Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

Kearney, D. W.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Preliminary operational results of the low-temperature solar industrial process heat field tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six solar industrial process heat field tests have been in operation for a year or more - three are hot water systems and three are hot air systems. All are low-temperature projects (process heat at temperatures below 212/sup 0/F). Performance results gathered by each contractor's data acquisition system are presented and project costs and problems encountered are summarized. Flat-plate, evacuated-tube, and line-focus collectors are all represented in the program, with collector array areas ranging from 2500 to 21,000 ft/sup 2/. Collector array efficiencies ranged from 12% to 36% with net system efficiencies from 8% to 33%. Low efficiencies are attributable in some cases to high thermal losses and, for the two projects using air collectors, are due in part to high parasitic power consumption. Problems have included industrial effluents on collectors, glazing and absorber surface failures, excessive thermal losses, freezing and overheating, control problems, and data acquisition system failure. With design and data acquisition costs excluded costs of the projects ranged from $25/ft/sup 2/ to $87/ft/sup 2/ and $499/(MBtu/yr) to $1537/(MBtu/yr).

Kutscher, C.F.; Davenport, R.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Optimizing the heat pipe for operation in a magnetic field when liquid-metal working fluids are used  

SciTech Connect

A novel method for reducing the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drops in the liquid metal flow in a heat pipe wick is described. By flattening the heat pipe, the eddy current return path in the metallic heat pipe wall is inreased significantly, thereby increasing the effective wall resistance. This, in turn, reduces the magnitude of the MHD pressure drop. The same principle can also be applied to flows of liquid metal coolants in a magnetic field.

Werner, R.W.; Hoffman, M.A.

1981-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

4

Heat Transfer Operators Associated with Quantum Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any quantum operation applied on a physical system is performed as a unitary transformation on a larger extended system. If the extension used is a heat bath in thermal equilibrium, the concomitant change in the state of the bath necessarily implies a heat exchange with it. The dependence of the average heat transferred to the bath on the initial state of the system can then be found from the expectation value of a hermitian operator, which is named as the heat transfer operator (HTO). The purpose of this article is the investigation of the relation between the HTOs and the associated quantum operations. Since, any given quantum operation on a system can be realized by different baths and unitaries, many different HTOs are possible for each quantum operation. On the other hand, there are also strong restrictions on the HTOs which arise from the unitarity of the transformations. The most important of these is the Landauer erasure principle. This article is concerned with the question of finding a complete set of restrictions on the HTOs that are associated with a given quantum operation. An answer to this question has been found only for a subset of quantum operations. For erasure operations, these characterizations are equivalent to the generalized Landauer erasure principle. For the case of generic quantum operations however, it appears that the HTOs obey further restrictions which cannot be obtained from the entropic restrictions of the generalized Landauer erasure principle.

Ç. Aksak; S. Turgut

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

5

Field Operations Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

688 688 May 1999 Field Operations Program Activities Status Report Fiscal Years 1997 through mid-1999 J. E. Francfort D. V. O'Hara L. A. Slezak DOE/ID-10688 Field Operations Program Activities Status Report Fiscal Years 1997 through mid-1999 J. E. Francfort 1 D. V. O'Hara 2 L. A. Slezak 2 Published May 1999 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Automotive Systems and Technology Department Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office 1 INEEL/Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. 2 U.S. Department of Energy iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental

6

Heat pipes for use in a magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe configuration is described for use in a magnetic field environment of a fusion reactor. Heat pipes for operation in a magnetic field when liquid metal working fluids are used are optimized by flattening of the heat pipes having an unobstructed annulus which significantly reduces the adverse side region effect of the prior known cylindrically configured heat pipes. The flattened heat pipes operating in a magnetic field can remove 2 to 3 times the heat as a cylindrical heat pipe of the same cross sectional area.

Werner, R.W.; Hoffman, M.A.

1981-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

7

Heat pipes for use in a magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe configuration for use in a magnetic field environment of a fusion reactor is disclosed. Heat pipes for operation in a magnetic field when liquid metal working fluids are used are optimized by flattening of the heat pipes having an unobstructed annulus which significantly reduces the adverse side region effect of the prior known cylindrically configured heat pipes. The flattened heat pipes operating in a magnetic field can remove 2--3 times the heat as a cylindrical heat pipe of the same cross sectional area. 4 figs.

Werner, R.W.; Hoffman, M.A.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

8

Heat pipes for use in a magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe configuration for use in a magnetic field environment of a fusion reactor. Heat pipes for operation in a magnetic field when liquid metal working fluids are used are optimized by flattening of the heat pipes having an unobstructed annulus which significantly reduces the adverse side region effect of the prior known cylindrically configured heat pipes. The flattened heat pipes operating in a magnetic field can remove 2--3 times the heat as a cylindrical heat pipe of the same cross sectional area.

Werner, Richard W. (San Ramon, CA); Hoffman, Myron A. (Davis, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Field Operations Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMMARY This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery- equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the U.S. Department of Energy's Field...

10

Renewable Combined Heat and Power Dairy Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horsepower Guascor model SFGLD-560 biogas-fired lean burn internal combustion (IC) engine and generator set and modify the existing biogas toelectricity combined heat and power (CHP) system operated at Fiscalini bacteria to remove hydrogen sulfide presented in the biogas. Source: Fiscalini Farms Term: March 2011

11

Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters B. Sparn, L. Earle, D. Christensen, J. Maguire, and E. Wilson National Renewable Energy Laboratory C.E. Hancock Mountain Energy...

12

Field Guide: Heat Recovery Steam Generator Outage Inspection Pocket Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) pose a unique set of operational challenges, due in part to their rapid startup capabilities and high operating efficiencies. Among these challenges are the difficulty of inspection and repair, which are complicated by limited access as well as the complexity of the equipment. To help members address these challenges, the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Heat Recovery Steam Generator Dependability program has added this field guide to its comprehensive s...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

13

Operating and Maintaining Your Heat Pump | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operating and Maintaining Your Heat Pump Operating and Maintaining Your Heat Pump Operating and Maintaining Your Heat Pump June 24, 2012 - 3:22pm Addthis Changing filters regularly is an important part of maintaining a heat pump system. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos Changing filters regularly is an important part of maintaining a heat pump system. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos What does this mean for me? Learn to operate and maintain your heat pump system properly to maximize energy and money savings. You can do many operational and maintenance tasks yourself. Proper operation of your heat pump will save energy. Do not set back the heat pump's thermostat if it causes the backup heating to come on -- backup heating systems are usually more expensive to operate. Continuous indoor

14

Field Operation Power Switching Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety is of paramount consideration in all aspects of utility operations. Power switching operations, due to their variable nature, are susceptible to errors that can place utility workers at risk, lower system reliability or ability to respond to contingencies, increase customer outages, lower customer satisfactions, and reduce revenue. This report summarizes the results of analysis of utility data collected on human error in power switching operations and describes industry techniques used to reduce t...

1996-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

15

Heating Structures of the TRMM Field Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating profiles calculated from sounding networks and other observations during three Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) field campaigns [the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX), TRMM Large-Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (...

Courtney Schumacher; Minghua H. Zhang; Paul E. Ciesielski

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Field Operation Program - Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Fleet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Fleet Use J. Francfort M. Carroll July 2001 United States Department of Energy INEELEXT-01-00864 Field Operations Program...

17

Geothermal field tests: heat exchanger evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of the heat exchanger tests conducted on a scale model of a heat exchanger that has been designed and fabricated for the Geothermal Test Facility show that this exchanger will lose 60% of its heat transfer capability and fall below design requirements after 92 hours of operation. When the test exchanger was clean and operating as close as possible to design conditions, its overall heat transfer coefficient was 426 BTU/hr-ft/sup 2/ - /sup 0/f. when calculating in the fouling factor of .0035 this gave a design coefficient of 171 BTU/hr-ft/sup 2/ - /sup 0/f which was reached after less than four days of steady state operation. Thermal shocking of the test heat exchanger once each hour while the exchanger was operating at design conditions had no effect on scale removal or heat transfer. Results of tube cleaning showed that chemical treatment with 30% hydrochloric acid followed by a high pressure water jet (6000 psig), was effective in removing scale from tubes contacted with geothermal brine. After cleaning, the tubes were examined and some pitting was observed throughout the length of one tube.

Felsinger, D.E.

1973-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

18

Field Performance of Heat Recovery Chillers and Heat Recovery Heat Pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat recovery chillers and heat recovery heat pumps operate at high efficiency and excellent economy by simultaneously providing both heating and cooling. Although this technology has been in use for more than thirty years and all major chiller manufacturers offer heat recovery models, applications are not yet widespread. One of the barriers to using this technology is the lack of measured performance information on the devices. This project was undertaken to identify and summarize existing sources of pe...

1994-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

19

Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a standard field monitoring protocol for evaluating the installed performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in residential buildings. The report is organized to be consistent with the chronology of field test planning and execution. Research questions are identified first, followed by a discussion of analysis methods, and then the details of measuring the required information are laid out. A field validation of the protocol at a house near the NREL campus is included for reference.

Sparn, B.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.; Wilson, E.; Hancock, E.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

HEAT CAPACITY MEASUREMENTS IN PULSED MAGNETIC FIELDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(World Scientific, to be published) The new NHMFL 60T quasi-continuous magnet produces a flat-top field for a period of 100 ms at 60 Tesla, and for longer time at lower fields, e.g. 0.5 s at 35 Tesla. We have developed for the first time the capability to measure heat capacity at very high magnetic fields in the NHMFL 60T quasi-continuous magnet at LANL, using a probe built out of various plastic materials. The field plateau allows us to utilize a heat-pulse method to obtain heat capacity data. Proof-of-principle heat capacity experiments were performed on a variety of correlated electron systems. Both magnet performance characteristics and physical properties of various materials studied hold out a promise of wide application of this new tool. 1 I. TECHNIQUE The 60 Tesla Long-Pulse (60TLP) magnet was recently commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This magnet produces a flat-top field for a period of 100 ms at 60

M. Jaime; R. Movshovich; J. L. Sarrao; J. Kim; G. Stewart; W. P. Beyermann

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Vortex operators in gauge field theories  

SciTech Connect

Several related aspects of the 't Hooft vortex operator are studied. The current picture of the vacuum of quantum chromodynamics, the idea of dual field theories, and the idea of the vortex operator are reviewed first. The Abelian vortex operator written in terms of elementary fields and the calculation of its Green's functions are considered. A two-dimensional solvable model of a Dirac string is presented. The expression of the Green's functions more neatly in terms of Wu and Yang's geometrical idea of sections is addressed. The renormalization of the Green's functions of two kinds of Abelian looplike operators, the Wilson loop and the vortex operator, is studied; for both operators only an overall multiplicative renormalization is needed. In the case of the vortex this involves a surprising cancellation. Next, the dependence of the Green's functions of the Wilson and 't Hooft operators on the nature of the vacuum is discussed. The cluster properties of the Green's functions are emphasized. It is seen that the vortex operator in a massive Abelian theory always has surface-like clustering. The form of Green's functions in terms of Feynman graphs is the same in Higgs and symmetric phases; the difference appears in the sum over all tadpole trees. Finally, systems having fields in the fundamental representation are considered. When these fields enter only weakly into the dynamics, a vortex-like operator is anticipated. Any such operator can no longer be local looplike, but must have commutators at long range. A U(1) lattice gauge theory with two matter fields, one singly charged (fundamental) and one doubly charged (adjoint), is examined. When the fundamental field is weakly coupled, the expected phase transitions are found. When it is strongly coupled, the operator still appears to be a good order parameter, a discontinuous change in its behavior leads to a new phase transition. 18 figures.

Polchinski, J.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Stochastic Ion Heating in a Field-reversed Configuration Geometry by Rotating Magnetic Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion heating by application of rotating magnetic fields (RMF) to a prolate field-reversed configuration(FRC) is explored by analytical and numerical techniques. For odd-parity RMF (RMFo), perturbation analysis shows ions in figure-8 orbits gain energy at resonances of the RMFo frequency, ?R, with the figure-8 orbital frequency, ?. Since figure-8 orbits tend to gain the most energy from the RMF and are unlikely to escape in the cusp region (where most losses occur), they are optimal candidates for rapid stochastic heating, as compared to cyclotron and betatron orbits. Comparisons are made between heating caused by even- and odd-parity RMFs and between heating in currently operating and in reactor-scale FRC devices.

S.A. Cohen, A.S. Landsman, and A.H. Glasser

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

23

Predicting Combined Operational and Residual Stress Fields and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of Heat Treatments on Precipitates, Microstructures and Mechanical ... Electric Arc Furnace Operation with Electromagnetic Stirring and Hot Heel.

24

Field Operations Program Activities Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program's goals are to evaluate electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments, support electric vehicle technology advancement, develop infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use, support increased use of electric vehicles in federal fleets, and increase overall awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from fiscal year 1997 through mid-fiscal year 1999. The Field Operations Program succeeded the Site Operator Program, which ended in September 1996. Electric vehicle testing conducted by the Program includes baseline performance testing (EV America testing), accelerated reliability (life-cycle) testing, and fleet testing. The baseline performance parameters include accelerations, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collects accelerated reliability and fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program's Qualified Vehicle Testing (QVT) partners. The Program's QVT partners have over 3 million miles of electric vehicle operating experience.

J. E. Francfort; D. V. O'Hara; L. A. Slezak

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Near-field radiative heat transfer for structured surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply an analytical approach for determining the near-field radiative heat transfer between a metallic nanosphere and a planar semi-infinite medium with some given surface structure. This approach is based on a perturbative expansion, and evaluated to first order in the surface profile. With the help of numerical results obtained for some simple model geometries we discuss typical signatures that should be obtainable with a near-field scanning thermal microscope operated in either constant-height or constant-distance mode.

Svend-Age Biehs; Oliver Huth; Felix Rüting

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Research of Heat Storage Tank Operation Modes in Cogeneration Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dissertation investigates typical operation modes of the heat storage tank in the small-scale cogeneration (CHP) plant, analyses formation of thermal stratifi-cation in such storage… (more)

Streckien?, Giedr?

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Description and operation of Haakon School geothermal-heating system  

SciTech Connect

To encourage the development of hydrothermal energy, twenty-three demonstration projects were funded. The Haakon School project is one of twelve such projects. The geothermal direct-use heating system at the Haakon School complex in Philip, South Dakota is described and information gained during approximately three heating seasons of operation is presented.

Childs, F.W.; Kirol, L.D.; Sanders, R.D.; McLatchy, M.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring(tm), A.O. Smith Voltex(r), and Stiebel Eltron Accelera(r)300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

Shapiro, C.; Puttagunta, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Wireless Roadside Inspection Field Operations.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Operational Test (FOT) Field Operational Test (FOT) Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief T he U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has commissioned the Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program to validate technologies and methodologies that can improve safety through inspections using wireless technologies that convey real-time identification of commercial vehicles, drivers, and carriers, as well as information about the status of the vehicles and their drivers. It is hypothesized that

30

High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid state laser technology is a very well developed field and numerous embodiments and modes of operation have been demonstrated. A more recent development has been the pumping of a solid state laser active medium with an array of diode lasers (diode pumping, for short). These diode pump packages have previously been developed to pump solid state lasers with good efficiency, but low average power. This invention is a method and the resulting apparatus for operating a solid state laser in the heat capacity mode. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself.

Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W. [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Enhancing Building Operations Through Automated Diagnostics: Field Test Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Whole Building Diagnostician (WBD) is a modular diagnostic software system that provides detection and diagnosis of problems with the operation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems and major energy end-uses. It has been extensively field tested and demonstrated in buildings over the past several years. WBD found problems with many air-handling units at all sites. The problems ranged from a simple set point deviation to improper implementation of controls. The results from these demonstrations, along with the feedback from building operators and managers on the use of diagnostic tools, are presented in the paper. Experience from field tests indicates that providing diagnostic tools to building operators can increase their awareness of equipment faults, but it will not by itself solve the problems of inefficient operations. Changes in operation and maintenance practices and behavior are needed. We discuss how these new technologies might be delivered and used more effectively to better manage facilities, improving their condition and increasing their energy efficiency.

Katipamula, S.; Brambley, M. R.; Bauman, N.; Pratt, R. G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Combined Operation of Solar Energy Source Heat Pump, Low-vale Electricity and Floor Radiant System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today energy sources are decreasing and saving energy conservation becomes more important. Therefore, it becomes an important investigative direction how to use reproducible energy sources in the HVAC field. The feasibility and necessity of using solar energy, low-vale electricity as heat sources in a floor radiant system are analyzed. This paper presents a new heat pump system and discusses its operational modes in winter.

Liu, G.; Guo, Z.; Hu, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

Josh A. Salmond

2009-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Design and operation of solar thermal heat transfer systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of heat transfer systems in the collection and use of solar energy is discussed. The success or failure of many solar energy systems has been determined by the design of the heat transfer system. This report includes a short summary of some of the DOE sponsored solar industrial process heat sites. From the design, construction, and operation of these systems many lessons were learned which will be important to designers and potential users of solar thermal systems. Also included is a discussion of solar collector foundation over-design that has increased the collector system costs.

Rush, E.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Field Operations Management .:. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home OCFO Financial Calendar Home OCFO Financial Calendar Quicklinks: A-Z Index for the OCFO Berkeley Lab Home Contact Us: By Group Contact Us: By Subject Contact Us: Full Listing Employment Financial Systems Modernization (F$M) Fiscal Close Forms: By Group Forms: Full Listing Glossary OCFO EH&S OCFO HR OCFO Home Policies Signature Authority ---------------------------------- UCOP University of California DOE CFO U.S. Department of Energy --------------------------------- Cost Accounting Standards DOE Accounting Handbook Federal Accounting Standards Generally Accepted Accounting Principles OMB Circular Regulations & Procedures Manual (RPM) UC Accounting Manual UC/DOE Prime Contract (Contract 31) CFO Departments: Budget Office Business Systems Analysis Conference Services Controller's Office Field Operations Management Financial Policy & Assurance Procurement & Property Office of Sponsored Projects & Industry Partnerships Training Travel Office

36

Measurement of flow field and local heat transfer distribution on a scraped heat exchanger crystalliser surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of flow field and local heat transfer distribution on a scraped heat exchanger.ravelet@laposte.net Geert-Jan Witkamp G.J.Witkamp@xs4all.nl Abstract In a cylindrical scraped heat exchanger crystallizer exchanger surface has been studied by direct measurements of the heat exchanger surface temperature

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

37

Field Measurements of Heating System Efficiency in Nine Electrically-Heated Manufactured Homes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency performed on nine manufactured homes sited in the Pacific Northwest. The testing procedure collects real-time data on heating system energy use and heating zone temperatures, allowing direct calculation of heating system efficiency.

Davis, Bob; Siegel, J.; Palmiter, L.; Baylon, D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity for vertical distances in the order of 3 to 7 meters and more. A return conduit into which an inert gas is introduced is used to lower the specific density of the working fluid so that it may be returned a greater vertical distance from condenser to evaporator.

Koenig, Daniel R. (Santa Fe, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Determining the temperature field for cylinder symmetrical heat conduction problems in unsteady heat conduction in finite space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes to present a new method to calculate unsteady heat conduction for cylinder symmetrical geometry. We will investigate the situation where the temperature field and heat flux created around a heat source placed in finite space are determined. ... Keywords: Garbai's integral equation, Laplace transformation, determining the temperate field, district heating pipes, geothermal producing pipe, heat flux density, heat loss, heat pump

László Garbai; Szabolcs Méhes

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Heat exchanger efficiently operable alternatively as evaporator or condenser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger adapted for efficient operation alternatively as evaporator or condenser and characterized by flexible outer tube having a plurality of inner conduits and check valves sealingly disposed within the outer tube and connected with respective inlet and outlet master flow conduits and configured so as to define a parallel flow path for a first fluid such as a refrigerant when flowed in one direction and to define a serpentine and series flow path for the first fluid when flowed in the opposite direction. The flexible outer tube has a heat exchange fluid, such as water, flowed therethrough by way of suitable inlet and outlet connections. The inner conduits and check valves form a package that is twistable so as to define a spiral annular flow path within the flexible outer tube for the heat exchange fluid. The inner conduits have thin walls of highly efficient heat transfer material for transferring heat between the first and second fluids. Also disclosed are specific materials and configurations.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Random Analysis on Line-Heat Source Temperature Field of Ground Source Heat Pumps Buried Pipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the random properties of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) system.GSHP buried pipe to Kelvin one-dimensional line source of heat transfer model are discussed. The model randomness is analyzed, and the GSHP buried pipe to random excess temperature ... Keywords: GSHP, Buriedpipe, Line-heat source, Temperature field, Correlation

Changsheng Guan; Zhuodong Liu; Kai Xia; Xuyi Chen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

AFBC - operation of small scale demonstration for greenhouse heating  

SciTech Connect

A 2.2 million Btu/hr unit prototype AFBC system was installed in 1995 at Cedar Lane Farms, a commercial nursery in Ohio. The AFBC is in operation and is heating hot water for greenhouse temperature control. A team consisting of the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center of Ohio State University and the Will-Burt Company developed this technology with funding support from the Ohio Coal Development Office and the U.S. Department of Energy. The system is fully automated with little operator attention being required. Operating experience at Cedar Lane Farms has shown that only 2 hours per day of operation attention is required for the system. The system includes flyash/sorbent reinjection and underbed coal/limestone feed. These features provide for good limestone utilization; a Ca/S (in coal) ratio of 2.5 will maintain an SO{sub 2} emissions level of 1.2 lb/10{sup 6} Btu when burning high sulfur (3.2%) Ohio coal. A baghouse is used to control particulate emissions. Based on the success of the prototype unit, a design has been recently completed for a commercial size 10 x 10{sup 6} Btu/hr capacity range. Multiple AFBC units can be used to provide larger heat outputs. Potential coal-fired AFBC users include institutions (schools, hospitals, prisons, government), light industry (agricultural, food processing), commercial users (shopping centers), and large residential users (apartment complexes). 6 figs., 1 tab.

Ashworth, R.A.; Plessinger, D.A.; Webner, R.L.; Machamer, T.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR SRS RADIOACTIVE TANK OPERATION  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the present work is to perform a heat balance study for type-I waste tank to assess the impact of using submersible mixer pumps during waste removal. The temperature results calculated by the model will be used to evaluate the temperatures of the slurry waste under various tank operating conditions. A parametric approach was taken to develop a transient model for the heat balance study for type-I waste tanks such as Tank 11, during waste removal by SMP. The tank domain used in the present model consists of two SMP?s for sludge mixing, one STP for the waste removal, cooling coil system with 36 coils, and purge gas system. The sludge waste contained in Tank 11 also has a decay heat load of about 43 W/m{sup 3} mainly due to the emission of radioactive gamma rays. All governing equations were established by an overall energy balance for the tank domain, and they were numerically solved. A transient heat balance model used single waste temperature model, which represents one temperature for the entire waste liquid domain contained in the tank at each transient time.

Lee, S.

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

44

A Simple Strategy for Optimal Operation of Heat Exchanger V. LERSBAMRUNGSUK1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Simple Strategy for Optimal Operation of Heat Exchanger Networks V. LERSBAMRUNGSUK1 , S for optimal operation of heat exchanger networks. Optimal operation in this context requires that 1) all of heat exchanger networks are analyzed and used to identify if the operation is structurally feasible

Skogestad, Sigurd

45

Modulation of near-field heat transfer between two gratings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical study of near-field heat transfer between two uniaxial anisotropic planar structures. We investigate how the distance and relative orientation (with respect to their optical axes) between the objects affect the heat flux. In particular, we show that by changing the angle between the optical axes it is possible in certain cases to modulate the net heat flux up to 90% at room temperature, and discuss possible applications of such a strong effect.

Svend-Age Biehs; Felipe S. S. Rosa; Philippe Ben-Abdallah

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

46

Intercomparison of Various Surface Latent Heat Flux Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Japanese Ocean Flux Data Sets with use of Remote Sensing Observations (J-OFURO) latent heat flux field is compared with the Hamburg Ocean–Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data (HOAPS), the Goddard Satellite-Based Surface ...

Masahisa Kubota; Atsuko Kano; Hidenori Muramatsu; Hiroyuki Tomita

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cryogenic apparatus for study of near-field heat transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For bodies spaced in vacuum at distances shorter than the wavelength of the thermal radiation, radiative heat transfer substantially increases due to the contribution of evanescent electromagnetic waves. Experimental data on heat transfer in near-field regime are scarce. We have designed a cryogenic apparatus for the study of heat transfer over microscopic distances between metallic and non-metallic surfaces. Using a mechanical positioning system, a planeparallel gap between the samples, concentric disks, each 35 mm in diameter, is set and varied from 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 3} {mu}m. The heat transferred from the hot (10 - 100 K) to the cold sample ({approx}5 K) sinks into a liquid helium bath through a thermal resistor, serving as a heat flux meter. Transferred heat power within {approx}2 nW/cm{sup 2} and {approx}30 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} is derived from the temperature drop along the thermal resistor. For tungsten samples, the distance of the near-field effect onset was inversely proportional to temperature and the heat power increase was observed up to three orders of magnitude greater than the power of far-field radiative heat transfer.

Kralik, T.; Hanzelka, P.; Musilova, V.; Srnka, A.; Zobac, M. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the ASCR, v.v.i., Kralovopolska 147, Brno (Czech Republic)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Consumer benefits of electricity-price-driven heat pump operation in future smart grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the financial benefits of consumers while applying different operating modes to their heat pump. In order to evaluate the different operating modes a single family house with heating system has been modeled and simulated with different ...

Christoph Molitor; Ferdinanda Ponci; Antonello Monti; Davide Cali; Dirk Muller

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Soleras solar active cooling field test operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SOLERAS Program has designed and built four solar cooling systems, which have been installed on buildings in Phoenix, Arizona. The projects represent the latest state-of-the-art solar cooling systems of small commercial size. The systems use a variety of storage concepts. Because of time limitations, only one system is described in detail. Operational results of 1981 are discussed. The overall system performance was very close to engineering predictions.

Williamson, J.; Martin, R.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Heat-flow mapping at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect

Pertinent data were compiled for 187 temperature-gradient holes in the vicinity of The Geysers Geothermal field. Terrain-correction techniques were applied to most of the temperature-gradient data, and a temperature-gradient map was constructed. Cutting samples from 16, deep, production wells were analyzed for thermal conductivity. From these samples, the mean thermal conductivities were determined for serpentinized ultramafic rock, greenstone, and graywacke. Then, a heat flow map was made. The temperature-gradient and heat-flow maps show that The Geysers Geothermal field is part of a very large, northwesterly-trending, thermal anomaly; the commercially productive portion of the field may be 100 km/sup 2/ in area. The rate that heat energy flows through the surface by thermal conduction is estimated at 1.79 x 10/sup 9/MJ per year. The net heat energy loss from commercial production for 1983 is estimated at 180.14 x 10/sup 9/MJ.

Thomas, R.P.

1986-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Snow and Ice Field Handbook for Snowplow Operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minnesota Snow and Ice Control Field Handbook for Snowplow Operators Second Revision Manual Number Local Road Research Board #12;#12;Minnesota Snow and Ice Control Field Handbook for Snowplow Operators for an Effective Anti-icing Program, produced by the Utah LTAP Center. Thanks to the following sponsors

Minnesota, University of

52

SunShot Initiative: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Operating Temperature Liquid High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards

53

Field Guide: Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional and combined-cycle plants, boiler and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures have been the main availability problem for as long as reliable statistics have been kept for each generating source. The three volumes of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Boiler and Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failures: Theory and Practice (1012757) present an in-depth description of the various HRSG and degradation mechanisms, providing plant owners and operators with the t...

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Field measurement of the interactions between heat pumps and attic duct systems in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts to improve residential heat-pump performance have tended to focus on laboratory and theoretical studies of the machine itself, with some limited field research having been focused on in-situ performance and installation issues. One issue that has received surprisingly little attention is the interaction between the heat pump and the duct system to which it is connected. This paper presents the results of a field study that addresses this interaction. Field performance measurements before and after sealing and insulating the duct systems were made on three heat pumps. From the pre-retrofit data it was found that reductions in heat-pump capacity due to low outdoor temperatures and/or coil frosting are accompanied by lower duct-system energy delivery efficiencies. The conduction loss reductions, and thus the delivery temperature improvements, due to adding duct insulation were found to vary widely depending on the length of the particular duct section, the thermal mass of that duct section, and the cycling characteristics of the heat-pump. In addition, it was found that the use of strip-heat back-up decreased after the retrofits, and that heat-pump cycling increased dramatically after the retrofits, which respectively increase and decrease savings due to the retrofits. Finally, normalized energy use for the three systems which were operated consistently pre- and post-retrofit showed an average reduction of 19% after retrofit, which corresponds to a chance in overall distribution-system efficiency of 24%.

Modera, M.P.; Jump, D.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

CONSEQUENCES OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE FOR HEAT TRANSPORT IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS  

SciTech Connect

Interfaces between hot and cold magnetized plasmas exist in various astrophysical contexts, for example, where hot outflows impinge on an ambient interstellar medium. It is of interest to understand how the structure of the magnetic field spanning the interface affects the temporal evolution of the temperature gradient. Here, we explore the relation between the magnetic field topology and the heat transfer rate by adding various fractions of tangled versus ordered field across a hot-cold interface that allows the system to evolve to a steady state. We find a simple mathematical relation for the rate of heat conduction as a function of the initial ratio of ordered-to-tangled field across the interface. We discuss potential implications for the astrophysical context of magnetized wind blown bubbles around evolved stars.

Li Shule; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric, E-mail: shuleli@pas.rochester.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

Study of Operating Control Strategies for Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump System with Supplemental Cooling Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground source heat pump for cooling-dominated commercial buildings may utilize supplemental cooling towers to reduce system first cost and to improve system performance. The use of hybrid ground source heat pump (HGSP) can reduce the size of the ground-loop ... Keywords: hybrid ground source heat pump, supplement heat rejection, control strategies, operating performance

Wang Jinggang; Gao Xiaoxia; Yin Zhenjiang; Li Fang

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Investigation of several critical issues in screen mesh heat pipe manufacturing and operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The PhD thesis with the title “Investigation of several critical issues in screen mesh heat pipe manufacturing and operation” presented hereafter describes work carried out… (more)

Engelhardt, Andreas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Field Monitoring of a Geothermal Heat Pump Water Heater: Unicoi County High School, Erwin, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A geothermal heat pump water heater (HPWH) system -- installed to preheat water entering a 250-gallon gas-fired water heater (GWH) at a Tennessee high school -- reduced water-heating costs by 34 percent per year, compared to the base case GWH system. This report provides results from field monitoring of the geothermal HPWH system, tested in three distinct operating modes for five months. The program goal was to assess the energy and economic benefits of the GWH system with and without the geothermal HPWH...

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Safety and emergency preparedness considerations for geotechnical field operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The GEO Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories is involved in several remote-site drilling and/or experimental operations each year. In 1987, the Geothermal Research Division of the Department developed a general set of Safe Operating Procedures (SOPs) that could be applied to a variety of projects. This general set is supplemented by site-specific SOPs as needed. Effective field operations require: integration of safety and emergency preparedness planning with overall project planning, training of field personnel and inventorying of local emergency support resources, and, developing a clear line of responsibility and authority to enforce the safety requirements. Copies of SOPs used in recent operations are included as examples of working documents for the reader.

Wemple, R.P.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Control Structure Selection for Optimal Operation of a Heat Exchanger Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control Structure Selection for Optimal Operation of a Heat Exchanger Network Johannes J--We consider the control structure design for a heat exchanger network (HEN), where a stream is split of temperature measurements. Index Terms--Control structure selection, Self-optimizing con- trol, Heat exchanger

Skogestad, Sigurd

62

High Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Thermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Thermal Power Generation UCLA, UCB, Yale Award Number: DE-EE0005941 | January 9, 2013 | Sungtaek Ju 1.1 Thermochemistry modeling Identified promising...

63

Spectroscopic investigation of a reversed field pinch operated without limiters  

SciTech Connect

Spectroscopic measurements on the ZT-40M reversed field pinch (submitted to Fusion Tech.) discharge are reported. Specifically, the impurity content, Z/sub eff/, recycling behavior, ion temperature, and propagation of magnetohydrodynamic modes in the edge are addressed. The importance of the plasma--wall interaction in ZT-40M, operated without limiters, is demonstrated.

Weber, P.G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

Albrecht, Georg (Livermore, CA); George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Sooy, Walter (Pleasanton, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geothermal Heat Pump Systems in Schools: Construction, Maintenance and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal heat pumping and cooling systems are still not widely used to heat and cool buildings. They are an unknown to most architects and engineers. The electric utility industry has recognized them as being a very energy-efficient way to heat and cool buildings using electricity. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has assisted in design and installation of many geothermal systems, particularly in school buildings. With a number of geothermal heat pump systems in schools in operation in the TVA regi...

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

67

Operation characteristics of cylindrical miniature grooved heat pipe using aqueous CuO nanofluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to investigate the operation characteristics of a cylindrical miniature grooved heat pipe using aqueous CuO nanofluid as the working fluid at some steady cooling conditions. The experiments were carried out under both the steady operation process and the unsteady startup process. The experiment results show that substituting the nanofluid for water as the working fluid can apparently improve the thermal performance of the heat pipe for steady operation. The total heat resistance and the maximum heat removal capacity of the heat pipe using nanofluids can maximally reduce by 50% and increase by 40% compared with that of the heat pipe using water, respectively. For unsteady startup process, substituting the nanofluid for water as the working fluid, cannot only improve the thermal performance, but also reduce significantly the startup time. (author)

Wang, Guo-Shan; Song, Bin; Liu, Zhen-Hua [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 200240 Shanghai (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Analysis of field-performance data on shell-and-tube heat exchangers in geothermal service  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of field performance data from a binary cycle test loop using geothermal brine and a hydrocarbon working fluid is reported. Results include test loop operational problems, and shell-and-tube heat exchanger performance factors such as overall heat transfer coefficients, film coefficients, pinch points, and pressure drops. Performance factors are for six primary heaters having brine in the tubes and hydrocarbon in the shells in counterflow, and for a condenser having cooling water in the tubes and hydrocarbon in the shell. Working fluids reported are isobutane, 90/10 isobutane/isopentane, and 80/20 isobutane/isopentane. Performance factors are for heating each working fluid at supercritical conditions in the vicinity of their critical pressure and temperature and condensing the same fluid.

Silvester, L.F.; Doyle, P.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Thermal heat radiation, near-field energy density and near-field radiative heat transfer of coated materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the thermal radiation and thermal near-field energy density of a metal-coated semi-infinite body for different substrates. We show that the surface polariton coupling within the metal coating leads to an enhancement of the TM-mode part of the thermal near-field energy density when a polar substrate is used. In this case the result obtained for a free standing metal film is retrieved. In contrast, in the case of a metal substrate there is no enhancement in the TM-mode part, as can also be explained within the framework of surface plasmon coupling within the coating. Finally, we discuss the influence of the enhanced thermal energy density on the near-field radiative heat transfer between a simple semi-infinite and a coated semi-infinite body for different material combinations.

Biehs, Svend-Age

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Thermal heat radiation, near-field energy density and near-field radiative heat transfer of coated materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the thermal radiation and thermal near-field energy density of a metal-coated semi-infinite body for different substrates. We show that the surface polariton coupling within the metal coating leads to an enhancement of the TM-mode part of the thermal near-field energy density when a polar substrate is used. In this case the result obtained for a free standing metal film is retrieved. In contrast, in the case of a metal substrate there is no enhancement in the TM-mode part, as can also be explained within the framework of surface plasmon coupling within the coating. Finally, we discuss the influence of the enhanced thermal energy density on the near-field radiative heat transfer between a simple semi-infinite and a coated semi-infinite body for different material combinations.

Svend-Age Biehs

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part II: Field Measurements of Surface Heat Flux and Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI) described by Sromovsky et al. (Part I, this issue) was field-tested in a combination of freshwater and ocean deployments. Solar irradiance monitoring and field calibration techniques were ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Parallel heat transport in integrable and chaotic magnetic fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics research. Three issues make this problem particularly challenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), {chi}{sub ||} , and the perpendicular, {chi}{sub Up-Tack }, conductivities ({chi}{sub ||} /{chi}{sub Up-Tack} may exceed 10{sup 10} in fusion plasmas); (ii) Nonlocal parallel transport in the limit of small collisionality; and (iii) Magnetic field lines chaos which in general complicates (and may preclude) the construction of magnetic field line coordinates. Motivated by these issues, we present a Lagrangian Green's function method to solve the local and non-local parallel transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields in arbitrary geometry. The method avoids by construction the numerical pollution issues of grid-based algorithms. The potential of the approach is demonstrated with nontrivial applications to integrable (magnetic island), weakly chaotic (Devil's staircase), and fully chaotic magnetic field configurations. For the latter, numerical solutions of the parallel heat transport equation show that the effective radial transport, with local and non-local parallel closures, is non-diffusive, thus casting doubts on the applicability of quasilinear diffusion descriptions. General conditions for the existence of non-diffusive, multivalued flux-gradient relations in the temperature evolution are derived.

Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Chacon, L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8071 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring, A.O. Smith Voltex, and Stiebel Eltron Accelera 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

Not Available

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Energy.gov » Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for About Energy.gov » Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site Offices Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site Offices Name Telephone Number U.S. Department of Energy Ames Site Office 111 TASF, Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011 515-294-9557 U.S. Department of Energy Argonne Site Office 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-2000 U.S. Department of Energy Berkeley Site Office Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 510-486-5784 U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 905 NE 11th Avenue Portland, OR 97232 Bonneville Power Administration General and Regional Offices 503-230-3000 U.S. Department of Energy Brookhaven Site Office Upton, NY 11973 631-344-5050

75

High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Metal Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids UCLA, UCB, Yale DE-EE0005941 | April 15, 2013 | Ju 1.1 Thermochemistry modeling * Continue CALPHAD based calculations to search for optimal ternary alloy compositions. * Initiate development of liquid density models. 1.2 Combinatorial synthesis and characterization * Pipe-Liquid interaction of compositional library * More alloys, alloy additions and effect on liquidus temperatures * Iteratively optimize the compositions. 1.3 Corrosion characterization and mitigation * Tune static corrosion testing systems for testing over an extended period of time. * Perform analysis of the micro mechanical testing on the oxide layers. 1.4 Heat transfer characterization and modeling * Complete the construction of the flow loop and perform experiments to measure

76

Study of YBCO tape anisotropy as a function of field, field orientation and operating temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting magnets with magnetic fields above 20 T will be needed for a Muon Collider and possible LHC energy upgrade. This field level exceeds the possibilities of traditional Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) such as Nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Al. Presently the use of high field high temperature superconductors (HTS) is the only option available for achieving such field levels. Commercially available YBCO comes in tapes and shows noticeable anisotropy with respect to field orientation, which needs to be accounted for during magnet design. In the present work, critical current test results are presented for YBCO tape manufactured by Bruker. Short sample measurements results are presented up to 14 T, assessing the level of anisotropy as a function of field, field orientation and operating temperature.

Lombardo, v.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of California, Los Angeles, the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI): High Operating Temperature (HOT) Fluids. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Field Operations Program Neighborhood Electric Vehicles - Fleet Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study of 15 automotive fleets that operate neighborhood electric vehicles(NEVs) in the United States. The information was obtained to help Field Operations Program personnel understand how NEVs are being used, how many miles they are being driven, and if they are being used to replace other types of fleet vehicles or as additions to fleets. (The Field Operations Program is a U.S. Department of Energy Program within the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Transportation Technologies). The NEVs contribution to petroleum avoidance and cleaner air can be estimated based on the miles driven and by assuming gasoline use and air emissions values for the vehicles being replaced. Gasoline and emissions data for a Honda Civic are used as the Civic has the best fuel use for a gasoline-powered vehicle and very clean emissions. Based on these conservation assumptions, the 348 NEVs are being driven a total of about 1.2 million miles per year. This equates to an average of 3,409 miles per NEV annually or 9 miles per day. It is estimated that 29,195 gallons of petroleum use is avoided annually by the 348 NEVs. This equates to 87 gallons of petroleum use avoided per NEV, per year. Using the 348 NEVs avoids the generation of at least 775 pounds of smog- forming emissions annually.

Francfort, James Edward; Carroll, M.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Field Operations Program - Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Fleet Use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study of 15 automotive fleets that operate neighborhood electric vehicles (NEVs) in the United States. The information was obtained to help Field Operations Program personnel understand how NEVs are being used, how many miles they are being driven, and if they are being used to replace other types of fleet vehicles or as additions to fleets. (The Field Operations Program is a U.S. Department of Energy Program within the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Transportation Technologies). The NEVs contribution to petroleum avoidance and cleaner air can be estimated based on the miles driven and by assuming gasoline use and air emissions values for the vehicles being replaced. Gasoline and emissions data for a Honda Civic are used as the Civic has the best fuel use for a gasoline-powered vehicle and very clean emissions. Based on these conservation assumptions, the 348 NEVs are being driven a total of about 1.2 million miles per year. This equates to an average of 3,409 miles per NEV annually or 9 miles per day. It is estimated that 29,195 gallons of petroleum use is avoided annually by the 348 NEVs. This equates to 87 gallons of petroleum use avoided per NEV, per year. Using the 348 NEVs avoids the generation of at least 775 pounds of smog-forming emissions annually.

Francfort, J. E.; Carroll, M. R.

2001-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

80

Field test of Six-Phase Soil Heating and evaluation of engineering design code  

SciTech Connect

A field test was conducted to evaluate the performance of Six-Phase Soil Heating to enhance the removal of contaminants. The purpose of the test was to determine the scale-up characteristics of the Six-Phase Soil Heating technology and to evaluate a computer process simulator developed for the technology. The test heated a 20-ft diameter cylinder of uncontaminated soil to a 10-ft depth. Six-phase ac power was applied at a rate of 30--35 kW using a power system built from surplus electrical components. The test ran unattended, using a computer-based system to record data, alert staff of any excursions in operating conditions via telephone, and provide automatic shut-off of power depending on the type of excursion. The test data included in situ soil temperatures, voltage profiles, and moisture profiles (using a neutron-probetechnique). After 50 days of heating, soil in the center of the array at the 6-ft depth reached 80[degrees]C. Soil temperatures between the two electrodes at this depth reached approximately 75[degrees]C. Data from this test were compared with those predicted by a computer process simulator. The computer process simulator is a modified version of the TOUGH2 code, a thermal porous media code that can be used to determine the movement of air and moisture in soils. The code was modified to include electrical resistive heating and configured such that an application could be run quickly on a workstation (approximately 5 min for 1 day of field operation). Temperature and soil resistance data predicted from the process simulations matched actual data fairly closely. A series of parametric studies was performed to assess the affect of simulation assumptions on predicted parameters.

Bergsman, T.M.; Roberts, J.S.; Lessor, D.L.; Heath, W.O.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Field test of Six-Phase Soil Heating and evaluation of engineering design code  

SciTech Connect

A field test was conducted to evaluate the performance of Six-Phase Soil Heating to enhance the removal of contaminants. The purpose of the test was to determine the scale-up characteristics of the Six-Phase Soil Heating technology and to evaluate a computer process simulator developed for the technology. The test heated a 20-ft diameter cylinder of uncontaminated soil to a 10-ft depth. Six-phase ac power was applied at a rate of 30--35 kW using a power system built from surplus electrical components. The test ran unattended, using a computer-based system to record data, alert staff of any excursions in operating conditions via telephone, and provide automatic shut-off of power depending on the type of excursion. The test data included in situ soil temperatures, voltage profiles, and moisture profiles (using a neutron-probetechnique). After 50 days of heating, soil in the center of the array at the 6-ft depth reached 80{degrees}C. Soil temperatures between the two electrodes at this depth reached approximately 75{degrees}C. Data from this test were compared with those predicted by a computer process simulator. The computer process simulator is a modified version of the TOUGH2 code, a thermal porous media code that can be used to determine the movement of air and moisture in soils. The code was modified to include electrical resistive heating and configured such that an application could be run quickly on a workstation (approximately 5 min for 1 day of field operation). Temperature and soil resistance data predicted from the process simulations matched actual data fairly closely. A series of parametric studies was performed to assess the affect of simulation assumptions on predicted parameters.

Bergsman, T.M.; Roberts, J.S.; Lessor, D.L.; Heath, W.O.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Exposure to transmission line electric fields during farming operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an analysis of exposure to transmission line electric fields during typical farming operations. This analysis makes use of experimentally determined ''activity factors'' and time budget information for typical farms as compiled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. A detailed exposure assessment for 18 ''typical farms'' (as defined by USDA) is provided for a base case 345 kV design. Exposure estimates for transmission lines ranging from 115-765 kV are provided for a representative farm.

Silva, M.; Huber, D.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Long Term Geothermal Heat Pump System Ground Loop Heat Exchanger Performance: Field Data from a Quick Service Restaurant Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes measured long-term performance of the ground loop heat exchanger in a geothermal heat pump system in a McDonald's Quick Service Restaurant located in Westland near Detroit, Michigan. Heat build-up in the soil around the heat exchanger over a long period of time has always been a concern, but only limited data has been available in the past. The gradual increase in the return loop temperature over a period of five years is evidence of the heat built up in the ground loop field, whic...

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

From surface operators to non-Abelian volume operators in puff field theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Puff field theory (PFT) is a low energy decoupling regime of string theory that still retains the nonlocal attributes of the parent theory--while preserving isotropy for its nonlocal degrees of freedom. It realizes an extended holographic dictionary at strong coupling and dynamical nonlocal states akin to defects or the surface operators of local gauge theories. In this work, we probe the nonlocal features of PFT using D3 branes. We find supersymmetric configurations that end on defects endowed with non-Abelian degrees of freedom. These are 2+1 dimensional defects in the 3+1 dimensional PFT that may be viewed as volume operators. We determine their R charge, vacuum expectation value, energy, and gauge group structure.

Sahakian, Vatche [Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, California 91711 (United States) and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Development and extended operation of a high power radiation loaded heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature, high power molybdenum-lithium heat pipe has been fabricated and tested at 1500 K for 1700 hours with radiant heat rejection. Power throughput during the test was approximately 14 kW, corresponding to an axial flux density of 11 kW/cm/sup 2/ for the 1.59 cm diameter heat pipe. Radial flux density was 70 W/cm/sup 2/ over an evaporator length of 40.0 cm. Condenser length was approximately 150 cm with radiant heat rejection from the condenser to a coaxial water cooled radiation calorimeter. A plasma sprayed, high emissivity coating was used on the condenser surface to increase the radiant heat rejection during the tests. The heat pipe was operated for 514 hours at steady state conditions before being damaged during a planned shutdown for test equipment maintenance. The damage was repaired and the initial 1000 hour test period completed without further incident. After physical examination of the heat pipe at 1000 hours the test was resumed and the heat pipe operated at the same conditions for an additional 700 hours before conclusion of this test phase.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Runyan, J.R.; Martinez, H.E.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

High Magnetic Field Processing - A Heat-Free Heat Treating Method  

SciTech Connect

The High and Thermal Magnetic Processing/Electro-magnetic Acoustic Transducer (HTMP/EMAT) technology has been shown to be an enabling disruptive materials processing technology, that can achieve significant improvements in microstructure and consequently material performance beyond that achievable through conventional processing, and will lead to the next generation of advanced performance structural and functional materials. HTMP exposure increased the reaction kinetics enabling refinement of microstructural features such as finer martensite lath size, and finer, more copious, homogeneous dispersions of strengthening carbides leading to combined strength and toughness improvements in bainitic steels. When induction heating is applied in a high magnetic field environment, the induction heating coil is configured so that high intensity acoustic/ultrasonic treatment occurs naturally. The configuration results in a highly effective electromagnetic acoustical transducer (EMAT). HTMP combined with applying high-field EMAT, produce a non-contact ultrasonic treatment that can be used to process metal alloys in either the liquid state resulting in significant microstructural changes over conventional processing. Proof-of-principle experiments on cast irons resulted in homogeneous microstructures in small castings along with improved casting surface appearance. The experiment showed that by exposing liquid metal to the non-contact acoustic/ultrasonic processing technology developed using HMFP/EMAT wrought-like microstructures were developed in cast components. This Energy Intensive Processes (EIP) project sponsored by the DOE EERE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) demonstrated the following: (1) The reduction of retained austenite in high carbon/high alloy steels with an ambient temperature HTMP process, replacing either a cryogenic or double tempering thermal process normally employed to accomplish retained austenite transformation. HTMP can be described as a 'heat-free', heat treating technology. Lower residual stresses in HTMP treated materials are anticipated since no thermal strains are involved in inducing the transformation of retained austenite to martensite in high alloy steel. (2) The simultaneous increase of 12% in yield strength and 22% in impact energy in a bainitic alloy using HTMP processing. This is a major breakthrough in materials processing for the next generation of structural materials since conventionally processed materials show a reduction in impact toughness with an increase in yield strength. HTMP is a new paradigm to beneficially increase both yield strength and impact energy absorption simultaneously. (3) HTMP processing refined both the martensite lath population and the carbide dispersion in a bainitic steel alloy during Gausstempering. The refinement was believed to be responsible for the simultaneous increase in strength and toughness. Hence, HTMP significantly impacts nucleation and growth phenomenon. (4) HTMP processing developed comparable ultimate tensile strength and twice the impact energy in a lower cost, lower alloy content ({approx}8% alloy content) steel, compared to highly alloyed, (31% alloy elements involving Ni, Co, and Mo) 250-grade margining steel. Future low-cost HTMP alloys appear viable that will exceed the structural performance of highly alloyed materials that are conventionally processed. This economic benefit will enable U.S. industry to reduce cost (better more competitive worldwide) while maintaining or exceeding current performance. (5) EMAT processed cast iron exhibits significantly higher hardness (by 51% for a 9T condition) than a no-field processed sample. (6) EMAT produced microstructures in cast iron resulted in an unique graphite nodule morphology, a modified pearlite content, and unique carbide types, that formed during solidification and cooling. (7) EMAT processed nanoparticle dispersions in Mg resulted in a very fine, unagglomerated distribution of the nanoparticles in the magnesium matrix. This provides a breakthrough technology to make the next generation of

Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz- [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; Rogers, Hiram [ORNL; Manuel, Michele [University of Florida, Gainesville; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Murphy, Bart L [ORNL

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes Jaschke, Helge Smedsrud, Sigurd Skogestad*, Henrik Manum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes J¨aschke, Helge@chemeng.ntnu.no off-line. This systematic approach is here applied to a waste incineration plant for district heating. In district heating networks, operators usually wish to ob- tain the lowest possible return temperature

Skogestad, Sigurd

90

Evaluation of Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) Operating Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of a preliminary evaluation to determine the operating conditions for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) that will transfer heat from the reactor primary system to the demonstration hydrogen production plant(s). The Department of Energy is currently investigating two primary options for the production of hydrogen using a high temperature reactor as the power source. These options are the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) and Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical hydrogen production processes. However, since the SI process relies entirely on process heat from the reactor, while the HTE process relies primarily on electrical energy with only a small amount of process heat required, the design of the IHX is dictated by the SI process heat requirements. Therefore, the IHX operating conditions were defined assuming 50 MWt is available for the production of hydrogen using the SI process. Three configurations for the intermediate loop were evaluated, including configurations for both direct and indirect power conversion systems. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to perform sensitivity studies to determine the influence of reactor outlet temperatures, intermediate loop working fluids (helium and molten salt), intermediate loop pressures, and intermediate loop piping lengths on NGNP performance and IHX operating conditions. The evaluation of NGNP performance included assessments of overall electric power conversion efficiency and estimated hydrogen production efficiency. Based on these evaluations, recommended IHX operating conditions are defined.

E. A. Harvego

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

NGNP/HTE full-power operation at reduced high-temperature heat exchanger temperatures.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) with reduced reactor outlet temperature at full power was investigated for the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen-production application. The foremost challenge for operation at design temperature is achieving an acceptably long service life for heat exchangers. In both the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and the Process Heat Exchanger (PHX) (referred to collectively as high temperature heat exchangers) a pressure differential of several MPa exists with temperatures at or above 850 C. Thermal creep of the heat exchanger channel wall may severely limit heat exchanger life depending on the alloy selected. This report investigates plant performance with IHX temperatures reduced by lowering reactor outlet temperature. The objective is to lower the temperature in heat transfer channels to the point where existing materials can meet the 40 year lifetime needed for this component. A conservative estimate for this temperature is believed to be about 700 C. The reactor outlet temperature was reduced from 850 C to 700 C while maintaining reactor power at 600 MWt and high pressure compressor outlet at 7 MPa. We included a previously reported design option for reducing temperature at the PHX. Heat exchanger lengths were adjusted to reflect the change in performance resulting from coolant property changes and from resizing related to operating-point change. Turbomachine parameters were also optimized for the new operating condition. An integrated optimization of the complete system including heat transfer equipment was not performed. It is estimated, however, that by performing a pinch analysis the combined plant efficiency can be increased from 35.5 percent obtained in this report to a value between 38.5 and 40.1 percent. Then after normalizing for a more than three percent decrease in commodities inventory compared to the reference plant, the commodities-normalized efficiency lies between 40.0 and 41.3. This compares with a value of 43.9 for the reference plant. This latter plant has a reactor outlet temperature of 850 C and the two high temperature heat exchangers. The reduction in reactor outlet temperature from 850 C to 700 C reduces the tritium permeability rate in the IHX metal by a factor of three and thermal creep by five orders of magnitude. The design option for reducing PHX temperature from 800 C to 200 C reduces the permeability there by three orders of magnitude. In that design option this heat exchanger is the single 'choke-point' for tritium migration from the nuclear to the chemical plant.

VIlim, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

93

The effect of a magnetic field on heat transfer in a slotted channel  

SciTech Connect

The results of numerical and experimental studies of liquid metal heat transfer in slotted channels in a transverse magnetic field are presented. Test results showed an improvement in heat transfer in a straight channel at low and moderate interaction parameter, N. The Nusselt number at small N (around 120) was up to 2 times higher than in turbulent flow without a magnetic field, Peclet number being equal. This effect of heat transfer enhancement is caused by the generation and development of large scale velocity fluctuations in the near heated wall area. Qualitative and quantitative correlations between heat transfer and velocity fluctuation characteristics are presented.

Evtushenko, I.A.; Kirillov, I.R.; Sidorenkov, S.S. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Hua, T.Q.; Reed, C.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB) to cool process syngas. The gas enters satisfies all 3 design criteria. · Correlations relating our experimental results to a waste heat boiler

Demirel, Melik C.

95

Laboratory and Field Evaluation of Four Heat Pump Water Heater Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water heating represents the second-largest load in residential buildings in the United States, and also a large load in many commercial and industrial buildings. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) continues research on heat pump water heater (HPWH) systems, which provide high-efficiency electric water heating using the heat pump cycle. In this study, four systems, representing both residential and commercial applications, were tested in the laboratory and/or in the field. An A.O. Smith ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

Entirely passive heat-pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity for vertical distances in the order of 3 to 7 and more. A return conduit into which an inert gas is introduced is used to lower the specific density of the working fluid so that it may be returned a greater vertical distance from condenser to evaporator.

Koenig, D.R.

1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

97

Establishing low-power operating limits for liquid metal heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point for long durations may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and hot returning to the evaporator section. Eventually sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort between the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate the phenomena. Experiments include both high temperature liquid metal and low temperature organic heat pipes. To date, a low temperature working fluid has been selected and its performance in a heat pipe validated. Additionally, a low-temperature heat pipe has been fabricated and is presently being tested.

Secary, J. (Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)); Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Establishing low-power operating limits for liquid metal heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point for long durations may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and hot returning to the evaporator section. Eventually sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort between the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate the phenomena. Experiments include both high temperature liquid metal and low temperature organic heat pipes. To date, a low temperature working fluid has been selected and its performance in a heat pipe validated. Additionally, a low-temperature heat pipe has been fabricated and is presently being tested.

Secary, J. [Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Elimination of Heat-Shielding for Geothermal Tools Operating Up To 300 Degress Celsius  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses Sandia National Laboratories' effort to create high-temperature logging tools for geothermal applications not requiring heat-shielding. Tool electronics can operate up to 300 C with a few limiting components operating to 250 C. Second generation electronics are needed to increase measurement accuracy and extend the operating range to 300 and then 350 C are identified. Custom development of high-temperature batteries and assembling techniques are touched on. Outcomes of this work are discussed and new directions for developing high-temperature industry are suggested.

HENFLING,JOSEPH A.; NORMANN,RANDY A.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Field Monitoring Protocol: Mini-Split Heat Pumps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report provides a detailed method for accurately measuring and monitoring performance of a residential Mini-Split Heat Pump. It will be used in high-performance retrofit applications, and as part of DOE's Building America residential research program.

Christensen, D.; Fang, X.; Tomerlin, J.; Winkler, J.; Hancock, E.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Field Operations Organization | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Operations Organization Field Operations Organization Deputy Director for Field Operations Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Organization Chart .pdf file (77KB) Field Offices Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) Safety, Security and Infrastructure (SSI) Oversight Operations Improvement Committee Contact Information Deputy Director for Field Operations U.S. Department of Energy SC-3/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5434 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov Field Operations Organization Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Field Operations is led by Deputy Director Joseph McBrearty and consists of three major elements - Site Offices, a Support Center, and Headquarters

102

SunShot Initiative: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids UCLA logo University of California Berkeley logo Yale logo Four graphics in a grid that represent the sputtering technique being used in this project. Combinatorial screening and high throughput characterization of materials will be used to identify, develop, and demonstrate metal alloys that meet the MURI HOT Fluids targets suitable for CSP applications. The University of California, Los Angeles, the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), along with partners at the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University, under the 2012 Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI): High Operating Temperature (HOT) Fluids funding opportunity, is investigating the use of metal alloys as a heat transfer fluid (HTF) in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems operating at temperatures in excess of 800°C. By allowing higher temperature operation, CSP systems can achieve greater efficiencies and thereby reduce the overall cost of electricity production.

103

Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Advanced Heat Pump Water Heating Technology: Testing Commercial and Residential Systems in the Laboratory and Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) provide electric water heating at a much greater overall efficiency than conventional electric resistance systems. In the residential market, approximately half of all water heaters are electric resistance; these systems can be replaced by HPWHs in most applications with expected savings of 30%–60%. In commercial applications, most systems presently use natural gas or another fuel in direct combustion. Emerging HPWH systems are now able to provide water heating ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

105

Field Operations Program - Honda Insight Hybrid Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

both Urban and Freeway drive cycles, each conducted at four operating scenarios that mix minimum and maximum payloads with different auxiliary (e.g., lights, air conditioning)...

106

Heating of heavy ions on auroral field lines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heating of heavy ions is studied in the presence of large amplitude hydrogen cyclotron waves. A three wave decay process, in which a large amplitude pump hydrogen cyclotron wave decays into a daughter hydrogen cyclotron wave and a low frequency oxygen cyclotron wave, is studied theoretically and by numerical simulations. The numerical simulations show a decay instability resulting in strong heating of both the oxygen ions and the hydrogen ions. In particular, the high energy tail of the oxygen ions is observed in the perpendicular distribution.

Nishikawa, K.I.; Okuda, H., Hasegawa, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Solar-assisted heat pump field performance evaluation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An analysis carried out to determine some guidelines to use in laying out six ground coil installations is summarized. The installation of the solar-assisted ground coupled heat pumps is described. The instrumentation employed at each of the installations in order to obtain performance data is discussed. (MHR)

1980-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

108

Electric fields in solar magnetic structures due to gradient driven instabilities: heating and acceleration of particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electrostatic instabilities driven by the gradients of the density, temperature and magnetic field, are discussed in their application to solar magnetic structures. Strongly growing modes are found for some typical plasma parameters. These instabilities i) imply the presence of electric fields that can accelerate the plasma particles in both perpendicular and parallel directions with respect to the magnetic field vector, and ii) can stochastically heat ions. The perpendicular acceleration is to the leading order determined by the $\\bmath{E}\\times \\bmath{B}$-drift acting equally on both ions and electrons, while the parallel acceleration is most effective on electrons. The experimentally confirmed stochastic heating is shown to act mainly in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field vector and acts stronger on heavier ions. The energy release rate and heating may exceed for several orders of magnitude the value accepted as necessary for a self-sustained heating in the solar corona. The energy sourc...

Vranjes, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Transient Response to Localized Episodic Heating in the Tropics. Part II: Far-Field Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this investigation, we described the stochastic, near-field behavior of disturbances excited by randomly evolving tropical heating. In the present paper, we examine how these disturbances are modified as they propagate through the ...

Rolando R. Garcia; Murry L. Salby

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Anomalous Near-Field Heat Transfer between a Cylinder and a Perforated Surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We predict that the near-field radiative heat-transfer rate between a cylinder and a perforated surface depends nonmonotonically on their separation. This anomalous behavior, which arises due to evanescent-wave effects, ...

Rodriguez-Wong, Alejandro

111

Simulated and Observed Influence of the Nocturnal Urban Heat Island on the Local Wind Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional primative equation model was used to simulate the low-level wind field, given the urban heat island as the lower temperature boundary condition. The specification of the average heat island bypassed the need to calculate the ...

Roland R. Draxler

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Numerical Simulations of Temperature Field of Coal-Bed Methane with Heat Injection Based on ANSYS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional temperature field of the coal-bed methane with heat injection was numerically calculated by ANSYS. The calculated results revealed that the temperature, the thermal gradients and the thermal flux vector sum of the coal-bed near ... Keywords: heat injection, numerical simulation, temperature

Bing Xiong Lu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Energy savings from operation and maintenance training for apartment boiler heating systems  

SciTech Connect

The Portland Energy Office provided operation and maintenance (O M) training to the operators of boiler heating systems for ten low-income apartment complexes in the Fall of 1990. This study tracked energy usage before and after O M training to see if savings occurred. Training was provided on both weatherized and non-weatherized apartments to find out if weatherization impacted the amount of O M savings to be obtained. Also, energy savings from the O M training and building shell weatherization are compared. The O M training averaged about four hours per building. Content was adjusted at each site to match needs of the boiler and operator. The Energy Office also provided a boiler tune-up by a service technician. The training stressed low-cost and no-cost measures which operators could either do themselves or hire service help to implement. It also emphasized boiler safety. Nine of the ten apartment complexes in the study used less energy per heating degree-day after the O M help. Average savings were 10%. Four apartments chosen randomly as controls had negative savings; they used slightly more energy during the same post-O M time frame. Weatherized and unweatherized apartments showed similar savings after the O M help, 10% and 11% percent respectively. Savings from weatherization of six of the apartments in the winter of 1988--1989 were also measured. A low average of only 4% was observed, reflecting negative savings in two buildings.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Field Operational Test (FOT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, system loading, and back office system integration (2008- 2011) Several vehicles Alternative technology system (consisting of partners, hardware, software, and vehicles) is small enough to be manageable of Operation, and Architecture. #12;Center for Transportation Analysis 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN

115

Field test and assessment of thermal energy storage for residential heating  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage (TES) heating units can be connected to the utility grid to accept electricity only during utility off-peak periods and yet provide round-the-clock comfort heating. Their use by an increasingly larger part of the electric-heat market could provide economic and oil-saving benefits. A field test was carried out over two full heating seasons in Vermont and Maine at 45 TES sites and 30 control sites heated by electric baseboard heaters. The TES users were billed under applicable time-of-day (TOD) rates. All sites were instrumented, and measurements of inside and outside temperatures and electrical energy consumption for heating were made and recorded every 15 min. Analysis of the data has led to the following findings and conclusions: Overall technical performance of the TES units was good under extreme weather conditions. Annualized energy use was the same for the TES and the control households. Proper sizing of the storage systems is much more important for storage heaters than for nonstorage heaters. TES users were satisfied with performance. Electric-heat bills were much lower for TES users. Occupancy effects were large and caused wide variations in energy consumption on days that had the same number of heating degree-days. The individual building heat loss determined experimentally from an analysis of the actual energy consumption per heating degreeday was 30% to 50% smaller than that determined by a walkthrough energy audit.

Hersh, H.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) or cogeneration is the sequential production of two forms of useful energy from a single fuel source. In most CHP applications, chemical energy in fuel is converted to both mechanical and thermal energy. The mechanical energy is generally used to generate electricity, while the thermal energy or heat is used to produce steam, hot water, or hot air. Depending on the application, CHP is referred to by various names including Building Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP); Cooling, Heating, and Power for Buildings (CHPB); Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power (CCHP); Integrated Energy Systems (IES), or Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The principal technical advantage of a CHP system is its ability to extract more useful energy from fuel compared to traditional energy systems such as conventional power plants that only generate electricity and industrial boiler systems that only produce steam or hot water for process applications. By using fuel energy for both power and heat production, CHP systems can be very energy efficient and have the potential to produce electricity below the price charged by the local power provider. Another important incentive for applying cogeneration technology is to reduce or eliminate dependency on the electrical grid. For some industrial processes, the consequences of losing power for even a short period of time are unacceptable. The primary objective of the guide is to present information needed to evaluate the viability of cogeneration for new or existing industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boiler installations and to make informed CHP equipment selection decisions. Information presented is meant to help boiler owners and operators understand the potential benefits derived from implementing a CHP project and recognize opportunities for successful application of cogeneration technology. Topics covered in the guide follow: (1) an overview of cogeneration technology with discussions about benefits of applying cogeneration technology and barriers to implementing cogeneration technology; (2) applicable federal regulations and permitting issues; (3) descriptions of prime movers commonly used in CHP applications, including discussions about design characteristics, heat-recovery options and equipment, fuels and emissions, efficiency, maintenance, availability, and capital cost; (4) electrical generators and electrical interconnection equipment; (5) cooling and dehumidification equipment; (6) thermodynamic cycle options and configurations; (7) steps for evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of applying cogeneration technology; and (8) information sources.

Oland, CB

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Comparative Analysis of Upper-Ocean Heat Content Variability from an Ensemble of Operational Ocean Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean heat content (HC) is one of the key indicators of climate variability and also provides ocean memory critical for seasonal and decadal predictions. The availability of multiple operational ocean analyses (ORAs) now routinely produced around ...

Yan Xue; Magdalena A. Balmaseda; Tim Boyer; Nicolas Ferry; Simon Good; Ichiro Ishikawa; Arun Kumar; Michele Rienecker; Anthony J. Rosati; Yonghong Yin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Field Measurement of Heating System in a Hotel Building in Harbin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating energy consumption in winter is an important component of the whole building energy consumption in the severe cold zone in north China. This paper presents a heating water system of a hotel building in Harbin, finishes the testing of its heating energy consumption in winter under operational conditions, and presents an stimation index of the performance of an exchanger, pump and motor. Analysis of device running conditions based on testing data is conducted. Results show that low stream supply temperature and wide-range flow fluctuation mainly lead to unhealthy working conditions of the device and excessive energy consumption, and a corresponding improved method is presented.

Zhao, T.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Evaluation of the heating operation and transmission district: Feasibility of cogeneration. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The General Services Administration, through its National Capital Region, operates a district heating system - called the Heating Operation and Transmission District - that provides steam to approximately 100 government buildings in Washington, D.C. HOTD is examining a host of options that will improve its ability to provide reliable, environmentally sound, and cost-effective service to its customers. This report evaluates one of those options - cogeneration, a technology that would enable HOTD to produce steam and electricity simultaneously. The study concluded that, under current regulations, cogeneration is not attractive economically because the payback period (15 years) exceeds Federal return-on-investment guidelines. However, if the regulatory environment changes to allow wheeling (transmission of power by a non-utility power producer to another user), cogeneration would be attractive; HOTD would save anywhere from $38 million to $118 million and the investment would pay back in 7 to 10 years. Although incorporating cogeneration into the HOTD system has no strong benefit at this time, the report recommends that GSA reevaluate cogeneration in one or two years because Federal regulations regarding wheeling are under review. It also recommends that GSA work with the District of Columbia government to develop standards for cogeneration.

Cable, J.H.; Gilday, L.T.; Moss, M.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

HVAC and water heating system field test experiences at the Tennessee Energy Conservation in Housing (TECH) complex  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TECH complex has been utilized since 1976 as a field test site for several novel and conventional space conditioning and water heating systems. Systems tested include the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES), solar space heating systems (hydronic and air), parallel and series solar assisted heat pumps, air-type solar heating with off-peak storage, passive solar heating, two conventional air-to-air heat pumps, an air-to-air heat pump with desuperheater water heater, and horizontal coil and multiple shallow vertical coil ground-coupled heat pumps. System descriptions and test results are presented as well as performance observations.

Baxter, V.D.; McGraw, B.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Influence of roughness on near-field heat transfer between two plates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surface roughness correction to the near-field heat transfer between two rough bulk materials is discussed by using second-order perturbation theory. The results allow for estimating the impact of surface roughness to the heat transfer in recent experiments between two plates and between a microsphere and a plate (using the Derjaguin approximation). Furthermore, we show that the proximity approximation for describing rough surfaces is valid for distances much smaller than the correlation length of the surface roughness even if the heat transfer is dominated by the coupling of surface modes.

Svend-Age Biehs; Jean-Jacques Greffet

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

122

Real-Time Combined Heat and Power Operational Strategy Using a Hierarchical Optimization Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing attempts to optimize the operation of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems for building applications have two major limitations: the electrical and thermal loads are obtained from historical weather profiles; and the CHP system models ignore transient responses by using constant equipment efficiencies. This paper considers the transient response of a building combined with a hierarchical CHP optimal control algorithm to obtain a real-time integrated system that uses the most recent weather and electric load information. This is accomplished by running concurrent simulations of two transient building models. The first transient building model uses current as well as forecast input information to obtain short term predictions of the thermal and electric building loads. The predictions are then used by an optimization algorithm, i.e., a hierarchical controller, that decides the amount of fuel and of electrical energy to be allocated at the current time step. In a simulation, the actual physical building is not available and, hence, to simulate a real-time environment, a second, building model with similar but not identical input loads are used to represent the actual building. A state-variable feedback loop is completed at the beginning of each time step by copying, i.e., measuring, the state variable from the actual building and restarting the predictive model using these ?measured? values as initial conditions. The simulation environment presented in this paper features nonlinear effects such as the dependence of the heat exchanger effectiveness on their operating conditions. The results indicate that the CHP engine operation dictated by the proposed hierarchical controller with uncertain weather conditions have the potential to yield significant savings when compared to conventional systems using current values of electricity and fuel prices.

Yun, Kyung Tae; Cho, Heejin; Luck, Rogelio; Mago, Pedro J.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Field Measurements of Heating Efficiency of Electric Forced-Air Furnaces in Six Manufactured Homes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency for six manufactured homes in the Pacific Northwest heated with electric forced-air systems. This is the first in a series of regional and national efforts to measure in detail the heating efficiency of manufactured homes. Only six homes were included in this study because of budgetary constraints; therefore this is not a representative sample. These investigations do provide some useful information on the heating efficiency of these homes. Useful comparisons can be drawn between these study homes and site-built heating efficiencies measured with a similar protocol. The protocol used to test these homes is very similar to another Ecotope protocol used in the study conducted in 1992 and 1993 for the Bonneville Power Administration to test the heating efficiency of 24 homes. This protocol combined real-time power measurements of furnace energy usage with energy usage during co-heat periods. Accessory data such as house and duct tightness measurements and tracer gas measurements were used to describe these homes and their heating system efficiency. Ensuring that manufactured housing is constructed in an energy and resource efficient manner is of increasing concern to manufactured home builders and consumers. No comparable work has been done to measure the heating system efficiency of MCS manufactured homes, although some co-heat tests have been performed on manufactured homes heated with natural gas to validate HUD thermal standards. It is expected that later in 1994 more research of this kind will be conducted, and perhaps a less costly and less time-consuming method for testing efficiencies will be develops.

Davis, Bob; Palmiter, Larry S.; Siegel, Jeff

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

124

Optimizing the operation of an urban district heating system by means of variable speed drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work is presenting an urban district heating system which is subjected to a modernization process. The urban district heating system is composed by the pumping station of the primary heat carrier and the district heating stations. The modernization ... Keywords: district heating system, energetic efficiency, pumping station, static frequency converter, testing

Sorin Ioan Deaconu; Gabriel Nicolae Popa; Iosif Popa

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Regional Field Verification -- Operational Results from Four Small Wind Turbines in the Pacific Northwest: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes four small wind turbines installed in the Pacific Northwest under DOE/NREL's Regional Field Verification Program between 2003 and 2004 and summarizes operational data from each site.

Sinclair, K.; Raker, J.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of geothermal field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of a geothermal field, and mapping the entire field, is based upon an elongated heat-flux transducer (10) comprised of a length of tubing (12) of relatively low thermal conductivity with a thermopile (20) inside for measuring the thermal gradient between the ends of the transducer after it has been positioned in a borehole for a period sufficient for the tube to reach thermal equilibrium. The transducer is thermally coupled to the surrounding earth by a fluid annulus, preferably water or mud. A second transducer comprised of a length of tubing of relatively high thermal conductivity is used for a second thermal gradient measurement. The ratio of the first measurement to the second is then used to determine the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., from a precalculated graph, and using the value of thermal conductivity thus determined, then determining the vertical earth temperature gradient, b, from predetermined steady state heat balance equations which relate the undisturbed vertical earth temperature distributions at some distance from the borehole and earth thermal conductivity to the temperature gradients in the transducers and their thermal conductivity. The product of the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and the earth's undisturbed vertical temperature gradient, b, then determines the earth's vertical heat flux. The process can be repeated many times for boreholes of a geothermal field to map vertical heat flux.

Poppendiek, Heinz F. (LaJolla, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Proof of Operation in a Planar Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) Based on CPS Wick.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As electronic design allows higher throughput in small packages, dissipating the heat load becomes a critical design factor. Available cooling approaches, such as extruded heat… (more)

Suh, Junwoo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Army Solid State Laser Program: Design, Operation, and Mission Analysis for a Heat-Capacity Laser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-state lasers have held great promise for the generation of high-average-power, high-quality output beams for a number of decades. However, the inherent difficulty of scaling the active solid-state gain media while continuing to provide efficient cooling has limited demonstrated powers to <5kW. Even at the maximum demonstrated average powers, the output is most often delivered as continuous wave (CW) or as small energy pulses at high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the beam divergence is typically >10X the diffraction limit. Challenges posed by optical distortions and depolarization arising from internal temperature gradients in the gain medium of a continuously cooled system are only increased for laser designs that would attempt to deliver the high average power in the form of high energy pulses (>25J) from a single coherent optical aperture. Although demonstrated phase-locking of multiple laser apertures may hold significant promise for the future scaling of solid-state laser systems,1 the continuing need for additional technical development and innovation coupled with the anticipated complexity of these systems effectively limits this approach for near-term multi-kW laser operation outside of a laboratory setting. We have developed and demonstrated a new operational mode for solid-state laser systems in which the cooling of the gain medium is separated in time from the lasing cycle. In ''heat-capacity'' operation, no cooling takes place during lasing. The gain medium is pumped very uniformly and the waste heat from the excitation process is stored in the solid-state gain medium. By depositing the heat on time scales that are short compared to thermal diffusion across the optical aperture, very high average power operation is possible while maintaining low optical distortions. After a lasing cycle, aggressive cooling can then take place in the absence of lasing, limited only by the fracture limit of the solid-state medium. This mode of operation is ideally suited for applications that require 1-30s engagements at very high average power. If necessary, multiple laser apertures can provide continuous operation. Land Combat mission analysis of a stressing air defense scenario including a dense attack of rockets, mortars, and artillery has indicated that multiple HEL weapon systems, based on the solid state, heat capacity laser concept, can provide significantly improved protection of high value battlefield assets. We will present EADSIM results for two government-supplied scenarios, one with temporally high threat density over a fairly large defended area, and one with fewer threats concentrating on a single defended asset. Implications for weapon system requirements will be presented. In order to demonstrate the operation of a high average power heat-capacity laser system, we have developed a flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass laser with output energies in the range of 500-1000J/pulse in a 10 x 10cm{sup 2} beam. With a repetition frequency of 20Hz, an average power of 13kW has been demonstrated for operational periods of up to 10s using a stable optical resonator (see enclosed figure). Using an M=1.4 unstable resonator, a beam divergence of 5X diffraction-limited has been measured with no active wavefront correction. An adaptively corrected unstable resonator that incorporates an intracavity deformable mirror controlled by feedback from an external wavefront sensor will provide <2X diffraction-limited output integrated over an entire 10s run at an average power of 10kW. A very similar laser architecture in which the Nd:glass is replaced by Nd:GGG and the flashlamps are replaced by large diode-laser arrays will enable the scaling of the output average power from the demonstrated 10kW to 100kW (500J/pulse at 200Hz). Risk reduction experiments for diode-pumped Nd:GGG, the fabrication of large Nd:GGG amplifier slabs, as well as the progress toward a sub-scale amplifier testbed pumped by diode arrays with total of 1MW peak power will also be presented.

Dane, C B; Flath, L; Rotter, M; Fochs, S; Brase, J; Bretney, K

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

Flow and heat transfer in gas turbine disk cavities subject to nonuniform external pressure field  

SciTech Connect

Ingestion of hot gas from the main-stream gas path into turbine disk cavities, particularly the first-stage disk cavity, has become a serious concern for the next-generation industrial gas turbines features high rotor inlet temperature. Fluid temperature in the cavities increases further due to windage generated by fluid drag at the rotating and stationary surfaces. The resulting problem of rotor disk heat-up is exacerbated by the high disk rim temperature due to adverse (relatively flat) temperature profile of the mainstream gas in the annular flow passage of the turbine. This describes an investigation into local convective heat transfer coefficient and cooling effectiveness of the rotor disk, flow field in the disk cavity, computation of the flow field and heat transfer in the disk cavity, and mainstream gas injection and rotor disk cooling effectiveness by mass transfer analogy.

Roy, R.P.; Kim, Y.W.; Tong, T.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Role of Magnetic Fields in Transient Seismic Emission Driven by Atmospheric Heating in Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics of transient seismic emission in flares remains largely mysterious. Its discoverers proposed that these "sunquakes" are the signature of a shock driven by "thick-target heating" of the flaring chromosphere. H-{\\alpha} observations show evidence for such a shock. However, simulations of shocks driven by impulsive chromospheric heating show withering radiative losses as the shock proceeds downward. The compression of the shocked gas heats and increases its density, making it more radiative. So, radiative losses increase radically with the strength of the shock. This has introduced doubt that sufficient energy from such a shock can penetrate into the solar interior to match that indicated by the helioseismic signatures. We point out that simulations of acoustic transients driven by impulsive heating have no account for magnetic fields characteristic of transient-seismic-source environments. These must have a major impact on the seismic flux conducted into the solar interior. A strong horizontal magne...

Lindsey, C; Oliveros, J C Martinez; Hudson, H S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Modeling and Experimental Research on Ground-Source Heat Pump in Operation by Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground source Heat Pump(GSHP) is becoming the more and more focus of the world¡¯s attention as a HVAC technique of energy saving and environment protection. This paper first introduced the experiment for Ground-Source water/water Heat Pump. The heat ... Keywords: Ground-Source Heat Pump(GSHP), Neural Network(NN) Predication modeling

Jianping Chen; Zhiwei Lian; Lizheng Tan; Weifeng Zhu; Weiqiang Zhang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Dehumidification Performance of Air Conditioning Systems in Supermarkets: Field Demonstration with Heat Pipe Heat Exchangers in Delchamps Supermarket, Gulf Breeze, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lower humidity in supermarkets translates to reduced operational cost from refrigeration equipment. A demonstration project at a Florida supermarket showed that use of a heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHX) improved the HVAC system's dehumidification performance; but lower airflow rates, with or without an HPHX, also provided significant dehumidification enhancements.

1996-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

133

Method for starting and operating an advanced regenerative parallel compound dual fluid heat engine-advanced Cheng cycle(ACC)  

SciTech Connect

In a Cheng cycle, dual fluid heat engine of the type is described having: (i) a gas turbine engine including a compressor for compressing a first working fluid, having a compressor outlet, a combustion chamber in fluid communication with the compressor outlet, a turbine unit having an inlet in fluid communication with the combustion chamber for performing work by expansion of working fluid, and a turbine exhaust; (ii) a heat recovery steam generator coupled to the turbine exhaust for heating a second working fluid having a superheater with an outlet and an inlet, an evaporator having an outlet coupled to the superheater inlet and an evaporator inlet, a heat recovery boiler between the evaporator inlet and outlet having a drum; (iii) an injector for introducing heated second working fluid from the heat recovery steam generator into the gas turbine; (iv) a coolant inlet port for introducing coolant to at least one of turbine nozzles and blades in the gas turbine; and (v) control valve means for selectively throttling flow rate of second working fluid into the gas turbine connected upstream of the injector; (vi) a compressed gas source and pressure regulator selectively in communication with the drum; (vii) a sensor system coupled to gas turbine engine and the heat recovery steam generator for temperature and pressure detection; and (viii) a control system for operating fuel flow to the gas turbine; a method of operation of the heat engine comprising: (a) initializing start conditions in the gas turbine engine and the heat recovery steam generator with the control system; (b) setting the control valve means for idle flow condition of the heat engine; (c) pressurizing the drum with the compressed gas source, (d) starting the gas turbine engine from idle to full load; (e) throttling second working fluid flow rate with the control valve means and shutting off the compressed gas source.

Cheng, D.Y.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

134

Influence of Transfer Efficiency of the Outdoor Pipe Network and Boiler Operating Efficiency on the Building Heat Consumption Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the influence of transfer efficiency of the outdoor pipe network and operating efficiency of the boiler on the building heat consumption index, on the premise of saving up to 65 percent energy in different climates. The results show that transfer efficiency is not influenced by the climate, and the influence is in accordance with that in other climates. The article also presents data on the energy consumption caused by the improvement of the transfer efficiency of the outdoor pipe network and the operating efficiency of the boiler, and the calculated formula for the building heat consumption index on the condition of saving 65 percent energy.

Fang, X.; Wang, Z.; Liu, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Near-field heat transfer between a nanoparticle and a rough surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we focus on the surface roughness correction to the near-field radiative heat transfer between a nanoparticle and a material with a rough surface utilizing a direct perturbation theory up to second order in the surface profile. We discuss the different distance regimes for the local density of states above the rough material and the heat flux analytically and numerically. We show that the heat transfer rate is larger than that corresponding to a flat surface at short distances. At larger distances it can become smaller due to surface polariton scattering by the rough surface. For distances much smaller than the correlation length of the surface profile, we show that the results converge to a proximity approximation, whereas in the opposite limit the rough surface can be replaced by an equivalent surface layer.

Svend-Age Biehs; Jean-Jacques Greffet

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

136

Field Operations Program, Toyota PRIUS Hybrid Electric Vehicle Performance Characterization Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Field Operations Program evaluates advanced technology vehicles in real-world applications and environments. Advanced technology vehicles include pure electric, hybrid electric, hydrogen, and other vehicles that use emerging technologies such as fuel cells. Information generated by the Program is targeted to fleet managers and others considering the deployment of advanced technology vehicles. As part of the above activities, the Field Operations Program has initiated the testing of the Toyota Prius hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a technology increasingly being considered for use in fleet applications. This report describes the Pomona Loop testing of the Prius, providing not only initial operational and performance information, but also a better understanding of HEV testing issues. The Pomona Loop testing includes both Urban and Freeway drive cycles, each conducted at four operating scenarios that mix minimum and maximum payloads with different auxiliary (e.g., lights, air conditioning) load levels.

Francfort, James Edward; Nguyen, N.; Phung, J.; Smith, J.; Wehrey, M.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A microscopic model of electronic field noise heating in ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motional heating of ions in micro-fabricated traps is a challenge hindering experimental realization of large-scale quantum processing devices. Recently a series of measurements of the heating rates in surface-electrode ion traps characterized their frequency, distance, and temperature dependencies, but our understanding of the microscopic origin of this noise is still vague. In this work we develop a theoretical model for the electric field noise which is associated with a random distribution of adsorbed atoms on the trap electrode surface. By using first principle calculations of the fluctuating dipole moments of the adsorbed atoms we evaluate the distance, frequency and temperature dependence of the resulting electric field fluctuation spectrum.Our theory calculates the noise spectrum beyond the standard scenario of two-level fluctuators, by incorporating all the relevant vibrational states. The $1/f$ noise is shown to commence at roughly the frequency of the fundamental phonon transition rate and the $d^{...

Safavi-Naini, A; Weck, P; Sadeghpour, H R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

G. L. Schwendiman

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

139

Magnetostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields using iterative optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Combining x-ray fluoroscopy and MR imaging systems for guidance of interventional procedures has become more commonplace. By designing an x-ray tube that is immune to the magnetic fields outside of the MR bore, the two systems can be placed in close proximity to each other. A major obstacle to robust x-ray tube design is correcting for the effects of the magnetic fields on the x-ray tube focal spot. A potential solution is to design active shielding that locally cancels the magnetic fields near the focal spot. Methods: An iterative optimization algorithm is implemented to design resistive active shielding coils that will be placed outside the x-ray tube insert. The optimization procedure attempts to minimize the power consumption of the shielding coils while satisfying magnetic field homogeneity constraints. The algorithm is composed of a linear programming step and a nonlinear programming step that are interleaved with each other. The coil results are verified using a finite element space charge simulation of the electron beam inside the x-ray tube. To alleviate heating concerns an optimized coil solution is derived that includes a neodymium permanent magnet. Any demagnetization of the permanent magnet is calculated prior to solving for the optimized coils. The temperature dynamics of the coil solutions are calculated using a lumped parameter model, which is used to estimate operation times of the coils before temperature failure. Results: For a magnetic field strength of 88 mT, the algorithm solves for coils that consume 588 A/cm{sup 2}. This specific coil geometry can operate for 15 min continuously before reaching temperature failure. By including a neodymium magnet in the design the current density drops to 337 A/cm{sup 2}, which increases the operation time to 59 min. Space charge simulations verify that the coil designs are effective, but for oblique x-ray tube geometries there is still distortion of the focal spot shape along with deflections of approximately 3 mm in the radial and circumferential directions on the anode. Conclusions: Active shielding is an attractive solution for correcting the effects of magnetic fields on the x-ray focal spot. If extremely long fluoroscopic exposure times are required, longer operation times can be achieved by including a permanent magnet with the active shielding design.

Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Conolly, Steven M.; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) and Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Energy Conservation and Efficiency Improvement for the Electric Motors Operating in U.S. Oil Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Because of its versatility, electricity consumption continues to grow all over the world more rapidly than any other energy form. The portion of the United States' primary energy supply used as electricity has expanded from near zero at the turn of the century to 38 percent in 1987. Electric motors use as input about 64% of all electricity in the U.S. and many other countries. The cost of powering motors in the U.S. is estimated to be roughly $90 billion a year. In terms of primary energy input, motor energy use in the U.S. is comparable to all auto energy use. Electric motors are the largest users of energy in all mineral extraction activities. In oil fields, electric motors drive the pumping units used for lifting the oil and water to the surface. To find out actual efficiencies of operating motors in the oil fields, the University of Wyoming and the U.S. Department of Energy -Denver Support Office have been working for the last twelve months on two Naval Petroleum Reserve oil fields -one each in California and Wyoming. So far, actual motor loading of all operating oil fields motors has been determined by actual field measurements. We have also completed the analysis of economy of operation of existing motors and evaluating the candidate replacement motors. In this paper, we will present these results along with the methodologies and protocol developed for motor energy efficiency improvement in oil field applications.

Ula, S.; Cain, W.; Nichols, T.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Induction Heating Stress Improvement Effectiveness on Crack Growth in Operating Plants (BWRVIP-61)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New reports of intergranular stress corrosion cracking prompted this review of factors that could influence the performance of the pipe cracking remedy known as induction heating stress improvement.

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

142

Operational and maintenance instruction manual for the Ingham County Geriatric Medical Care Facility solar water-heating system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ingham County solar system consists of approximately 10,000 square feet of solar collectors connected in a closed configuration loop. The primary loop solution is a 1:12 mixture of water and propylene glycol which flows through the tube side of a heat exchanger connected to the primary storage tank. The heat energy which is supplied to the primary storage tank is subsequently used to preheat the temperature of the laundry water, kitchen water, and domestic potable water. Included in this report are: detailed drawings and flow chart; operational methodology; preventive maintenance instructions; general instructions and safety precautions; and a corrective maintenance and tabulation of failure modes. Appendices include: manufacturers technical manual and component specifications; IBM data sensors and responsibilities; digital county monitor operations manual; and on site monitor operations manual. Reference CAPE-2834. (LS)

Not Available

1983-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

143

Deputy Director for Field Operations Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Home Home Deputy Director for Field Operations Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Oversight Operations Improvement Committee Contact Information Deputy Director for Field Operations U.S. Department of Energy SC-3/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5434 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page The DOE laboratory system is the most comprehensive research system of its kind in the world, and constitutes a critical strategic scientific and technical resource. The Office of Science has responsibility for 10 of the 17 DOE laboratories, helping to ensure they deliver exceptional scientific productivity benefiting the taxpayer. Each laboratory is

144

Rod Bundle Heat Transfer for Pressurized Water Reactors at Operating Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently available heat transfer correlations for subcooled forced convection and subcooled boiling have not been validated with rod-array data at typical PWR fluid conditions. At the present time, rod bundle heat transfer processes cannot be analyzed with sufficient accuracy to make sound decisions regarding changes that might avoid an Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA).

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Comparison between a spray column and a sieve tray column operating as liquid-liquid heat exchangers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a spray column and a sieve tray column was compared as a liquid-liquid heat exchanger. In carrying out these studies a 15.2 cm (6.0 in.) diameter column, 183 cm (6.0 ft) tall was utilized. The performance of the spray column as a heat exchanger was shown to correlate with the model of Letan-Kehat which has as a basis that the heat transfer is dominated by the wakeshedding characteristics of the drops over much of the column length. This model defines several hydrodynamic zones along the column of which the wake formation zone at the bottom appears to have the most efficient heat transfer. The column was also operated with four perforated plates spaced two column diameters apart in order to take advantage of the wake formation zone heat transfer. The plates induce coalescence of the dispersed phase and reformation of the drops, and thus cause a repetition of the wake formation zone. It is shown that the overall volumetric heat transfer coefficient in a perforated plate column is increased by a minimum of eleven percent over that in a spray column. A hydrodynamic model that predicts the performance of a perforated plate column is suggested.

Keller, A.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Laboratory Study of the Urban Heat Island in a Calm and Stably Stratified Environment. Part I: Temperature Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive and systematic water-tank study was performed to simulate the urban heat island under a calm and stably stratified environment. The objective was to examine the mean-temperature field, mixing height, and heat-island intensity as ...

Jie Lu; S. Pal Arya; William H. Snyder; Robert E. Lawson Jr.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Electric field noise above surfaces: a model for heating rate scaling law in ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model for the scaling laws of the electric field noise spectral density as a function of the distance, $d$, above a conducting surface. Our analytical approach models the patch potentials by introducing a correlation length, $\\zeta$, of the electric potential on the surface. The predicted scaling laws are in excellent agreement with two different classes of experiments (cold trapped ions and cantilevers), that span at least four orders of magnitude of $d$. According to this model, heating rate in miniature ion traps could be greatly reduced by proper material engineering.

Dubessy, Romain; Guidoni, Luca

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Electric field noise above surfaces: a model for heating rate scaling law in ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model for the scaling laws of the electric field noise spectral density as a function of the distance, $d$, above a conducting surface. Our analytical approach models the patch potentials by introducing a correlation length, $\\zeta$, of the electric potential on the surface. The predicted scaling laws are in excellent agreement with two different classes of experiments (cold trapped ions and cantilevers), that span at least four orders of magnitude of $d$. According to this model, heating rate in miniature ion traps could be greatly reduced by proper material engineering.

Romain Dubessy; Thomas Coudreau; Luca Guidoni

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

150

TURBULENT HEAT TRANSPORT IN TWO-AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL TEMPERATURE FIELDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most fluid flows and heat transfer processes of practicalfor turbulent heat and mass transfer processes. The study

Samaraweera, D.S.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A Case for Employing Near-field Measurements to Detect Important Effluents from Nuclear Material Processing Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General discussion of effluents from nuclear material reprocessing operations and the opportunity to detect important effluents in the near-field domain.

Hartman, John S.; Kelly, James F.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Metering, Network, in the Field Operations, and Information System (MENOFIS) Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) IntelliGrid Project Set 161D (Infrastructure for Smart Customer Interface) includes an element of tracking and reporting regarding work that is happening in utility laboratories. The MENOFIS (Metering, Network, in the Field Operations, and Information System) platform is an example of such work at Elctricite de France (EdF) RD aimed at testing technological aspects of three research and demonstration (RD) projects of the Measurement and Information System for ...

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Performance of a solar energy-assisted heat pump heating system: analysis and correlation of field-collected data  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of building energy usage and thermal load for the Solar Building during the winter heating seasons of 1974-75 and 1975-76 is reported. The one-story office building is located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Its mechanical heating and cooling equipment is categorized as a solar-assisted heat pump system consisting of solar collectors, water thermal storage, a water-to-water heat pump and five smaller water-to-air heat pump packaged units. Building energy usage was examined with emphasis on the time of day energy was consumed and the source from which the energy was obtained; i.e., from the electricity for lighting, office equipment and mechanical equipment, and from the heat output of the thermal storage and heat pumps. The rate of electrical energy consumption was found to be very dependent on building use. High rates of electrical energy usage during occupied periods required cooling during parts of even the coldest days. Mechanical equipment heating was found to vary as a function of building usage as well as a function of the indoor-outdoor temperature differential. Energies supplied to and withdrawn from the building were examined and are presented for hourly, daily, and seasonal periods. A comparison of the two heating seasons was made. Energy losses and gains from the building to the surroundings were examined for both steady-state and transient load profiles. Envelope conductive heat losses and losses due to infiltration and ventilation were calculated using actual weather data through the use of the Building Environmental Analysis Program (BEAP). The effect of building thermal storage on heating and cooling loads was examined and a set of building balance-point temperatures was established. Comparisons between the building energy consumption and a calculated load were made for hourly, daily, and seasonal periods.

Williams, R.C.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Regional Field Verification - Operational Results from Four Small Wind Turbines in the Pacific Northwest  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (DOE/NREL) Regional Field Verification (RFV) project is to support industry needs for gaining initial field operation experience with small wind turbines and to verify the performance, reliability, maintainability, and cost of small wind turbines in diverse applications. In addition, RFV aims to help expand opportunities for wind energy in new regions of the United States by tailoring projects to meet unique regional requirements, and document and communicate the experience from these projects for the benefit of others in the wind power development community and rural utilities. Under RFV, Bergey Excel S (10kW) wind turbines were installed at sites in the Pacific Northwest as part of Northwest Sustainable Energy for Economic Development's (NWSEED) Our Wind Cooperative. Each installation was instrumented with data acquisition systems to collect a minimum of two years of operating data. The four turbines highlighted in this paper were installed between 2003 and 2004. At least two years of operational data have been collected from each of these sites by Northwest SEED. This paper describes DOE/NREL's RFV project and summarizes operational data from these sites.

Sinclair, K.; Raker, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A microscopic model of electronic field noise heating in ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motional heating of ions in micro-fabricated traps is a challenge hindering experimental realization of large-scale quantum processing devices. Recently a series of measurements of the heating rates in surface-electrode ion traps characterized their frequency, distance, and temperature dependencies, but our understanding of the microscopic origin of this noise is still vague. In this work we develop a theoretical model for the electric field noise which is associated with a random distribution of adsorbed atoms on the trap electrode surface. By using first principle calculations of the fluctuating dipole moments of the adsorbed atoms we evaluate the distance, frequency and temperature dependence of the resulting electric field fluctuation spectrum.Our theory calculates the noise spectrum beyond the standard scenario of two-level fluctuators, by incorporating all the relevant vibrational states. The $1/f$ noise is shown to commence at roughly the frequency of the fundamental phonon transition rate and the $d^{-4}$ dependence with distance of the ion from the electrode surface is established.

A. Safavi-Naini; P. Rabl; P. Weck; H. R. Sadeghpour

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

156

ROLE OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND NUMERICAL RESOLUTION IN SIMULATIONS OF THE HEAT-FLUX-DRIVEN BUOYANCY INSTABILITY  

SciTech Connect

The role played by magnetic fields in the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters is complex. The weakly collisional nature of the ICM leads to thermal conduction that is channeled along field lines. This anisotropic heat conduction profoundly changes the instabilities of the ICM atmosphere, with convective stabilities being driven by temperature gradients of either sign. Here, we employ the Athena magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the local non-linear behavior of the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI) relevant in the cores of cooling-core clusters where the temperature increases with radius. We study a grid of two-dimensional simulations that span a large range of initial magnetic field strengths and numerical resolutions. For very weak initial fields, we recover the previously known result that the HBI wraps the field in the horizontal direction, thereby shutting off the heat flux. However, we find that simulations that begin with intermediate initial field strengths have a qualitatively different behavior, forming HBI-stable filaments that resist field-line wrapping and enable sustained vertical conductive heat flux at a level of 10%-25% of the Spitzer value. While astrophysical conclusions regarding the role of conduction in cooling cores require detailed global models, our local study proves that systems dominated by the HBI do not necessarily quench the conductive heat flux.

Avara, Mark J.; Reynolds, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Bogdanovic, Tamara, E-mail: mavara@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: chris@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: tamarab@gatech.edu [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering an estimated energy equivalent of nearly 1.1 million barrels of oil annually. Energy recovered by these units has been used to either preheat process supply air or to heat plant comfort make-up air. Heat pipe heat exchangers have been applied to an ever-expanding variety of industrial processes. One notable application in recent years has been for combustion airs preheat of fired heaters in petroleum refineries and petrochemical plants. Another recent development has been a waste heat recovery boiler using heat pipes. This device has a number of advantageous features. Field operational experience of several units in service has been excellent.

Ruch, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, two conventional air- to-ir heat pumps, an air-to-air heat pump with desuperheater water heater for several novel and conventional heat pump systems for space conditioning and water heating. Systems tested include the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES), solar assisted heat pumps (SAHP) both parallel and series

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

159

Heat Recovery Steam Generators for Combined Cycle Applications: HRSG Procurement, Design, Construction, and Operation Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design alternatives and procurement approaches for heat recovery steam generators, supplemental firing duct burners, and ancillary steam systems are addressed in this report. Power engineers and project developers will find an up-to-date, comprehensive resource for planning, specification and preliminary design in support of combined cycle plant development.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

160

Operator splitting approach applied to oscillatory flow and heat transfer in a tube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method of operator splitting is applied to an advection-diffusion model as it occurs in a pulse tube. Firstly, the governing equations of the simplified model are studied and the mathematical description is derived. Then the splitting approach is ... Keywords: 35L65, 65M06, 80A20, Domain decomposition, Operator splitting, Pulse tube, Recuperator, Taylor dispersion

R. Widura; M. Lehn; K. Muralidhar; R. Scherer

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Evaluation and Analysis of an Integrated PEM Fuel Cell with Absorption Cooling and Water Heating System for Sustainable Building Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a parametric study of a PEM fuel cell integrated with a double effect absorption system is carried out in order to study the effect of different operating conditions on the efficiency of the PEM fuel cell, utilization factor of the over all system, COPs of the double effect cooling and heating system, and power and heat output of the PEM fuel cell. It is found that the efficiency of the cell decreases, ranging from 46.2% to 24.4% with increase in membrane thickness and current density, and at the same time the COP increases ranging from 0.65 to 1.52. The heat and power output of the fuel cell decreases from 10.54 kW to 5.12 kW, and 9.12 kW to 6.99 kW, respectively for the increase in membrane thickness. However, when the temperature of the cell is increased the heat and power output increases from 5.12 kW to 10.54 kW, and 6.9 kW to 7.02 kW, respectively. The COP is found to be decreasing ranging from 1.53 to 0.33 with the increase in temperature of the cell and heat input to the HTG. As for the utilization factor, it increases ranging from 17% to 87% with increase in the temperature of the cell and heat input to the HTG. This study reveals that an integrated PEM fuel cell with a double effect absorption cooling systems has a very high potential to be an economical and environmental solution as compared with conventional systems of high electricity and natural gas prices which emit lots of harmful gasses and are not that efficient.

Gadalla, M.; Ratlamwala, T.; Dincer, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Field testing the Raman gas composition sensor for gas turbine operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gas composition sensor based on Raman spectroscopy using reflective metal lined capillary waveguides is tested under field conditions for feed-forward applications in gas turbine control. The capillary waveguide enables effective use of low powered lasers and rapid composition determination, for computation of required parameters to pre-adjust burner control based on incoming fuel. Tests on high pressure fuel streams show sub-second time response and better than one percent accuracy on natural gas fuel mixtures. Fuel composition and Wobbe constant values are provided at one second intervals or faster. The sensor, designed and constructed at NETL, is packaged for Class I Division 2 operations typical of gas turbine environments, and samples gas at up to 800 psig. Simultaneous determination of the hydrocarbons methane, ethane, and propane plus CO, CO2, H2O, H2, N2, and O2 are realized. The capillary waveguide permits use of miniature spectrometers and laser power of less than 100 mW. The capillary dimensions of 1 m length and 300 ?m ID also enable a full sample exchange in 0.4 s or less at 5 psig pressure differential, which allows a fast response to changes in sample composition. Sensor operation under field operation conditions will be reported.

Buric, M.; Chorpening, B.; Mullem, J.; Ranalli, J.; Woodruff, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years.

Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Compare Energy Use in Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pumps Field Demonstration and Computer Model  

SciTech Connect

Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are often regarded as energy efficient air-conditioning systems which offer electricity savings as well as reduction in peak electric demand while providing improved individual zone setpoint control. One of the key advantages of VRF systems is minimal duct losses which provide significant reduction in energy use and duct space. However, there is limited data available to show their actual performance in the field. Since VRF systems are increasingly gaining market share in the US, it is highly desirable to have more actual field performance data of these systems. An effort was made in this direction to monitor VRF system performance over an extended period of time in a US national lab test facility. Due to increasing demand by the energy modeling community, an empirical model to simulate VRF systems was implemented in the building simulation program EnergyPlus. This paper presents the comparison of energy consumption as measured in the national lab and as predicted by the program. For increased accuracy in the comparison, a customized weather file was created by using measured outdoor temperature and relative humidity at the test facility. Other inputs to the model included building construction, VRF system model based on lab measured performance, occupancy of the building, lighting/plug loads, and thermostat set-points etc. Infiltration model inputs were adjusted in the beginning to tune the computer model and then subsequent field measurements were compared to the simulation results. Differences between the computer model results and actual field measurements are discussed. The computer generated VRF performance closely resembled the field measurements.

Sharma, Chandan; Raustad, Richard

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN B. B.Temperature Nonnal-State Heat Capacity of Tungsten* B. n.single crystal This work, heat capacity 57,000a 4 d' 1&11.

Triplett, B.B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Method and apparatus for operating a self-starting air heating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-starting, fuel fired, air heating system including a fuel burner fired vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser and heating the air. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with a method and apparatus which on start-up prevents the vapor generator's vapor output from being conducted to the turbine until a predetermined pressure differential has been achieved. However, after the vapor flow is once permitted, it cannot again be prevented until after the fuel burner has been shut off and restarted.

Heinrich, Charles E. (Mentor, OH)

1983-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

167

Documentation of the operation of an arc-heated hydrogen atom source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed description of the operation is given including establishment of an argon arc, changeover to hydrogen, and parameters of the hydrogen arc. A table of arc parameters for an 18 hour period is included. (GHT)

Way, K.R.; Yang, S.C.; Stwalley, W.C.

1976-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Role of Latent Heat Release in Explosive Cyclogenesis: Three Examples Based on ECMWF Operational Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operational forecasts from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts of three cases of explosive cyclogenesis of large magnitude that occurred in the North Atlantic during a 1-week period in January 1986 are presented, and results of ...

Richard J. Reed; Mark D. Albright; Adrian J. Sammons; Per Undén

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Thermionic converter with differentially heated cesium-oxygen source and method of operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermionic converter having an emitter, a collector, and a source of cesium vapor is provided, wherein the source of cesium vapor is differentially heated so that said source has a hotter end and a cooler end, with cesium vapor evaporating from said hotter end into the space between the emitter and the collector and with cesium vapor condensing at said cooler end. The condensed cesium vapor migrates through a porous element from the cooler end to the hotter end.

Rasor, N.S.; Riley, D.R.; Murray, C.S.; Geller, C.B.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Limited field investigation report for the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-DR-1 Source Operable Unite LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 D/DR Area at the Hanford Site. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit encompasses approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} (0.59 mi{sup 2}) and is located immediately adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. In general, it contains waste facilities associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support D Reactor facilities, as well as cooling water retention basin systems for both D and DR Reactors. The 100-DR-1 LFI began the investigative phase of the remedial investigation for a select number of high-priority sites. The LFI was performed to provide additional data needed to support selection, design and implementation of IRM, if needed. The LFI included data compilation, nonintrusive investigations, intrusive investigations, summarization of 100 Area aggregate studies, and data evaluation.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Solar water-heating system for the Ingham County geriatric medical care facility, Okemos, Michigan. Operational and maintenance instruction manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Ingham County Solar Project include: the demonstration of a major operational supplement to fossil fuels, thereby reducing the demand for non-renewable energy sources, demonstration of the economic and technical feasibility of solar systems as an important energy supplement over the expected life of the building, and to encourage Michigan industry to produce and incorporate solar systems in their own facility. The Ingham County solar system consists of approximately 10,000 square feet of solar collectors connected in a closed configuration loop. The primary loop solution is a mixture of water and propylene glycol which flows through the tube side of a heat exchanger connected to the primary storage tank. The heat energy which is supplied to the primary storage tank is subsequently utilized to increase the temperature of the laundry water, kitchen water, and domestic potable water.

Not Available

1983-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

173

Expert Meeting Report: Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exploring the Disconnect Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems M. Hoeschele and E. Weitzel Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) May 2013 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affiliated partners makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

174

Field comparison of conventional HVAC systems with a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump  

SciTech Connect

Through its Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical and administrative support to federal agency programs directed at reducing energy consumption and cost in federal buildings and facilities. One such program is the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP). In this context, NTDP is a demonstration of a US energy-related technology at a federal site. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate new technologies. The partnership of these interests is secured through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The Fort Sam Houston (San Antonio, Texas) NTDP is a field evaluation of a 3-ton gas-engine-driven residential heat pump. Details of the technical approach used in the evaluation, including instrumentation and methodology, are presented. Dynamic performance maps, based on field data, are developed for the existing residential furnaces and air conditioners at Fort Sam Houston. These maps are the basis for comparisons between the candidate and current equipment. The approach offers advantages over pre/post-measure evaluations by decoupling the measured equipment performance from the effects of different envelope characteristics, occupant behavior, and weather.

Miller, J.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

176

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation; Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate-temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. The project resource assessment, based on a thorough review of existing data, indicates that a substantial resource likely exists in the Baca Grande region capable of supporting residential and light industrial activity. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The feasibility evaluation indicates the economics of the residential areas are dependent on the continued rate of housing construction. If essentially complete development could occur over a 30-year period, the economics are favorable as compared to existing alternatives. For the commercial area, the economics are good as compared to existing conventional energy sources. This is especially true as related to proposed greenhouse operations. The institutional and environmental analyses indicates that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Fritzler, E.A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Experimental Study on Operating Characteristic of the System of Ground Source Heat Pump Combined with Floor Radiant Heating of Capillary Tube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At first, the article presented particularly the working theory of the system of ground source heat pump combined with floor radiant heating of capillary tube, the characteristic of soil layers and the arrangement form of capillary tube mat and the floor ... Keywords: Ground source heat pump, Capillary tube, Radiant heating, Characteristic, Experiment

Yunzhun Fu; Cai Yingling; Jing Li; Yeyu Wang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Final Report: Mobile Surveillance and Wireless Communication Systems Field Operational Test; Volume 1: Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design and Operation The mobile surveillance and wirelessAND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION SYSTEM DESIGN AND OPERATION.with camera operation. Mobile Surveillance and Wireless

Klein, Lawrence

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Operating efficiencies of a Lysholm, helical expander for Brayton-Cycle heat engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating tests on a Lysholm helical expander have been done to develop a data base for comparing the performance of helical expanders with turbine expanders by using simple scaling arguments. The eventual goal of such work would be to develop a rugged and reliable ceramic helical expander for operating at temperatures up to 1300/sup 0/C (2400/sup 0/F). The authors used a 127.5 mm (5.020 in.) metal expander on which they measured seven performance variables against applied pressure ratio at six shaft speeds and an inlet gas temperture of 100/sup 0/C (212/sup 0/F). The data system included: a torque and angular-speed cell to measure power; flow, pressure, and temperature instrumentation; and a data reduction program. Test results are presented in seven data plots; equations for computing the performance variables are tabulated. Adiabatic efficiency was found to be at least 85% in the pressure ratio range of 2.75 to 5.00. Performance is strongly influenced by gas leakage. Large machines with clearance ratios the same as smaller machines would benefit by size scaling effects. The authors expect that ceramic helical expanders for 1300/sup 0/C service would be able to operate at adiabatic efficiencies higher than 85%.

Myers, B.; Deis, G.; Shell, T.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Operating efficiencies of a Lysholm helical expander for Brayton-cycle heat engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating tests on a Lysholm helical expander have been done to develop a data base for comparing the performance of helical expanders with turbine expanders by using simple scaling arguments. The eventual goal of such work would be to develop a rugged and reliable ceramic helical expander for operating at temperatures up to 1300/sup 0/C (2400/sup 0/F). We used a 127.5 mm (5.020 in.) metal expander on which we measured seven performance variables against applied pressure ratio at six shaft speeds and an inlet gas temperature of 100/sup 0/C (212/sup 0/F). Our data system included: a torque and angular-speed cell to measure power; flow, pressure, and temperature instrumentation; and a data reduction program. Test results are presented in seven data plots; equations for computing the performance variables are tabulated. Adiabatic efficiency was found to be at least 85% in the pressure ratio range of 2.75 to 5.00. Performance is strongly influenced by gas leakage. Large machines with clearance ratios the same as smaller machines would benefit by size scaling effects. We expect that ceramic helical expanders for 1300/sup 0/C service would be able to operate at adiabatic efficiencies higher than 85%. 9 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Myers, B.; Deis, G.; Shell, T.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

y CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURECritical Field for Superconductivity and Low-Temperaturemagnetic field for superconductivity In tungsten from 5.5 to

Triplett, B.B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 (Lead-Acid) Accelerated Reliability Testing - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery-equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the US Department of Energy's Field Operations Program and the Program's testing partners, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Southern California Edison (SCE). ETA and SCE operated the S-10s with the goal of placing 25,000 miles on each vehicle within 1 year, providing an accelerated life-cycle analysis. The testing was performed according to established and published test procedures. The S-10s' average ranges were highest during summer months; changes in ambient temperature from night to day and from season-to-season impacted range by as much as 10 miles. Drivers also noted that excessive use of power during acceleration also had a dramatic effect on vehicle range. The spirited performance of the S-10s created a great temptation to inexperienced electric vehicle drivers to ''have a good time'' and to fully utilize the S-10's acceleration capability. The price of injudicious use of power is greatly reduced range and a long-term reduction in battery life. The range using full-power accelerations followed by rapid deceleration in city driving has been 20 miles or less.

J. Francfort (INEEL); J. Argueta; M. Wehrey (Southern California Edison); D. Karner; L. Tyree (Electric Transportation Applications)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Flow fields and heat transfer of liquid falling film on horizontal cylinders.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A liquid film flowing over horizontal cylinders is of great importance as a high rate of heat transfer exists between the falling liquid film and… (more)

Jafar, Farial A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Expert Meeting Report: Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect

Water heating represents a major residential energy end use, especially in highly efficient homes where space conditioning loads and energy use has been significantly reduced. Future efforts to reduce water heating energy use requires the development of an improved understanding of equipment performance, as well as recognizing system interactions related to the distribution system and the fixture use characteristics. By bringing together a group of water heating experts, we hope to advance the shared knowledge on key water heating performance issues and identify additional data needs that will further this critical research area.

Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Field Operations Program - U.S. Postal Service - Fountain Valley Electric Carrier Route Vehicle Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Postal Service (USPS) has ordered 500 light-duty electric carrier route vehicles (ECRV) mostly for their delivery carriers to use in several California locations. The 500 ECRVs have been defined as a demonstration fleet to support a decision of potentially ordering 5,500 additional ECRVs. Several different test methods are being used by the USPS to evaluate the 500-vehicle deployment. One of these test methods is the ECRV Customer Acceptance Test Program at Fountain Valley, California. Two newly manufactured ECRVs were delivered to the Fountain Valley Post Office and eighteen mail carriers primarily drove the ECRVs on ''park and loop'' mail delivery routes for a period of 2 days each. This ECRV testing consisted of 36 route tests, 18 tests per vehicle. The 18 mail carriers testing the ECRVs were surveyed for the opinions on the performance of the ECRVs. The U.S. Department of Energy, through its Field Operations Program, is supporting the USPS's ECRV testing activities both financially and with technical expertise. As part of this support, Field Operations Program personnel at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have compiled this report based on the data generated by the USPS and its testing contractor (Ryerson, Master and Associates, Inc.) During the 36 route tests, the two test vehicles were driven a total of 474 miles, averaging 13 mile per test. The distance of the 36 route tests ranged from 4 to 34 miles. Both miles driven and State-of-Charge (SOC) data was collected for only 28 of the route tests. During these 28 tests, the ECRVs were driven a total of 447 miles. The SOC used during the 28 tests averaged a 41% decrease and the average distance driven was 16 miles. This suggests that a 16-mile route uses almost half of the ECRV's battery energy. The 18 carriers also rated 12 ECRV traits that included the physical design of the ECRVs as well as their performance. Based on a scale of 1 being the lowest and 5 being highest, or best, the overall average score for the ECRV was 4.3. The report also included individual comments from the ECRV drivers.

Francfort, J.E.

2002-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

188

Field Operations Program - US Postal Service Fountain Valley Electric Carrier Route Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect

The United States Postal Service (USPS) has ordered 500 light-duty electric carrier route vehicles (ECRV) mostly for their delivery carriers to use in several California locations. The 500 ECRVs have been defined as a demonstration fleet to support a decision of potentially ordering 5,500 additional ECRVs. Several different test methods are being used by the USPS to evaluate the 500-vehicle deployment. One of these test methods is the ECRV Customer Acceptance Test Program at Fountain Valley, California. Two newly manufactured ECRVs were delivered to the Fountain Valey Post Office and eighteen mail carriers primarily drove the ECRVs on "park and loop" mail delivery routes for a period of 2 days each. This ECRV testing consisted of 36 route tests, 18 tests per vehicle. The 18 mail carriers testing the ECRVs were surveyed for the opinions on the performance of the ECRVs. The U.S. Department of Energy, through its Field Operations Program, is supporting the USPS's ECRV testing activities both financially and with technical expertise. As part of this support, Field Operations Program personnel at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have compiled this report based on the data generated by the USPS and its testing contractor (Ryerson, Master and Associates, Inc.) During the 36 route tests, the two test vehicles were driven a total of 474 miles, averaging 13 mile per test. The distance of the 36 route tests ranged from 4 to 34 miles. Both miles driven and State-of-Charge (SOC) data was collected for only 28 of the route tests. During these 28 tests, the ECRVs were driven a total of 447 miles. The SOC used during the 28 tests averaged a 41% decrease and the average distance driven was 16 miles. This suggests that a 16-mile route uses almost half of the ECRV's battery energy. The 18 carriers also rated 12 ECRV traits that included the physical design of the ECRVs as well as their performance. Based on a scale of 1 being the lowest and 5 being highest, or best, the overall average score for the ECRV was 4.3. The report also included individual comments from the ECRV drivers.

Francfort, James Edward

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Furnace Design and Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...S. Lampman, Energy-Efficient Heat-Treating Furnace Design and Operation, Heat Treating, Vol 4, ASM Handbook, ASM International,

190

Documentation of the Irvine Integrated Corridor Freeway Ramp Metering and Arterial Adaptive Control Field Operational Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Ramp Metering/Adaptive Signal Control FieldIntegrated Ramp Metering/Adaptive Signal Control FieldTest Plan," Integrated Ramp Metering/Adaptive Signal Control

McNally, M. G.; Moore, II, James E.; MacCarley, C. Arthur

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A Numerical Study on the Enhancement of Heat Transfer by Pressure Distributions in Acoustic Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The enhancement of heat transfer in a cavity was investigated in the absence of and in the presence of acoustic streaming induced by ultrasonic waves. The present study provides the experimental and numerical results of heat transfer in the acoustic ... Keywords: Acoustic pressure, Acoustic streaming, Coupled FE-BEM, Particle imaging velocimetry (PIV), Ultrasonic wave

Y. K. Oh; H. D. Yang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes  

SciTech Connect

The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other.

De Doncker, Rik W. A. A. (Schenectady, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes  

SciTech Connect

The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other. 3 figs.

De Doncker, R.W.A.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Parallel transport of long mean-free-path plasma along open magnetic field lines: Parallel heat flux  

SciTech Connect

In a long mean-free-path plasma where temperature anisotropy can be sustained, the parallel heat flux has two components with one associated with the parallel thermal energy and the other the perpendicular thermal energy. Due to the large deviation of the distribution function from local Maxwellian in an open field line plasma with low collisionality, the conventional perturbative calculation of the parallel heat flux closure in its local or non-local form is no longer applicable. Here, a non-perturbative calculation is presented for a collisionless plasma in a two-dimensional flux expander bounded by absorbing walls. Specifically, closures of previously unfamiliar form are obtained for ions and electrons, which relate two distinct components of the species parallel heat flux to the lower order fluid moments such as density, parallel flow, parallel and perpendicular temperatures, and the field quantities such as the magnetic field strength and the electrostatic potential. The plasma source and boundary condition at the absorbing wall enter explicitly in the closure calculation. Although the closure calculation does not take into account wave-particle interactions, the results based on passing orbits from steady-state collisionless drift-kinetic equation show remarkable agreement with fully kinetic-Maxwell simulations. As an example of the physical implications of the theory, the parallel heat flux closures are found to predict a surprising observation in the kinetic-Maxwell simulation of the 2D magnetic flux expander problem, where the parallel heat flux of the parallel thermal energy flows from low to high parallel temperature region.

Guo Zehua; Tang Xianzhu [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to <25%, even at the same sorbent injection concentration. Other tests examined the impacts of fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fundamental solutions of pseudo-differential operators over p-adic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show the existence of fundamental solutions for p-adic pseudo-differential operators with polynomial symbols.

W. A. Zuniga-Galindo

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Dynamical Basis of Regional Vertical Motion Fields Surrounding Localized Tropical Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of real-data integrations of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model with tropical heat anomalies display regions of pronounced subsidence and drying surrounding the anomaly. The present emphasis is upon ...

Julio Buchmann; Lawrence E. Buja; Julia Nogués-Paegle; Jan Paegle

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Evaluation of Latent Heat Flux Fields from Satellites and Models during SEMAPHORE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Latent heat fluxes were derived from satellite observations in the region of Structure des Echanges Mer–Atmosphère, Propriétés des Hétérogénéités Océaniques: Recherche Expérimentale (SEMAPHORE), which was conducted near the Azores islands in the ...

Denis Bourras; W. Timothy Liu; Laurence Eymard; Wenqing Tang

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Heat pipe heat amplifier  

SciTech Connect

In a heat pipe combination consisting of a common condenser section with evaporator sections at either end, two working fluids of different vapor pressures are employed to effectively form two heat pipe sections within the same cavity to support an amplifier mode of operation.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Hot dry rock energy extraction field test: 75 days of operation of a prototype reservoir at Fenton Hill, Segment 2 of Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from the first extensive field test of a man-made hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir in low permeability crystalline rock are presented. A reservoir with a small heat transfer area was utilized to study the characteristics of a prototype HDR system over a shortened lifetime. The resulting accelerated thermal drawdown was modeled to yield an effective area of 8000 m/sup 2/. In addition to the thermal effects, this test provided an opportunity to examine equipment operation, water permeation into the formation, geochemical interaction between the circulating fluid and the rock and flow characteristics including impedance and residence time distributions. Continuous monitoring for induced seismic effects showed that no activity to a Richter threshold of -1.0 was detected during the 75-day experiment.

Tester, J.W.; Albright, J.N. (eds.)

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Results of Continuous Load Cell Monitoring Field Trial for UF6 Withdrawals at an Operating Industrial Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) has been implemented and tested for use as a safeguards tool during a 2009 field trial in an operating UF6 transfer facility. The transfer facility is part of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio, operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. During the field trial, two process scales for UF{sub 6} cylinders were continuously monitored for a 6-month period as cylinders were being filled. The collected CLCM data were used in testing an event processor serving as a filter for highlighting measurements representing significant operational activities that are important in verifying declared operations. The collection of CLCM data, coupled with rules-based event processing, can provide inspectors with knowledge of a facility's feed and withdrawal activities occurring between site visits. Such process knowledge promises to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards by enabling inspectors to quantitatively compare declared activities directly with process measurements. Selected results of the field trial and event processing will be presented in the context of their value to an independent inspector and a facility operator.

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Bell, Lisa S [ORNL; Conchewski, Curtis A [ORNL; Peters, Benjamin R [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Measured Impact on Space Conditioning Energy Use in a Residence Due to Operating a Heat Pump Water Heater inside the Conditioned Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact on space conditioning energy use due to operating a heat pump water heater (HPWH) inside the conditioned space is analyzed based on 2010-2011 data from a research house with simulated occupancy and hot water use controls. The 2700 ft2 (345 m2) house is located in Oak Ridge, TN (mixed-humid climate) and is equipped with a 50 gallon (189 l) HPWH that provided approximately 55 gallons/d (208 l/d) of hot water at 120 F (46 C) to the house during the test period. The HPWH has been operated every other week from December 2010 through November 2011 in two modes; a heat pump only mode, and a standard mode that utilizes 15355 Btu/hr (4500 W) resistance heating elements. The energy consumption of the air-source heat pump (ASHP) that provides space conditioning for the house is compared for the two HPWH operating modes with weather effects taken into account. Impacts during the heating and cooling seasons are compared.

Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Regional Field Verification Project--Operational Results from Four Small Wind Turbines (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

A poster describing two years of operating data for four Bergey, 10-kW wind turbines on different host sites in the Pacific Northwest.

Sinclair, K.; Raker, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Latent Heat of Single Flavor Color Superconductivity in a Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the energy release associated with first-order phase transition between different types of single flavor color superconductivity in a magnetic field.

Ping-ping Wu; Hang He; Defu Hou; Hai-cang Ren

2011-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

205

A solid oxide fuel cell power system: 1992--1993 field operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has deployed fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generation systems in order to obtain useful customer feedback. Recently, Westinghouse has deployed 20 kW class natural gas fueled SOFC generator modules integrated into two 25 kW SOFC systems, the first with The UTILITIES, a Japanese consortium. The UTILITIES 25 kW SOFC system is the focus of this paper. The unit was shipped to the Rokko Island Test Center for Advanced Energy Systems (near Kobe, Japan) operated by Kansai Electric Power Co.; testing was initiated February 1992. Module A operated for 2601 hours at an ave output 16.6 kW dc; final shutdown was induced by current stability problems with dissipator (restart not possible because of damaged cells). Module B operated for 1579 hours at ave output 17.8 kWdc. The unit was damaged by operation at excessively high fuel utilization > 91%. It was rebuilt and returned to Rokko Island. This module B2 operated for 1843 hours on PNG; shutdown was cuased by air supply failure. After a new blower and motor were installed July 1993, the system was restarted August 5, 1993 and operated continuously until November 10, 1993, when an automatic shutdown was induced as part of a MITI licensing inspection. After restart, the unit passed 6000 hours of operation on desulfurized PNG on January 25, 1994. Westinghouse`s future plans are outlined.

Veyo, S.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center; Kusunoki, A.; Takeuchi, S. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Kaneko, S. [Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd. (Japan); Yokoyama, H. [Osaka Gas Co. Ltd. (Japan)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest that were varied included SO{sub 3} conditioning on/off, injection concentrations, and distribution spray patterns. The original test plan called for parametric testing of NORIT FGD carbon at 1, 3, and 10 lbs/MMacf. These injection concentrations were estimated based on results from the Pleasant Prairie tests that showed no additional mercury removal when injection concentrations were increased above 10 lbs/MMacf. The Brayton Point parametric test data indicated that higher injection concentrations would achieve higher removal efficiencies and should be tested. The test plan was altered to include testing at 20 lbs/MMacf. The first test at this higher rate showed very high removal across the second ESP (>80%). Unlike the ''ceiling'' phenomenon witnessed at Pleasant Prairie, increasing sorbent injection concentration resulted in further capture of vapor-phase mercury. The final phase of field-testing was a 10-day period of continuous injection of NORIT FGD carbon. During the first five days, the injection concentration was held at 10 lbs/MMacf, followed by nominally five days of testing at an injection concentration of 20 lbs/MMacf. The mercury removal, as measured by the semi-continuous emission monitors (S-CEM), varied between 78% and 95% during the 10 lbs/MMacf period and increased to >97% when the injection concentration was increased to 20 lbs/MMacf. During the long-term testing period, mercury measurements following EPA's draft Ontario Hydro method were conducted by TRC Environmental Corporation at both 10 and 20 lbs/MMacf test conditions. The Ontario Hydro data showed that the particulate mercury removal was similar between the two conditions of 10 or 20 lbs/MMacf and removal efficiencies were greater than 99%. Elemental mercury was not detected in any samples, so no conclusions as to its removal can be drawn. Removal of oxidized mercury, on the other hand, increased from 68% to 93% with the higher injection concentration. These removal rates agreed well with the S-CEM results.

Michael D. Durham

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

207

NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change heat exchanger with Na as the heat exchanger coolant. In order to design a very efficient and effective heat exchanger one must optimize the design such that we have a high heat transfer and a lower pressure drop, but there is always a trade-off between them. Based on NGNP operational parameters, a heat exchanger analysis with the sodium phase change will be presented to show that the heat exchanger has the potential for highly effective heat transfer, within a small volume at reasonable cost.

Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Field Results from a Second-Generation Ocean/Lake Surface Contact Heat Flux, Solar Irradiance, and Temperature Measurement Instrument—The Multisensor Float  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from two field programs that support development of a wave-following surface contact multisensor float (MSF) designed to simultaneously measure net surface heat flux, net solar irradiance, and water temperature. The ...

J. P. Boyle

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Topic 14. Retrofit and optimal operation of the building energy systems Performances of Low Temperature Radiant Heating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

panel system are given by its energy (the consumption of gas for heating, electricity for pumps for residential buildings are increasingly used. According to some studies, this figure exceeds 50% (Kilkis et al of new calculation methods. However, in terms of heat transfer modelling, there are several analytical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

210

A Modified Analytical Method for Simulating Cyclic Operation of Vertical U-Tube Ground-Coupled Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modified analytical model is presented which discretizes the ground-coupled heat exchanger of a ground-coupled heat pump and utilized a separate cylindrical source solution for each element. First law expressions are utilized for each element to derive a set of fully implicit finite difference equations for the pipe wall temperature and the fluid temperature profile inside the ground-coupled heat exchanger. This method entails less computational overhead than methods which utilize numerical solutions inside the soil, and comes closer than previous analytical methods to satisfying the constant heat flux assumption of the original analytical solution. The thermal capacitance effects of the fluid inside the ground-coupled heat exchanger are included to allow proper prediction of the entering water temperature (EWT) profile at start-up. Comparisons with experimental data on EWT, capacity, energy input and cycling are provided.

Dobson, M. K.; O'Neal, D. L.; Aldred, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Heat transfer and heat exchangers reference handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with an understanding of the basic concepts of heat transfer and the operation of heat exchangers.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the groundwater sampling and water level monitoring that will be conducted to evaluate contaminations in the Snake River Plain Aquifer entering and leaving the Idaho National Laboratory. The sampling and monitoring locations were selected to meet the data quality objectives detailed in this plan. Data for the Snake River Plain Aquifer obtained under this plan will be evaluated in the Operable Unit 10-08 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study report and will be used to support the Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide groundwater model.

M. S. Roddy

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Brushed permanent magnet DC MLC motor operation in an external magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Linac-MR systems for real-time image-guided radiotherapy will utilize the multileaf collimators (MLCs) to perform conformal radiotherapy and tumor tracking. The MLCs would be exposed to the external fringe magnetic fields of the linac-MR hybrid systems. Therefore, an experimental investigation of the effect of an external magnetic field on the brushed permanent magnet DC motors used in some MLC systems was performed. Methods: The changes in motor speed and current were measured for varying external magnetic field strengths up to 2000 G generated by an EEV electromagnet. These changes in motor characteristics were measured for three orientations of the motor in the external magnetic field, mimicking changes in motor orientations due to installation and/or collimator rotations. In addition, the functionality of the associated magnetic motor encoder was tested. The tested motors are used with the Varian 120 leaf Millennium MLC (Maxon Motor half leaf and full leaf motors) and the Varian 52 leaf MKII MLC (MicroMo Electronics leaf motor) including a carriage motor (MicroMo Electronics). Results: In most cases, the magnetic encoder of the motors failed prior to any damage to the gearbox or the permanent magnet motor itself. This sets an upper limit of the external magnetic field strength on the motor function. The measured limits of the external magnetic fields were found to vary by the motor type. The leaf motor used with a Varian 52 leaf MKII MLC system tolerated up to 450{+-}10 G. The carriage motor tolerated up to 2000{+-}10 G field. The motors used with the Varian 120 leaf Millennium MLC system were found to tolerate a maximum of 600{+-}10 G. Conclusions: The current Varian MLC system motors can be used for real-time image-guided radiotherapy coupled to a linac-MR system, provided the fringe magnetic fields at their locations are below the determined tolerance levels. With the fringe magnetic fields of linac-MR systems expected to be larger than the tolerance levels determined, some form of magnetic shielding would be required.

Yun, J.; St Aubin, J.; Rathee, S.; Fallone, B. G. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Audit of Departmental Integrated Standardized Core Accounting System (DISCAS) Operations at Selected Field Sites, AP-FS-97-02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AUDIT OF DEPARTMENTAL INTEGRATED STANDARDIZED CORE ACCOUNTING SYSTEM (DISCAS) OPERATIONS AT SELECTED FIELD SITES The Office of Inspector General wants to make the distribution of its reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. Therefore, this report will be available electronically through the Internet five to seven days after publication at the following alternative addresses: Department of Energy Headquarters Gopher gopher.hr.doe.gov Department of Energy Headquarters Anonymous FTP vm1.hqadmin.doe.gov

215

Exergy Analysis and Operational Efficiency of a Horizontal Ground Source Heat Pump System Operated in a Low-Energy Test House under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents data, analyses, measures of performance, and conclusions for a ground-source heat pump (GSHP) providing space conditioning to a 345m2 house whose envelope is made of structural insulated panels (SIP). The entire thermal load of this SIP house with RSI-3.7 (RUS-21) walls, triple pane windows with a U-factor of 1.64 W/m2 K (0.29 Btu/h ft2 oF) and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) of 0.25, a roof assembly with overall thermal resistance of about RSI-8.8 (RUS-50) and low leakage rates of 0.74 ACH at 50Pa was satisfied with a 2.16-Ton (7.56 kW) GSHP unit consuming negligible (9.83kWh) auxiliary heat during peak winter season. The highest and lowest heating COP achieved was 4.90 (October) and 3.44 (February), respectively. The highest and lowest cooling COP achieved was 6.09 (April) and 3.88 (August). These COPs are calculated on the basis of the total power input (including duct, ground loop, and control power losses ). The second Law (Exergy) analysis provides deep insight into how systemic inefficiencies are distributed among the various GSHP components. Opportunities for design and further performance improvements are identified. Through Exergy analysis we provide a true measure of how closely actual performance approaches the ideal, and it unequivocally identifies, better than energy analysis does, the sources and causes of lost work, the root cause of system inefficiencies.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Results of a Field Test Using R-407C in Split System Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the results of a field test to determine implications of an R-407C replacement of R-22. A change of refrigerants precipitates other changes in materials, component selection, and processing. In addition, thermodynamic properties are different. Consequently, the effects on durability, thermal performance, humidity control, servicing, and manufacturability were questioned. The field test addressed many of these questions. Anticipated changes in manufacturing processes were implemented on the production line. Contractors were educated on the differences in the refrigerant. Data were obtained by refrigerant, lubricant, and component tear down analysis. Experiential information was derived from feed back of contractors and home owners, as well as multiple site visits. Generally, the field test has demonstrated that by following a few basic rules, the industry can anticipate use of R-407C with satisfactory results. However, the surprising appearance of a contaminate precipitant indicates the need for more investigation into long term effects.

Boyd, A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Performance Testing Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters under South- and Central-Florida Climate Conditions: Hot, Humid Climate and Warm Ground Water Pose Unusual Operating Environment for Heat Pump Water Heaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are known to provide considerable energy savings compared with electric resistance devices in many applications. However, as their performance is climate-dependent, it is important to understand their operation in extreme climates. Southern and Central Florida presents an extreme climate for HPWHs, as the air temperature, humidity, and entering water temperatures are all high nearly year-round. This report examines HPWH performance in the Florida Power & Light ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Phase-Field Model Based on a Three-Phase-Lag Heat Conduction  

SciTech Connect

Our aim in this article is to study a phase-field system based on a three-phase-lag for the thermal flux vector. In particular, we prove the existence and uniqueness of solutions and then study the spatial behavior of the solutions in a semi-infinite cylinder, when such solutions exist.

Miranville, Alain, E-mail: Alain.Miranville@math.univ-poitiers.f [Universite de Poitiers, Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Applications, UMR CNRS 6086-SP2MI (France); Quintanilla, Ramon, E-mail: Ramon.Quintanilla@upc.ed [ETSEIAT-UPC, Matematica Aplicada 2 (Spain)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

The impact of pipelining on energy per operation in field-programmable gate arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper investigates experimentally the quantitative impact of pipelining on energy per operation for two representative FPGA devices: a 0.13µm CMOS high density/high speed FPGA (Altera Stratix EP1S40), and a 0.18µm CMOS low-cost FPGA (Xilinx XC2S200). The results are obtained by both measurements and execution of vendor-supplied tools for power estimation. It is found that pipelining can reduce the amount of energy per operation by between 40 % and 90%. Further reduction in energy consumption can be achieved by power-aware clustering, although the effect becomes less pronounced for circuits with a large number of pipeline stages. 1.

Steven J. E. Wilton; Su-shin Ang; Wayne Luk

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

On the eigenfunctions of no-pair operators in classical magnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a relativistic no-pair model of a hydrogenic atom in a classical, exterior magnetic field. First, we prove that the corresponding Hamiltonian is semi-bounded below, for all coupling constants less than or equal to the critical one known for the Brown-Ravenhall model, i.e., for vanishing magnetic fields. We give conditions ensuring that its essential spectrum equals [1,\\infty) and that there exist infinitely many eigenvalues below 1. (The rest energy of the electron is 1 in our units.) Assuming that the magnetic vector potential is smooth and that all its partial derivatives increase subexponentially, we finally show that an eigenfunction corresponding to an eigenvalue \\lambdarate a<(1-\\lambda^2)^{1/2}, for \\lambda\\in[0,1), and a<1, for \\lambda<0.

Oliver Matte; Edgardo Stockmeyer

2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Field analysis of occupancy sensor operation: Parameters affecting lighting energy savings  

SciTech Connect

A field study of the actual lighting savings achievable from occupancy sensor use was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The study involved two seperate field assessments. The objective of the first test was to assess and effectively quantify the potential ``wasted-light`` hours associated with different occupant and space types associated with occupancy sensor control installations. These quantities are the primary factor in determining actual lighting energy savings associated with occupancy lighting control. The second test was conducted to explore the potential additional savings from more sensitive sensor equipment or better equipment adjustment that might reduce the need for delay timers. This information provides quantitative insight into the energy savings lost because of the limitations of current sensing equipment.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Areally averaged estimates of surface heat flux from ARM field studies  

SciTech Connect

The determination of areally averaged surface fluxes is a problem of fundamental interest to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The Cloud And Radiation Testbed (CART) sites central to the ARM program will provide high-quality data for input to and verification of General Circulation Models (GCMs). The extension of several point measurements of surface fluxes within the heterogeneous CART sites to an accurate representation of the areally averaged surface fluxes is not straightforward. Two field studies designed to investigate these problems, implemented by ARM science team members, took place near Boardman, Oregon, during June of 1991 and 1992. The site was chosen to provide strong contrasts in surface moisture while minimizing the differences in topography. The region consists of a substantial dry steppe (desert) upwind of an extensive area of heavily irrigated farm land, 15 km in width and divided into 800-m-diameter circular fields in a close packed array, in which wheat, alfalfa, corn, or potatoes were grown. This region provides marked contrasts, not only on the scale of farm-desert (10--20 km) but also within the farm (0.1--1 km), because different crops transpire at different rates, and the pivoting irrigation arms provide an ever-changing pattern of heavy surface moisture throughout the farm area. This paper primarily discusses results from the 1992 field study.

Coulter, R.L.; Martin, T.J.; Cook, D.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Electrodynamics of Magnetars III: Pair Creation Processes in an Ultrastrong Magnetic Field and Particle Heating in a Dynamic Magnetosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the details of the QED processes that create electron-positron pairs in magnetic fields approaching and exceeding 10^{14} G. The formation of free and bound pairs is addressed, and the importance of positronium dissociation by thermal X-rays is noted. We calculate the collision cross section between an X-ray and a gamma ray, and point out a resonance in the cross section when the gamma ray is close to the threshold for pair conversion. We also discuss how the pair creation rate in the open-field circuit and the outer magnetosphere can be strongly enhanced by instabilities near the light cylinder. When the current has a strong fluctuating component, a cascade develops. We examine the details of particle heating, and show that a high rate of pair creation can be sustained close to the star, but only if the spin period is shorter than several seconds. The dissipation rate in this turbulent state can easily accommodate the observed radio output of the transient radio-emitting magnetars, and even their infrared emission. Finally, we outline how a very high rate of pair creation on the open magnetic field lines can help to stabilize a static twist in the closed magnetosphere and to regulate the loss of magnetic helicity by reconnection at the light cylinder.

Christopher Thompson

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Laboratory and Field Measurements of Electrical Resistivity to Determine Saturation and Detect Fractures in a Heated Rock Mass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of intact and fractured representative geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to infer saturation and fracture location in a large-scale field test. Measurements were performed to simulate test conditions with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures to 145 C. Measurements presented are a first step toward making the search for fractures using electrical methods quantitatively. Intact samples showed a gradual resistivity increase when pore pressure was decreased below the phase-boundary pressure of free water, while fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling. The resistivity change is greatest for samples with the most exposed surface area. Analysis of a field test provided the opportunity to evaluate fracture detection using electrical methods at a large scale. Interpretation of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) images of resistivity contrasts, aided by laboratory derived resistivity-saturation-temperature relationships, indicates that dynamic saturation changes in a heated rock mass are observable and that fractures experiencing drying or resaturation can be identified. The same techniques can be used to locate fractures in geothermal reservoirs using electrical field methods.

Roberts, J J; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

225

Near-field characterization of hydrogen and helium operation on the TFTR diagnostic neutral beam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An optical multichannel analyzer has been used to measure beam divergence and composition. This measurement is usually performed near the center of the neutralizer or beyond the magnet. In the past, these locations suffered difficult beam composition analysis and low light intensity, respectively. It has been determined that the light emission is relatively independent of neutralizer line density in the near field, allowing near-field measurements to overcome both difficulties. At optimum perveance, but under conditions of high gas throughput, the helium 1/{ital e} divergence angle was measured to be 1.5{degree}. Further investigation found that the divergence decreased with gas throughput down to 1.25{degree}. Minimum divergences for the full-, half-, and third-energy hydrogen components were 1.1{degree}, 1.2{degree}, and 1.4{degree}, respectively. Relative neutral hydrogen particle fluxes available for injection into TFTR are a function of perveance. At maximum perveance, the full-, half-, and third-energy atom fractions were 0.25{plus minus}0.04, 0.5{plus minus}0.04, and 0.25{plus minus}0.05, respectively.

Kamperschroer, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Roquemore, A.L. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The two-nucleon electromagnetic charge operator in chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$EFT) up to one loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electromagnetic charge operator in a two-nucleon system is derived in chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$EFT) up to order $e\\, Q$ (or N4LO), where $Q$ denotes the low-momentum scale and $e$ is the electric charge. The specific form of the N3LO and N4LO corrections from, respectively, one-pion-exchange and two-pion-exchange depends on the off-the-energy-shell prescriptions adopted for the non-static terms in the corresponding potentials. We show that different prescriptions lead to unitarily equivalent potentials and accompanying charge operators. Thus, provided a consistent set is adopted, predictions for physical observables will remain unaffected by the non-uniqueness associated with these off-the-energy-shell effects.

S. Pastore,L. Girlanda,R. Schiavilla,M. Viviani,S. Pastore,L. Girlanda,R. Schiavilla,M. Viviani

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Two-nucleon electromagnetic charge operator in chiral effective field theory ({chi}EFT) up to one loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electromagnetic charge operator in a two-nucleon system is derived in chiral effective field theory ({chi}EFT) up to order e Q[or next-to-next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N4LO)], where Q denotes the low-momentum scale and e is the electric charge. The specific form of the N3LO and N4LO corrections from, respectively, one-pion-exchange and two-pion-exchange depends on the off-the-energy-shell prescriptions adopted for the nonstatic terms in the corresponding potentials. We show that different prescriptions lead to unitarily equivalent potentials and accompanying charge operators. Thus, provided a consistent set is adopted, predictions for physical observables will remain unaffected by the nonuniqueness associated with these off-the-energy-shell effects.

Pastore, S. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States); Girlanda, L. [Department of Physics, Universita del Salento, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN Sezione di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Schiavilla, R. [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Jefferson Lab, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Viviani, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Requirements for Computer Based-Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Field Operators Results from a Qualitative Study  

SciTech Connect

Although computer-based procedures (CBPs) have been investigated as a way to enhance operator performance on procedural tasks in the nuclear industry for almost thirty years, they are not currently widely deployed at United States utilities. One of the barriers to the wide scale deployment of CBPs is the lack of operational experience with CBPs that could serve as a sound basis for justifying the use of CBPs for nuclear utilities. Utilities are hesitant to adopt CBPs because of concern over potential costs of implementation, and concern over regulatory approval. Regulators require a sound technical basis for the use of any procedure at the utilities; without operating experience to support the use CBPs, it is difficult to establish such a technical basis. In an effort to begin the process of developing a technical basis for CBPs, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory are partnering with industry to explore CBPs with the objective of defining requirements for CBPs and developing an industry-wide vision and path forward for the use of CBPs. This paper describes the results from a qualitative study aimed at defining requirements for CBPs to be used by field operators and maintenance technicians.

Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Synchronized operation by field programmable gate array based signal controller for the Thomson scattering diagnostic system in KSTAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thomson scattering diagnostic system is successfully installed in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) facility. We got the electron temperature and electron density data for the first time in 2011, 4th campaign using a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based signal control board. It operates as a signal generator, a detector, a controller, and a time measuring device. This board produces two configurable trigger pulses to operate Nd:YAG laser system and receives a laser beam detection signal from a photodiode detector. It allows a trigger pulse to be delivered to a time delay module to make a scattered signal measurement, measuring an asynchronous time value between the KSTAR timing board and the laser system injection signal. All functions are controlled by the embedded processor running on operating system within a single FPGA. It provides Ethernet communication interface and is configured with standard middleware to integrate with KSTAR. This controller has operated for two experimental campaigns including commissioning and performed the reconfiguration of logic designs to accommodate varying experimental situation without hardware rebuilding.

Lee, W. R.; Park, M. K.; Lee, J. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H. S. [Chungnam National University, Daehak-ro 99, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. H. [Seed Core Co., Ltd., Daehak-ro 99, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Reactor-relevant quiescent H-mode operation using torque from non-axisymmetric, non-resonant magnetic fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from recent experiments demonstrate that quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) sustained by magnetic torque from non-axisymmetric magnetic fields is a promising operating mode for future burning plasmas. Using magnetic torque from n=3 fields to replace counter-I{sub p} torque from neutral beam injection (NBI), we have achieved long duration, counter-rotating QH-mode operation with NBI torque ranging from counter-I{sub p} to up to co-I{sub p} values of 1-1.3 Nm. This co-I{sub p} torque is 3 to 4 times the scaled torque that ITER will have. These experiments utilized an ITER-relevant lower single-null plasma shape and were done with ITER-relevant values of {nu}{sub ped}{sup *} and {beta}{sub N}{sup ped}. These discharges exhibited confinement quality H{sub 98y2}=1.3, in the range required for ITER. In preliminary experiments using n=3 fields only from a coil outside the toroidal coil, QH-mode plasmas with low q{sub 95}=3.4 have reached fusion gain values of G={beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2}=0.4, which is the desired value for ITER. Shots with the same coil configuration also operated with net zero NBI torque. The limits on G and co-I{sub p} torque have not yet been established for this coil configuration. QH-mode work to has made significant contact with theory. The importance of edge rotational shear is consistent with peeling-ballooning mode theory. Qualitative and quantitative agreements with the predicted neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque is seen.

Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M; Osborne, T. H.; Schaffer, M. J.; Snyder, P. B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Solomon, W. M.; Park, J.-K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Fenstermacher, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Near-field heat transfer at the spent fuel test-climax: a comparison of measurements and calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spent Fuel Test in the Climax granitic stock at the DOE Nevada Test Site is a test of the feasibility of storage and retrieval of spent nuclear reactor fuel in a deep geologic environment. Eleven spent fuel elements, together with six thermally identical electrical resistance heaters and 20 peripheral guard heaters, are emplaced 420 m below surface in a three-drift test array. This array was designed to simulate the near-field effects of thousands of canisters of nuclear waste and to evaluate the effects of heat alone, and heat plus ionizing radiation on the rock. Thermal calculations and measurements are conducted to determine thermal transport from the spent fuel and electrical resistance heaters. Calculations associated with the as-built Spent Fuel Test geometry and thermal source histories are presented and compared with thermocouple measurements made throughout the test array. Comparisons in space begin at the spent fuel canister and include the first few metres outside the test array. Comparisons in time begin at emplacement and progress through the first year of thermal loading in this multi-year test.

Patrick, W.C.; Montan, D.N.; Ballou, L.B.

1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

232

Field monitoring and evaluation of a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump: Volume 1, Cooling season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States; consumption approaches 1.5 quads/year of energy (1 quad = 10{sup 15} Btu) at a cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)is one of four DOE national multiprogram laboratories that participate in the NTDP by providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied and evaluated under that program. This two-volume report describes a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology -- a gas-engine-driven heat pump. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Sam Houston, a US Army base in San Antonio, Texas, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were York International, the heat pump manufacturer, Gas Research Institute (GRI), the technology developer; City Public Service of San Antonio, the local utility; American Gas Cooling Center (AGCC); Fort Sam Houston; and PNL.

Miller, J.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Thermal History of the Felsite Unit, Geysers Geothermal Field, From Thermal Modeling of 40Ar/39Ar Incremental Heating Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Pb study was performed of the Geysers plutonic complex of the Geysers Geothermal Field in California. Sixty-nine ion microprobe spot analyses of zircons from four granite samples from the plutonic complex that underlies the Geysers geothermal field yielded Pb-207/Pb-206 vs. U-238/Pb-206 concordia ages ranging from 1.13 {+-} 0.04 Ma to 1.25 {+-} 0.04 Ma. The U-Pb ages coincide closely with Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateau and ''terminal'' ages from coexisting K-feldspars and with the eruption ages of overlying volcanic rocks. The data indicate that the granite crystallized at 1.18 Ma and had cooled below 350 C by {approximately}0.9-1.0 Ma. Interpretation of the feldspar Ar-40/Ar-39 age data using multi-diffusion domain theory indicates that post-emplacement rapid cooling was succeeded either by slower cooling from 350-300 C between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma or transitory reheating to 300-350 C at about 0.4-0.6 Ma. Heat flow calculations constrained with K-feldspar thermal histories and the pre sent elevated regional heal flow anomaly demonstrate that appreciable heat input from sources external to the known Geysers plutonic complex is required to maintain the geothermal system. This requirement is satisfied by either a large, underlying, convecting magma chamber (now solidified) emplaced at 1.2 Ma or episodic intrusion of smaller bodies from 1.2-0.6 Ma.

T. M. Harrison (U of California); G. B. Dalrymple (Oregon State U); J. B. Hulen (U of Utah); M. A. Lanphere; M. Grove; O. M. Lovera

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols  

SciTech Connect

Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

235

ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP IN THE DISTRICT HEATING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP IN THE DISTRICT HEATING PLANT Dr.sc.ing. Agnese Lickrastina M.Sc. Normunds European Heat Pump Summit 2013, Nuremberg, 15-16.10.2013 · Riga District Heating company · Operation #12;JSC RGAS SILTUMS · the biggest District Heating company in Latvia and in the Baltic states

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

236

Development and testing of a photometric method to identify non-operating solar hot water systems in field settings.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of experimental tests of a concept for using infrared (IR) photos to identify non-operational systems based on their glazing temperatures; operating systems have lower glazing temperatures than those in stagnation. In recent years thousands of new solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed in some utility districts. As these numbers increase, concern is growing about the systems dependability because installation rebates are often based on the assumption that all of the SHW systems will perform flawlessly for a 20-year period. If SHW systems routinely fail prematurely, then the utilities will have overpaid for grid-energy reduction performance that is unrealized. Moreover, utilities are responsible for replacing energy for loads that failed SHW system were supplying. Thus, utilities are seeking data to quantify the reliability of SHW systems. The work described herein is intended to help meet this need. The details of the experiment are presented, including a description of the SHW collectors that were examined, the testbed that was used to control the system and record data, the IR camera that was employed, and the conditions in which testing was completed. The details of the associated analysis are presented, including direct examination of the video records of operational and stagnant collectors, as well as the development of a model to predict glazing temperatures and an analysis of temporal intermittency of the images, both of which are critical to properly adjusting the IR camera for optimal performance. Many IR images and a video are presented to show the contrast between operating and stagnant collectors. The major conclusion is that the technique has potential to be applied by using an aircraft fitted with an IR camera that can fly over an area with installed SHW systems, thus recording the images. Subsequent analysis of the images can determine the operational condition of the fielded collectors. Specific recommendations are presented relative to the application of the technique, including ways to mitigate and manage potential sources of error.

He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Vorobieff, Peter V. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Field analysis of occupancy sensor operation: Parameters affecting lighting energy savings  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in Hanford Site facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing the cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include an assessment of the total potential savings from the application of sensors across the entire site. The study involved placing sensor test equipment in multiple office spaces in eight buildings that are part of the Hanford contractor facilities. Further testing was conducted to assess the effects of timer sensitivity adjustments on potential lighting energy savings. The results of this test indicated that up to 100% additional wasted-light energy can be saved by using timer sensitivity settings as low as 2.5 min, which is less than standard factory settings of usually 10 to 20 min. The analysis indicates that savings from lighting operations are affected by the work function and number of occupants in occupied spaces. The availability of daylight in a building space does not appear to have any noticeable aggregate effect on the quantity of wasted-light hours in occupied or unoccupied spaces. An assessment of the total potential savings for the entire Hanford Site included life-cycle costing that followed the federally accepted methodology. The life-cycle cost analysis was performed for a set of possible lighting wattages across the building spaces and occupant types identified from the initial analysis. Under current conditions, the potential savings is estimated to be $525,812/yr at an initial cost of $976,824. The total Net Present Value for the site is estimated at $3,539,926 with a simple payback period of 1.85 years.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs Owned, 2008 . The operator of an oil or gas field is the company responsible for the field’s ...

239

Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics c ? European Geosciences Union 2003 MHD turbulence and heating of the open field-line solar corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper discusses the possibility that heating of the solar corona in open field-line regions emanating from coronal holes is due to a nonlinear cascade, driven by low-frequency or quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations. Reflection from coronal inhomogeneities plays an important role in sustaining the cascade. Physical and observational constraints are discussed. Kinetic processes that convert cascaded energy into heat must occur in regions of turbulent small-scale reconnection, and may be similar in some respects to ion heating due to intense electron beams observed in the aurora. 1

W. H. Matthaeus; D. J. Mullan; P. Dmitruk; L. Milano; S. Oughton

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

Michael D. Durham

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Micro-Columnated Loop Heat Pipe: The Future of Electronic Substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loop Heat Pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Heat Pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of operation of a heat pipe [13]. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Dhillon, Navdeep Singh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

An Operational System for Specifying Monthly Precipitation Amounts over the United States from the Field of Concurrent Mean 700-mb Heights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an operational system for specifying monthly precipitation amounts in the contiguous United States from the concurrent 700-mb monthly mean height field over North America and adjacent oceans. Multiple regression equations are ...

William H. Klein; Hal J. Bloom

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Modeling near-field radiative heat transfer from sharp objects using a general three-dimensional numerical scattering technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a general numerical method to calculate the nonequilibrium radiative heat transfer between a plate and compact objects of arbitrary shapes, making the first accurate theoretical predictions for the total heat ...

McCauley, Alexander Patrick

244

Dual source heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX); Pietsch, Joseph A. (Dallas, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Energy savings from operation and maintenance training for apartment boiler heating systems. An energy study on ten low-income apartments  

SciTech Connect

The Portland Energy Office provided operation and maintenance (O&M) training to the operators of boiler heating systems for ten low-income apartment complexes in the Fall of 1990. This study tracked energy usage before and after O&M training to see if savings occurred. Training was provided on both weatherized and non-weatherized apartments to find out if weatherization impacted the amount of O&M savings to be obtained. Also, energy savings from the O&M training and building shell weatherization are compared. The O&M training averaged about four hours per building. Content was adjusted at each site to match needs of the boiler and operator. The Energy Office also provided a boiler tune-up by a service technician. The training stressed low-cost and no-cost measures which operators could either do themselves or hire service help to implement. It also emphasized boiler safety. Nine of the ten apartment complexes in the study used less energy per heating degree-day after the O&M help. Average savings were 10%. Four apartments chosen randomly as controls had negative savings; they used slightly more energy during the same post-O&M time frame. Weatherized and unweatherized apartments showed similar savings after the O&M help, 10% and 11% percent respectively. Savings from weatherization of six of the apartments in the winter of 1988--1989 were also measured. A low average of only 4% was observed, reflecting negative savings in two buildings.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Field Sampling Plan for the Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04 Remedial Action, Phase IV  

SciTech Connect

This Field Sampling Plan outlines the collection and analysis of samples in support of Phase IV of the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04 remedial action. Phase IV addresses the remedial actions to areas with the potential for unexploded ordnance at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. The remedial action consists of removal and disposal of ordnance by high-order detonation, followed by sampling to determine the extent, if any, of soil that might have been contaminated by the detonation activities associated with the disposal of ordnance during the Phase IV activities and explosives during the Phase II activities.

R. Wells

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

247

Heat loss from an open cavity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cavity type receivers are used extensively in concentrating solar thermal energy collecting systems. The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP) in Shenandoah, Georgia is a large scale field test for the collection of solar thermal energy. The STEP experiment consists of a large field array of solar collectors used to supplement the process steam, cooling and other electrical power requirements of an adjacent knitwear manufacturing facility. The purpose of the tests, conducted for this study, was to isolate and quantify the radiative, conductive, and convective components of total heat loss, and to determine the effects of operating temperature, receiver angle, and aperture size on cavity heat loss. An analytical model for radiative heat loss was developed and compared with two other methods used to determine radiative heat loss. A proposed convective heat loss correlation, including effects of aperture size, receiver operating temperature, and receiver angle is presented. The resulting data is a source to evaluate the STEP measurements.

McDonald, C.G. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States). Coll. of Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Multiple source heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Evaluation of EPA Region IV Standard Operating Procedures for decontamination of field equipment when sampling for volatile organic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decontamination procedures for use at CERCLA sites where the US Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region IV is the lead agency are specified in their Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) document. Under certain circumstances, the objectives of proper decontamination can be obtained without utilizing the full procedure as specified in the SOP. Because some treatment methods may introduce low levels of organic constituents into water (e.g., chlorination), the use of treated potable water would actually have an adverse effect on the decontamination procedure compared to the use of an untreated potable supply. Certified organic-free water, the cost of which ranges from five dollars per gallon to over sixty dollars per gallon may also be unnecessary in some cases. Distilled water samples from seven different suppliers (at a cost of less than a dollar per gallon) were analyzed for Target Compound List (TCL) volatile, organic compounds (VOCs) or benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Fifty of the samples analyzed for BTEX contained no detectable amounts of these compounds, and twenty-six of the samples analyzed for TCL VOCs contained no detectable concentration. The use of solvent rinses may cause false positives during sampling. Field experiments have shown that isopropanol may degrade to acetone under some circumstances. In many cases, particularly when sampling ground water or decontaminating drilling equipment, the elimination of this step should not adversely affect sample quality. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Brice, D.A. (Westinghouse Materials Co. of Ohio, Cincinnati, OH (USA). Feed Materials Production Center); Kelley, M.E. (Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Transient Response to Localized Episodic Heating in the Tropics. Part I: Excitation and Short-Time Near-Field Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical response to localized, unsteady tropical heating is studied in a stochastic framework. Spectral statistics of the random wave response are derived from those of tropical convection using the primitive equations for a spherical ...

Murry L. Salby; Rolando R. Garcia

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Accuracy of Diagnostic Heat and Moisture Budgets Using SESAME-79 Field Data as Revealed by Observing System Simulation Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of diagnostic heat and moisture budgets using the AVE-SESAME 1979 data is investigated through a series of observing system simulation experiments. The four-dimensional (including time) data set provided by a mesoscale model is used ...

Ying-Hwa Kuo; Richard A. Anthes

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests  

SciTech Connect

Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. |...

254

Comparative performance of two types of evacuated tubular solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system. Final report, October 1 1977-September 30 1978 (including 1974-1977 operating results comparisons)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two types of evacuated tubular solar collectors have been operated in space heating, cooling, and domestic hot water heating systems in Colorado State University Solar House I. An experimental collector from Corning Glass works supplied heat to the system from January 1977 through February 1978, and an experimental collector from the Phillips Research Laboratory, Aachen, which is currently in use, has been operating since August 1978. A flat absorber plate inside a single-walled glass tube is used in the Corning design, whereas heat is conducted through a single glass wall to an external heat exchanger plate in the Philips collector. The respective aperture areas are 50.0 m/sup 2/ and 44.7 m/sup 2/. Since system designs and conditions of operation were not identical, efficiencies and energy deliveries of the two evacuated tubular collectors should not be compared without recognition of these factors. But in comparison with conventional flat plate collectors, both types show substantially reduced heat losses and improved efficiency.

Loef, G.O.G.; Duff, W.S.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Heat collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, Michael A. (Santa Cruz, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Heat collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, M.A.

1981-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

257

Process Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update uses real world examples to discuss applications of electrotechnology in industrial process heating and to highlight some of the emerging technologies in this field. These emerging technologies, when implemented in a plant, will provide significant energy savings as well as increase productivity. The report presents three case studies of successful implementation of two different electric process-heating technologies in three different industries. The case studies show that in some ...

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Laboratory Study of the Urban Heat Island in a Calm and Stably Stratified Environment. Part II: Velocity Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully turbulent, low-aspect-ratio buoyant plume with no initial momentum under calm and stably stratified conditions is produced in a convection tank. The plume is generated by a circular heat island at the bottom of the tank. Two analytical ...

Jie Lu; S. Pal Arya; William H. Snyder; Robert E. Lawson Jr.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Mass and Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last few years heat recovery was under spot and in air conditioning fields usually we use heat recovery by different types of heat exchangers. The heat exchanging between the exhaust air from the building with the fresh air to the building (air to air heat exchanger). In my papers I use (water to air heat exchanger) as a heat recovery and I use the water as a mass recovery. The source of mass and heat recovery is the condensate water which we were dispose and connect it to the drain lines.

Hindawai, S. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Results of a field test of heating system efficiency and thermal distribution system efficiency in a manufactured home  

SciTech Connect

A two-day test using electric coheating was performed on a manufactured home in Watertown, New York. The main objective of the test was to evaluate planned procedures for measuring thermal distribution system efficiency. (Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork or piping used to transport heat or cooling effect from the equipment that produces it to the building spaces in which it is used.) These procedures are under consideration for a standard method of test now being prepared by a special committee of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers. The ability of a coheating test to give a credible and repeatable value for the overall heating system efficiency was supported by the test data. Distribution efficiency is derived from system efficiency by correcting for energy losses from the equipment. Alternative means for achieving this were tested and assessed. The best value for system efficiency in the Watertown house was 0.53, while the best value for distribution efficiency was 0.72.

Andrews, J.W.; Krajewski, R.F.; Strasser, J.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kinney, L.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Design and testing of an electron cyclotron resonance heating ion source for use in high field compact superconducting cyclotrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of axial injection of a high brightness beam from an Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source into a high magnetic field cyclotron. Axial injection from an ion ...

Artz, Mark E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Poloidal OHMIC heating in a multipole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using poloidal currents to heat plasmas confined by a multipole field has been examined experimentaly in Tokapole II. The machine is operated as a toroidal octupole, with a time-varying toroidal magnetic field driving poloidal plasma currents I/sub plasma/ - 20 kA to give densities n/sub e/ - 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ and temperatures T/sub e/ - 30 eV.

Holly, D.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Performance of underfloor air distribution in a field setting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation of the ground source heat pumps that heat or coolconditioned with ground-source heat pump units, and then

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Field and Laboratory Study of a Ground-Coupled Water Source Heat Pump with an Integral Enthalpy Exchange System for Classrooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School classroom space-conditioning equipment in hot and humid climates is often excessively burdened by the requirement to dehumidify incoming air to maintain proper thermal comfort and air quality. To that end, application of new or modified technologies is needed to increase the dehumidification abilities of equipment without compromising energy efficiency or the need for fresh ventilation air. To study the effectiveness of integrated heat pump and enthalpy exchange equipment, a nominal 4-ton water-source heat pump, coupled with a geothermal water loop and incorporating a forced fresh-air enthalpy exchange system was installed in a typical middle school classroom in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This project is a joint effort among Oak Ridge School District, Tennessee Valley Authority, Energy Office of the State of Tennessee, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The retrofit classroom, along with a similar baseline classroom (employing a water source heat pump supplied by a boiler/cooling tower loop), were instrumented with an Internet-based system to control and monitor performance, efficiency, and a variety of air states. Those include classroom air, outdoor air, semi-conditioned fresh air, and supply air. Particular attention was dedicated to the humidity content and the carbon dioxide content of conditioned space (classroom) air and to the intake rate of forced fresh air. This field study builds on a previous laboratory study of a water-source heat pump coupled to an enthalpy recovery system. The laboratory work showed good potential for reducing the moisture load from forced ventilation air. At simulated outdoor conditions of 90°F (32.2°C) and 90% RH, the enthalpy recovery wheel in the nominal 2-ton system was able to capture and exhaust 9.9 lb of moisture that would otherwise have to be handled solely by the cooling coil.

Domitrovic, R.; Hayzen, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.; Chen, F. C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

SUPERGLASS. Engineering field tests - Phase 3. Production, market planning, and product evaluation for a high-thermal-performance insulating glass design utilizing HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

HEAT MIRROR transparent window insulation consists of a clear polyester film two mils (.002'') thick with a thin, clear low-emissivity (.15) coating deposited on one side by state-of-the-art vacuum deposition processes. This neutral-colored invisible coating reflects long-wave infrared energy (heat). When mounted by being stretched with a 1/2'' air-gap on each side of the film, the resulting unit reduces heat loss by 60% compared to dual insulating glass. Southwall Corporation produces HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation and markets it to manufacturers of sealed insulating glass (I.G.) units and window and building manufacturers who make their own I.G. These companies build and sell the SUPERGLASS sealed glazing units. Units made and installed in buildings by six customers were visited. These units were located in many geographic regions, including the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountains, New England, Southeast, and West Coast. As much as could be obtained of their history was recorded, as was their current condition and performance. These units had been in place from two weeks to over a year. All of the units were performing thermally very well, as measured by taking temperature profiles through them and through adjacent conventional I.G. units. Some units had minor visual defects (attributed to I.G. assembly techniques) which are discussed in detail. Overall occupant acceptance was enthusiastically positive. In addition to saving energy, without compromise of optical quality or appearance, the product makes rooms with large glazing areas comfortable to be in in cold weather. All defects observed were present when built; there appears to be no in-field degradation of quality at this time.

Tilford, C L

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce Operating Costs of Small Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce produced water to create "green" electricity usable on site or for transmission off site . The goal the environmental impact by creating green electricity using produced water and no additional fossil fuel. Approach

267

Two well storage systems for combined heating and airconditioning by groundwater heatpumps in shallow aquifers  

SciTech Connect

The use of soil and ground water as an energy source and heat storage systems for heat pumps in order to conserve energy in heating and air conditioning buildings is discussed. Information is included on heat pump operation and performance, aquifer characteristics, soil and ground water temperatures, and cooling and heating demands. Mathematical models are used to calculate flow and temperature fields in the aquifer. It is concluded that two well storage systems with ground water heat pumps are desirable, particularly in northern climates. (LCL)

Pelka, W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Applications Tests of Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field application tests have been conducted on three 4 to 6-ton commercial heat pump water heater systems in a restaurant, a coin-operated laundry, and an office building cafeteria in Atlanta. The units provide space cooling while rejecting heat to a water heating load. The tests, conducted for Georgia Power Company, examined both quantitative and qualitative aspects of the heat pumps and the overall water heating systems. The results provide valuable insight into the actual operating characteristics of heat pump water heaters and useful guidelines for system design and operation. The capacity and efficiency of the units agreed with manufacturers' specifications. COP values ranged from 2 .6 to 3.0 for water heating only, and from 4.1 to 5.0 when space cooling benefit was included. It was concluded that heat pump water heaters can provide economical water heating and space conditioning. However, application sites must be selected within certain constraints and a minimum level of operating control and maintenance must be observed.

Oshinski, J. N..; Abrams, D. W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the loss of residual heat removal during midloop operation experiment conducted at the ROSA-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modeling of the complex thermal hydraulics Of reactor systems involves the use Of experimental test systems as well as numerical codes. A simulation of the loss of residual heat removal (RHR) during midloop operations was performed using the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. The experiment was conducted at the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA)-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The experiment involved a 5% cold leg break along with the loss of the RHR system-The transient was simulated for 3040 seconds. The ROSA-1-V/]LsTF is one of the largest test facilities in the world and is located in Japan. It is a volumetrically scaled (1/48) full height, two loop model of a Westinghouse four loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). The facility consists of pressure vessel, two symmetric loops, a pressurizer and a full emergency core cooling system (ECCS) system. The transient was run on the CRAY-YMP supercomputer at Texas A&M university. Core boiling and primary pressurization followed the initiation of the transient. The time to core boiling was overpredicted. Almost all Primary parameters were predicted well until the occurrence of the loop seal clearing (LSC) at 2400 seconds. The secondary side temperatures were in good agreement with the experimental data until the LSC. Following the LSC, the steam condensation in the tubes was not calculated. This resulted in the overprediction of primary pressures after the LSC. Also, the temperatures in the hot and the cold legs were overpredicted. Because there was no significant condensation in the U-tubes, the core remained uncovered. Moreover, the LSC did not recover. Consequently, secondary side temperatures were underpredicted after the LSC. This indicated the deficiency of the condensation model. The core temperature excursion at the time of the LSC was not predicted, though there was good agreement between the experimental and calculated data for the rest of the transient. Severe oscillations were calculated throughout the course of the transient. Overall, there was reasonable qualitative agreement between the measured and the calculated data.

Banerjee, Sibashis Sanatkumar

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations  

SciTech Connect

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

271

Near-field characterization of hydrogen and helium operation on the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) diagnostic neutral beam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Optical Multichannel Analyzer has been used to measure beam divergence and composition. This measurement is usually performed near the center of the neutralizer or beyond the magnet. In the past, these locations suffered difficult beam composition analysis and low light intensity, respectively. It has been determined that the light emission is relatively independent of neutralizer line density in the near field, allowing near-field measurements to overcome both difficulties. At optimum perveance, but under conditions of high gas throughput, the helium 1/e-divergence angle was measured to be 1.5{degree}. Further investigation found that the divergence decreased with gas throughput down to 1.25{degree}. Mimimum divergences for the full-, half-, and third-energy hydrogen components were 1.1{degree}, 1.2{degree}, and 1.4{degree}, respectively. Relative neutral hydrogen particle fluxes available for injection into TFTR are a function of perveance. At maximum perveance, the full-, half-, and third-energy atom fractions were 0.25 {plus minus} 0.04, 0.5 {plus minus} 0.04, and 0.25 {plus minus} 0.05, respectively. 10 refs., 5 figs.

Kamperschroer, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Roquemore, A.L.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Operation and Performance of a Biphase Turbine Power Plant at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (Final Report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A full scale, wellhead Biphase turbine was manufactured and installed with the balance of plant at Well 103 of the Cerro Prieto geothermal resource in Baja, California. The Biphase turbine was first synchronized with the electrical grid of Comision Federal de Electricidad on August 20, 1997. The Biphase power plant was operated from that time until May 23, 2000, a period of 2 years and 9 months. A total of 77,549 kWh were delivered to the grid. The power plant was subsequently placed in a standby condition pending replacement of the rotor with a newly designed, higher power rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals. The maximum measured power output of the Biphase turbine, 808 kWe at 640 psig wellhead pressure, agreed closely with the predicted output, 840 kWe. When combined with the backpressure steam turbine the total output power from that flow would be increased by 40% above the power derived only from the flow by the present flash steam plant. The design relations used to predict performance and design the turbine were verified by these tests. The performance and durability of the Biphase turbine support the conclusion of the Economics and Application Report previously published, (Appendix A). The newly designed rotor (the Dual Pressure Rotor) was analyzed for the above power condition. The Dual Pressure Rotor would increase the power output to 2064 kWe by incorporating two pressure letdown stages in the Biphase rotor, eliminating the requirement for a backpressure steam turbine. The power plant availability was low due to deposition of solids from the well on the Biphase rotor and balance of plant problems. A great deal of plant down time resulted from the requirement to develop methods to handle the solids and from testing the apparatus in the Biphase turbine. Finally an online, washing method using the high pressure two-phase flow was developed which completely eliminated the solids problem. The availability of the Biphase turbine itself was 100% after implementations of this method in March 2000. However, failures of instrumentation and control system components led to additional plant down time and damage to the bearings and seals. The enthalpy and pressure of well 103 declined substantially from the inception of the project. When the project was started the wellhead pressure and enthalpy were 760 psig and 882 Btu/lb respectively. At the time the plant was placed in standby the corresponding values were only 525 psig and 658 Btu/lb. This reduced the available plant power to only 400 kWe making the project economically unfeasible. However, replacement of the existing rotor with the Dual Pressure Rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals will enable the existing Biphase turbine to produce 1190 kWe at the present well conditions without the backpressure steam turbine. Operation with the present staff can then be sustained by selling power under the existing Agreement with CFE. Implementation of this option is recommended with operation of the facility to continue as a demonstration plant. Biphase turbine theory, design and performance are reported herein. The construction of the Biphase turbine and power plant and operational experience are detailed. Improvements in the Biphase turbine are indicated and analyzed. The impact of Biphase techonology on geothermal power production is discussed and recommendations made.

Hays, Lance G. [Douglas Energy Company, Placentia, CA (United States)

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

274

On the spectrum of the Schrodinger Operator with Aharonov-Bohm Magnetic Field in quantum waveguide with Neumann window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a previous study \\cite{n} we investigate the bound states of the Hamiltonian describing a quantum particle living on three dimensional straight strip of width $d$. We impose the Neumann boundary condition on a disc window of radius $a$ and Dirichlet boundary conditions on the remained part of the boundary of the strip. We proved that such system exhibits discrete eigenvalues below the essential spectrum for any $a>0$. In the present work we study the effect of a magnetic filed of Aharonov-Bohm type when the magnetic field is turned on this system. Precisely we prove that in the presence of such magnetic filed there is some critical values of $a_0>0$, for which we have absence of the discrete spectrum for $\\displaystyle 0<\\frac{a}{d}

H. Najar; M. Rayssi

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

275

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: United Technologies Research Center. Design guidelines for solar heating/cooling/power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, design guidelines and analytical tools for the preliminary technical/economic evaluation of solar heating/cooling/power generation systems. In particular, it provides the theoretical framework, data bases and software tools for: determining the preliminary economic feasibility of solar-powered configurations compared with grid-supplied electric power and/or competing fossil fuels; selecting the optimum system configuration with respect to solar collector area and ''solar-side'' thermal storage capacity. Implementation of the methodology described in this report can be facilitated by the use of the accompanying IBM PC-compatible computer program ''SOLERAS''. This report represents the final task of the multi-year SOLERAS Program -- jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology -- which involved the development and field-testing of a solar-powered cooling system in Phoenix, AZ. 11 refs., 37 figs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

Not Available

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Design, construction, operation, and evaluation of solar systems for industrial process-heat applications in the intermediate-temperature range (212/sup 0/F to 550/sup 0/F). Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental impacts are assessed for a proposed 50,000 square foot field of single axis tracking, concentrating solar collectors along the Ohio River in southern Ohio. The facility is planned to produce process steam for use in the production of polystyrene. Absorbed solar energy would heat an aliphatic hydrocarbon synthetic heat transfer fluid to a maximum temperature of 500/sup 0/F. The existing environment is briefly described, particularly regarding air quality. The potential environmental impacts of the solar process heat system on the air, water, soil, endangered species and archaeological and historical resources are examined, including risks due to flood and glare and a comparison of alternatives. Also included are a Consent Judgment relating to two coal-fired boilers in violation of EPA regulations, property data of Gulf Synfluid 4CS (a candidate heat transfer fluid), piping and instrumentation diagrams and schematics, site grade and drainage plan, geological survey map, subsurface soil investigation, Ohio endangered species list, Ohio Archaeological Counsel certification list, and a study of heat transfer fluids and their properties. (LEW)

Not Available

279

Heat pipe technology quarterly literature review. Volume 1, Number 3  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography containing 110 citations is presented. The citations are arranged in five sections on general information on heat pipes, heat pipe applications, heat pipe theory, heat pipe design, development, and fabrication, and heat pipe testing and operation.

Srinivasan, R.; Gonzales, R.W. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Overview of KSTAR initial operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the successful first plasma generation in the middle of 2008, three experimental campaigns were successfully made for the KSTAR device, accompanied with a necessary upgrade in the power supply, heating, wall-conditioning and diagnostic systems. KSTAR was operated with the toroidal magnetic field up to 3.6 T and the circular and shaped plasmas with current up to 700 kA and pulse length of 7 s, have been achieved with limited capacity of PF magnet power supplies. The mission of the KSTAR experimental program is to achieve steady-state operations with high performance plasmas relevant to ITER and future reactors. The first phase (2008 2012) of operation of KSTAR is dedicated to the development of operational capabilities for a super-conducting device with relatively short pulse. Development of start-up scenario for a super-conducting tokamak and the understanding of magnetic field errors on start-up are one of the important issues to be resolved. Some specific operation techniques for a super-conducting device are also developed and tested. The second harmonic pre-ionization with 84 and 110 GHz gyrotrons is an example. Various parameters have been scanned to optimize the pre-ionization. Another example is the ICRF wall conditioning (ICWC), which was routinely applied during the shot to shot interval. The plasma operation window has been extended in terms of plasma beta and stability boundary. The achievement of high confinement mode was made in the last campaign with the first neutral beam injector and good wall conditioning. Plasma control has been applied in shape and position control and now a preliminary kinetic control scheme is being applied including plasma current and density. Advanced control schemes will be developed and tested in future operations including active profiles, heating and current drives and control coil-driven magnetic perturbation.

Kwon, M. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Oh, Y. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Yang, H. L. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Na, H. K. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Kim, Y. S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Kwak, J. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Kim, W. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Kim, J. Y. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Ahn, Joonwook [ORNL; Ahn, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bae, Y. S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Baek, S. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Bak, J. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Bang, E. N. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Chang, C. S. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; Chang, D. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Chavdarovski, I. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Chen, Z. Y. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Cho, K. W. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Cho, M. H. [Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Republic of Korea; Choe, W. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; Choi, J. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Chu, Y. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Chung, K. S. [Hanyang University, Korea; Diamond, P. H. [University of California, San Diego; Do, H. J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Eidietis, N. W. [General Atomics, San Diego; England, A. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Grisham, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hahm, T. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hahn, S. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Han, W. S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Hatae, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Hillis, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hong, J. S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea; Hong, S. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon, South Korea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Modeling the Heating of Biological Tissue based on the Hyperbolic Heat Transfer Equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In modern surgery, a multitude of minimally intrusive operational techniques are used which are based on the punctual heating of target zones of human tissue via laser or radio-frequency currents. Traditionally, these processes are modeled by the bioheat equation introduced by Pennes, who considers Fourier's theory of heat conduction. We present an alternative and more realistic model established by the hyperbolic equation of heat transfer. To demonstrate some features and advantages of our proposed method, we apply the obtained results to different types of tissue heating with high energy fluxes, in particular radiofrequency heating and pulsed laser treatment of the cornea to correct refractive errors. Hopefully, the results of our approach help to refine surgical interventions in this novel field of medical treatment.

Tung, M M; Molina, J A Lopez; Rivera, M J; Berjano, E J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. Methods: The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors' assembly were also evaluated to determine its stability during acceleration, and a pulse width modulation algorithm was implemented to control the rotation speed of the motor. Results: At a magnetic flux density of 41 mT orthogonal to the axis of rotation (on the lower end of the expected flux density in the MR suite) the maximum speed of the motor was found to be 5150 revolutions per minute (rpm). The acceleration time necessary to reach 3000 rpm was found to be approximately 10 s at 59 mT. The resonance frequency of the assembly with the anode attached was 1310 rpm (21.8 Hz) which is far below the desired operating speeds. Pulse width modulation provides an effective method to control the speed of the motor with a resolution of 100 rpm. Conclusions: The proposed design can serve as a direct replacement to the conventional induction motor used in rotating anode x-ray tubes. It does not suffer from a reduced rotation speed when operating in a MR environment. The presence of chromic steel bearings in the prototype prevented testing at the higher field strengths, and future iterations of the design could eliminate this shortcoming. The prototype assembly demonstrates proof of concept of the authors' design and overcomes one of the major obstacles for a MR compatible rotating anode x-ray tube.

Lillaney, Prasheel; Pelc, Norbert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Shin Mihye [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bennett, N. Robert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Qualcomm MEMS Technologies, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following tasks; solar heating with isothermal collector operation and advanced control strategy; solar cooling with solid desiccant; liquid desiccant cooling system development; solar house III -- development and improvement of solar heating systems employing boiling liquid collectors; generic solar domestic water heating systems; advanced residential solar domestic hot water (DHW) systems; management and coordination of Colorado State/DOE program; and field monitoring workshop.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

Final Report: Mobile Surveillance and Wireless Communication Systems Field Operational Test Volume 2: FOT Objectives, Organization, System Design, Results, Conclusions and Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for operation Mobile Surveillance and Wireless CommunicationDesign and Operation The mobile surveillance and wirelessAND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION SYSTEM DESIGN AND OPERATION .

Klein, Lawrence

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Heat pump having improved defrost system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger. 2 figs.

Chen, F.C.; Mei, V.C.; Murphy, R.W.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Heat pump having improved defrost system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger.

Chen, Fang C. (Knoxville, TN); Mei, Viung C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Murphy, Richard W. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Design and technology of heat pipes for cooling and heat exchange  

SciTech Connect

This new book presents a comprehensive account of heat pipe design, technology, and operation. It is based on insights and techniques developed by the author during more than twenty years of investigating high-performance heat pipe systems. The book provides information on a unique device with the capability to transport heat isothermally at high rates with no external power input. Emphasis is on high-performance liquid metal heat pipes, although nonliquid metal heat pipes are treated, as well. The first three chapters deal with the nonmathematical background for understanding heat pipe operation and heat transport capability. Remaining chapters detail heat pipe characteristics and design methods. Of special interest are simplified equations for obtaining heat pipe heat transport limits, heat pipe heat exchangers, heat pipe transient behavior, and inverted (nonwetting) heat pipes. Operational boundaries on heat pipe temperature and heat transport rate are described, and step-by-step procedures are given for involved calculations.

Silverstein, C.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Absorption heat pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

Grossman, Gershon (Oak Ridge, TN); Perez-Blanco, Horacio (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

FEMP--Geothermal Heat Pumps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

conditioner or refrigera- tor-moves heat from one place to another. In the summer, a geothermal heat pump (GHP) operating in a cooling mode lowers indoor temperatures by...

290

Analysis of Cyclic Variability of Heat Release for High-EGR GDI Engine Operation with Observations on Implications for Effective Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operation of spark-ignition (SI) engines with high levels of charge dilution through exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) achieves significant engine efficiency gains while maintaining stoichiometric operation for compatibility with three-way catalysts. Dilution levels, however, are limited by cyclic variability-including significant numbers of misfires-that becomes more pronounced with increasing dilution. This variability has been shown to have both stochastic and deterministic components. Stochastic effects include turbulence, mixing variations, and the like, while the deterministic effect is primarily due to the nonlinear dependence of flame propagation rates and ignition characteristics on the charge composition, which is influenced by the composition of residual gases from prior cycles. The presence of determinism implies that an increased understanding the dynamics of such systems could lead to effective control approaches that allow operation near the edge of stability, effectively extending the dilution limit. This nonlinear dependence has been characterized previously for homogeneous charge, port fuel-injected (PFI) SI engines operating fuel-lean as well as with inert diluents such as bottled N2 gas. In this paper, cyclic dispersion in a modern boosted gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine using a cooled external EGR loop is examined, and the potential for improvement with effective control is evaluated through the use of symbol sequence statistics and other techniques from chaos theory. Observations related to the potential implications of these results for control approaches that could effectively enable engine operation at the edge of combustion stability are noted.

Kaul, Brian C [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Green Jr, Johney Boyd [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Electric Vehicle Field Operations Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vehicle performance information. The final product is a report describing energy use, miles driven, maintenance requirements, and overall vehicle performance. Fleet Testing....

292

Research and Development of a New Field Enhanced Low Temperature Thermionic Cathode that Enables Fluorescent Dimming and Loan Shedding without Auxiliary Cathode Heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report for project entitled 'Research and development of a new field enhanced low temperature thermionic cathode that enables fluorescent dimming and load shedding without auxiliary cathode heating', under Agreement Number: DE-FC26-04NT-42329. Under this project, a highly efficient CNT based thermionic cathode was demonstrated. This cathode is capable of emitting electron at a current density two order of magnitude stronger then a typical fluorescent cathode at same temperatures, or capable of emitting at same current density but at temperature about 300 C lower than that of a fluorescent cathode. Detailed fabrication techniques were developed including CVD growth of CNTs and sputter deposition of oxide thin films on CNTs. These are mature technologies that have been widely used in industry for large scale materials processing and device fabrications, thus, with further development work, the techniques developed in this project can be scaled-up in manufacturing environment. The prototype cathodes developed in this project were tested in lighting plasma discharge environment. In many cases, they not only lit and sustain the plasma, but also out perform the fluorescent cathodes in key parameters such like cathode fall voltages. More work will be needed to further evaluate more detailed and longer term performance of the prototype cathode in lighting plasma.

Feng Jin

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Heat pump apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pump apparatus including a compact arrangement of individual tubular reactors containing hydride-dehydride beds in opposite end sections, each pair of beds in each reactor being operable by sequential and coordinated treatment with a plurality of heat transfer fluids in a plurality of processing stages, and first and second valves located adjacent the reactor end sections with rotatable members having multiple ports and associated portions for separating the hydride beds at each of the end sections into groups and for simultaneously directing a plurality of heat transfer fluids to the different groups. As heat is being generated by a group of beds, others are being regenerated so that heat is continuously available for space heating. As each of the processing stages is completed for a hydride bed or group of beds, each valve member is rotated causing the heat transfer fluid for the heat processing stage to be directed to that bed or group of beds. Each of the end sections are arranged to form a closed perimeter and the valve member may be rotated repeatedly about the perimeter to provide a continuous operation. Both valves are driven by a common motor to provide a coordinated treatment of beds in the same reactors. The heat pump apparatus is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Horowitz, Jeffrey S. (Woodridge, IL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

System for measuring the effect of fouling and corrosion on heat transfer under simulated OTEC conditions. [HTAU and LABTTF codes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A complete system designed to measure, with high precision, changes in heat transfer rates due to fouling and corrosion of simulated heat exchanger tubes, at sea and under OTEC conditions is described. All aspects of the system are described in detail, including theory, mechanical design, electronics design, assembly procedures, test and calibration, operating procedures, laboratory results, field results, and data analysis programs.

Fetkovich, J.G.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l U CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING* M.Wahlig,be capable of operating solar heating and cooling systemsand now transferred to ERDA, on solar heating and cooling of

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Radiant Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Radiant heating systems involve supplying heat directly to the floor or to panels in the walls or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer: the delivery of heat...

297

Heat pump with freeze-up prevention  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid prevents freeze up of the second heat exchanger by keeping the temperature above the dew point; and, optionally, provides heat for efficient operation.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Enhancement of heat transfer for ground source heat pump systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Uptake of geothermal heat pump (GSHP) systems has been slow in some parts of the world due to the unpredictable operational performance, large installation space… (more)

Mori, Hiromi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Tips: Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Tips: Heat Pumps June 24, 2013 - 5:48pm Addthis Heat pumps can be a cost-effective choice in moderate climates, especially if you heat your home with electricity. Heat pumps can be a cost-effective choice in moderate climates, especially if you heat your home with electricity. Heat pumps are the most efficient form of electric heating in moderate climates. Because they move heat rather than generate heat, heat pumps can provide equivalent space conditioning at as little as one quarter of the cost of operating conventional heating or cooling appliances. A heat pump does double duty as a central air conditioner by collecting the heat inside your house and pumping it outside. There are three types of heat pumps: air-to-air, water source, and geothermal. They collect heat from the air, water, or ground outside your

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Heat pipe technology issues  

SciTech Connect

Critical high temperature, high power applications in space nuclear power designs are near the current state of the art of heat pipe technology in terms of power density, operating temperature, and lifetime. Recent heat pipe development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has involved performance testing of typical space reactor heat pipe designs to power levels in excess of 19 kW/cm/sup 2/ axially and 300 W/cm/sup 2/ radially at temperatures in the 1400 to 1500 K range. Operation at conditions in the 10 kW/cm/sup 2/ range has been sustained for periods of up to 1000 hours without evidence of performance degradation. The effective length for heat transport in these heat pipes was from 1.0 to 1.5 M. Materials used were molybdenum alloys with lithium employed as the heat pipe operating fluid. Shorter, somewhat lower power, molybdenum heat pipes have been life tested at Los Alamos for periods of greater than 25,000 hours at 1700 K with lithium and 20,000 hours at 1500/sup 0/K with sodium. These life test demonstrations and the attendant performance limit investigations provide an experimental basis for heat pipe application in space reactor design and represent the current state-of-the-art of high temperature heat pipe technology.

Merrigan, M.A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Residential Ground Source Heat Pumps with Integrated Domestic Hot Water Generation: Performance Results from Long-Term Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) show promise for reducing house energy consumption, and a desuperheater can potentially further reduce energy consumption where the heat pump from the space conditioning system creates hot water. Two unoccupied houses were instrumented to document the installed operational space conditioning and water heating efficiency of their GSHP systems. This paper discusses instrumentation methods and field operation characteristics of the GSHPs, compares manufacturers' values of the coefficients of performance calculated from field measured data for the two GSHPs, and compares the measured efficiency of the desuperheater system to other domestic hot water systems.

Stecher, D.; Allison, K.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Switchable heat pipe assembly  

SciTech Connect

The heat pipe assembly is formed into an H-shape or a Y-shape. The H-shaped configuration comprises two heat pipes, each having condenser and evaporator sections with wicking therein coupled by a tube with wick at their evaporator sections. The Y-shaped configuration utilizes a common evaporator section in place of the two evaporator sections of the H-shaped configuration. In both configurations, the connection between the vapor spaces of the two heat pipes equalizes vapor pressure within the heat pipes. Although both heat pipes have wicks, they have sufficient fluid only to saturate a single pipe. If heat is applied to the condenser section of one of the pipes, this heat pipe becomes inoperative since all the fluid is transferred to the second pipe which can operate with a lower thermal load.

Sun, T.H.; Basiulis, A.

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Top 100 Operators: Proved Reserves and Production, Operated vs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The operator of an oil or gas field is the company ... Operators in the United States are obligated to ... Reserves Production Reserves Production ...

305

FEMP--Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

heat pump-like an air conditioner or refrigera- heat pump-like an air conditioner or refrigera- tor-moves heat from one place to another. In the summer, a geothermal heat pump (GHP) operating in a cooling mode lowers indoor temperatures by transferring heat from inside a building to the ground outside or below it. Unlike an air condition- er, though, a heat pump's process can be reversed. In the winter, a GHP extracts heat from the ground and transfers it inside. Also, the GHP can use waste heat from summer air-conditioning to provide virtually free hot-water heating. The energy value of the heat moved is typically more than three times the electricity used in the transfer process. GHPs are efficient and require no backup heat because the earth stays at a relatively moderate temperature throughout the year.

306

Plasma heat pump and heat engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model system where cold charged particles are locally confined in a volume V{sub P} within a warm plasma of volume V (V{sub P}kilowatts is possible with the present day technology. Second, we discuss the feasibility of constructing an electrostatic heat engine which converts plasma heat into mechanical work via plasma electric fields. Effects of P{sub E} are shown to be observable in colloidal solutions.

Avinash, K. [Centre for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States) and Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Heat and mass exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

308

Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Transfer of the Heat Source / Radioisotope Themoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

031 031 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 191 / Friday, October 2, 1998 / Notices SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The package listing contains the following information: (1) Title of the information collection package; (2) current OMB control number; (3) type of respondents; (4) estimated number of responses annually; (5) estimated total burden hours, annually, including recordkeeping hours required to provide the information; (6) purpose; and (7) number of collections. Package Title: Legal. Current OMB No.: 1910-0800. Type of Respondents: DOE management and operating contractors, and offsite contractors. Estimated Number of Responses: 2,719. Estimated Total Burden Hours: 21,052. Purpose: This information is required by the Department to ensure that legal resources and requirements are

309

Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical brief is a guide to help plant operators reduce waste heat losses associated with process heating equipment.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Heat pipe development status  

SciTech Connect

Test heat pipes have been operated in the 1400 K to 1700 K range for periods in excess of 20,000 hours with the objective of understanding and controlling corrosion and failure mechanisms. The results of a post test analysis of one of these heat pipes that was operated for 25,216 hours at 1700 K are reviewed and the implications for heat pipe lifetime discussed. An in-process report of an investigation of transient heat pipe behavior is presented. This investigation is being conducted as a result of restart problems encountered during life test of a 2 m. radiation cooled heat pipe. The results of a series of shut-down tests from power and temperature are given and probable causes of the restart problem discussed.

Merrigan, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

High beta plasma operation in a toroidal plasma producing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high beta plasma is produced in a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration by ohmic heating and auxiliary heating. The plasma pressure is continuously monitored and used in a control system to program the current in the poloidal field windings. Throughout the heating process, magnetic flux is conserved inside the plasma and the distortion of the flux surfaces drives a current in the plasma. As a consequence, the total current increases and the poloidal field windings are driven with an equal and opposing increasing current. The spatial distribution of the current in the poloidal field windings is determined by the plasma pressure. Plasma equilibrium is maintained thereby, and high temperature, high beta operation results.

Clarke, John F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Analysis of the performance and space-conditioning impacts of dedicated heat-pump water heaters  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the development and testing of the newly-marketed dedicated heat pump water heater (HPWH), and an analysis is presented of its performance and space conditioning impacts. This system utilizes an air-to-water heat pump, costs about $1000 installed, and obtains a coefficient of performance (COP) of about 2.0 in laboratory and field tests. Since a HPWH is usually installed indoors and extracts heat from the air, its operation is a space conditioning benefit if an air conditioning load exists and a penalty if a space heating load exists. To investigate HPWH performance and a space conditioning impacts, a simulation has been developed to model the thermal performance of a residence with resistance baseboard heat, air conditioning, and either heat pump or resistance water heating. The building characteristics are adapted for three US geographical areas (Madison, Wisconsin; Washington, DC; and Ft. Worth, Texas), and the system is simulated for a year with typical weather data. For each city, HPWH COPs are calculated monthly and yearly. In addition, the water heating and space conditioning energy requirements of HPWH operation are compared with those of resistance water heater operation to determine the relative performance ratio (RPR) of the HPWH. The annual simulated RPRs range from 1.5 to 1.7, which indicate a substantial space heating penalty of HPWH operation in these cities.

Morrison, L.; Swisher, J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Graphite curtain vacuum outgassing and heat transfer. Quarterly progress report No. 2, 1 April 1976--30 June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A sodium filled heat pipe was tested in a magnetic field of up to 1 Tesla. An analysis of the heat pipe operation is given. The MHD pressure drop is calculated as a function of the Hartmann number, which includes effects of the magnetic field strength and a characteristic flow area dimension parallel to the lines of magnetic flux. Some vacuum outgassing and atomic hydrogen and helium sticking probability measurements are given for graphite fibers. (MOW)

Fivel, H.J.; Lang, G.P.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Geothermal direct contact heat exchange. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A glass direct contact heat exchange column was operated in the laboratory. The column was operated at atmospheric pressure using hot water and normal hexane. Column internals testing included an empty column, sieve trays, disk-and-doughnut trays, and two types of packing. Operation was very smooth in all cases and the minimum temperature approaches varied from less than 1/sup 0/C for packing to 13/sup 0/C for the empty column. High heat transfer rates were obtained in all cases, however, columns should be sized on the basis of liquid and vapor traffic. The solubilities of hydrocarbons were determined for normal hexane, pentane and butane in water and sodium chloride and calcium chloride brines at various temperatures. The values seem to be internally consistent and salt content was found to depress hydrocarbon solubility. Laboratory stripping tests showed that gas stripping can be used to remove hydrocarbon from reject hot water from the direct contact heat exchange column. Although the gas volumes required are small, stripping gas requirements cannot be accurately predicted without testing. A computer program was used to study the effect of operating variables on the thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. Optimum efficiencies for the moderate brine conditions studied were obtained with isopentane as working fluid and relatively low operating pressure. A preliminary design for a 50 MWe plant was prepared and plant capital cost and operating cost were estimated. These costs were combined with previously developed brine production and power transmission costs to provide an estimate of the cost of delivered power for a geothermal field at Heber, California. A pilot plant program is described that would be suitable for continuing the investigation of the direct contact process in the field. The program includes a suggested schedule and the estimated cost.

Sims, A.V.

1977-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

Heating Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are used in many varied applications--from small household appliances to large industrial process heating systems and furnaces. In appliances or industrial process heating, the heating elements are usually either open

316

Intense Summer Heat in Tokyo and Its Suburban Areas Related with Variation in the Synoptic-Scale Pressure Field: A Statistical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense summer heat in Tokyo and its suburban areas between 1990 and 2010 was statistically analyzed. Sample days were selected from among days with a sea breeze and sufficient sunshine duration, because sea breeze is the dominant summertime ...

Hiroshi Yoshikado

317

Spatiotemporal Variations in Growing Season Exchanges of CO2, H2O, and Sensible Heat in Agricultural Fields of the Southern Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate, vegetation cover, and management create finescale heterogeneity in unirrigated agricultural regions, with important but not well-quantified consequences for spatial and temporal variations in surface CO2, water, and heat fluxes. Eddy ...

Marc L. Fischer; David P. Billesbach; Joseph A. Berry; William J. Riley; Margaret S. Torn

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Passive heat transfer means for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. Means such as shrouding normally isolated the secondary condensing section from effective heat transfer with the heat sink, but a sensor responds to overheat conditions of the reactor to open the shrouding, which thereby increases the cooling capacity of the heat pipe. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A variety of heating technologies are available today. In addition to heat pumps, which are discussed separately, many homes and buildings use the following approaches:

320

Additional studies of geothermal district heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Final report, October 1977--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A field survey of three heating uses: snow melting, jacuzzi pool heating, and swimming pool heating in Mammoth was undertaken. Based on the results, monthly heating capacity factors were calculated and rough designs were prepared for hydronic district heating for each system. Capital cost estimates were prepared for snow melting, jacuzzi pool heating and swimming pool heating systems using LPG and geothermal district heating. It was determined that incorporation of the three additional heating uses in the District Heating System previously defined would require a capacity increase from 52 MWt to 60 MWt to meet peak demands. Energy sales would increase by about 40 percent to 127 million kwh(t) per year. The unit cost for delivered heat at 1977 price levels would decrease from 4.26 cents to 3.22 cents/kwh(t) for an investor owned District Heating System, or from 2.89 cents to 2.24 cents/kwh(t) for public ownership. The total heating costs, including annual costs of customer's heating equipment for a typical building in the Village with district heating, were compared with costs to heat the same building with electricity. The total annual costs for snow melting, jacuzzi heating and swimming pool heating using a 60 MWt District Heating System were compared with costs to heat with LPG. It was determined that 11 permits must be obtained prior to beginning construction of the District Heating System. A project schedule outlining regulatory, engineering, design, construction and operation activities for the District Heating System was prepared.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1978-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Additional studies of geothermal district heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Final report, October 1977--March 1978  

SciTech Connect

A field survey of three heating uses: snow melting, jacuzzi pool heating, and swimming pool heating in Mammoth was undertaken. Based on the results, monthly heating capacity factors were calculated and rough designs were prepared for hydronic district heating for each system. Capital cost estimates were prepared for snow melting, jacuzzi pool heating and swimming pool heating systems using LPG and geothermal district heating. It was determined that incorporation of the three additional heating uses in the District Heating System previously defined would require a capacity increase from 52 MWt to 60 MWt to meet peak demands. Energy sales would increase by about 40 percent to 127 million kwh(t) per year. The unit cost for delivered heat at 1977 price levels would decrease from 4.26 cents to 3.22 cents/kwh(t) for an investor owned District Heating System, or from 2.89 cents to 2.24 cents/kwh(t) for public ownership. The total heating costs, including annual costs of customer's heating equipment for a typical building in the Village with district heating, were compared with costs to heat the same building with electricity. The total annual costs for snow melting, jacuzzi heating and swimming pool heating using a 60 MWt District Heating System were compared with costs to heat with LPG. It was determined that 11 permits must be obtained prior to beginning construction of the District Heating System. A project schedule outlining regulatory, engineering, design, construction and operation activities for the District Heating System was prepared.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1978-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

THERMAL STUDY OF THE DIII-D MACHINE HEAT REMOVAL CAPACITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 With each plasma shot, the DIII-D tokamak dissipates 0.5 to 1.0 GJ of energy. Plasma shots may occur as frequently as every ten minutes, and the energy is removed in the form of heat by a cooling water system. to remove heat from the machine, cooling water circulates through each major heat source. These sources include the power supplies, motor/generator, rf current drives, neutral beam power supplies, magnetic field coils, and vacuum vessel. The cooling water system consists of isolated primary and secondary cooling loops separated by intermediate heat exchangers. As future DIII-D plans include operation during summer months and longer pulse duration, the cooling system's overall heat removal capability and performance efficiency must be assessed. Temperature and flow data from around the DIII-D facility are collected by a programmable logic controller (PLC); the data are used to analyze the heat generating sources, the heat transfer rate to intermediate heat exchangers, and the ultimate heat rejection to the environment via the cooling towers. A comparison of the original DIII-D machine design versus the actual performance determines the margin of heat removal capacity. projections of the heat removal rate for various longer plasma shots are made. Improvements in design and/or operational procedure will be necessary to attain the desired pulse duration.

YIP,H; ADERSON,P.M; HOLTROP,K.L; HARRISON,S

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat and power; distributed generation; premium powerand operation of distributed generation, combined heat andcost combination of distributed generation technologies that

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

ARM - SGP Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Operations SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Operations Routine Operations SGP central facility offices. SGP central facility offices. The overwhelming majority of the measurements with the highest priority, on which the existing experimental designs are based, are regular routine observations, as specified in the ARM Program Plan, 1990 (U.S. Department of Energy 1990). Scientifically and logistically, routine operations also serve as the basis and background for all nonroutine operations, including

325

Panel: Microgrid Research and Field Testing IEEE PES General Meeting, 24-28 June 2007, Tampa, FL 1 In general, a microgrid can operate in both the grid-connected  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Panel: Microgrid Research and Field Testing IEEE PES General Meeting, 24-28 June 2007, Tampa, FL 1 Abstract In general, a microgrid can operate in both the grid-connected mode and the islanded mode where the microgrid is interfaced to the main power system by a fast semiconductor switch called static switch, (SS

326

Nitrogen heat pipe for cryocooler thermal shunt  

SciTech Connect

A nitrogen heat pipe was designed, built and tested for the purpose of providing a thermal shunt between the two stages of a Gifford-McMahan (GM) cryocooler during cooldown. The nitrogen heat pipe has an operating temperature range between 63 and 123 K. While the heat pipe is in the temperature range during the system cooldown, it acts as a thermal shunt between the first and second stage of the cryocooler. The heat pipe increases the heat transfer to the first stage of the cryocooler, thereby reducing the cooldown time of the system. When the heat pipe temperature drops below the triple point, the nitrogen working fluid freezes, effectively stopping the heat pipe operation. A small heat leak between cryocooler stages remains because of axial conduction along the heat pipe wall. As long as the heat pipe remains below 63 K, the heat pipe remains inactive. Heat pipe performance limits were measured and the optimum fluid charge was determined.

Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Green, G.F.; Roth, E.W. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

C. Jean Bustard

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Cooling Strings of Superconducting Devices below 2 K the Helium II Bayonet Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy particle accelerators and colliders contain long strings of superconducting devices - acceleration RF cavities and magnets - operating at high field, which may require cooling in helium II below 2 K. In order to maintain adequate operating conditions, the applied or generated heat loads must be extracted and transported with minimum temperature difference. Conventional cooling schemes based on conductive or convective heat transport in pressurized helium II very soon reach their intrinsic limits of thermal impedance over extended lengths. We present the concept of helium II bayonet heat exchanger, which has been developed at CERN for the magnet cooling scheme of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and describe its specific advantages as a slim, quasi-isothermal heat sink. Experimental results obtained on several test set-ups, and a prototype magnet string have permitted to validate its performance and sizing rules, for transporting linear heat loads in the W.m-1 range over distances of several tens o...

Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Van Weelderen, R

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Heat Rate Program Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant facilities with performance or heat rate improvement programs perform better than those that do not have those programs. A heat rate improvement program typically provides sufficient information for decision making with respect to timely maintenance actions and/or operational adjustments. Monitoring the performance of any power plant component includes the trending of parameters that also describe the performance of other plant components, providing insight and information on improving ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Ceramic heat pipes for high temperature heat removal  

SciTech Connect

Difficulties in finding metal or protected metal components that exhibit both strength and corrosion resistance at high temperature have severely restricted the application of effective heat recovery techniques to process heat furnaces. A potential method of overcoming this restriction is to use heat pipes fabricated from ceramic materials to construct counterflow recuperators. A development program has been initiated to demonstrate the technical and eventually the economical feasibility of ceramic heat pipes and ceramic heat pipe recuperators. The prime candidate for heat pipe construction is SiC. Closed-end tubes of this material have been prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). These tubes were lined internally with tungsten by a subsequent CVD operation, partially filled with sodium, and sealed by brazing a tungsten lined SiC plug into the open-end with a palladium--cobalt alloy. Heat pipes constructed in this manner have been successfully operated in vacuum at temperatures of 1225/sup 0/K and in air at a temperature of 1125/sup 0/K. The heat source used initially for the air testing was an induction heated metallic sleeve in thermal contact with the test unit. Subsequent testing has shown that a silicon carbide heat pipe can be successfully operated with natural gas burners providing the input heat. Methods of fabricating and testing these devices are described.

Keddy, E.S.; Ranken, W.A.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Smelting Exhaust Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a cost efficient capture of more valuable heat (higher exergy), heat exchangers should operate on the exhaust gases upstream of the gas treatment plants.

332

Heat Tint Effects on General Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat tint is usually created during a welding operation. The heat tint creates an oxide ... Reformer Inlet Hair-pin-pipe Weld Cracking · Remedy of Deficiencies

333

JGI - Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations The Operations Department sees to it that JGI has the best possible facilities and support, ensuring that its operations are conducted in accordance with the...

334

Power Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Operations Outage Coordination Standards of Conduct Transmission Planning You are here: SN Home page > Power Operations Power Operations Western's Sierra Nevada Region...

335

Performance Optimization of an Irreversible Heat Pump with Variable-temperature Heat Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An irreversible cycle model of a heat pump operating between two variable-temperature heat reservoirs is established and used to analyze the performance of the heat pump affected by heat resistances, heat leakage and internal dissipation of the working substance. The coefficient of performance of the heat pump is optimized for a given heating load. The characteristic curves of the coefficient of performance versus power input are generated. The influence of intake temperatures of heat reservoirs, thermal capacity of heat reservoirs, efficiency of heat exchangers, heat leak and internal irreversibilities on the performance of the system is discussed. The optimal ratio of the times spent on two processes of heat transfer to and from the working substance is determined. Some new results which are conducive to the optimal design and operation of real heat pump systems are obtained.

Huang, Y.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW operates in the energy efficiency field- one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen® and WOWClean® provide more energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. •WOWGen® - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat •WOWClean® - Multi Pollutant emission control system. Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel and converts it to useful output. The remaining 65% is discharged into the environment as waste heat at temperatures ranging from 300°F to 1,200°F. This waste heat can be captured using the WOWGen® technology and turned into electricity. This efficiency is up to twice the rate of competing technologies. Compelling economics and current environmental policy are stimulating industry interest. WOWGen® power plants can generate between 1 - 25 MW of electricity. Project payback is between two to five years with IRR of 15% 30%. Nearly anywhere industrial waste heat is present, the WOW products can be applied. Beneficial applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas (pipeline compression stations, processing plants). Sources such as stack flue gases, steam, diesel exhaust, hot oil or combinations of sources can be used to generate power. WOWGen® can also be used with stand alone power plants burning fossil fuels or using renewable energy sources such as solar and biomass.

Romero, M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hot dry rock heat mining: An alternative energy progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mining Heat from the hot dry rock (HDR) resource that lies beneath the earth's crust may provide an almost inexhaustible supply of energy for mankind with minimal environmental effects. In the heat mining process, water is pumped down an injection well into a mass of hydraulically fractured hot rock. As the water flows under high pressure through the opened rock joints, it becomes heated by the rock. It is returned to the surface through a production well (or wells) located some distance from the injector where its thermal energy is recovered by a heat exchanger. The same water is then recirculated through the system to extract more thermal energy. In this closed-loop process, nothing but heat is released to the environment during normal operation. The technical feasibility of HDR heat mining already has been proven by field testing. A long-term flow test is scheduled to begin in 1991 at the world's largest HDR heat mine in New Mexico, USA, to demonstrate that energy can be produced from HDR on a continuous basis over an extended time period. Significant HDR programs are also underway in several other countries. The paper describes the HDR resource, the heat mining concept, environmental characteristics, economics, developments at Los Alamos to date, and HDR development outside the US. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Duchane, D.V.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Emissions Tradeoffs Between Boiler Operations and a Selective Catalytic Reduction System: Field Test Results on an 850-MW Opposed-Wall Design Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burning low-cost, high-sulfur coals under staged combustion conditions can lead to increased waterwall wastage. Utilities are thus in need of a method for determining the least-cost approach for minimizing nitrogen oxide (NOx) through both boiler and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) operations, while taking into account potential cost impacts of various operating scenarios. This report is one in an EPRI series to quantify the costs and benefits associated with different boiler and SCR ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

Heat Conduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Differential equations for heat conduction in solids...conduction in solids General form with variable thermal properties General form with constant thermal properties General form, constant properties, without heat

340

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and increase carbon injection when inlet loading and mercury removal were low. The resulting mercury removal varied between 50 and 98%, with an overall average of 85.6%, showing that the process was successful at removing high percentages of vapor-phase mercury even with a widely varying mass loading. In an effort to improve baghouse performance, high-permeability bags were tested. The new bags made a significant difference in the cleaning frequency of the baghouse. Before changing the bags, the baghouse was often in a continuous clean of 4.4 p/b/h, but with the new bags the cleaning frequency was very low, at less than 1 p/b/h. Alternative sorbent tests were also performed using these high-permeability bags. The results of these tests showed that most standard, high-quality activated carbon performed similarly at this site; low-cost sorbent and ash-based sorbents were not very effective at removing mercury; and chemically enhanced sorbents did not appear to offer any benefits over standard activated carbons at this site.

C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microchannel heat sink assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watertight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures. 13 figs.

Bonde, W.L.; Contolini, R.J.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

Daman, Ernest L. (Westfield, NJ); McCallister, Robert A. (Mountain Lakes, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Solar heat pipe feedback turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of radiant heat to electricity by a heat pipe-turbogenerator combination is described. The heat pipe-tubogenerator assembly is suitably externally insulated, as by a vacuum shield, to prevent heat losses and heat is recovered from the condenser portion of the heat pipe and returned to the evaporator portions. An application of the generic invention is discussed which it is employed on wall or roof portions of a building and serves as at least a partial supporting structure for these. In another application the solar heat pipe feedback turbogenerator may be incorporated in or used with reflective means, such as reflective sheet material of large area positioned to direct solar radiation onto the evaporator section of the heat pipe. The reflective means may be changed in position to follow the sun to produce maximum power during operation.

Decker, B.J.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

344

Absorption-heat-pump system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

345

Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with heat pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 4 to 20 K range utilizes heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the magnetic material at the appropriate points during the material's movement. In one embodiment circular disks of magnetic material can be interleaved with the ends of the heat pipes. In another embodiment a mass of magnetic material reciprocatingly moves between the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the object of cooling to the magnetic material and the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the magnetic material to a heat sink.

Barclay, J.A.; Prenger, F.C. Jr.

1985-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

346

Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with heat pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 4 to 20 K range utilizes heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the magnetic material at the appropriate points during the material's movement. In one embodiment circular disks of magnetic material can be interleaved with the ends of the heat pipes. In another embodiment a mass of magnetic material reciprocatingly moves between the end of the heat pipe of pipes that transmits heat from the object of cooling to the magnetic material and the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the magnetic material to a heat sink.

Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Prenger, Jr., F. Coyne (Madison, WI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy Basics: Heat Pump Water Heaters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for optimum operation in either summer or winter. Homeowners primarily install geothermal heat pumps-which draw heat from the ground during the winter and from the indoor air...

348

Intrinsically irreversible heat engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat. 11 figs.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

349

Intrinsically irreversible heat engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. The second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Intrinsically irreversible heat engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A class of heat engines based on an intrinsically irreversible heat transfer process is disclosed. In a typical embodiment the engine comprises a compressible fluid that is cyclically compressed and expanded while at the same time being driven in reciprocal motion by a positive displacement drive means. A second thermodynamic medium is maintained in imperfect thermal contact with the fluid and bears a broken thermodynamic symmetry with respect to the fluid. the second thermodynamic medium is a structure adapted to have a low fluid flow impedance with respect to the compressible fluid, and which is further adapted to be in only moderate thermal contact with the fluid. In operation, thermal energy is pumped along the second medium due to a phase lag between the cyclical heating and cooling of the fluid and the resulting heat conduction between the fluid and the medium. In a preferred embodiment the engine comprises an acoustical drive and a housing containing a gas which is driven at a resonant frequency so as to be maintained in a standing wave. Operation of the engine at acoustic frequencies improves the power density and coefficient of performance. The second thermodynamic medium can be coupled to suitable heat exchangers to utilize the engine as a simple refrigeration device having no mechanical moving parts. Alternatively, the engine is reversible in function so as to be utilizable as a prime mover by coupling it to suitable sources and sinks of heat.

Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

352

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

353

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

354

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

355

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

356

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

357

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

358

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

359

Heat Pipes: An Industrial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the basics of heat pipe exchangers. Included are how they are constructed, how they operate, where they have application, and various aspects of evaluating a potential application. After discussing the technical aspects of heat pipe exchangers, an industrial case history is presented. The case history involves a retrofit project which added heat pipes to five natural draft process heaters with a combined heat duty of 150 M Btu/hr. A heat recovery of 15 M Btu/hr has resulted from the flue gas/combustion air interchange. The paper will include design considerations, and operating and maintenance history since early 1980. A second application for heat pipes with a 12 M Btu/hr duty installed in 1983 will also be discussed.

Murray, F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Operational Demonstration Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Demonstration Program Operational Demonstration Program Operational Demonstration Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate $500,000 Program Info Funding Source CEFIA Start Date 2005 State Connecticut Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount $150,000 - $500,000 Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority This program is currently closed. Applications were due in February 2012.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

German central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central solar heating plants contribute to the reduction of CO{sub 2}-emissions and global warming. The combination of central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage enables high solar fractions of 50% and more. Several pilot central solar heating plants with seasonal heat storage (CSHPSS) built in Germany since 1996 have proven the appropriate operation of these systems and confirmed the high solar fractions. Four different types of seasonal thermal energy stores have been developed, tested and monitored under realistic operation conditions: Hot-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Friedrichshafen), gravel-water thermal energy store (e.g. in Steinfurt-Borghorst), borehole thermal energy store (in Neckarsulm) and aquifer thermal energy store (in Rostock). In this paper, measured heat balances of several German CSHPSS are presented. The different types of thermal energy stores and the affiliated central solar heating plants and district heating systems are described. Their operational characteristics are compared using measured data gained from an extensive monitoring program. Thus long-term operational experiences such as the influence of net return temperatures are shown. (author)

Bauer, D.; Marx, R.; Nussbicker-Lux, J.; Ochs, F.; Heidemann, W. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Mueller-Steinhagen, H. [Institute of Thermodynamics and Thermal Engineering (ITW), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 6, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute of Technical Thermodynamics (ITT), German Aerospace Centre (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Frostless heat pump having thermal expansion valves  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pump system having an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant and further having a compressor, an interior heat exchanger, an exterior heat exchanger, a heat pump reversing valve, an accumulator, a thermal expansion valve having a remote sensing bulb disposed in heat transferable contact with the refrigerant piping section between said accumulator and said reversing valve, an outdoor temperature sensor, and a first means for heating said remote sensing bulb in response to said outdoor temperature sensor thereby opening said thermal expansion valve to raise suction pressure in order to mitigate defrosting of said exterior heat exchanger wherein said heat pump continues to operate in a heating mode.

Chen, Fang C [Knoxville, TN; Mei, Viung C [Oak Ridge, TN

2002-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

363

Passive Core Decay Heat Removal Performance Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive decay heat removal systems operate without pumps when normal heat removal systems are not available. Safety is ensured by confirming that an adequate thermal margin is provided to accommodate various operating conditions, design uncertainties, and degradation. Guidelines to ensure adequate thermal performance are provided for three different system configurations.This report introduces utility systems engineers to the design and operation of passive decay heat removal systems and ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

364

Exploration, Drilling and Development Operations in the Bottle Rock Area of the Geysers Steam Field, With New Geologic Insights and Models Defining Reservoir Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MCR Geothermal Corporation pioneered successful exploratiory drilling the Bottle Rock area of the Geysers Steam Field in 1976. The wellfield is characterized by a deep reservoir with varied flowrates, temperatures, pressures, and stem chemistries being quite acceptable. More detailed reservoir engineering tests will follow as production commences.

Hebein, Jeffrey J.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Use the drop-down search menus and operators (AND, OR, NOT) to customize your search. Search by topic, author, journal title, publication year, and other fields.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by topic, author, journal title, publication year, and other fields. Topic Enter your search words, joined, and subject terms; choose Title from the drop-down search menu to restrict your search to document titles only for the most comprehensive search. 1.To find all articles by Francis Harry Compton Crick, click , enter Crick F

California at Berkeley, University of

366

Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or biotransform hazardous organic contaminants to environmentally safe levels in soils, subsurface materials, water, sludges, and residues.. While bioremediation technology is promising, DOE managers and non-DOE scientists have recognized that the fundamental scientific information needed to develop effective bioremediation technologies for cleanup of the legacy waste sites is lacking in many cases. DOE believes that field-based research is needed to realize the full potential of bioremediation. The Department of Energy faces a unique set of challenges associated with cleaning up waste at its former weapons production and research sites. These sites contain complex mixtures of contaminants in the subsurface, including radioactive compounds. In many cases, the fundamental field-based scientific information needed to develop safe and effective remediation and cleanup technologies is lacking. DOE needs fundamental research on the use of microorganisms and their products to assist DOE in the decontamination and cleanup of its legacy waste sites. The existing NABIR program to-date has focused on fundamental scientific research in the laboratory. Because subsurface hydrologic and geologic conditions at contaminated DOE sites cannot easily be duplicated in a laboratory, however, the DOE needs a field component to permit existing and future laboratory research results to be field-tested on a small scale in a controlled outdoor setting. Such field-testing needs to be conducted under actual legacy waste field conditions representative of those that DOE is most in need of remediating. Ideally, these field conditions should be as representative as practicable of the types of subsurface contamination conditions that resulted from legacy wastes from the nuclear weapons program activities. They should also be representative of the types of hydrologic and geologic conditions that exist across the DOE complex.

N /A

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

367

Discussions on Disposal Forms of Auxiliary Heat Source in Surface Water Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents two common forms of auxiliary heat source in surface water heat pump system and puts forward the idea that the disposal forms affect operation cost. It deduces operation cost per hour of the two forms. With a project calculation, it illuminates that the post-located auxiliary heat source cheaper and superior to the fore-located one.

Qian, J.; Sun, D.; Li, X.; Li, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Quantum Operation Time Reversal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation, a linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes towards equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

Crooks, Gavin E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Quantum Operation Time Reversal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation, a linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes towards equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

Gavin E. Crooks

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

370

Liquid metal heat pipe behavior under transient cooling and heating  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation of the transient behavior of a liquid metal heat pipe. A 0.457 m long, screen-wick, sodium heat pipe with 0.0127 m outer diameter was tested in sodium loop facility. The heat pipe reversed under a pulse heat load applied at the condenser. The time at which the heat pipe reversed was dependent of the heat pipe properties, the sodium loop flow rate and heating conditions at the condenser. The start-up and the operational shut-down by forced cooling of the condenser were also studied. During the start-up process, at least part of the heat pipe was active. The active region extended gradually down to the end of the condenser until all working fluid in the heat pipe was molten. With forced cooling at the condenser, the heat pipe approached its heat transport limit before section of the condenser became frozen. The measured heat transport limit was in agreement with the theoretical value. 5 refs.

Nguyen, H.X.; Hahn, T.O.; Hahn, O.J.; Chow, L.C.; Tagavi, K.A.; Morgan, M.J. (Kentucky, University, Lexington (United States) USAF, Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Operating Instructions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ensure the maximum possible flow cross-section in ... thermostat ? external circuit ? flow-through cooler ... Heat transfer tubing and other hot parts ...

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

372

Active Solar Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Active Solar Heating Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. |...

373

Operations & Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates Operations & Maintenance Operations OASIS: WACM (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) wesTTrans Common...

374

MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for cooling-dominated commercial buildings utilize supplemental heat rejecters such as cooling towers, fluid of supplemental heat rejecters for cooling dominated buildings allows the design of smaller borehole fields. Heat

375

A comparison of ground source heat pumps and micro-combined heat and power as residential greenhouse gas reduction strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both ground source heat pumps operating on electricity and micro-combined heat and power systems operating on fossil fuels offer potential for the reduction of green house gas emissions in comparison to the conventional ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Handbook of heat and mass transfer. Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume series presents advanced topics in industrial heat and mass transfer operations for reactor design technology.

Cheremisinoff, N.P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Microchannel Heat Exchangers with Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the present study was to determine the performance of CO{sub 2} microchannel evaporators and gas coolers in operational conditions representing those of residential heat pumps. A set of breadboard prototype microchannel evaporators and gas coolers was developed and tested. The refrigerant in the heat exchangers followed a counter cross-flow path with respect to the airflow direction. The test conditions corresponded to the typical operating conditions of residential heat pumps. In addition, a second set of commercial microchannel evaporators and gas coolers was tested for a less comprehensive range of operating conditions. The test results were reduced and a comprehensive data analysis, including comparison with the previous studies in this field, was performed. Capacity and pressure drop of the evaporator and gas cooler for the range of parameters studied were analyzed and are documented in this report. A gas cooler performance prediction model based on non-dimensional parameters was also developed and results are discussed as well. In addition, in the present study, experiments were conducted to evaluate capacities and pressure drops for sub-critical CO{sub 2} flow boiling and transcritical CO{sub 2} gas cooling in microchannel heat exchangers. An extensive review of the literature failed to indicate any previous systematic study in this area, suggesting a lack of fundamental understanding of the phenomena and a lack of comprehensive data that would quantify the performance potential of CO{sub 2} microchannel heat exchangers for the application at hand. All experimental tests were successfully conducted with an energy balance within {+-}3%. The only exceptions to this were experiments at very low saturation temperatures (-23 C), where energy balances were as high as 10%. In the case of evaporators, it was found that a lower saturation temperature (especially when moisture condensation occurs) improves the overall heat transfer coefficient significantly. However, under such conditions, air side pressure drop also increases when moisture condensation occurs. An increase in airflow rate also increases the overall heat transfer coefficient. Air side pressure drop mainly depends on airflow rate. For the gas cooler, a significant portion of the heat transfer occurred in the first heat exchanger module on the refrigerant inlet side. The temperature and pressure of CO{sub 2} significantly affect the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics due to some important properties (such as specific heat, density, and viscosity). In the transcritical region, performance of CO{sub 2} strongly depends on the operating temperature and pressure. Semi-empirical models were developed for predictions of CO{sub 2} evaporator and gas cooler system capacities. The evaporator model introduced two new factors to account for the effects of air-side moisture condensate and refrigerant outlet superheat. The model agreed with the experimental results within {+-}13%. The gas cooler model, based on non-dimensional parameters, successfully predicted the experimental results within {+-}20%. Recommendations for future work on this project include redesigning headers and/or introducing flow mixers to avoid flow mal-distribution problems, devising new defrosting techniques, and improving numerical models. These recommendations are described in more detail at the end of this report.

Zhao, Y.; Ohadi, M.M.; Radermacher, R.

2001-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Observations in Nonurban Heat Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The urban heat island is a well-known and well-described temperature anomaly, but other types of heat islands are also infrequently reported. A 10 km × 30 km data field containing more than 100 individual winter morning air temperature ...

A. W. Hogan; M. G. Ferrick

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Increasing Confidence In Geothermal Heat Pump Design Methods  

SciTech Connect

Sizing the ground heat exchanger is one of the most important tasks in the design of a geothermal heat pump (GHP) system. Undersizing the heat exchanger can result in poor operating efficiency, reduced comfort, and nuisance heat pump lockouts on safety controls, while an oversized heat exchanger increases the installation cost of the system. The cost of ground loop installation may mean the difference between a feasible and an unfeasible project. Thus there are strong incentives to select heat exchanger lengths which allow satisfactory performance under all operating conditions within a feasible project budget. Sizing a ground heat exchanger is not a simple calculation. In the first place, there is usually some uncertainty in the peak block and annual space conditioning loads for the building to be served by the GHPs. The thermal properties of the soil formation may be unknown as well. Drilling logs and core samples can identify the soil type, but handbook values for the thermal properties of soils vary widely. Properly-done short-term on-site tests and data analysis to obtain thermal properties provide more accurate information, but since these tests are expensive they are usually only feasible in large projects. Given the uncertainties inherent in the process, if designers were truly working 'close to the edge' - selecting the absolute minimum heat exchanger length required to meet the predicted loads - one would expect to see more examples of undersized heat exchangers. Indeed there have been a few. However, over the past twenty years GHPs have been installed and successfully operated at thousands of locations all over the world. Conversations with customers and facility managers reveal a high degree of satisfaction with the technology, but studies of projects reveal far more cases of generously sized ground heat exchangers than undersized ones. This indicates that the uncertainties in space conditioning loads and soil properties are covered by a factor of safety. These conservative designs increase the installed cost of GHP systems, limiting their use and applicability. Moreover, as ground heat exchanger sizing methods have improved, they have suggested (and field tests are beginning to verify) that standard bore backfill practices lead to unnecessarily large ground heat exchangers. Growing evidence suggests that in many applications use of sand backfill with a grout plug at the surface, or use of bottom-to-top thermally enhanced grout, may provide groundwater protection equal to current practice at far less cost. Site tests of thermal properties provides more accurate information, but since these tests are expensive they are usually only performed in large projects. Even so, because soil properties can vary over a distance as small as a few feet, the value of these tests is limited. One objective of ongoing research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is to increase designers confidence in available ground heat exchanger sizing methods that lead to reliable yet cost-effective designs. To this end we have developed research-grade models that address the interactions between buildings, geothermal heat pump systems and ground heat exchangers The first application of these models was at Fort Polk, Louisiana, where the space conditioning systems of over 4,000 homes were replaced with geothermal heat pumps (Shonder and Hughes, 1997; Hughes et. al., 1997). At Fort Polk, the models were calibrated to detailed data from one of the residences. Data on the energy use of the heat pump, combined with inlet and outlet water temperature and flow rate in the ground heat exchangers, allowed us to determine the thermal properties of the soil formation being experienced by the operating GHP system. Outputs from the models provide all the data required by the various commercially-available ground loop sizing programs. Accurate knowledge of both the building loads and the soil properties eliminated the uncertainty normally associated with the design process, and allowed us to compare the predictions of the commercially-available

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

DESIGN OF A COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGER FOR HEAT RECUPERATION FROM A HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design details of a compact heat exchanger and supporting hardware for heat recuperation in a high-temperature electrolysis application are presented. The recuperative heat exchanger uses a vacuum-brazed plate-fin design and operates between 300 and 800°C. It includes corrugated inserts for enhancement of heat transfer coefficients and extended heat transfer surface area. Two recuperative heat exchangers are required per each four-stack electrolysis module. The heat exchangers are mated to a base manifold unit that distributes the inlet and outlet flows to and from the four electrolysis stacks. Results of heat exchanger design calculations and assembly details are also presented.

G. K. Housley; J.E. O'Brien; G.L. Hawkes

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

Rice, C Keith [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Hern, Shawn [ClimateMaster, Inc.; McDowell, Tim [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The deterioration in heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure and high heat fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At slightly supercritical pressure and in the neighborhood of the pseudo-critical temperature (defined as the temperature corresponding to the peak in specific heat at the operating pressure), the heat transfer coefficient ...

Shiralkar, B. S.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Heat Stroke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stress, from exertion or hot environments, places stress, from exertion or hot environments, places workers at risk for illnesses such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Heat Stroke A condition that occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature, and can cause death or permanent disability. Symptoms â–  High body temperature â–  Confusion â–  Loss of coordination â–  Hot, dry skin or profuse sweating â–  Throbbing headache â–  Seizures, coma First Aid â–  Request immediate medical assistance. â–  Move the worker to a cool, shaded area. â–  Remove excess clothing and apply cool water to their body. Heat Exhaustion The body's response to an excessive loss of water and salt, usually through sweating. Symptoms â–  Rapid heart beat â–  Heavy sweating â–  Extreme weakness or fatigue â– 

384

Heat reclaimer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A device for reclaiming heat from stove pipes and the like. A semi-circular shaped hollow enclosed housing with a highly thermal-conductive concave surface is mounted contactingly to surround approximately one-half of the circumference of the stove pipe. The concave surface is formed to contact the pipe at a maximum number of points along that surface. The hollow interior of the housing contains thin multi-surfaced projections which are integral with the concave surface and conductively transfer heat from the stove pipe and concave surface to heat the air in the housing. A fan blower is attached via an air conduit to an entrance opening in the housing. When turned on, the blower pushes the heated interior air out a plurality of air exit openings in the ends of the housing and brings in lower temperature outside air for heating.

Parham, F.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

Heat transfer. [heat transfer roller employing a heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A heat transfer roller embodying a heat pipe is disclosed. The heat pipe is mounted on a shaft, and the shaft is adapted for rotation on its axis.

Sarcia, D.S.

1978-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

386

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: HEAT2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

internal modifications is 100 (one application is analysis of floor heating with many pipes). Conductances and capacities may be written to file. Temperature field may be...

387

Solar industrial process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

Lumsdaine, E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Self-contained passive solar heating system  

SciTech Connect

A self-contained passive solar heating system includes first and second heat pipes, each having a refrigerant medium therein, a condenser portion and an evaporator portion, with the condenser portion of the first heat pipe being coupled to the evaporator portion of the second heat pipe for transferring heat thereto when the pressure within the first heat pipe is greater than the pressure within the second heat pipe. The evaporator portion of the first heat pipe is adapted to be exposed to a source of heat and the condenser portion of the second heat pipe contacts a medium to be heated. A temperature control mechanism may be installed as the coupling between the first and second heat pipes for uncoupling the same when the temperature within the first heat pipe falls below a predetermined temperature. Also, a third heat pipe may be provided having a thermostatic portion operatively connected to the condenser portion of the second heat pipe by a piston means so that changes in pressure within the thermostatic portion occasioned by changes in temperature of the medium to be heated will cause movement of the pistons to vary the size of the condensing portion of the second heat pipe to increase or decrease the rate of heat transfer to the medium.

Maldonado, E.A.; Woods, J.E.

1983-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Technical Subtopic 2.1: Modeling Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump and Heat Recovery Equipment in EnergyPlus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Central Florida/Florida Solar Energy Center, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute and several variable-refrigerant-flow heat pump (VRF HP) manufacturers, provided a detailed computer model for a VRF HP system in the United States Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE) EnergyPlus? building energy simulation tool. Detailed laboratory testing and field demonstrations were performed to measure equipment performance and compare this performance to both the manufacturer's data and that predicted by the use of this new model through computer simulation. The project goal was to investigate the complex interactions of VRF HP systems from an HVAC system perspective, and explore the operational characteristics of this HVAC system type within a laboratory and real world building environment. Detailed laboratory testing of this advanced HVAC system provided invaluable performance information which does not currently exist in the form required for proper analysis and modeling. This information will also be useful for developing and/or supporting test standards for VRF HP systems. Field testing VRF HP systems also provided performance and operational information pertaining to installation, system configuration, and operational controls. Information collected from both laboratory and field tests were then used to create and validate the VRF HP system computer model which, in turn, provides architects, engineers, and building owners the confidence necessary to accurately and reliably perform building energy simulations. This new VRF HP model is available in the current public release version of DOE?s EnergyPlus software and can be used to investigate building energy use in both new and existing building stock. The general laboratory testing did not use the AHRI Standard 1230 test procedure and instead used an approach designed to measure the field installed full-load operating performance. This projects test methodology used the air enthalpy method where relevant air-side parameters were controlled while collecting output performance data at discreet points of steady-state operation. The primary metrics include system power consumption and zonal heating and cooling capacity. Using this test method, the measured total cooling capacity was somewhat lower than reported by the manufacturer. The measured power was found to be equal to or greater than the manufacturers indicated power. Heating capacity measurements produced similar results. The air-side performance metric was total cooling and heating energy since the computer model uses those same metrics as input to the model. Although the sensible and latent components of total cooling were measured, they are not described in this report. The test methodology set the thermostat set point temperature very low for cooling and very high for heating to measure full-load performance and was originally thought to provide the maximum available capacity. Manufacturers stated that this test method would not accurately measure performance of VRF systems which is now believed to be a true statement. Near the end of the project, an alternate test method was developed to better represent VRF system performance as if field installed. This method of test is preliminarily called the Load Based Method of Test where the load is fixed and the indoor conditions and unit operation are allowed to fluctuate. This test method was only briefly attempted in a laboratory setting but does show promise for future lab testing. Since variable-speed air-conditioners and heat pumps include an on-board control algorithm to modulate capacity, these systems are difficult to test. Manufacturers do have the ability to override internal components to accommodate certification procedures, however, it is unknown if the resulting operation is replicated in the field, or if so, how often. Other studies have shown that variable-speed air-conditioners and heat pumps do out perform their single-speed counterparts though these field studies leave as many questions as they do provide answers. The measure

Raustad, Richard; Nigusse, Bereket; Domitrovic, Ron

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

PARALLEL OPERATION OF WELDING GENERATORS  

SciTech Connect

Eight 900-amp, 36-kw direct current welding generators driven by eight 60-hp induction motors were operated in parallel to supply up to 7200 amp to resistance loads for heat transfer studies. A description and circuit designs of this installation, which provides safety interlocks and permits sectionalized operation for separate leads, are given. (auth)

Butler, B.H.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Operator pencil passing through a given operator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\Delta$ be a linear differential operator acting on the space of densities of a given weight $\\lo$ on a manifold $M$. One can consider a pencil of operators $\\hPi(\\Delta)=\\{\\Delta_\\l\\}$ passing through the operator $\\Delta$ such that any $\\Delta_\\l$ is a linear differential operator acting on densities of weight $\\l$. This pencil can be identified with a linear differential operator $\\hD$ acting on the algebra of densities of all weights. The existence of an invariant scalar product in the algebra of densities implies a natural decomposition of operators, i.e. pencils of self-adjoint and anti-self-adjoint operators. We study lifting maps that are on one hand equivariant with respect to divergenceless vector fields, and, on the other hand, with values in self-adjoint or anti-self-adjoint operators. In particular we analyze the relation between these two concepts, and apply it to the study of $\\diff(M)$-equivariant liftings. Finally we briefly consider the case of liftings equivariant with respect to the algebra of projective transformations and describe all regular self-adjoint and anti-self-adjoint liftings.

A. Biggs; H. M. Khudaverdian

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

392

CRBRP decay heat removal systems  

SciTech Connect

The Decay Heat Removal Systems for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are designed to adequately remove sensible and decay heat from the reactor following normal shutdown, operational occurrences, and postulated accidents on both a short term and a long term basis. The Decay Heat Removal Systems are composed of the Main Heat Transport System, the Main Condenser and Feedwater System, the Steam Generator Auxiliary Heat Removal System (SGAHRS), and the Direct Heat Removal Service (DHRS). The overall design of the CRBRP Decay Heat Removal Systems and the operation under normal and off-normal conditions is examined. The redundancies of the system design, such as the four decay heat removal paths, the emergency diesel power supplies, and the auxiliary feedwater pumps, and the diversities of the design such as forced circulation/natural circulation and AC Power/DC Power are presented. In addition to overall design and system capabilities, the detailed designs for the Protected Air Cooled Condensers (PACC) and the Air Blast Heat Exchangers (ABHX) are presented.

Hottel, R.E.; Louison, R.; Boardman, C.E.; Kiley, M.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Solid state radiative heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state radiative heat pump (10, 50, 70) operable at room temperature (300.degree. K.) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of charge carriers as compared to thermal equilibrium. In one form of the invention (10, 70) an infrared semiconductor photodiode (21, 71) is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention (50), a homogeneous semiconductor (51) is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation through the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-reflection layer (19) is coated into the active surface (13) of the semiconductor (11), the anti-reflection layer (19) having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor (11). In the second method, a passive layer (75) is spaced from the active surface (73) of the semiconductor (71) by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler (91) with a paraboloid reflecting surface (92) is in contact with the active surface (13, 53) of the semiconductor (11, 51), the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Solid state radiative heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

Berdahl, P.H.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

395

Heat transport system, method and material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

Musinski, Donald L. (Saline, MI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Development of a cryogenic heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

Heat pipe operating characteristics can be used to advantage in cryogenic systems. Diode operation of the heat pipe, the ability to conduct heat in one direction only, is useful in protecting the heat load if the heat sink temperature rises above the load temperature. Because of this, the heat pipe can be made to act as a thermal switch. A screened-wick, inverted-artery, cryogenic heat pipe was designed, fabricated, and tested. The tests were first conducted with hydrogen and then with oxygen as the working fluid. Heat pipe performance limits were measured as a function of operating temperature, and startup from both the supercritical and the frozen state was demonstrated. The heat pipe was designed to operate as a thermal diode, and transient tests were used to determine the turndown ratio. The heat pipe test results were correlated with the Los Alamos heat pipe computer code and good agreement was obtained between the predicted and measured performance. The heat pipe was developed for spacecraft sensor cooling applications. Test results show significant performance advantages over solid conductors.

Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Runyan, J.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Testing of a sodium heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The operation of a heat pipe with both thermal radiation and convection heat rejection has been experimentally examined. The thermal radiation heat rejection conditions are similar to those which would be experienced in a space environment. The experimental results show good agreement with the analytical model. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Holtz, R.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Integrated Approach to Revamping Heat Exchangers Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A heat exchanger network constitutes the core of the plant energy systems interlinking the core process operation and the utility systems. This paper will illustrate an integrated approach for the revamp of a heat exchanger network by bringing together process simulation, pinch analysis and detailed heat exchanger design tools. The paper will illustrate the methodology using a refinery example.

Glass, K. E.; Dhole, V.; Wang, Y.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{trademark} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{trademark} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{trademark} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury--elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{trademark}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{trademark} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{trademark} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

402

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001 ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury: elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Tom Millar

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

405

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

406

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

407

Energy Basics: Heat Pump Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Air-Source Heat Pumps Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Geothermal Heat Pumps Supporting Equipment for Heating & Cooling Systems Water Heating Heat...

408

FIELD TEST INSTRUCTION 100-NR-2 OPERABLE UNIT DESIGN OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR SEQUESTRATION OF SR-90 SATURATED ZONE APATITE PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER EXTENSION  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this field test instruction is to provide technical guidance for aqueous injection emplacement of an extension apatite permeable reactive barrier (PRE) for the sequestration of strontium-90 (Sr-90) using a high concentration amendment formulation. These field activities will be conducted according to the guidelines established in DOE/RL-2010-29, 100-NR-2 Design Optimization Study, hereafter referred to as the DOS. The DOS supports the Federal Facility Agreement Consent Order (EPA et al., 1989), Milestone M-16-06-01, and 'Complete Construction of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at 100-N.' Injections of apatite precursor chemicals will occur at an equal distance intervals on each end of the existing PRE to extend the PRB from the existing 91 m (300 ft) to at least 274 m (900 ft). Field testing at the 100-N Area Apatite Treatability Test Site, as depicted on Figure 1, shows that the barrier is categorized by two general hydrologic conceptual models based on overall well capacity and contrast between the Hanford and Ringold hydraulic conductivities. The upstream portion of the original barrier, shown on Figure 1, is characterized by relatively low overall well specific capacity. This is estimated from well development data and a lower contrast in hydraulic conductivity between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formations. Comparison of test results from these two locations indicate that permeability contrast between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation is significantly less over the upstream one-third of the barrier. The estimated hydraulic conductivity for the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation over the upstream portion of the barrier based on observations during emplacement of the existing 91 m (300 ft) PRB is approximately 12 and 10 m/day (39 and 32 ft/day), respectively (PNNL-17429). However, these estimates should be used as a rough guideline only, as significant variability in hydraulic conductivity is likely to be observed in the barrier extension wells, particularly those in the Ringold formation. The downstream portion of the original barrier, shown on Figure 1, is characterized by generally higher well specific capacity and a larger hydraulic conductivity contrast between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation. Hydraulic conductivity rates for the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation over the downstream portion of the barrier were estimated at 29 and 9 m/day (95 and 29 ft/day), respectively (with the Hanford formation hydraulic conductivity being greater in the downstream portion than the upstream portion). Once again, it should be noted that the actual conductivities may vary significantly, and the values state above should only be used as a rough initial estimates. Optimum apatite emplacement has been shown to occur when injections targeting the Hanford formation and the Ringold Formation are performed separately. The remainder of this test instruction provides details for conducting these formation-targeted injections.

BOWLES NA

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

409

Industrial Heat Recovery - 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two years ago I summarized 20 years of experience on Industrial Heat Recovery for the Energy-source Technology Conference and Exhibition held in New Orleans, Louisiana. At the end of that paper I concluded with brief advice on 'How to specify heat recovery equipment.' The two years which have elapsed since then have convinced me that proper specification assures the most reliable equipment at the lowest price. The most economical specification describes the operating and site data but leaves the design details for the supplier. A true specialist will be able to provide you with the latest technology at the best possible price. This paper explores the impact of specifications on heat recovery equipment and its associated cost.

Csathy, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Modular heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger for use in nuclear reactors includes a heat exchange tube bundle formed from similar modules each having a hexagonal shroud containing a large number of thermally conductive tubes which are connected with inlet and outlet headers at opposite ends of each module, the respective headers being adapted for interconnection with suitable inlet and outlet manifold means. In order to adapt the heat exchanger for operation in a high temperature and high pressure environment and to provide access to all tube ports at opposite ends of the tube bundle, a spherical tube sheet is arranged in sealed relation across the chamber with an elongated duct extending outwardly therefrom to provide manifold means for interconnection with the opposite end of the tube bundle.

Culver, Donald W. (Poway, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Heat reclaimer  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for reclaiming heat from the discharge gas from a combustion fuel heating unit, which has: inlet and outlet sections; an expansion section whose circumference gradually increases in the direction of flow, thereby providing an increased area for heat transfer; flow splitter plates which lie within and act in conjunction with the expansion section wall to form flow compartments, which flow splitter plates and expansion section wall have a slope, with respect to the centroidal axis of the flow compartment not exceeding 0.1228, which geometry prevents a separation of the flow from the enclosing walls, thereby increasing heat transfer and maintaining the drafting function; and a reduction section which converges the flow to the outlet section.

Horkey, E.J.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

412

Design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high magnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the construction and performance of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) capable of taking maps of the tunneling density of states with sub-atomic spatial resolution at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high (14 T) magnetic fields. The fully ultra-high vacuum system features visual access to a two-sample microscope stage at the end of a bottom-loading dilution refrigerator, which facilitates the transfer of in situ prepared tips and samples. The two-sample stage enables location of the best area of the sample under study and extends the experiment lifetime. The successful thermal anchoring of the microscope, described in detail, is confirmed through a base temperature reading of 20 mK, along with a measured electron temperature of 250 mK. Atomically-resolved images, along with complementary vibration measurements, are presented to confirm the effectiveness of the vibration isolation scheme in this instrument. Finally, we demonstrate that the microscope is capable of the same level of perform...

Misra, Shashank; Drozdov, Ilya K; Seo, Jungpil; Gyenis, Andras; Kingsley, Simon C J; Jones, Howard; Yazdani, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

HEAT EXCHANGER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

414

Corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Installation package for a solar heating system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Installation information is presented for a solar heating system installed in Concho Indian School at El Reno, Oklahoma. This package includes a system Operation and Maintenance Manual, hardware brochures, schematics, system operating modes and drawings. The Solar Engineering and Equipment Company (SEECO) developed this prototype solar heating system consisting of the following subsystems: solar collectors, control and storage.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Guidance for an Effective Heat Exchanger Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat exchangers are used extensively in the nuclear power generation industry. Their proper operation is essential for reliable and safe nuclear plant operation. Increased emphasis on heat exchanger reliability at nuclear power plants has resulted in the development of engineering programs or equivalent actions to maintain the required thermal performance and structural integrity.

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

417

Philip, South Dakota geothermal district heating systems  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal heating project in Philip, South Dakota which uses the waste water from the Haakon School has now been in operation for 15 years. This project was one of the 23 cost shared by the U.S. DOE starting in 1978, of which 15 became operational. This article describes the geothermal heating system for eight buildings in downtown Philip.

Lund, J.W.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Heat transfer characteristics of a three-phase volume boiling direct contact heat exchanger  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The advantages of direct contact heat transfer over heat transfer utilizing conventional metallic heat exchangers are listed. The performance characteristics of a three-phase direct contact heat exchanger in near counterflow operation were evaluated using water as the continuous phase fluid and refrigerant 113 as the dispersed phase fluid. Conclusions are drawn from the results having to do with refrigerant injection technique, vessel operating height, mass flow rate of refrigerant, water inlet temperature, operation at pinch point temperature differences below 13 to 20/sup 0/C, and operation with a dispersed phase fluid less dense than water. (MHR)

Blair, C.K.; Boehm, R.F.; Jacobs, H.R.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Multifamily Heat Pump Water Heater Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Although heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have gained significant attention in recent years as a high efficiency electric water heating solution for single family homes, central HPWHs for commercial or multi-family applications are not as well documented in terms of measured performance and cost effectiveness. To evaluate this technology, the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team monitored the performance of a 10.5 ton central HPWH installed on a student apartment building at the West Village Zero Net Energy Community in Davis, California. Monitoring data collected over a 16 month period were then used to validate a TRNSYS simulation model. The TRNSYS model was then used to project performance in different climates using local electric rates. Results of the study indicate that after some initial commissioning issues, the HPWH operated reliably with an annual average efficiency of 2.12 (Coefficient of Performance). The observed efficiency was lower than the unit's rated efficiency, primarily due to the fact that the system rarely operated under steady-state conditions. Changes in the system configuration, storage tank sizing, and control settings would likely improve the observed field efficiency. Modeling results suggest significant energy savings relative to electric storage water heating systems (typical annual efficiencies around 0.90) providing for typical simple paybacks of six to ten years without any incentives. The economics versus gas water heating are currently much more challenging given the current low natural gas prices in much of the country. Increased market size for this technology would benefit cost effectiveness and spur greater technology innovation.

Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Heat Transfer Enhancement: Second Generation Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews current activity in the field of enhanced heat transfer, with the aim of illustrating the technology and typical applications. Guidelines for application of enhanced surfaces are given, and practical concerns and economics are discussed. Special attention is directed toward use of enhanced surfaces in industrial process heat exchangers and heat recovery equipment.

Bergles, A. E.; Webb, R. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field operations heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

OPERATIONS (OPS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPS) OPS) OBJECTIVE OPS.1 The formality and discipline of operations is adequate to conduct work safely and programs are in place to maintain this formality and discipline. (CR 13) Scope: The Conduct of Operations Program was evaluated during the recent KE Basin FTS ORR and was found to be adequately implemented. Based on this result and the subsequent program enhancements, the scope of the review is to be limited to the SWS operating and maintenance evolutions. Criteria * Programmatic elements of conduct of operations are in place for SWS operations. (DOE Order 5480.19) * The SWS operations personnel adequately demonstrate the principles of conduct of operations requirements during the shift performance period. (DOE Order 5480.19)

422

Heat transport system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transport system of small size which can be operated in any orientation consists of a coolant loop containing a vaporizable liquid as working fluid and includes in series a vaporizer, a condenser and two one-way valves and a pressurizer connected to the loop between the two valves. The pressurizer may be divided into tw