of the magnetic fields are probably caused by weak coupling between rotational motions of U/N and convective motions of conducting fluids in dynamos that make those magnetic fields. Ironically, the...

  17. GIS Symbology for FRMAC/CMHT Radiological/Nuclear Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Aluzzi, F; Foster, K; Pobanz, B; Sher, B

    2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is intended to codify, to the extent currently possible, the representation of map products produced for and by the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) and the Consequence Management Home Team (CHMT), particularly those that include model products from the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (NARAC). This is to facilitate consistency between GIS products produced by different members of these teams, which should ease the task of interpreting these products by both team members and those outside the team who may need to use these products during a response. The aspects of symbology being considered are primarily isopleths levels (breakpoints) and colors used to plot NARAC modeled dose or deposition fields on mpas, although some comments will be made about the handling of legend and supporting textual information. Other aspects of symbolizing such products (e.g., transparency) are being left to the individual team members to allow them to adapt to particular organizational needs or requirements that develop during a particular a response or exercise. This document has been written in coordination with the creation of training material in Baskett, et al., 2008. It is not intended as an aid to NARAC product interpretation but to facilitate the work of GIS specialists who deal with these products in map design and in the development of supporting scripts and software that partially or completely automate the integration of NARAC model products with other GIS data. This work was completed as part of the NA-42 Technical Integration Project on GIS Automated Data Processing and Map Production in FY 2008. Other efforts that are part of this work include (a) updating the NARAC shapefile product representation to facilitate the automation work proceed at RSL as part of the same TI effort and (b) to ensure that the NARAC shapefile construct includes all of the necessary legend and other textual data to interpret dispersion and deposition patterns and related products correctly. This document is focusing on the products produced by the GIS Division of the Remove Sensing Laboratory (RSL) and by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), both separately and in combination. The expectation is that standard products produced by either group independently or in combination should use the same key attributes in displaying the same kinds of data so that products of a given type generally look similar in key aspects of the presentation, thereby minimizing any confusion of users when a variety of products from these groups may be needed. This document is dealing with the set of common standard products used in responding to radiological/nuclear releases. There are a number of less standard products that are used occasionally or in certain specific situations that are not addressed here. This includes special products that are occasionally produced by both NARAC and RSL in responses and major exercises to meet immediate and unanticipated requirements. At some future time, it may be appropriate to review the handling of such special products by both organizations to determine if there are any areas that would benefit from being integrated with the conventions described here. A particular area that should be addressed in the near-term is that of Derived Response Levels (DRLs) calculated by the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT) or FRMAC Assessment Scientists. A new calculation is done for every event assigning contour levels, or break-points, based upon field measurements. These contour levels can be applied to deposition or dose rate NARAC calculations. Because these calculations are different every time, they can not be stored in a database.

  18. Hydroprocessing Bio-oil and Products Separation for Coke Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass can be used to produce a raw bio-oil product, which can be upgraded by catalytic hydroprocessing to hydrocarbon liquid products. In this study the upgraded products were distilled to recover light naphtha and oils and to produce a distillation resid with useful properties for coker processing and production of renewable, low-sulfur electrode carbon. For this hydroprocessing work, phase separation of the bio-oil was applied as a preparatory step to concentrate the heavier, more phenolic components thus generating a more amenable feedstock for resid production. Low residual oxygen content products were produced by continuous-flow, catalytic hydroprocessing of the phase separated bio-oil.

  19. Anomalies and Invertible Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel S. Freed

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a modern geometric viewpoint on anomalies in quantum field theory and illustrate it in a 1-dimensional theory: supersymmetric quantum mechanics. This is background for the resolution of worldsheet anomalies in orientifold superstring theory.

  20. Field emission from organic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kymissis, Ioannis, 1977-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field emission displays (FEDs) show great promise as high performance flat panel displays. The light emission process is efficient, long lifetimes are possible with high brightness, and bright passive matrix displays can ...

  1. Field ionization from carbon nanofibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeoti, Bosun J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Micro Gas Analyzer project aims to develop power-efficient, high resolution, high sensitivity, portable and real-time gas sensors. We developed a field ionizer array based on gated CNTs. Arrays of CNTs are used because ...

  2. Improvements in Low Field MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogier, Stephen E

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presently dominated by multi-million dollar machines that use large superconducting magnets to generate very high quality images. It is possible to perform MRI at lower magnetic field...

  3. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahn, Robert N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Flows of Dark Energy Robert N. Cahn, Roland de Putter,July 8, 2008) Scalar ?eld dark energy evolving from a longthe key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of

  4. Topics in double field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Seung Ki

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of momentum and winding modes of closed string on a torus leads to a natural idea that the field theoretical approach of string theory should involve winding type coordinates as well as the usual space-time ...

  5. Fsusy and Field Theoretical Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Sedra; J. Zerouaoui

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Following our previous work on fractional spin symmetries (FSS) \\cite{6, 7}, we consider here the construction of field theoretical models that are invariant under the $D=2(1/3,1/3)$ supersymmetric algebra.

  6. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  7. Extreme field physics and QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Heinzl; Anton Ilderton

    2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a brief overview of the most important QED effects that can be studied in the presence of extreme fields such as those expected at the Vulcan laser upgraded to a power of 10 Petawatts.

  8. Tulenovo field holds key to new drilling in Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottomley, S.; Pritchard, G. [Balkan Explorers (Bulgaria) Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Tulenovo oil field is located on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast, 60 km northeast of the port of Varna and 25 km south of the Romanian border. The accumulation, second largest in Bulgaria, has several unusual technical features: shallow depth ({+-}350 m); cavernous porosity, giving excellent reservoir quality, oil recovery, and production flow rates; an effective chalk seal; controversial and unproven source rock; a secondary gas cap; and extensive well coverage yielding detailed reservoir data. The field`s gas cap is reported to contain 94% methane and > 5% nitrogen. The gas is not in equilibrium with the underlying oil and is interpreted to represent a secondary feature resulting from more recent thermal or biogenic gas generation. Carbon isotope analysis of the gas is not available to resolve this matter. The most likely source of the gas is the fore-deep to the Balkan mountains (the Kamchia depression), located south of the field. The paper describes the reservoir, its seal, oil and gas characteristics, structure, production performance, and development plans.

  9. Green functions and Euclidean fields near the bifurcate Killing horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Haba

    2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We approximate a Euclidean version of a D+1 dimensional manifold with a bifurcate Killing horizon by a product of a two-dimensional Rindler space and a D-1 dimensional manifold M. We obtain approximate formulas for the Green functions. We study the behaviour of Green functions near the horizon and their dimensional reduction. We show that if M is compact then the massless minimally coupled quantum field contains a zero mode which is a conformal invariant free field on R^2. Then, the Green function near the horizon can be approximated by the Green function of the two-dimensional quantum field theory. The correction term is exponentially small away from the horizon. If the volume of a geodesic ball is growing to infinity with its radius then the Green function cannot be approximated by a two-dimensional one.

  10. New dynamo pattern revealed by solar helical magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongqi; Pevtsov, A; Gao, Yu; Xu, Haiqing; Sokoloff, D D; Kuzanyan, K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previously unobservable mirror asymmetry of the solar magnetic field -- a key ingredient of the dynamo mechanism which is believed to drive the 11-year activity cycle -- has now been measured. This was achieved through systematic monitoring of solar active regions carried out for more than 20 years at observatories in Mees, Huairou, and Mitaka. In this paper we report on detailed analysis of vector magnetic field data, obtained at Huairou Solar Observing Station in China. Electric current helicity (the product of current and magnetic field component in the same direction) was estimated from the data and a latitude-time plot of solar helicity during the last two solar cycles has been produced. We find that like sunspots helicity patterns propagate equatorwards but unlike sunspot polarity helicity in each solar hemisphere does not change sign from cycle to cycle - confirming the theory. There are, however, two significant time-latitudinal domains in each cycle when the sign does briefly invert. Our findings she...

  11. Total cross-section for photon-axion conversions in external electromagnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Soa; H. N. Long; T. D. Tham

    2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconsider the conversion of the photon into axion in the external electromagnetic fields, namely in the static fields and in a periodic field of the wave guide. The total cross-sections for the conversion are evaluated in detail. The result shows that with strong strength of external electromagnetic fields, the cross-sections are large enough to measure the axion production. In the wave guide there exists the resonant conversion at the low energies, in which the value of cross-sections is much enhanced

  12. Electromagnetic field and cosmic censorship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koray Düzta?

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a gedanken experiment in which an extremal Kerr black hole interacts with a test electromagnetic field. Using Teukolsky's solutions for electromagnetic perturbations in Kerr spacetime, and the conservation laws imposed by the energy momentum tensor of the electromagnetic field and the Killing vectors of the spacetime, we prove that this interaction cannot convert the black hole into a naked singularity, thus cosmic censorship conjecture is not violated in this case.

  13. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

  14. Production design for plate products in the steel industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjeeb Dash

    2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 5, 2007 ... The use of these tools provides two types of benefits: improvements in the productivity of the plant and an approach to making the key business ...

  15. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  16. Hydrogen production from carbonaceous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lackner, Klaus S.; Ziock, Hans J.; Harrison, Douglas P.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen is produced from solid or liquid carbon-containing fuels in a two-step process. The fuel is gasified with hydrogen in a hydrogenation reaction to produce a methane-rich gaseous reaction product, which is then reacted with water and calcium oxide in a hydrogen production and carbonation reaction to produce hydrogen and calcium carbonate. The calcium carbonate may be continuously removed from the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone and calcined to regenerate calcium oxide, which may be reintroduced into the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone. Hydrogen produced in the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction is more than sufficient both to provide the energy necessary for the calcination reaction and also to sustain the hydrogenation of the coal in the gasification reaction. The excess hydrogen is available for energy production or other purposes. Substantially all of the carbon introduced as fuel ultimately emerges from the invention process in a stream of substantially pure carbon dioxide. The water necessary for the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction may be introduced into both the gasification and hydrogen production and carbonation reactions, and allocated so as transfer the exothermic heat of reaction of the gasification reaction to the endothermic hydrogen production and carbonation reaction.

  17. Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial griddles, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program

  18. Optimization Online - Robust Production Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Guigues

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 23, 2011 ... Abstract: The problem of production management can often be cast in the form ... We then give the quality of robust solutions obtained by using ...

  19. Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial fryers, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  20. Toda Cathode Materials Production Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cathode Materials Production Facility 2013 DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 13-17, 2013 David Han, Yasuhiro Abe Toda America Inc. Project ID: ARRAVT017...

  1. Coalbed methane production case histories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of methane gas from coal and coal-bearing rocks is one of the prime objectives of the Department of Energy's Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project. This report contains brief description of wells that are presently producing gas from coal or coal-bearing rocks. Data from three gob gas production areas in Illinois, an in-mine horizontal borehole degasification, and eleven vertical boreholes are presented. Production charts and electric logs of the producing zones are included for some of the wells. Additional information on dry gas production from the San Juan Basin, Colorado/New Mexico and the Greater Green River Coal Region, Colorado/Wyoming is also included.

  2. AGENDA: PETROLEUM PRODUCT TRANSMISSION & DISTRIBUTION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The agenda for the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) public stakeholder meeting in New Orleans on petroleum product transmission, distribution, and storage.

  3. Video Production Checklist Gear needed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Laurence J.

    Video Production Checklist Gear needed: · Camera · Tripod · Headphones · Microphone · Memory cards (sunlight, tungsten, fluorescent, etc.) Camera should have an auto white balance setting. · Mic the person

  4. FISHERY PRODUCTS SITUATION Consumption of fishery products is ex-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Per -capita sales likely will be near 11.2 pounds--down from 11.4 pounds in 1970. Consumption had beenFISHERY PRODUCTS SITUATION Consumption of fishery products is ex- pected to be off a little in 1971 to attract more imports in 1971 . Since U.S. fish consumption is about 550/0-de- pendent on imports

  5. Production of carboxylic acid and salt co-products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanchar, Robert J.; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provide processes for producing carboxylic acid product, along with useful salts. The carboxylic acid product that is produced according to this invention is preferably a C.sub.2-C.sub.12 carboxylic acid. Among the salts produced in the process of the invention are ammonium salts.

  6. Universal Product Design: Transforming User Activity Into Product Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostovich, Vincent

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Many people have disabilities and would like to have all of the amenities typical of daily life. Universal product design is important in designing for the disabled and creating user-friendly products for all people. The goal of this thesis...

  7. Electric field statistics in MHD turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Robert

    Electric field statistics in MHD turbulence Bernard Knaepen, Nicolas Denewet & Daniele Carati, ULB #12;Electric field statistics in MHD turbulence Outline Electric field in MHD? Particle acceleration Statistics of the electric & magnetic fields #12;Outline Electric field in MHD? Particle acceleration

  8. Product Development Practices for Meeting Financial Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makumbe, Pedzi

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports product development practices that separate the most successful product development programs from the rest. A detailed understanding of best product development practices is important because product ...

  9. Productivity Improvement of a Manual Assembly Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerasi, Pranavi

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The current project addresses the productivity improvement of a manual assembly line by making use of operations analysis in the framework of Lean production. A methodology is proposed that helps to improve the productivity of any production process...

  10. THIN SECTION DESCRIPTIONS: LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field in Utah (figure 1). However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  11. CARBON AND OXYGEN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS: BUG, CHEROKEE, AND PATTERSON CANYON FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Stephen T. Nelson

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  12. CAPILLARY PRESSURE/MERCURY INJECTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  13. THIN SECTION DESCRIPTIONS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  14. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND PORE CASTING: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Louis H. Taylor

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  15. Fission product solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, B.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Sachleben, R.A. [and others

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two main objectives concerning removal of fission products from high-level tank wastes will be accomplished in this project. The first objective entails the development of an acid-side Cs solvent-extraction (SX) process applicable to remediation of the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved calcine waste (DCW) at INEEL. The second objective is to develop alkaline-side SX processes for the combined removal of Tc, Cs, and possibly Sr and for individual separation of Tc (alone or together with Sr) and Cs. These alkaline-side processes apply to tank wastes stored at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge. This work exploits the useful properties of crown ethers and calixarenes and has shown that such compounds may be economically adapted to practical processing conditions. Potential benefits for both acid- and alkaline-side processing include order-of-magnitude concentration factors, high rejection of bulk sodium and potassium salts, and stripping with dilute (typically 10 mM) nitric acid. These benefits minimize the subsequent burden on the very expensive vitrification and storage of the high-activity waste. In the case of the SRTALK process for Tc extraction as pertechnetate anion from alkaline waste, such benefits have now been proven at the scale of a 12-stage flowsheet tested in 2-cm centrifugal contactors with a Hanford supernatant waste simulant. SRTALK employs a crown ether in a TBP-modified aliphatic kerosene diluent, is economically competitive with other applicable separation processes being considered, and has been successfully tested in batch extraction of actual Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF).

  16. Secondary Production of Massive Quarks in Thrust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre H. Hoang; Vicent Mateu; Piotr Pietrulewicz

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e+ e- --> hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N3LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(Lambda_QCD) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  17. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH): Thermochemic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH): Thermochemical Cycle Selection and Investment Priority Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH):...

  18. A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production...

  19. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVILAMENDMENT20/%2A6/%2A6/%2A9/%2A en

  20. Thermalization in External Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali-Akbari, Mohammad

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the AdS/CFT framework meson thermalization in the presence of a constant external magnetic field in a strongly coupled gauge theory has been studied. In the gravitational description the thermalization of mesons corresponds to the horizon formation on the flavour D7-brane which is embedded in the AdS_5 x S^5 background in the probe limit. The apparent horizon forms due to the time-dependent change in the baryon number chemical potential, the injection of baryons in the gauge theory. We will numerically show that the thermalization happens even faster in the presence of the magnetic field on the probe brane. We observe that this reduction in the thermalization time sustains up to a specific value of the magnetic field.