Sample records for field operational test

  1. Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar May 1, 2012 - 2:56pm Addthis The Department...

  2. Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

  3. Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

  4. Pricetown I underground coal gasification field test: operations report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, A.K.; Seabaugh, P.W.; Zielinski, R.E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) field test in bituminous coal was successfully completed near Pricetown, West Virginia. The primary objective of this field test was to determine the viability of the linked vertical well (LVV) technology to recover the 900 foot deep, 6 foot thick coal seam. A methane rich product gas with an average heating value of approximately 250 Btu/SCF was produced at low air injection flow rates during the reverse combustion linkage phase. Heating value of the gas produced during the linkage enhancement phase was 221 Btu/SCF with air injection. The high methane formation has been attributed to the thermal and hydrocracking of tars and oils along with hydropyrolysis and hydrogasification of coal char. The high heating value of the gas was the combined effect of residence time, flow pattern, injection flow rate, injection pressure, and back pressure. During the gasification phase, a gas with an average heating value of 125 Btu/SCF was produced with only air injection, which resulted in an average energy production of 362 MMBtu/day.

  5. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Durham

    2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest that were varied included SO{sub 3} conditioning on/off, injection concentrations, and distribution spray patterns. The original test plan called for parametric testing of NORIT FGD carbon at 1, 3, and 10 lbs/MMacf. These injection concentrations were estimated based on results from the Pleasant Prairie tests that showed no additional mercury removal when injection concentrations were increased above 10 lbs/MMacf. The Brayton Point parametric test data indicated that higher injection concentrations would achieve higher removal efficiencies and should be tested. The test plan was altered to include testing at 20 lbs/MMacf. The first test at this higher rate showed very high removal across the second ESP (>80%). Unlike the ''ceiling'' phenomenon witnessed at Pleasant Prairie, increasing sorbent injection concentration resulted in further capture of vapor-phase mercury. The final phase of field-testing was a 10-day period of continuous injection of NORIT FGD carbon. During the first five days, the injection concentration was held at 10 lbs/MMacf, followed by nominally five days of testing at an injection concentration of 20 lbs/MMacf. The mercury removal, as measured by the semi-continuous emission monitors (S-CEM), varied between 78% and 95% during the 10 lbs/MMacf period and increased to >97% when the injection concentration was increased to 20 lbs/MMacf. During the long-term testing period, mercury measurements following EPA's draft Ontario Hydro method were conducted by TRC Environmental Corporation at both 10 and 20 lbs/MMacf test conditions. The Ontario Hydro data showed that the particulate mercury removal was similar between the two conditions of 10 or 20 lbs/MMacf and removal efficiencies were greater than 99%. Elemental mercury was not detected in any samples, so no conclusions as to its removal can be drawn. Removal of oxidized mercury, on the other hand, increased from 68% to 93% with the higher injection concentration. These removal rates agreed well with the S-CEM results.

  6. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael D. Durham

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

  7. Development and testing of a photometric method to identify non-operating solar hot water systems in field settings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Vorobieff, Peter V. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of experimental tests of a concept for using infrared (IR) photos to identify non-operational systems based on their glazing temperatures; operating systems have lower glazing temperatures than those in stagnation. In recent years thousands of new solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed in some utility districts. As these numbers increase, concern is growing about the systems dependability because installation rebates are often based on the assumption that all of the SHW systems will perform flawlessly for a 20-year period. If SHW systems routinely fail prematurely, then the utilities will have overpaid for grid-energy reduction performance that is unrealized. Moreover, utilities are responsible for replacing energy for loads that failed SHW system were supplying. Thus, utilities are seeking data to quantify the reliability of SHW systems. The work described herein is intended to help meet this need. The details of the experiment are presented, including a description of the SHW collectors that were examined, the testbed that was used to control the system and record data, the IR camera that was employed, and the conditions in which testing was completed. The details of the associated analysis are presented, including direct examination of the video records of operational and stagnant collectors, as well as the development of a model to predict glazing temperatures and an analysis of temporal intermittency of the images, both of which are critical to properly adjusting the IR camera for optimal performance. Many IR images and a video are presented to show the contrast between operating and stagnant collectors. The major conclusion is that the technique has potential to be applied by using an aircraft fitted with an IR camera that can fly over an area with installed SHW systems, thus recording the images. Subsequent analysis of the images can determine the operational condition of the fielded collectors. Specific recommendations are presented relative to the application of the technique, including ways to mitigate and manage potential sources of error.

  8. SPECTR System Operational Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.H. Landman Jr.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report overviews installation of the Small Pressure Cycling Test Rig (SPECTR) and documents the system operational testing performed to demonstrate that it meets the requirements for operations. The system operational testing involved operation of the furnace system to the design conditions and demonstration of the test article gas supply system using a simulated test article. The furnace and test article systems were demonstrated to meet the design requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Therefore, the system is deemed acceptable and is ready for actual test article testing.

  9. Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneller, Tricia; Salas, Jose

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In October 1999, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Halliburton Energy Services cooperated on a field test of Halliburton's new Production Hydraulic Packer technology on Well 46-TPX-10 at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 near Casper, WY. Performance of the packer was evaluated in set and unset operations. The packer's ability to seal the annulus between the casing and tubing was hydraulically tested and the results were recorded.

  10. Field Operations Program Activities Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. Francfort; D. V. O'Hara; L. A. Slezak

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program's goals are to evaluate electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments, support electric vehicle technology advancement, develop infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use, support increased use of electric vehicles in federal fleets, and increase overall awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from fiscal year 1997 through mid-fiscal year 1999. The Field Operations Program succeeded the Site Operator Program, which ended in September 1996. Electric vehicle testing conducted by the Program includes baseline performance testing (EV America testing), accelerated reliability (life-cycle) testing, and fleet testing. The baseline performance parameters include accelerations, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collects accelerated reliability and fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program's Qualified Vehicle Testing (QVT) partners. The Program's QVT partners have over 3 million miles of electric vehicle operating experience.

  11. RESULTS OF FIELD TESTING DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIELD TESTING AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER May through September of 2011 RMOTC is an energy testing center that partners with industry to...

  12. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Schlager

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the seventh reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: (1) PG&E NEG Brayton Point Station--Sorbent injection equipment was installed at the site during the quarter; Test plans were prepared for the field testing phase of the project; Baseline testing was completed during the quarter and parametric testing was begun; and A paper summarizing the full-scale tests was written and submitted to A&WMA for presentation at the annual meeting in June 2002. (2) Technology Transfer--A number of technical presentations and briefings were made during the quarter. Notable among them are papers published in the A&WMA EM journal and Pollution Engineering. Also, information was provided to the EPA MACT Working Group and a paper was presented at the annual A&WMA meeting.

  13. Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and increase carbon injection when inlet loading and mercury removal were low. The resulting mercury removal varied between 50 and 98%, with an overall average of 85.6%, showing that the process was successful at removing high percentages of vapor-phase mercury even with a widely varying mass loading. In an effort to improve baghouse performance, high-permeability bags were tested. The new bags made a significant difference in the cleaning frequency of the baghouse. Before changing the bags, the baghouse was often in a continuous clean of 4.4 p/b/h, but with the new bags the cleaning frequency was very low, at less than 1 p/b/h. Alternative sorbent tests were also performed using these high-permeability bags. The results of these tests showed that most standard, high-quality activated carbon performed similarly at this site; low-cost sorbent and ash-based sorbents were not very effective at removing mercury; and chemically enhanced sorbents did not appear to offer any benefits over standard activated carbons at this site.

  14. RDS operations manualField implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    for trainings and TA. #12;RDS operations manual IBBS Toolbox 227 Women's Health Monitoring Survey fieldRDS operations manualField implementation #12;RDS operations manual 226 IBBS Toolbox RDS operations manual The RDS operations manual is designed to guide project staff during the implementation of RDS

  15. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Jean Bustard

    2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG and E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

  16. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Jean Bustard

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

  17. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Schlager; Tom Millar

    2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the eighth reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: (1) PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station--Sorbent injection equipment was installed at the site during the quarter; Test plans were prepared for the field-testing phase of the project; and Baseline testing was completed during the quarter. (2) Technology Transfer--A number of technical presentations and briefings were made during the quarter. Notable among them was a paper published in the JAWMA. Also, two papers were presented at the Air Quality III Conference and one at the Pittsburgh Coal Conference.

  18. Summary of Test Results for the Interagency Field Test &Evaluation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Summary of Test Results for the Interagency Field Test &Evaluation of Wind Turbine - Radar Interference Mitigation Technologies Summary of Test Results for the Interagency Field...

  19. Panel: Microgrid Research and Field Testing IEEE PES General Meeting, 24-28 June 2007, Tampa, FL 1 In general, a microgrid can operate in both the grid-connected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panel: Microgrid Research and Field Testing IEEE PES General Meeting, 24-28 June 2007, Tampa, FL 1 Abstract In general, a microgrid can operate in both the grid-connected mode and the islanded mode where the microgrid is interfaced to the main power system by a fast semiconductor switch called static switch, (SS

  20. Test fire environmental testing operations at Mound Applied Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes Mound Laboratory`s environmental testing operations. The function of environmental testing is to perform quality environmental (thermal, mechanical, spin, resistance, visual) testing/conditioning of inert/explosive products to assure their compliance with specified customer acceptance criteria. Capabilities, organization, equipment specifications, and test facilities are summarized.

  1. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  2. From operator algebras to superconformal field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawahigashi, Yasuyuki [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Tokyo 153-8914 (Japan)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We survey operator algebraic approach to (super)conformal field theory. We discuss representation theory, classification results, full and boundary conformal field theories, relations to supervertex operator algebras and Moonshine, connections to subfactor theory of Jones, and certain aspects of noncommutative geometry of Connes.

  3. Improving Unit Operations-Test Station Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filak, J. J. Jr.

    IMPROVING UNIT OPERATIONS - TEST STATION PERFORMANCE JosqIb 1. Filak. Jr, ? Corporate Energy Manager. Park.er?Hannafin COfpontioo- Cleveland. Oh ABSTRACT: This program's basic concept deals with the possibilities for reducing energy efficiency... requirements, control operation test performance functions more successfully, and retain peak load surges from reaching higher utility rate expense levels. 142 ESL-IE-95-04-23 Proceedings from the Seventeenth Industrial Energy Technology Conference...

  4. FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

    2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{trademark} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{trademark} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{trademark} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury--elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{trademark}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{trademark} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{trademark} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

  5. FIELD TEST INSTRUCTION 100-NR-2 OPERABLE UNIT DESIGN OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR SEQUESTRATION OF SR-90 SATURATED ZONE APATITE PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER EXTENSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOWLES NA

    2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this field test instruction is to provide technical guidance for aqueous injection emplacement of an extension apatite permeable reactive barrier (PRE) for the sequestration of strontium-90 (Sr-90) using a high concentration amendment formulation. These field activities will be conducted according to the guidelines established in DOE/RL-2010-29, 100-NR-2 Design Optimization Study, hereafter referred to as the DOS. The DOS supports the Federal Facility Agreement Consent Order (EPA et al., 1989), Milestone M-16-06-01, and 'Complete Construction of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at 100-N.' Injections of apatite precursor chemicals will occur at an equal distance intervals on each end of the existing PRE to extend the PRB from the existing 91 m (300 ft) to at least 274 m (900 ft). Field testing at the 100-N Area Apatite Treatability Test Site, as depicted on Figure 1, shows that the barrier is categorized by two general hydrologic conceptual models based on overall well capacity and contrast between the Hanford and Ringold hydraulic conductivities. The upstream portion of the original barrier, shown on Figure 1, is characterized by relatively low overall well specific capacity. This is estimated from well development data and a lower contrast in hydraulic conductivity between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formations. Comparison of test results from these two locations indicate that permeability contrast between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation is significantly less over the upstream one-third of the barrier. The estimated hydraulic conductivity for the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation over the upstream portion of the barrier based on observations during emplacement of the existing 91 m (300 ft) PRB is approximately 12 and 10 m/day (39 and 32 ft/day), respectively (PNNL-17429). However, these estimates should be used as a rough guideline only, as significant variability in hydraulic conductivity is likely to be observed in the barrier extension wells, particularly those in the Ringold formation. The downstream portion of the original barrier, shown on Figure 1, is characterized by generally higher well specific capacity and a larger hydraulic conductivity contrast between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation. Hydraulic conductivity rates for the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation over the downstream portion of the barrier were estimated at 29 and 9 m/day (95 and 29 ft/day), respectively (with the Hanford formation hydraulic conductivity being greater in the downstream portion than the upstream portion). Once again, it should be noted that the actual conductivities may vary significantly, and the values state above should only be used as a rough initial estimates. Optimum apatite emplacement has been shown to occur when injections targeting the Hanford formation and the Ringold Formation are performed separately. The remainder of this test instruction provides details for conducting these formation-targeted injections.

  6. The Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field test series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Gunn, R.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six field tests of in-situ coal gasification have been conducted by the Department of Energy's Laramie Energy Technology Center Near Hanna, Wyoming with typical gasification rates of 100 tons of coal per day for continuous operation of about 30 days. This paper presents an overview of the Hanna field tests.

  7. Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    stress tests beyond the qualification test levels, which are necessary to predict PV module wear-out. The commercial success of PVs is ultimately based on the long-term...

  8. Rigorous Definition of Quantum Field Operators in Noncommutative Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. N. Mnatsakanova; Yu. S. Vernov

    2010-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The space, on which quantum field operators are given, is constructed in any theory, in which the usual product between test functions is substituted by the $\\star$-product (the Moyal-type product). The important example of such a theory is noncommutative quantum field theory (NC QFT). This construction is the key point in the derivation of the Wightman reconstruction theorem.

  9. Test Functions Space in Noncommutative Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Chaichian; M. Mnatsakanova; A. Tureanu; Yu. Vernov

    2008-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proven that the $\\star$-product of field operators implies that the space of test functions in the Wightman approach to noncommutative quantum field theory is one of the Gel'fand-Shilov spaces $S^{\\beta}$ with $\\beta test functions smears the noncommutative Wightman functions, which are in this case generalized distributions, sometimes called hyperfunctions. The existence and determination of the class of the test function spaces in NC QFT is important for any rigorous treatment in the Wightman approach.

  10. Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) Overview: The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of power electronics that will be located at the TVA the testing of power electronics and energy storage technology from laboratory development and testing through

  11. WRAP operational test report drum non destructive examination system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUMPHRYS, K.L.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This operational test report was performed to verify the WRAP Facility Drum Non-Destructive Examination systems operate in accordance with the system designs and specifications.

  12. FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

  13. Transfer operators and topological field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor V. Ovchinnikov

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer operator (TO) formalism of the dynamical systems (DS) theory is reformulated here in terms of the recently proposed cohomological theory (ChT) of stochastic differential equations (SDE). It turns out that the stochastically generalized TO (GTO) of the DS theory is the finite-time ChT Fokker-Planck evolution operator. As a result comes the supersymmetric trivialization of the so-called sharp trace and sharp determinant of the GTO, with the former being the Witten index of the ChT. Moreover, the Witten index is also the stochastic generalization of the Lefschetz index so that it equals the Euler characteristic of the (closed) phase space for any flow vector field, noise metric, and temperature. The enabled possibility to apply the spectral theorems of the DS theory to the ChT Fokker-Planck operators allows to extend the previous picture of the spontaneous topological supersymmetry (Q-symmetry) breaking onto the situations with negative ground state's attenuation rate. The later signifies the exponential growth of the number of periodic solutions/orbits in the large time limit, which is the unique feature of chaotic behavior proving that the spontaneous breakdown of Q-symmetry is indeed the field-theoretic definition and stochastic generalization of the concept of deterministic chaos. In addition, the previously proposed low-temperature classification of SDE's, i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium / noise-induced chaos ((anti-)instanton condensation) / ordinary chaos (non-integrability), is complemented by the discussion of the high-temperature regime where the sharp boundary between the noise-induced and ordinary chaotic phases must smear out into a crossover, and at even higher temperatures the Q-symmetry is restored. An unambiguous resolution of the Ito-Stratonovich dilemma in favor of the Stratonovich approach and/or Weyl quantization is also presented.

  14. Irreducibility of the set of field operators in NC QFT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mnatsakanova, M. N., E-mail: mnatsak@theory.sinp.msu.ru [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Vernov, Yu. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Irreducibility of the set of quantum field operators has been proved in noncommutative quantum field theory in the general case when time does not commute with spatial variables.

  15. Operational test report for LERF Basin 242AL-44 integrity test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galioto, T.M.

    1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This operational test report documents the results of LERF operational testing per operational test procedure (OTP) TFPE-WP-0231, ``LERF Basin Integrity Testing.`` The primary purpose of the OTP was to resolve test exceptions generated as a result of TFPE-WP-0184. The TOP was prepared and performed in accordance with WHC-SD-534-OTP-002, ``Operational Test Plan for the 242-A Evaporator Upgrades and the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility.`` WHC-S-086, ``Specification for Operational Testing of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility, Basin Integrity Testing,`` identified the test requirements and acceptance criteria. The completed, signed-off test procedure is contained in Appendix A. The test log is contained in Appendix B. Section 2.1 describes all the test exceptions written during performance of the Operational Test Procedure. The test revisions generated during the testing are discussed in Section 2.2. The dispositioned test exception forms are contained in Appendix C.

  16. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification field test series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Gunn, R.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The six in situ coal gasification field tests conducted by LETC near Hanna, WY, demonstrated typical gasification rates of 100 tons/day for continuous operation of about 30 days. Featuring high coal recovery and high product-gas calorific values, the underground process proved to be simple, reliable, and potentially controllable.

  17. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Design and Field Test SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Wind Turbine Rotor. This work...

  18. Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Burnett

    2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

  19. Light Duty Utility Arm system pre-operational (cold test) test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K.L.

    1995-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Duty Utility (LDUA) Cold Test Facility, located in the Hanford 400 Area, will be used to support cold testing (pre- operational tests) of LDUA subsystems. Pre-operational testing is composed of subsystem development testing and rework activities, and integrated system qualification testing. Qualification testing will be conducted once development work is complete and documentation is under configuration control. Operational (hot) testing of the LDUA system will follow the testing covered in this plan and will be covered in a separate test plan

  20. Operability test report for K east basin canister cleaning system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1997-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes test data computed during the operability test procedure for the K East Basin Canister Cleaning System. Test Results show that the canister cleaning system successfully lowered the dose of each canister tested so that each canister could be disposed of as low level waste.

  1. New Construction of ?-Operator in Field-Antifield Formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Lavrov; O. V. Radchenko

    2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proven that the nilpotent $\\Delta$-operator in the field-antifield formalism can be constructed in terms of an antisymplectic structure only.

  2. Irreducibility of the set of field operators in Noncommutative Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. N. Mnatsakanova; Yu. S. Vernov

    2012-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Irreducibility of the set of quantum field operators has been proved in noncommutative quantum field theory in the general case when time does not commute with spatial variables.

  3. Novel quark-field creation operator construction for hadronic physics in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peardon, Michael [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Bulava, John; Foley, Justin; Morningstar, Colin [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Dudek, Jozef; Edwards, Robert G.; Joo, Balint; Lin, H.-W.; Richards, David G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Juge, Keisuke Jimmy [Department of Physics, University of the Pacific, Stockton, California 95211 (United States)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new quark-field smearing algorithm is defined which enables efficient calculations of a broad range of hadron correlation functions. The technique applies a low-rank operator to define smooth fields that are to be used in hadron creation operators. The resulting space of smooth fields is small enough that all elements of the reduced quark propagator can be computed exactly at reasonable computational cost. Correlations between arbitrary sources, including multihadron operators can be computed a posteriori without requiring new lattice Dirac operator inversions. The method is tested on realistic lattice sizes with light dynamical quarks.

  4. Operator coil monitoring acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  5. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  6. Field tests of a small instrumented pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korb, Kenneth Wayne

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pilot. Hole Installation of tbe Smail Pile Dynamic Test Procedure Static Test Procedure 23 24 2S 28 29 30 30 V ANALYSIS OF TIP DAKPING DATA Fine-Grained Soils Coarse-Grained Soils 34 40 VI ANAI YSIS OF FRICTION DAIiPING DATA Fine... Friction Damping Data for. Fine-Grained Soils 41 Friction Damping Constants from Modified Smith Model 48 VT Friction Damping Data for Coarse-Grained Soils 51 VII /nake Data from Field Test Program VIII Load Distribution Data 57 62 viii LISi...

  7. AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) for development of the DR Automation Server System This project could not have been completed without extensive: Greg Watson and Mark Lott · C&C Building Automation: Mark Johnson and John Fiegel · Chabot Space AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS: 2006 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS

  8. Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support...

  9. CRAD, System Operating Test Procedures - October 23, 2014 (EA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    October 23, 2014 System Operating Test Procedures - October 23, 2014 (EA CRAD 31-05, Rev. 0) This Criteria Review and Approach Document (EA CRAD 31-05, Rev. 0) provides objectives,...

  10. Field Operations Program, Toyota PRIUS Hybrid Electric Vehicle Performance Characterization Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, James Edward; Nguyen, N.; Phung, J.; Smith, J.; Wehrey, M.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Field Operations Program evaluates advanced technology vehicles in real-world applications and environments. Advanced technology vehicles include pure electric, hybrid electric, hydrogen, and other vehicles that use emerging technologies such as fuel cells. Information generated by the Program is targeted to fleet managers and others considering the deployment of advanced technology vehicles. As part of the above activities, the Field Operations Program has initiated the testing of the Toyota Prius hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a technology increasingly being considered for use in fleet applications. This report describes the Pomona Loop testing of the Prius, providing not only initial operational and performance information, but also a better understanding of HEV testing issues. The Pomona Loop testing includes both Urban and Freeway drive cycles, each conducted at four operating scenarios that mix minimum and maximum payloads with different auxiliary (e.g., lights, air conditioning) load levels.

  11. ISE 2012, Vienna USING RIVER RESTORATION OPERATIONS TO TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to assess how ecohydraulic models can predict actual biological responses to stream restoration. As other9 th ISE 2012, Vienna USING RIVER RESTORATION OPERATIONS TO TEST PREDICTIVE ECOHYDRAULIC MODELS physical restoration, it is still difficult to assess the ecological effects of restoration operations

  12. Long term materials test program. Preliminary operations plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Long Term Materials Testing (LTMT) PFB facility has been designed to duplicate the design point condition of the Coal-Fired Combined Cycle (CFCC) reference commercial plant design developed by GE under contract to DOE, including bed temperature (1750/sup 0/F), pressure (10 atm), excess air (20%), and gas residence time (1.8 sec). The test rig has a one foot diameter bed and consumes about 1.6 tons/day of coal and 0.5 tons/day of dolomite sulphur sorbent. Material specimens are contained in two test sections. The low velocity test section houses 132 pin specimens 1/4 dia., sixty of which can be cooled below the gas stream temperature. The nominal exposure environment of 1650/sup 0/F, 10 atm, 27 fps should ensure representative corrosive conditions, without erosion. The control system for the LTMT facility is designed to operate the rig in such a manner that the test specimens are subjected to constant, controlled conditions representative of the actual service environment. The Preliminary Test Plan presented in Section V outlines three phases of PFB testing, plus screening tests for candidate materials. Operating costs have been updated to reflect the preliminary rig design data and current raw material quotes. The projected operating costs have been effected by raw material costs since the time of the original estimate, but the overall cost per hour of test is still very low: $122/test hour.

  13. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  14. Field tests of a small instrumented pile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korb, Kenneth Wayne

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vari. cty of field soils. The soils at the test site;-, inc! udc clays of high and low p! anti c- ity, clayey sands, and silty sar. :ds. The model pile is instrun ?need in such a way that separate r&easurements of skin friction and poirt bearing arc...' Iant damping value for friction. S&tggestions are made regarding the practical use of te"t res lt in piljng behavior studies. Acknow I edgement. , The aut hor wishes to take this opportunity to thank the following persons for their. contributions...

  15. 3X-100 blade field test.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

  16. Locally smeared operator product expansions in scalar field theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Monahan, Christopher J. [College of William & Mary; Orginos, Kostas [William and Mary College, JLAB

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new locally smeared operator product expansion to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of smeared operators. The smeared operator product expansion formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements determined numerically using lattice field theory to matrix elements of non-local operators in the continuum. These nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, which significantly complicates calculations of quantities such as the moments of parton distribution functions, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale complicates the connection to the Wilson coefficients of the standard operator product expansion and requires the construction of a suitable formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach with examples in real scalar field theory.

  17. Locally smeared operator product expansions in scalar field theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Monahan, Christopher J.; Orginos, Kostas

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new locally smeared operator product expansion to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of smeared operators. The smeared operator product expansion formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements determined numerically using lattice field theory to matrix elements of non-local operators in the continuum. These nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, which significantly complicates calculations of quantities such as the moments of parton distribution functions, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale complicates the connection to the Wilson coefficients of the standardmore »operator product expansion and requires the construction of a suitable formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach with examples in real scalar field theory.« less

  18. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

  19. Superconducting radio-frequency modules test faciilty operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R&D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service Fermilab SRF R&D needs. The first stage of the project has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

  20. Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giangiacomo, L.A.

    1999-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box is a seal assembly for polished rod pumping installations commonly used in oil and gas pumping well installations to contain produced well fluids. The improved stuffing box was developed and patented by Harold H. Palmour of The Palmour Group of Livingston, TX. The stuffing box is designed to reduce the incidence of seal leakage and to utilize an environmentally safe fluid, so that if there is any leakage, environmental damage is reduced or eliminated. The unit was tested on two wells at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. During the test period, the performance of the stuffing box was measured by monitoring the pressure on the tubing and the inner chamber with a Barton Two-pen recorder. The amount of safe fluid consumed, fluid leakage at the top of the stuffing box, pressure supplied from the nitrogen bottle, ambient temperature, and polish rod temperature was recorded. The stuffing box is capable of providing a better seal between well fluids an d the environment than conventional stuffing boxes. It allows the polished rod to operate cooler and with lubrication, extending the life of the packing elements, and reducing the amount of attention required to prevent leakage.

  1. Cooperative field test program for wind systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  2. Crucial tests of the existence of a Time Operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Durt

    2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we show that the Temporal Wave Function approach of the decay process, which is a multicomponent version of the Time Operator approach leads to new, non-standard, predictions concerning the statistical properties of decay time distributions of single kaons and entangled pairs of mesons. These results suggest crucial experimental tests for the existence of a Time Operator for the decay process to be realized in High Energy Physics or Quantum Optics.

  3. DOE/RMOTC/05.98001 Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box Field Test Field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RMOTC05.98001 Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box Field Test Field Test Project Report Date Published: May 28, 1999 Leo A. Giangiacomo, P.E. Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 N....

  4. SSPS results of test and operation, 1981-1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of three years of testing and operation of the two dissimilar solar thermal power plants of the SSPS project are summarized. The project includes: (1) a Distributed Collector System, and (2) a Central Receiver System. Environmental conditions are presented and an economical assessment of the project is provided. (BCS)

  5. South Fence Road -- Phase 1 field operations summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, J.P. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Neel, D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Fence Road (SFR) project is part of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization (SWHC) task. The SWHC task has as its objective the reduction of uncertainty about the rate and direction of groundwater flow in the SNL/NM/Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) area. The SFR project area is located along the southern boundary of SNL/KAFB. This project area was selected to provide site-specific information related to geology and groundwater hydrology within the Hubbell Spring/Tijeras/Sandia fault complex. Specific objectives included determining the depth to the Santa Fe Group/bedrock contact, the depth to the water table, and the hydrogeologic complexities related to faulting. This report is a basic data report from the first phase of field operations associated with the drilling, logging, completion, and development of South Fence Road Wells SFR-1D and SFR-1S, SFR-2, SFR-3D and SFR-3S, and SFR-4. These test/monitoring wells were installed as part of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Environmental Restoration Project.

  6. Safety and emergency preparedness considerations for geotechnical field operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wemple, R.P.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GEO Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories is involved in several remote-site drilling and/or experimental operations each year. In 1987, the Geothermal Research Division of the Department developed a general set of Safe Operating Procedures (SOPs) that could be applied to a variety of projects. This general set is supplemented by site-specific SOPs as needed. Effective field operations require: integration of safety and emergency preparedness planning with overall project planning, training of field personnel and inventorying of local emergency support resources, and, developing a clear line of responsibility and authority to enforce the safety requirements. Copies of SOPs used in recent operations are included as examples of working documents for the reader.

  7. Design and field testing of a Savonius windpump in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalera, A.; Kammen, D.M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One important means of improving water availability and reducing disease exposure from polluted or stagnant sources involves the design and diffusion of inexpensive and reliable water pumps. Modernized versions of the decades-old Savonius vertical axis windmill present one technology that can play an important role in this effort. To be successful, these systems must be tailored to exploit the local wind and hydrological resources, constructed and managed locally, and inexpensive to operate and maintain. We report here on our design efforts and cooperative field research with several Kenyan development organizations. Performance tests from 10-15 meter deep water pumping applications at two field sites are presented, as well as preliminary results of an analysis of the steps involved in disseminating such technology. Our research suggests that the combination of reliability and performance offered by the Savonius design make it a useful resource for community managed energy initiatives, particularly in developing nation settings.

  8. Field Test of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan-Lin Tang; Hua-Lei Yin; Si-Jing Chen; Yang Liu; Wei-Jun Zhang; Xiao Jiang; Lu Zhang; Jian Wang; Li-Xing You; Jian-Yu Guan; Dong-Xu Yang; Zhen Wang; Hao Liang; Zhen Zhang; Nan Zhou; Xiongfeng Ma; Teng-Yun Chen; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A main type of obstacles of practical applications of quantum key distribution (QKD) network is various attacks on detection. Measurement-device-independent QKD (MDIQKD) protocol is immune to all these attacks and thus a strong candidate for network security. Recently, several proof-of-principle demonstrations of MDIQKD have been performed. Although novel, those experiments are implemented in the laboratory with secure key rates less than 0.1 bps. Besides, they need manual calibration frequently to maintain the system performance. These aspects render these demonstrations far from practicability. Thus, justification is extremely crucial for practical deployment into the field environment. Here, by developing an automatic feedback MDIQKD system operated at a high clock rate, we perform a field test via deployed fiber network of 30 km total length, achieving a 16.9 bps secure key rate. The result lays the foundation for a global quantum network which can shield from all the detection-side attacks.

  9. Summary of field operations Tijeras Arroyo Well TJA-2. Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foutz, W.L. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCord, J.P. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a basic data report for field operations associated with the drilling, logging, completion, and development of Tijeras Arroyo well TJA-2. This test/monitoring well was installed as part of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Environmental Restoration Project.

  10. Operational test report -- Project W-320 cathodic protection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, T.J.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 specifies that corrosion protection must be designed into tank systems that treat or store dangerous wastes. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), utilizes underground encased waste transfer piping between tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Corrosion protection is afforded to the encasements of the WRSS waste transfer piping through the application of earthen ionic currents onto the surface of the piping encasements. Cathodic protection is used in conjunction with the protective coatings that are applied upon the WRSS encasement piping. WRSS installed two new two rectifier systems (46 and 47) and modified one rectifier system (31). WAC 173-303-640 specifies that the proper operation of cathodic protection systems must be confirmed within six months after initial installation. The WRSS cathodic protection systems were energized to begin continuous operation on 5/5/98. Sixteen days after the initial steady-state start-up of the WRSS rectifier systems, the operational testing was accomplished with procedure OTP-320-006 Rev/Mod A-0. This operational test report documents the OTP-320-006 results and documents the results of configuration testing of integrated piping and rectifier systems associated with the W-320 cathodic protection systems.

  11. The LLNL HFTF (High-Field Test Facility): A flexible superconducting test facility for fusion magnet development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.R.; Chaplin, M.R.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.

    1987-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) is a flexible and, in many ways, unique facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for providing the test capabilities needed to develop the superconducting magnet systems of the next generation fusion machines. The superconducting coil set in HFTF has been operated successfully at LLNL, but in its original configuration, its utility as a test facility was somewhat restricted and cryogenic losses were intolerable. A new cryostat for the coil set allows the magnet system to remain cold indefinitely so the system is available on short notice to provide high fields (about 11 T) inside a reasonably large test volume (0.3-m diam). The test volume is physically and thermally isolated from the coil volume, allowing test articles to be inserted and removed without disturbing the coil cryogenic volume, which is maintained by an on-line refrigerator. Indeed, with the proper precautions, it is even unnecessary to drop the field in the HFTF during such an operation. The separate test volume also allows reduced temperature operation without the expense and complication of subcooling the entire coil set (about 20-t cold mass). The HFTF has thus become a key facility in the LLNL magnet development program, where the primary goal is to demonstrate the technology for producing fields to 15 T with winding-pack current densities of 40 A.mm/sup -2/ in coils sized for fusion applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Results of a Field Test Using R-407C in Split System Heat Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, A.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have been canied out by various organizations, field testing has been limited. A need to gain experience with manufacturing, installation, servicing, and field operation was recognized and resulted in a joint effort by Lennox Industries, Inc... the following: 1) validate R407C refrigerant and POE lubricant processing procedures for both the factory and the field, 2) monitor the installed units to assess compatibility of the refrigerant and lubricant with the system, 3) obtain input from the field...

  13. An observational test of magnetospheric magnetic field mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; Hones, E.W.; McComas, D.J.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distortion of the geomagnetic field is a key signature of the response of the magnetosphere to the solar wind input. A number of empirical models have been devised to estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions. We describe a technique whereby the field-line mapping predicted by such models is tested by matching measurements of magnetospheric plasma energy spectra obtained by Los Alamos instruments at geosynchronous orbit with spectra obtained by instruments on the polar-orbiting DMSP satellites (at an altitude of about 800 km) at times when the two satellites are in approximate magnetic conjugacy. With up to three geosynchronous satellites and as many as four DMSP satellites in operation at any given time, there are a very large number of such two-satellite conjunctions, allowing the model mappings to be tested under a wide range of local times and geomagnetic activity. Preliminary results from the application of this technique are presented for one week of data from March, 1991.

  14. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-UP-1 groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittreich, C.D.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology, as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-UP-1 Operable Unit interim remedial measure (IRM) proposed plan be developed for use in preparing an interim action record of decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of the testing described in this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-UP-1 Operable Unit activities (e.g., limited field investigation, development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the interim action ROD will specify the interim action for groundwater contamination at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. The approach discussed in this treatability test plan is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for the contaminant plume associated with the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are uranium and technetium-99; the secondary contaminant of concern is nitrate. The pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this test plan has as its primary purpose to assess the performance of aboveground treatment systems with respect to the ability to remove the primary contaminants in groundwater withdrawn from the contaminant plume.

  15. Initial operation of the Tidd PFBC HGCU test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, J.D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the design and obtain operating experience for up to two advanced particle filter (APF) systems through long-term testing on a slip stream at Ohio Power Company's Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant. Performance and reliability of commercial-scale filter modules will be monitored to aid in an assessment of the readiness and economic viability of this technology for commercial PFBC applications. The engineering, and design of the hot gas piping systems modifications were completed during the summer of 1992, and in September, 1992 reassembly of the pipe sections began at Tidd. The HGCU system will be commissioned with the APF in October, 1992. Present plans are to operate the APF system throughout the rest of the Tidd three-year test program which is scheduled to end in February, 1994.

  16. Initial operation of the Tidd PFBC HGCU test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, J.D.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the design and obtain operating experience for up to two advanced particle filter (APF) systems through long-term testing on a slip stream at Ohio Power Company`s Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant. Performance and reliability of commercial-scale filter modules will be monitored to aid in an assessment of the readiness and economic viability of this technology for commercial PFBC applications. The engineering, and design of the hot gas piping systems modifications were completed during the summer of 1992, and in September, 1992 reassembly of the pipe sections began at Tidd. The HGCU system will be commissioned with the APF in October, 1992. Present plans are to operate the APF system throughout the rest of the Tidd three-year test program which is scheduled to end in February, 1994.

  17. Operational Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Brown, Nicholas [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Fuller, Robert; Nichols, Kenneth [Barber Nichols 6325 W 55th Ave., Arvada, Colorado 80002 (United States)

    2005-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kWth with a maximum outlet temperature of {approx}1000 K.

  18. Operational results of a Closed Brayton Cycle test-loop.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Robert (Barber Nichols, Arvada, Colorado); Wright, Steven Alan; Nichols, Kenneth Graham. (Barber Nichols, Arvada, Colorado); Brown, Nicholas; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kW{sub th} with a maximum outlet temperature of {approx}1000 K.

  19. Controller Field Tests on the NREL CART2 Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossanyi, E.; Wright, A.; Fleming, P.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of the field tests carried out on the CART2 turbine at NREL to validate individual pitch control and active tower damping.

  20. Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31 Garfield County, Colorado September, 1995 Report Prepared for Mud Hammer Development Project Partners Mobil Oil...

  1. Tank Manufacturing, Testing, Deployment and Field Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010, in Beijing, China. ihfpvnewhouse.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Tank Manufacturing, Testing,...

  2. A standardized and safe method of sterile field maintenance during intra-operative horizontal plane fluoroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaska, Serge C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    method of sterile field maintenance during intra-operativemethod of sterile field maintenance during intra-operativemethod of sterile field maintenance during intra-operative

  3. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution`s (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

  4. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 2. The Hanna I field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Based on the recommendations of A.D. Little, Inc. in a 1971 report prepared for the US Bureau of Mines, the Hanna I test represented the first field test in reestablishing a field program by the US Bureau of Mines. The test was directed toward comparing results from a thick subbitiminous coal seam with those obtained during the field test series conducted at Gorgas, AL, in the 1940's and 1950's. Hanna I was conducted from March 1973 through February 1974. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facility description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 9 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Abnormal operating procedures for ATR (Advanced Test Reactor's) experiment loops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auflick, J.L.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the background from the TMI accident which resulted in the definition and development of function-oriented procedures. It also explains how function-oriented procedures were applied in a task for the Advanced Test Reactor's (ATR) NR experiment loops. Human performance design discrepancies were identified for existing procedures, and were corrected by upgrading them according to current NRC and DOE standards. Finally, specific recommendations are made with respect to future ATR control room and loop improvements, as they relate to the revision of operating procedures within INEL's power reactor program. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  6. area field test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area field test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Smart Parking Management Field Test: A...

  7. E3T Emerging Technology Field Tests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work with JeffersonFluctuation-drivenprimaryForE2Field

  8. WRAP 1, operational test report 80X non-destructive examination system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottenus, R.J.

    1997-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operational Test Report was performed to verify the WRAP 1 Facility 80X Non-Destructive Examination systems operate in accordance with the system designs and specifications.

  9. Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

  10. Transmission line relay mis-operation detection based on time-synchronized field data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Esmaeilian, Ahad; Popovic, Tomo; Kezunovic, Mladen

    2015-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a real-time tool to detect transmission line relay mis-operation is implemented. The tool uses time-synchronized measurements obtained from both ends of the line during disturbances. The proposed fault analysis tool comes into the picture only after the protective device has operated and tripped the line. The proposed methodology is able not only to detect, classify, and locate transmission line faults, but also to accurately confirm whether the line was tripped due to a mis-operation of protective relays. The analysis report includes either detailed description of the fault type and location or detection of relay mis-operation. As such,more »it can be a source of very useful information to support the system restoration. The focus of the paper is on the implementation requirements that allow practical application of the methodology, which is illustrated using the field data obtained the real power system. Testing and validation is done using the field data recorded by digital fault recorders and protective relays. The test data included several hundreds of event records corresponding to both relay mis-operations and actual faults. The discussion of results addresses various challenges encountered during the implementation and validation of the presented methodology.« less

  11. Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience - What Do They All Mean? (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the need for a set of tests for modules that would predict their long term-field performance.

  12. NREL: Wind Research - Field Test Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photo ofResearchFAST Revs Up with a

  13. Test of QED at critical field strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bula, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  14. Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

  15. Loch Linnhe `94: Test operations description and on-site analysis, US activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantrom, D.D.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field experiment named Loch Linnhe `94 (LL94) is described. This experiment was conducted in upper Loch Linnhe, Scotland, in September 1994, as an exercise involving UK and US investigators, under the Joint UK/US Radar Ocean Imaging Program. This experiment involved a dual-frequency, dual-polarization hillside real aperture radar operated by the UK, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) current meter array (CMA), in-water hydrodynamic sensors, and meteorological measurements. The primary measurements involved imaging ship-generated and ambient internal waves by the radar and the CMA. This report documents test operations from a US perspective and presents on-site analysis results derived by US investigators. The rationale underlying complementary radar and CMA measurements is described. Descriptions of the test site, platforms, and major US instrument systems are given. A summary of test operations and examples of radar, CMA, water column profile, and meteorological data are provided. A description of the rather extensive analysis of these data performed at the LL94 test site is presented. The products of this analysis are presented and some implications for further analysis and future experiments are discussed. All experimental objectives were either fully or partially met. Powerful on-site analysis capabilities generated many useful products and helped improve subsequent data collection. Significant further data analysis is planned.

  16. Quasinormal modes of test fields around regular black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobir Toshmatov; Ahmadjon Abdujabbarov; Zden?k Stuchlík; Bobomurat Ahmedov

    2015-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational test fields in the Hayward, Bardeen and Ay\\'on-Beato-Garc\\'ia regular black hole spacetimes and demonstrate that the test fields are stable in all these spacetimes. Using the sixth order WKB approximation of the linear "axial" perturbative scheme, we determine dependence of the quasinormal mode (QNM) frequencies on the characteristic parameters of the test fields and the spacetime charge parameters of the regular black holes. We give also the greybody factors, namely the transmission and reflection coefficients of scattered scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational waves. We show that damping of the QNMs in regular black hole spacetimes is suppressed in comparison to the case of Schwarzschild black holes, and increasing charge parameter of the regular black holes increases reflection and decreases transmission factor of incident waves for each of the test fields.

  17. A comprehensive test method for reprogammable field programmable gate arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashen, David Glen

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, a new test algorithm for reprogrammable field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) is developed. The fault models consisting of stuck-at faults, bridge faults, programmable switch stuck-on, and stuck-off faults, are utilized. Both...

  18. Quasinormal modes of test fields around regular black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobir Toshmatov; Ahmadjon Abdujabbarov; Zden?k Stuchlík; Bobomurat Ahmedov

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational test fields in the Hayward, Bardeen and Ay\\'{o}n-Beato-Garc\\'{i}a regular black hole spacetimes and demonstrate that the test fields are stable in all these spacetimes. Using the sixth order WKB approximation of the linear "axial" perturbative scheme, we determine dependence of the quasinormal mode (QNM) frequencies on the characteristic parameters of the test fields and the spacetime charge parameters of the regular black holes. We give also the greybody factors, namely the transmission and reflection coefficients of scattered scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational waves. We show that damping of the QNMs in regular black hole spacetimes is suppressed in comparison to the case of Schwarzschild black holes, and increasing charge parameter of the regular black holes increases reflection and decreases transmission factor of incident waves for each of the test fields.

  19. Analysis, testing, and operation of the MAGI thermal control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Sonny; Hall, Jeffrey L.; Kasper, Brian P. [The Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, CA 90245 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aerospace Corporation has completed the development of the Mineral and Gas Identifier (MAGI) sensor - an airborne multi-spectral infrared instrument that is designed to discriminate surface composition and to detect gas emissions from the environment. Sensor performance was demonstrated in a series of flights aboard a Twin Otter aircraft in December 2011 as a stepping stone to a future satellite sensor design. To meet sensor performance requirements the thermal control system was designed to operate the HgCdTe focal plane array (FPA) at 50 K with a 1.79 W heat rejection load to a 44.7 K sink and the optical assembly at 100 K with a 7.5 W heat load to a 82.3 K sink. Two commercial off-theshelf (COTS) Sunpower Stirling cryocoolers were used to meet the instrument’s cooling requirements. A thermal model constructed in Thermal Desktop was used to run parametric studies that guided the mechanical design and sized the two cryocoolers. This paper discusses the development, validation, and operation of the MAGI thermal control system. Detailed energy balances and temperature predictions are presented for various test cases to demonstrate the utility and accuracy of the thermal model. Model inputs included measured values of heat lift as a function of input power and cold tip temperature for the two cryocoolers. These measurements were also used to make predictions of the cool-down behavior from ambient conditions. Advanced heater software was developed to meet unique requirements for both sensor cool-down rate and stability at the set point temperatures.

  20. Modular Operational Test Plans for Inferences on Software Reliability Based on a Markov Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumdar, Mainak

    Modular Operational Test Plans for Inferences on Software Reliability Based on a Markov Model reliabilities. An operational test procedure is considered in which only the individual modules are tested and the system is considered acceptable if, and only if, no failures are observed. The minimum number of tests

  1. attempted field test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    attempted field test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Tests as Documentation: a First...

  2. activities field test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activities field test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Active Testing CERN Preprints...

  3. An observational test of magnetospheric field models at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomsen, M.F.; Weiss, L.A.; McComas, D.J.; Moldwin, M.B.; Reeves, G.D.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The configuration of the geomagnetic field is an indicator of the response of the magnetosphere to the solar wind input. A number of empirical magnetospheric field models are currently in use which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions. Here, the global nature of the Tsyganenko 89 [Tsyganenko, 1989] magnetospheric magnetic field model is tested by comparison of the model-predicted field orientations with the field orientations derived simultaneously at two different locations in geosynchronous orbit from the axis of symmetry of the plasma electron distribution function (30 eV--40 keV). The results for the particular time interval studied are inconclusive because the Tsyganenko 89 model does not describe the field at one of the satellites well enough, but the procedure itself appears promising.

  4. Concept tests: Wind tunnel tests in controlled wind Comparison tests: Free field comparison to 3D sonic anemometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    comparable potential. Wind measurements on wind turbines in undisturbed wind, relative to nacelle anemometryConcept tests: Wind tunnel tests in controlled wind Comparison tests: Free field comparison to 3D" by CFD calculations Spinner AnemometrySpinner Anemometry -- An Innovative Wind Measurement Concept

  5. Enhancing Building Operations Through Automated Diagnostics: Field Test Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katipamula, S.; Brambley, M. R.; Bauman, N.; Pratt, R. G.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 (EIA 2003), in 2001, 17.4 quadrillion Btu (1 quad = 1015 Btu) of primary energy was consumed by commercial buildings in the United States at a cost of about 127 billion dollars (in 2001 dollars). Many... maintenance is clearly insufficient to address this issue. Manually commissioning buildings is valuable in terms of both finding problems and developing the techniques for doing so, but it is expensive. With only 1 to 2% of total construction costs...

  6. 200-BP-5 operable unit treatability test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200-BP-5 Operable Unit was established in response to recommendations presented in the 200 East Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE-RL 1993a). Recognizing different approaches to remediation, the groundwater AAMSR recommended separating groundwater from source and vadose zone operable units and subdividing 200 East Area groundwater into two operable units. The division between the 200-BP-5 and 200-PO-1 Operable Units was based principally on source operable unit boundaries and distribution of groundwater plumes derived from either B Plant or Plutonium/Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant liquid waste disposal sites.

  7. Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

  8. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAlpine, J.L. (White Buffalo Petroleum Co., Tulsa, OK (US)); Joshi, S.D. (Joshi Technologies International Inc., Tulsa, OK (US))

    1991-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years, and presently no wells are producing in the field. In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, wells were drilled on 10-acre spacing, and the last well was plugged in 1961. The field was produced only on primary production and produced approximately 1 million bbl of oil. Because the field was not waterflooded, a large potential exists to produce from the field using secondary methods. To improve the economics for the secondary process, a combination of horizontal and vertical wells was considered.

  10. Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  11. ANOLE Portable Radiation Detection System Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris A. Hodge

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named “Anole,” it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  12. Laboratory and Modeling Evaluations in Support of Field Testing for Desiccation at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau includes testing of the desiccation technology as a potential technology to be used in conjunction with surface infiltration control to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. Laboratory and modeling efforts were conducted to investigate technical uncertainties related to the desiccation process and its impact on contaminant transport. This information is intended to support planning, operation, and interpretation of a field test for desiccation in the Hanford Central Plateau.

  13. Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

  14. Radiological considerations in the operation of the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moe, H.J.

    1998-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) is a facility that uses the existing APS linac to accelerate electrons up to an energy of 700 MeV. These electrons are transported through the Pm into a portion of the booster synchrotrons and on into the LEUTL main enclosure (MIL 97). Figure 1 shows the layout of the LEUTL building, which consists of an earth-benned concrete enclosure and an end-station building. The concrete enclosure houses the electron beamline, test undulator, and beam dump. This facility is about 51 m long and 3.66 m wide. Technical components and diagnostics for characterizing the undulator light are found in the end station. This building has about 111 m{sup 2} of floor space. This note deals with the radiological considerations of operations using electrons up to 700 MeV and at power levels up to the safety envelope of 1 kW. Previous radiological considerations for electron and positron operations in the linac, PAR, and synchrotrons have been addressed else-where (MOE 93a, 93b, and 93c). Much of the methodology discussed in the previous writeups, as well as in MOE 94, has been used in the computations in this note. The radiological aspects that are addressed include the following: prompt secondary radiation (bremsstrahlung, giant resonance neutrons, medium- and high-energy neutrons) produced by electrons interacting in a beam stop or in component structures; skyshine radiation, which produces a radiation field in nearby areas and at the nearest off-site location; radioactive gases produced by neutron irradiation of air in the vicinity of a particle loss site; noxious gases (ozone and others) produced in air by the escaping bremsstrahlung radiation that results from absorbing particles in the components; activation of the LEUTL components that results in a residual radiation field in the vicinity of these materials following shutdown; potential activation of water used for cooling the magnets and other purposes in the tunnel; and evaluation of the radiation fields due to escaping gas bremsstrahlung. Estimated dose rates have been computed or scaled (in the case of 400 MeV electrons) outside of the bermed tunnel, in Building 412, and in the Klystron Gallery for several modes of operation, including potential safety envelope beam power, normal beam power and MCI (maximum credible incident) conditions. Radiological aspects of shielding changes to the synchrotrons and their effect upon operations are addressed in MOE 97. No change in the safety envelope for synchrotrons operation was warranted.

  15. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume II. Integrated operations plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines an integrated plan for the operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The plan fulfills and further delineates LLNL policies and provides for accomplishing the functions required by the program. This plan specifies the management, operations, maintenance, and engineering support responsibilities. It covers phasing into sustained operations as well as the sustained operations themselves. Administrative and Plant Engineering support, which are now being performed satisfactorily, are not part of this plan unless there are unique needs.

  16. Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5556E Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information TCP/IP over CDMA CAISO Utility Aggregator NOC Proprietary Comm. EMS GridLink Loads Interval Meter

  17. Testing and operating a multiprocessor chip with processor redundancy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bellofatto, Ralph E; Douskey, Steven M; Haring, Rudolf A; McManus, Moyra K; Ohmacht, Martin; Schmunkamp, Dietmar; Sugavanam, Krishnan; Weatherford, Bryan J

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for improving the yield rate of a multiprocessor semiconductor chip that includes primary processor cores and one or more redundant processor cores. A first tester conducts a first test on one or more processor cores, and encodes results of the first test in an on-chip non-volatile memory. A second tester conducts a second test on the processor cores, and encodes results of the second test in an external non-volatile storage device. An override bit of a multiplexer is set if a processor core fails the second test. In response to the override bit, the multiplexer selects a physical-to-logical mapping of processor IDs according to one of: the encoded results in the memory device or the encoded results in the external storage device. On-chip logic configures the processor cores according to the selected physical-to-logical mapping.

  18. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 5. Hanna III field test research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna III was conducted during the spring and summer of 1977. The test involved only two process wells but also had twelve water monitoring wells, eight in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam and four in an aquifer above the coal seam. The test was designed to obtain information regarding the effects of the process on groundwater within the target seam and the overlying aquifer. The site for Hanna III had a low productivity aquifer above the Hanna No. 1 seam. The wells within the seam and the overlying aquifer were placed in such a manner that maximum information on groundwater flow and quality could be obtained. This report covers: (1) site selection and characterization; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 4 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Collection and Analysis of Reservoir Data from Testing and Operation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River 5 MW Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Collection and Analysis of Reservoir Data from Testing and...

  20. TEST EBIS Operation and Component Development for the RHIC EBIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and silicon, which are extracted directly from the Booster ring, the first of three synchrotrons in the RHICTEST EBIS Operation and Component Development for the RHIC EBIS Edward N. Beebe, James G. Alessi, David Graham, Ahovi Kponou, Alexander Pikin, Krsto Prelec, John Ritter, Vladimir Zajic Brookhaven

  1. Field testing of new multilateral drilling and completion technology at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giangiacomo, L.A. [Fluor Daniel NPOSR, Inc., Casper, WY (United States). Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has played an important role in bringing new multilateral well technology to the marketplace. Multilateral technology is more complex than most new technologies being brought to the oilfield. It is very difficult to test new designs in the laboratory or conventional test wells. They must be tested downhole in specialized wells to work out design and procedural details. Most of the applications for multilateral technology are in high cost drilling areas, such as offshore or in remote, environmentally sensitive areas. For this reason, opportunities for testing the new technology in the course of routine drilling and completion operations are scarce. Operators are not willing to risk expensive rig time, or losing a wellbore itself, on a test. RMOTC offers a neutral site where the technology can be tested in a relatively low cost environment. There are two drilling rigs and three workover and completion rigs available. Most associated services such as warehouse, roustabouts, backhoe, welders, and mechanics are also available on site, while specialized oilfield services and machine shops are available in nearby Casper. Technologies such as the hollow whipstock, adjustable stabilizer, downhole kickoff assembly, single trip sidetrack tool, stacked multidrain system, rotary steerable systems, and procedures for abandoning an open hole lateral have benefited through the use of RMOTC`s facilities. This paper details the capabilities of the new technologies and the benefits of testing them in a real oilfield environment before taking them to market.

  2. Duplex stainless steel corrosion behavior during acidification: Laboratory versus field test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheldi, T.; Obracaj, I. [AGIP S.p.A. CORM, San Donato Milanese (Italy). Corrosion and Materials Technologies Dept.; Cigada, A.; Cabrini, M. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica Applicata; Vicentini, B.; Rondelli, G. [C.N.R.-I.T.M., Milano (Italy)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory tests and field acidizing operations have been conducted on a 25% Cr-140 ksi duplex stainless steel utilizing a 90% HCl 15% + 10% CHs{sub 3}COOH acid mixture inhibited with a commercial package. Laboratory tests proved that the duplex stainless steel can be effectively protected in the adopted experimental conditions at 150 C. Examination of parts of tubings extracted from a real completion showed appreciable corrosion attack only in the sections of the string placed at higher depth (operating temperatures {approximately}130 C): in these cases the estimated rates of corrosion attack can be about one order of magnitude higher than that foreseeable on the basis of laboratory tests. However even in these cases the severity of attack is maintained within acceptable limits.

  3. Field Test Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response (DR) is an emerging research field and an effective tool that improves grid reliability and prevents the price of electricity from rising, especially in deregulated markets. This paper introduces the definition of DR and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). It describes the Auto-DR technology utilized at a commercial building in the summer of 2006 and the methodologies to evaluate associated demand savings. On the basis of field tests in a large office building, Auto-DR is proven to be a reliable and credible resource that ensures a stable and economical operation of the power grid.

  4. Insert Coil Test for HEP High Field Magnets Using YBCO Coated Conductor Tapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, V.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 30-50 T. In this paper we present progress in insert coil development using commercially available YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} Coated Conductor. Technological aspects covered in the development, including coil geometry, insulation, manufacturing process and testing are summarized and discussed. Test results of double pancake coils operated in liquid nitrogen and liquid helium are presented and compared with the performance of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} tape short samples.

  5. DOE Underground-Coal-Conversion-Program field-test activities for 1979 and 1980. [Pricetown 1, Hoe Creek 3, Hanna IV, and SDB 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the US Department of Energy's Underground-Coal-Conversion program, four field tests were completed in 1979 and preparations were begun in 1980 for two additional field tests to be operated in 1981. The Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) completed Hanna IV, an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) completed Pricetown 1, an air gasification test in West Virginia bituminous coal. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) completed Hoe Creek 3, a steam-oxygen gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. Gulf Research and Development Co. completed Steeply Dipping Beds (SDB) Test 1, primarily an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal and the first SDB test in the US. In 1980, Gulf R and D Co. began preparation of SDB Test 2, scheduled for operation in the fall of 1981. The DOE project teams at LETC, METC, LLNL, and SNL, in association with the Washington Irrigation and Development Co. (WIDCo), Washington Water Power (WWP), and the State of Washington, are preparing a field test site in the Centralia-Chehalis coal district of Washington. A series of large coal block tests will be completed prior to the field test, scheduled for operation in 1982 or 1983. This field test will utilize a directionally drilled link and steam-oxygen gasification system. This paper summarizes the results of the four recently completed field tests and the plans for additional tests.

  6. Field Test Design Simulations of Pore-Water Extraction for the SX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proof of principle test of pore water extraction is being performed by Washington River Protection Solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection. This test is being conducted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1989) Milestone M 045-20, and is described in RPP-PLAN-53808, 200 West Area Tank Farms Interim Measures Investigation Work Plan. To support design of this test, numerical simulations were conducted to help define equipment and operational parameters. The modeling effort builds from information collected in laboratory studies and from field characterization information collected at the test site near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. Numerical simulations were used to evaluate pore-water extraction performance as a function of the test site properties and for the type of extraction well configuration that can be constructed using the direct-push installation technique. Output of simulations included rates of water and soil-gas production as a function of operational conditions for use in supporting field equipment design. The simulations also investigated the impact of subsurface heterogeneities in sediment properties and moisture distribution on pore-water extraction performance. Phenomena near the extraction well were also investigated because of their importance for pore-water extraction performance.

  7. Pretest Caluculations of Temperature Changes for Field Thermal Conductivity Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.S. Brodsky

    2002-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A large volume fraction of the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain may reside in the Tptpll (Tertiary, Paintbrush Group, Topopah Spring Tuff, crystal poor, lower lithophysal) lithostratigraphic unit. This unit is characterized by voids, or lithophysae, which range in size from centimeters to meters. A series of thermal conductivity field tests are planned in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. The objective of the pretest calculation described in this document is to predict changes in temperatures in the surrounding rock for these tests for a given heater power and a set of thermal transport properties. The calculation can be extended, as described in this document, to obtain thermal conductivity, thermal capacitance (density x heat capacity, J {center_dot} m{sup -3} {center_dot} K{sup -1}), and thermal diffusivity from the field data. The work has been conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Testing and Monitoring'' (BSC 2001). One of the outcomes of this analysis is to determine the initial output of the heater. This heater output must be sufficiently high that it will provide results in a reasonably short period of time (within several weeks or a month) and be sufficiently high that the heat increase is detectable by the instruments employed in the test. The test will be conducted in stages and heater output will be step increased as the test progresses. If the initial temperature is set too high, the experiment will not have as many steps and thus fewer thermal conductivity data points will result.

  8. Results of Continuous Load Cell Monitoring Field Trial for UF6 Withdrawals at an Operating Industrial Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL] [ORNL; Bell, Lisa S [ORNL] [ORNL; Conchewski, Curtis A [ORNL] [ORNL; Peters, Benjamin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL] [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL] [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) has been implemented and tested for use as a safeguards tool during a 2009 field trial in an operating UF6 transfer facility. The transfer facility is part of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio, operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. During the field trial, two process scales for UF{sub 6} cylinders were continuously monitored for a 6-month period as cylinders were being filled. The collected CLCM data were used in testing an event processor serving as a filter for highlighting measurements representing significant operational activities that are important in verifying declared operations. The collection of CLCM data, coupled with rules-based event processing, can provide inspectors with knowledge of a facility's feed and withdrawal activities occurring between site visits. Such process knowledge promises to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards by enabling inspectors to quantitatively compare declared activities directly with process measurements. Selected results of the field trial and event processing will be presented in the context of their value to an independent inspector and a facility operator.

  9. Sandia Energy - Test Site Operations & Maintenance Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocumentsInstitute ofSitingStaffSunshineMolten SaltTest

  10. Form:Testing Facility Operator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,ForkedAdd a MarineAdd a Testing

  11. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

  12. Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    Tool-Assisted Unit-Test Generation and Selection Based on Operational Abstractions Tao Xie1 of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105 Abstract. Unit testing, a common step in software development, presents a chal- lenge. When produced manually, unit test suites are often insufficient to identify defects. The main

  13. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

    2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  14. Object-oriented methodology for analyzing and allocating resources for field operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Steven Andrew

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CODE FOR CALAUTO. LSP . . . . APPENDIX L; SOURCE CODE FOR CALUSER. LSP . . . . VITA. . . . . . 157 . . . . . 183 . 187 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 3. 1 Description of field operation data supplied by the farmer for each operation. . . . 33 3. 2... Description of time and labor data supplied by the farmer bimonthly. . . . 34 3. 3 Description of instance variables associated with the class: field operations. . 43 3. 4 Description of instance variables associated with the class: time period. . 44...

  15. Preliminary investigation Area 12 fleet operations steam cleaning discharge area Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the characterization activities and findings of a former steam cleaning discharge area at the Nevada Test Site. The former steam cleaning site is located in Area 12 east of Fleet Operations Building 12-16. The characterization project was completed as a required condition of the ``Temporary Water Pollution Control Permit for the Discharge From Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Facility`` issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The project objective was to collect shallow soil samples in eight locations in the former surface discharge area. Based upon field observations, twelve locations were sampled on September 6, 1995 to better define the area of potential impact. Samples were collected from the surface to a depth of approximately 0.3 meters (one foot) below land surface. Discoloration of the surface soil was observed in the area of the discharge pipe and in localized areas in the natural drainage channel. The discoloration appeared to be consistent with the topographically low areas of the site. Hydrocarbon odors were noted in the areas of discoloration only. Samples collected were analyzed for bulk asbestos, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (Semi-VOCs), and gamma scan.

  16. Re-START: The second operational test of the String Thermionic Assembly Research Testbed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, F.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Luchau, D. [TEAM Specialty Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCarson, T.D. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second operational test of the String Thermionic Assembly Research Testbed -- Re-START -- was carried out from June 9 to June 14, 1997. This test series was designed to help qualify and validate the designs and test methods proposed for the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) power converters for use during critical evaluations of the complete ISUS bimodal system during the Engine Ground Demonstration (EGD). The test article consisted of eight ISUS prototype thermionic converter diodes electrically connected in series.

  17. A flow field enabling operating direct methanol fuel cells with highly concentrated methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    A flow field enabling operating direct methanol fuel cells with highly concentrated methanol Q. Xu Available online 8 October 2010 Keywords: Fuel cells Direct methanol fuel cells Concentrated methanol Flow field a b s t r a c t In this work, an anode flow field that allows a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC

  18. OPERATING EXPERIENCE LEVEL 3, Requalification Test Failure of Certain High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters- Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information regarding the previous requalification test failure and subsequent successful requalification, of certain high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter models manufactured by Flanders Corporation.

  19. FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC-DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC- DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER By Richard F. Topping and manufacture pre-production units for home usage tests. The purpose of the field test and the associated market been promising. The first five months of field test data have shown an average 57% decrease in energy

  20. Operation of a test bed axial-gap brushless DC rotor with a superconducting stator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, J.W.; Sohns, C.W.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Campbell, V.W.; Hickey, M.H.; Ott, G.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bailey, J.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable-speed axial-gap motor with a stator consisting of four liquid helium cooled superconducting electromagnets (two pole pairs) was built and proof tested up to 608 rpm in November 1990 as a tool for joint industry-laboratory evaluation of coils fabricated from high-temperature oxide superconductors. A second rotor was fabricated with improved material, winding configuration, and wire type, and the drive system was modified to eliminate current spiking. The modified motor was characterized to design speed, 188 rad/s (1800 rpm), to acquire a performance baseline for future comparison with that of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wire. As it becomes commercially available, HTS wire will replace the low-temperature electromagnet wire in a stator modified to control wire temperatures between 4 K and 77 K. Measurements of the superconducting electromagnetic field and locked rotor torque as functions of cryocurrent and dc current through two phases of the rotor, respectively, provided data to estimate power that could be developed by the rotor. Back emf and parasitic mechanical and electromagnetic drag torques were measured as functions of angular velocity to calculate actual rotor power developed and to quantify losses, which reduce the motor`s efficiency. A detailed measurement of motor power at design speed confirmed the developed power equation. When subsequently operated at the 33-A maximum available rotor current, the motor delivered 15.3 kW (20.5 hp) to the load. In a final test, the cryostat was operated at 2500 A, 200 A below its critical current. At rotor design current of 60 A and 2500 A stator current, the extrapolated developed power would be 44.2 kW (59.2 hp) with 94% efficiency.

  1. Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of the walls containing the nano-PCM wallboards were performed to determine their actual impact on wall-generated heating and cooling loads. The models were first validated using field data, and then used to perform annual simulations using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data. This article presents the measured performance and numerical analysis to evaluate the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced building components.

  2. W-026 integrated engineering cold run operational test report for balance of plant (BOP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Cold Run test is designed to demonstrate the functionality of systems necessary to move waste drums throughout the plant using approved procedures, and the compatibility of these systems to function as an integrated process. This test excludes all internal functions of the gloveboxes. In the interest of efficiency and support of the facility schedule, the initial revision of the test (rev 0) was limited to the following: Receipt and storage of eight overpacked drums, four LLW and four TRU; Receipt, routing, and staging of eleven empty drums to the process area where they will be used later in this test; Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 9); Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 1). The above listed operations were tested using the rev 0 test document, through Section 5.4.25. The document was later revised to include movement of all staged drums to and from the LLW and TRU process and RWM gloveboxes. This testing was performed using Sections 5.5 though 5.11 of the rev 1 test document. The primary focus of this test is to prove the functionality of automatic operations for all mechanical and control processes listed. When necessary, the test demonstrates manual mode operations as well. Though the gloveboxes are listed, only waste and empty drum movement to, from, and between the gloveboxes was tested.

  3. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

  4. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump-and-treat testing at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The test will be conducted in fulfillment of interim Milestone M-15-06E to begin pilot-scale pump-and-treat operations by August 1994. The scope of the test was determined based on the results of lab/bench-scale tests (WHC 1993a) conducted in fulfillment of Milestone M-15-06B. These milestones were established per agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and documented on Hanford Federal of Ecology Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form M-15-93-02. This test plan discusses a pilot-scale pump-and-treat test for the chromium plume associated with the D Reactor portion of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Data will be collected during the pilot test to assess the effectiveness, operating parameters, and resource needs of the ion exchange (IX) pump-and-treat system. The test will provide information to assess the ability to remove contaminants by extracting groundwater from wells and treating extracted groundwater using IX. Bench-scale tests were conducted previously in which chromium VI was identified as the primary contaminant of concern in the 100-D reactor plume. The DOWEX 21K{trademark} resin was recommended for pilot-scale testing of an IX pump-and-treat system. The bench-scale test demonstrated that the system could remove chromium VI from groundwater to concentrations less than 50 ppb. The test also identified process parameters to monitor during pilot-scale testing. Water will be re-injected into the plume using wells outside the zone of influence and upgradient of the extraction well.

  5. Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  6. Design and field test of collaborative tools in the service of an innovative organization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Beler, N.; Parfouru, S. [EdF R and D -Industrial Risk Management Dept., Human Factors Group, 1, avenue du General de Gaulle, 92 141 Clamart Cedex (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the design process of collaborative tools, based on ICT, aiming at supporting the tasks of the team that manages an outage of an energy production plant for maintenance activities. The design process follows an iterative and multidisciplinary approach, based on a collective tasks modeling of the outage management team in the light of Socio Organizational and Human (SOH) field studies, and on the state of the art of ICT. Field test of the collaborative tools designed plays a great place in this approach, allowing taking into account the operational world but involves also some risks which must be managed. To implement tools on all the production plants, we build an 'operational concept' with a level of description which authorizes the evolution of tools and allows some local adaptations. The field tests provide lessons on the ICT topics. For examples: the status of the remote access tools, the potential of use of a given information input by an actor for several individual and collective purposes, the actors perception of the tools meaning, and the requirements for supporting the implementation of change. (authors)

  7. NREL Gearbox Reliability Collaborative: Comparing In-Field Gearbox Response to Different Dynamometer Test Conditions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCava, W.; van Dam, J.; Wallen, R.; McNiff, B.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of NREL's Gearbox Reliability Collaborative comparison of dynamometer tests conducted on a 750-kW gearbox to field testing.

  8. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH THE TEST FACILITIES FOR TESLA H. Weise, DESY, Hamburg, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH THE TEST FACILITIES FOR TESLA H. Weise, DESY, Hamburg, Germany Abstract The TESLA superconducting electron-positron linear collider with an integrated X-ray laser laboratory government in matters of science. In preparation of this, the TESLA Test Facility was set up at DESY. More

  9. Radiological Considerations in the Operation of the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    1 Radiological Considerations in the Operation of the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) April 10, 1998 H. J. Moe 1. General The Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) is a facility that uses dump. This facility is about 51 m long and 3.66 m wide. Technical compo- nents and diagnostics

  10. A midloop operation benchmark test of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luedeke, Thomas Paul

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A midloop operation test was performed in 1992 at the BETHSY Integral Test Facility in Grenoble, France. The purpose of this experiment was to produce data that could be used to assess the performance of thermal hydraulic codes under the conditions...

  11. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

  12. Wilson loops, geometric operators and fermions in 3d group field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Dowdall

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Group field theories whose Feynman diagrams describe 3d gravity with a varying configuration of Wilson loop observables and 3d gravity with volume observables at each vertex are defined. The volume observables are created by the usual spin network grasping operators which require the introduction of vector fields on the group. We then use this to define group field theories that give a previously defined spin foam model for fermion fields coupled to gravity, and the simpler quenched approximation, by using tensor fields on the group. The group field theory naturally includes the sum over fermionic loops at each order of the perturbation theory.

  13. Regional Field Verification -- Operational Results from Four Small Wind Turbines in the Pacific Northwest: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.; Raker, J.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes four small wind turbines installed in the Pacific Northwest under DOE/NREL's Regional Field Verification Program between 2003 and 2004 and summarizes operational data from each site.

  14. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. Field test evaluation of conservation retrofits of low-income, single-family buildings in Wisconsin: Audit field test implementation and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCold, L.N.; Schlegel, J.A.; O'Leary, L.; Hewitt, D.C.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the field test of a retrofit audit. The field test was performed during the winter of 1985-86 in four south central Wisconsin counties. The purpose of the field test was to measure the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the audit-directed retrofit program for optimizing the program's benefit-to-cost ratio. The audit-directed retrofit program is described briefly in this report and in more detail by another report in this series (ORNL/CON-228/P3). The purpose of this report is to describe the methods and results of the field test. 3 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco, August 2007 Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco,...

  17. Results from the Operational Testing of the Eaton Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brion Bennett

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the Eaton smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from Eaton for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Eaton smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  18. Field Testing of Pre-Production Prototype Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides and overview of field testing of 18 pre-production prototype residential heat pump water heaters

  19. Recent Test Results of the High Field Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet HD2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferracin, P.; Bingham, B.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, A. R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G.; Wang, X.

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, represents a step towards the development of block-type accelerator quality magnets operating in the range of 13-15 T. The magnet design features two coil modules composed of two layers wound around a titanium-alloy pole. The layer 1 pole includes a round cutout to provide room for a bore tube with a clear aperture of 36 mm. After a first series of tests where HD2 reached a maximum bore field of 13.8 T, corresponding to an estimated peak field on the conductor of 14.5 T, the magnet was disassembled and reloaded without the bore tube and with a clear aperture increased to 43 mm. We describe in this paper the magnet training observed in two consecutive tests after the removal of the bore tube, with a comparison of the quench performance with respect to the previous tests. An analysis of the voltage signals recorded before and after training quenches is then presented and discussed, and the results of coil visual inspections reported.

  20. Execution and performance of the CRIP process during the Rocky Mountain 1 UCG field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C.B.; Hill, R.W.; Britten, J.A.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Controlled Retracting Injection Point (CRIP) process for underground coal gasification (UCG) was successfully demonstrated during the Rocky Mountain I (RM I) field test conducted in the winter of 1987-88 near Hanna, Wyoming. The basic features for the CRIP process are its ability to maintain oxidant injection low in the coal seam by utilizing a horizontal, lined injection borehole, and its ability to re-ignite the coal at a given location via a movable igniter/torch assembly, when heat losses to inert overburden begin to degrade product gas quality in the mature cavity. This assembly is positioned to burn through the stainless steel liner at desire locations, creating new injection points for oxygen and steam, thereby allowing for multiple cavities from a single injection borehole. During the field test, thermocouples in the vicinity of the reactors indicated growth of the cavity beginning low in the coal seam. Also, on each of the three occasions that the torch was used to cut the liner and initiate a new cavity, a rapid improvement in gas quality occurred. These results confirm the ability of the CRIP process to operate as planned. In this paper the details of the igniter assembly are described, operating conditions during the liner cutting maneuvers are presented and data describing the system response to the initiation of new cavities are analyzed. Finally, optimization of the igniter assembly and its use at high pressures and in alternate geometries is discussed. 9 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Extending the Standard Model Effective Field Theory with the Complete Set of Dimension-7 Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landon Lehman

    2014-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a complete list of the independent dimension-7 operators that are constructed using the Standard Model degrees of freedom and are invariant under the Standard Model gauge group. This list contains only 20 independent operators; far fewer than the 63 operators available at dimension 6. All of these dimension-7 operators contain fermions and violate lepton number, and 7 of the 20 violate baryon number as well. This result extends the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT) and allows a more detailed exploration of the structure and properties of possible deformations from the Standard Model Lagrangian.

  2. An evaluation of new asphaltene inhibitors: Laboratory study and field testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouts, M.N.; Wiersma, R.J.; Muijs, H.M.; Samuel, A.J.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three candidate asphaltene inhibitors have been laboratory tested for their effectiveness on a Canadian crude. One inhibitor, an oil-soluble polymeric dispersant developed by Shell Chemicals, showed superior behavior compared to the others: flocculation titrations with n-heptane resulted in an optimum concentration of 1,300 ppm. PVT calculations, however, indicated that the prevailing conditions downhole can be quite favorable with respect to the amount of effective inhibitor compared to the atmospheric laboratory titrations which appear to be quite severe tests. Therefore, lower initial concentrations were recommended for a field trial. The chemical could be continuously injected through a capillary string, thereby avoiding the lost oil production associated with solvent cleaning operations. It has proved to be very effective at concentrations as low as 66 ppm, resulting in both a technically and an economically successful trial.

  3. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  4. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers will respond to this form of automation for CPP. (4) Evaluate what type of DR shifting and shedding strategies can be automated. (5) Explore how automation of control strategies can increase participation rates and DR saving levels with CPP. (6) Identify optimal demand response control strategies. (7) Determine occupant and tenant response.

  5. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 6. Hanna IVA and IVB field test research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. The reports in this series include: The Hanna IV test was designed as the first underground coal gasification test using commercial well spacings of 100 and 150 feet between well pairs in a linear 3-well pattern. The test was initiated in late 1977 and completed in late 1979. This long duration was due to unfavorable geologic conditions (faulting) which could not be successfully overcome resulting in the test being split into Hanna IVA and Hanna IVB with about one year between the conduct of each. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facility description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 5 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Internet relay during the Auto-CPP tests due to their2004 tests, five of the 18 sites used an Internet relay thatCPP test. Ten sites used the Internet relay to communicate

  7. Operating experience with ABB Power Plant Laboratories multi-use combustion test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jukkola, G.; Levasseur, A.; Mylchreest, D.; Turek, D.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion Engineering, Inc.'s ABB Power Plant Laboratories (PPL) has installed a new Multi-Use Combustion Test Facility to support the product development needs for ABB Group's Power Generation Businesses. This facility provides the flexibility to perform testing under fluidized bed combustion, conventional pulverized-coal firing, and gasification firing conditions, thus addressing the requirements for several test facilities. Initial operation of the facility began in late 1997. This paper will focus on the design and application of this Multi-Use Combustion Test Facility for fluidized bed product development. In addition, this paper will present experimental facility results from initial circulating fluidized bed operation, including combustion and environmental performance, heat transfer, and combustor profiles.

  8. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  9. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan Colon Container Terminal (CCT) Panama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newhouse, Robert N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on the Operational Testing and Evaluation to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the Second Line of Defense (SLD) mission requirements. An SLD system is defined as the detection technology and associated equipment, the system operators from the host country, the standard operating procedures (SOPs), and other elements such as training and maintenance which support long-term system sustainment. To this end, the activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports System can be operated effectively in real-time by Panama Direccion General de Aduanas (DGA Panama Customs) personnel to the standards of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA).

  10. A midloop operation benchmark test of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luedeke, Thomas Paul

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of low pressure and decay heat. The specific scenario of the test involved the loss of the residual heat removal system in a midloop operation with manways vents open in the pressurizer and at the steam generator. In participation with the International...

  11. Second Line of Defense, Megaports Initiative, Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Port of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Jamie D.

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phases of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports System supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA)—located at the Export Lanes of the Port of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico—to the Government of Mexico (GOM).

  12. Rocky Mountain 1: Underground coal gasification test, Hanna, Wyoming. Volume 1. Operations. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain 1 underground coal gasification (UCG) test was conducted near Hanna, Wyoming during the period January 1986 through March 1988. The report focuses on operations phases that included site selection, facility design, facility construction, well drilling, gasification and environmental monitoring. Two technologies were evaluated as separate modules: the Extended Linked Well (ELW) and the Controlled Retracting Injection Point (CRIP) processes. The test results, along with a discussion of the key test parameters and conclusions of the gasification phase, are provided. A bibliography and schematics are included.

  13. Field Test Results from the Sandia SMART Rotor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13,Conservation BillingFieldFieldFieldFieldField

  14. Pilot plant UF/sub 6/ to UF/sub 4/ test operations report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bicha, W.J.; Fallings, M.; Gilbert, D.D.; Koch, G.E.; Levine, P.J.; McLaughlin, D.F.; Nuhfer, K.R.; Reese, J.C.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FMPC site includes a plant designed for the reduction of uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) to uranium tetrafluoride (UF/sub 4/). Limited operation of the upgraded reduction facility began in August 1984 and continued through January 19, 1986. A reaction vessel ruptured on that date causing the plant operation to be shut down. The DOE conducted a Class B investigation with the findings of the investigation board issued in preliminary form in May 1986 and as a final recommendation in July 1986. A two-phase restart of the plant was planned and implemented. Phase I included implementing safety system modifications, changing reaction vessel temperature control strategy, and operating the reduction plant under an 8-week controlled test. The results of the test period are the subject of this report. 41 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  16. An Agent-Based Test Bed for the Integrated Study of Retail and Wholesale Power System Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    An Agent-Based Test Bed for the Integrated Study of Retail and Wholesale Power System Operations D study of retail and wholesale power markets operating over transmission and distribution networks with smart-grid functionality. The test bed will seam together two existing test beds, the AMES Wholesale

  17. Upcoming Funding Opportunity to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and operating wind energy facilities in locations with sensitive bat species. As wind energy continues to grow as a renewable source of energy for communities throughout...

  18. Evaluation of PMU Dynamic Performance in Both Lab Environments and under Field Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Hauer, John F.; Martin, Kenneth E.

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—Capturing system dynamics is one important feature of phasor measurements. To ensure PMU accurately reflect system dynamic behavior, one must evaluate the dynamic performance of a PMU. PMU dynamic performance evaluation includes three aspects: PMU modeling studies, laboratory testing and field evaluation. This paper briefly reviews the general PMU model structure, and then continues on PMU dynamic performance evaluation from actual field measurements. Reasons for field evaluation include: 1) inappropriate field settings of a PMU would generate unexpected phasor measurements; and 2) many conditions can not be easily produced in a lab environment. PMU field evaluation includes aspects like time synchronization, timing inconsistency due to filtering, frequency calculation issues, parasitic oscillations/processing artifacts, etc. Actual WECC measurement examples will be presented. Dynamic PMU testing in a lab environment is explored with a special focus on PMU filtering characteristics. How the phasor quality would impact derived system dynamic characteristics is addressed in the later part of this paper.

  19. FIELD EVALUATION OF IMPROVED METHODS FOR MEASURING THE AIR LEAKAGE OF DUCT SYSTEMS UNDER NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS IN 51 HOMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul W. Francisco; Larry Palmiter; Erin Kruse; Bob Davis

    2003-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Duct leakage in forced-air distribution systems has been recognized for years as a major source of energy losses in residential buildings. Unfortunately, the distribution of leakage across homes is far from uniform, and measuring duct leakage under normal operating conditions has proven to be difficult. Recently, two new methods for estimating duct leakage at normal operating conditions have been devised. These are called the nulling test and the Delta-Q test. Small exploratory studies have been done to evaluate these tests, but previously no large-scale study on a broad variety of homes has been performed to determine the accuracy of these new methods in the field against an independent benchmark of leakage. This sort of study is important because it is difficult in a laboratory setting to replicate the range of leakage types found in real homes. This report presents the results of a study on 51 homes to evaluate these new methods relative to an independent benchmark and a method that is currently used. An evaluation of the benchmark procedure found that it worked very well for supply-side leakage measurements, but not as well on the return side. The nulling test was found to perform well, as long as wind effects were minimal. Unfortunately, the time and difficulty of setup can be prohibitive, and it is likely that this method will not be practical for general use by contractors except in homes with no return ducts. The Delta-Q test was found to have a bias resulting in overprediction of the leakage, which qualitatively confirms the results of previous laboratory, simulation, and small-scale field studies. On average the bias was only a few percent of the air handler flow, but in about 20% of the homes the bias was large. A primary flaw with the Delta-Q test is the assumption that the pressure between the ducts and the house remain constant during the test, as this assumption does not hold true. Various modifications to the Delta-Q method were evaluated as possible improvements. Only one of these modifications provided improved results. This modification requires measuring the duct pressure relative to the house at either every pressure station within the Delta-Q test or at the extremes of the house pressure range involved in the Delta-Q test. If the pressures are only measured at the extremes, then calculated pressures at the other pressure stations are obtained via interpolation. Using these pressures reduced the bias in the Delta-Q test by about one-third.

  20. Experience with operation of a large magnet system in the international fusion superconducting magnet test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fietz, W.A.; Ellis, J.F.; Haubenreich, P.N.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Stamps, R.E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting toroidal field systems, including coils and ancillaries, are being developed through international collaboration in the Large Coil Task. Focal point is a test facility in Oak Ridge where six coils will be tested in a toroidal array. Shakedown of the facility and preliminary tests of the first three coils (from Japan, Switzerland, and the US) were accomplished in 1984. Useful data were obtained on performance of the helium refrigerator and distribution system, power supplies, control and data acquisition systems and voltages, currents, strains, and acoustic emission in the coils. Performance was generally gratifying except for the helium system, where improvements are being made.

  1. Environmental assessment for device assembly facility operations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-0971), to evaluate the impacts of consolidating all nuclear explosive operations at the newly constructed Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. These operations generally include assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, testing, maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. Such operations have previously been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in older facilities located in Area 27. The DAF will provide enhanced capabilities in a state-of-the-art facility for the safe, secure, and efficient handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium). Based on the information and analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  2. Field Report: Long-Baseline Acoustic Navigation for Under-Ice AUV Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Hanumant

    . The drifting pack ice made vehicle recovery more challenging and necessitated atypical adaptations relatively unexplored on account of its location beneath the permanent drifting Arctic ice pack. OurField Report: Long-Baseline Acoustic Navigation for Under-Ice AUV Operations Michael V. Jakuba

  3. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  4. Studies of IBL wire bonds operation in a ATLAS-like magnetic field.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez Feito, D; Mandelli, B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments, most of silicon detectors use wire bonds to connect front-end chips and sensors to circuit boards for the data and service trans- missions. These wire bonds are operated in strong magnetic field environments and if time varying currents pass through them with frequencies close to their mechanical resonance frequency, strong resonant oscillations may occur. Under certain conditions, this effect can lead to fatigue stress and eventually breakage of wire bonds. During the first LHC Long Shutdown, the ATLAS Pixel Detector has been upgraded with the addition of a fourth innermost layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), which has more than 50000 wire bonds operated in the ATLAS 2 T magnetic field. The results of systematic studies of operating wire bonds under IBL-like conditions are presented. Two different solutions have been investigated to minimize the oscillation amplitude of wire bonds.

  5. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) A HISTORY OF SAFETY & OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIELSEN, D L

    2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400-megawatt (thermal) sodium-cooled, high temperature, fast neutron flux, loop-type test reactor. The facility was constructed to support development and testing of fuels, materials and equipment for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor program. FFTF began operation in 1980 and over the next 10 years demonstrated its versatility to perform experiments and missions far beyond the original intent of its designers. The reactor had several distinctive features including its size, flux, core design, extensive instrumentation, and test features that enabled it to simultaneously carry out a significant array of missions while demonstrating its features that contributed to a high level of plant safety and availability. FFTF is currently being deactivated for final closure.

  6. Smart Parking Linked to Transit: Lessons Learned from the San Francisco Bay Area Field Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Kemmerer, Charlene

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LINKED TO TRANSIT: LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE SAN FRANCISCOmonth on average. Key lessons learned include that it wouldof the field test, and lessons learned. Key Words: Smart

  7. SciTech Connect: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint Citation Details In-Document...

  8. Field Testing of a Quad Rotor Smartphone Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, M.L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With recent regulatory efforts to reduce restrictions placed on the operation of Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) in the United States, it is likely that in the next few years, these vehicles will become commonplace in the ...

  9. Demand Control Utilizing Energy Management Systems - Report of Field Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, B. D.; Heller, R. P.; Perry, L. W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Management systems and particularly demand controllers are becoming more popular as commercial and light industrial operations attempt to reduce their electrical usage and demand. Numerous techniques are used to control energy use and demand...

  10. Operating Experience and Test Results From An Ammonia-Based Dry/Wet Cooling System For Electric Power Stations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allemann, R. T.; Werry, E. V.; Fricke, H. D.; Price, R. E.; Bartz, J. A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results of testing the Advanced Concept Test Facility, a 15 MW(e) heat rejection demonstration at the Kern Power Plant of PG&E* , Bakersfield, California, are summarized. The system operates stable and essentially as expected...

  11. Field Testing LIDAR Based Feed-Forward Controls on the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, A. K.; Fleming, P. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.; Schlipf, D.; Haizmann, F.; Belen, F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems driven by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic forces. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a chaotic three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. In order to reduce cost of energy, future large multimegawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and University of Stuttgart are designing, implementing, and testing advanced feed-back and feed-forward controls in order to reduce the cost of energy for wind turbines.

  12. Quantum hypothesis testing and the operational interpretation of the quantum Renyi relative entropies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milan Mosonyi; Tomohiro Ogawa

    2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the new quantum extension of Renyi's \\alpha-relative entropies, introduced recently by Muller-Lennert, Dupuis, Szehr, Fehr and Tomamichel, J. Math. Phys. 54, 122203, (2013), and Wilde, Winter, Yang, Commun. Math. Phys. 331, (2014), have an operational interpretation in the strong converse problem of quantum hypothesis testing. Together with related results for the direct part of quantum hypothesis testing, known as the quantum Hoeffding bound, our result suggests that the operationally relevant definition of the quantum Renyi relative entropies depends on the parameter \\alpha: for \\alpha1 the right choice is the newly introduced version. As a sideresult, we show that the new Renyi \\alpha-relative entropies are asymptotically attainable by measurements for \\alpha>1, and give a new simple proof for their monotonicity under completely positive trace-preserving maps.

  13. High-energy lattice for first-beam operation of the SRF test accelerator at NML

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokop, C.; /NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, P.; /NICADD, DeKalb /Fermilab; Church, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superconducting Radio Frequency Test Accelerator, a linear electron accelerator currently in construction at Fermilab's New Muon Laboratory, will eventually reach energies of {approx} 900 MeV using four ILC-type superconducting accelerating cryomodules. The accelerator's construction is staged according to cryomodules availability. The first phase that will support first beam operation incorporates one cryomodule. In this Note, we summarize a possible design for the first-beam accelerator configuration.

  14. Testing and Operation of the WR340 Waveguide Window in the APS Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, Andrew

    2003-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac high-power switching system makes extensive use of SF6 pressurized, WR340-size waveguide, incorporating waveguide switches. A tunable, extra low return loss waveguide window has been developed to support interfacing the pressurized waveguide with the original waveguide, which is under vacuum. The tunable approach is able to consistently achieve a return loss of at least 40 dB. Test and alignment methods, performance, and initial operating experience are described.

  15. Testing and operation of the WR340 waveguide window in the APS linac.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlick, A. E.; Berg, S.; Goeppner, G. A.; Nassiri, A.; Pile, G.; Smith, T. L.

    2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac high-power switching system makes extensive use of SF6 pressurized, WR340-size waveguide, incorporating waveguide switches. A tunable, extra low return loss waveguide window has been developed to support interfacing the pressurized waveguide with the original waveguide, which is under vacuum. The tunable approach is able to consistently achieve a return loss of at least 40 dB. Test and alignment methods, performance, and initial operating experience are described.

  16. 2006/07 Field Testing of Cellulose Fiber Insulation Enhanced with Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Yarbrough, David W [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Petrie, Thomas [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Syed, Azam M [ORNL

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most recent improvements in building envelope technologies suggest that in the near future, residences will be routinely constructed to operate with very low heating and cooling loads. In that light, the application of novel building materials containing active thermal components (e.g., phase change materials [PCMs,] sub-venting, radiant barriers, and integrated hydronic systems) is like a final step in achieving relatively significant heating and cooling energy savings from technological improvements in the building envelope. It is expected that optimized building envelope designs using PCMs for energy storage can effectively bring notable savings in energy consumption and reductions in peak hour power loads. During 2006/07, a research team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a series of laboratory and field tests of several wall and roof assemblies using PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation. This report summarizes the test results from the perspective of energy performance. The ORNL team is working on both inorganic and organic PCMs; this report discusses only paraffinic PCMs. A limited economical analysis also is presented. PCMs have been tested as a thermal mass component in buildings for at least 40 years. Most of the research studies found that PCMs enhanced building energy performance. In the case of the application of organic PCMs, problems such as high initial cost and PCM leaking (surface sweating) have hampered widespread adoption. Paraffinic hydrocarbon PCMs generally performed well, with the exception that they increased the flammability of the building envelope.

  17. Beam Homogeneity Dependence on the Magnetic Filter Field at the IPP Test Facility MANITU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzen, P.; Fantz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, PO Box 1533, 85740 Garching (Germany)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The homogeneity of the extracted current density from the large RF driven negative hydrogen ion sources of the ITER neutral beam system is a critical issue for the transmission of the negative ion beam through the accelerator and the beamline components. As a first test, the beam homogeneity at the IPP long pulse test facility MANITU is measured by means of the divergence and the stripping profiles obtained with a spatially resolved Doppler-shift spectroscopy system. Since MANITU is typically operating below the optimum perveance, an increase in the divergence corresponds to a lower local extracted negative ion current density if the extraction voltage is constant. The beam H{sub {alpha}} Doppler-shift spectroscopy is a rather simple tool, as no absolute calibration - both for the wavelength and the emission - is necessary. Even no relative calibration of the different used lines of sight is necessary for divergence and stripping profiles as these quantities can be obtained by the line broadening of the Doppler-shifted peak and the ratio of the integral of the stripping peak to the integral of the Doppler-shifted peak, respectively. The paper describes the H{sub {alpha}} MANITU Doppler-shift spectroscopy system which is now operating routinely and the evaluation methods of the divergence and the stripping profiles. Beam homogeneity measurements are presented for different extraction areas and magnetic filter field configurations both for Hydrogen and Deuterium operation; the results are compared with homogeneity measurements of the source plasma. The stripping loss measurements are compared with model calculations.

  18. Operational history of Fermilab's 1500 W refrigerator used for energy saver magnet production testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianchi, A.J.; Barger, R.K.; Johnson, F.B.; McGuire, K.J.; Pinyan, K.D.; Wilson, F.W.; Cooper, W.E.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1500 W helium refrigerator system utilizes two oil-injected screw compressors staged to feed a liquid nitrogen pre-cooled cold box. Refrigeration is provided by two Sulzer TGL-22 magnetic/gas bearing turbines. The refrigerator feeds six magnet test stands via a 10,000 L dewar and subcooler equipped distribution box. The design of the controls has permitted the system to be routinely operated 24 hours/day, seven days/week with only five operators. It has operated approximately 90% of the 4-1/2 years prior to shutting down in 1984 for a period of one year to move the compressor skid. Scheduled maintenance, failures, repairs and holidays are about equal to the 10% off time. The equipment described was used to test approximately 1200 superconducting magnets for the Fermilab accelerator ring. The seven year operating experience is presented as an equipment and technique review. Compressor hours currently exceed 42,000 and turbine hours exceed 39,000 each. Failure rates, causes, preventive maintenance, monitoring practices and equipment, and modifications are examined along with notes on some of the more successful applications of technique and equipment. 4 refs.

  19. US Department of Energy DOE Nevada Operations Office, Nevada Test Site: Underground safety and health standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Underground Safety and Health Standards Working Group was formed at the direction of John D. Stewart, Director, Nevada Test Site Office in April, 1990. The objective of the Working Group was to compile a safety and health standard from the California Tunnel Safety Orders and OSHA for the underground operations at the NTS, (excluding Yucca Mountain). These standards are called the NTS U/G Safety and Health Standards. The Working Group submits these standards as a RECOMMENDATION to the Director, NTSO. Although the Working Group considers these standards to be the most integrated and comprehensive standards that could be developed for NTS Underground Operations, the intent is not to supersede or replace any relevant DOE orders. Rather the intent is to collate the multiple safety and health references contained in DOE Order 5480.4 that have applicability to NTS Underground Operations into a single safety and heath standard to be used in the underground operations at the NTS. Each portion of the standard was included only after careful consideration by the Working Group and is judged to be both effective and appropriate. The specific methods and rationale used by the Working Group are outlined as follows: The letter from DOE/HQ, dated September 28, 1990 cited OSHA and the CTSO as the safety and health codes applicable to underground operations at the NTS. These mandated codes were each originally developed to be comprehensive, i.e., all underground operations of a particular type (e.g., tunnels in the case of the CTSO) were intended to be adequately regulated by the appropriate code. However, this is not true; the Working Group found extensive and confusing overlap in the codes in numerous areas. Other subjects and activities were addressed by the various codes in cursory fashion or not at all.

  20. Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

  1. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Information Systems (EIS) and Energy Management andstudy used their existing EIS systems for the Auto-DR test.different types of EMCS and EIS systems, they were “unified”

  2. Quantum field theory in curved spacetime, the operator product expansion, and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Hollands; R. M. Wald

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To make sense of quantum field theory in an arbitrary (globally hyperbolic) curved spacetime, the theory must be formulated in a local and covariant manner in terms of locally measureable field observables. Since a generic curved spacetime does not possess symmetries or a unique notion of a vacuum state, the theory also must be formulated in a manner that does not require symmetries or a preferred notion of a ``vacuum state'' and ``particles''. We propose such a formulation of quantum field theory, wherein the operator product expansion (OPE) of the quantum fields is elevated to a fundamental status, and the quantum field theory is viewed as being defined by its OPE. Since the OPE coefficients may be better behaved than any quantities having to do with states, we suggest that it may be possible to perturbatively construct the OPE coefficients--and, thus, the quantum field theory. By contrast, ground/vacuum states--in spacetimes, such as Minkowski spacetime, where they may be defined--cannot vary analytically with the parameters of the theory. We argue that this implies that composite fields may acquire nonvanishing vacuum state expectation values due to nonperturbative effects. We speculate that this could account for the existence of a nonvanishing vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor of a quantum field occurring at a scale much smaller than the natural scales of the theory.

  3. W-026, transuranic waste restricted waste management (TRU RWM) glovebox operational test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The TRU Waste/Restricted Waste Management (LLW/PWNP) Glovebox 401 is designed to accept and process waste from the Transuranic Process Glovebox 302. Waste is transferred to the glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagless Transfer Port (DO-07401) on a transfer stand. The stand is removed with a hoist and the operator inspects the waste (with the aid of the Sampling and Treatment Director) to determine a course of action for each item. The waste is separated into compliant and non compliant. One Trip Port DO-07402A is designated as ``Compliant``and One Trip Port DO-07402B is designated as ``Non Compliant``. As the processing (inspection, bar coding, sampling and treatment) of the transferred items takes place, residue is placed in the appropriate One Trip port. The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved for sampling or storage or it`s state altered by treatment, the Operator will track an items location using a portable barcode reader and entry any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolutions (described here) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

  4. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Residential Duct Placement Field Test and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , it is not individual building components, equipment, or materials that optimize energy efficiency. Instead, energy efficiency is improved through the integrated design, construction, and operation of building systems: GARD Analytics, Inc. Roger Hedrick, Lead Author Park Ridge, Illinois Managed By: New Buildings

  5. Design and Field Testing of an Autonomous Underground Tramming System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , the repetitive "load-haul-dump" cycle is well suited to automation. In this case, a vehicle called a load underground mining vehicle. Described is the development of a fast, re- liable, and robust "autotramming in underground mining operations by robotiz- ing some of the functions of underground vehicles. For example

  6. A new high performance field reversed configuration operating regime in the C-2 device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuszewski, M.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Barnes, D.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Brown, R.; Bui, D. Q.; Clary, R.; Conroy, K. D.; Deng, B. H.; Dettrick, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Garate, E.; Glass, F. J.; Gota, H.; Guo, H.Y.; Gupta, D.; Gupta, S.; Kinley, J. S.; Knapp, K. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); and others

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Large field reversed configurations (FRCs) are produced in the C-2 device by combining dynamic formation and merging processes. The good confinement of these FRCs must be further improved to achieve sustainment with neutral beam (NB) injection and pellet fuelling. A plasma gun is installed at one end of the C-2 device to attempt electric field control of the FRC edge layer. The gun inward radial electric field counters the usual FRC spin-up and mitigates the n = 2 rotational instability without applying quadrupole magnetic fields. Better plasma centering is also obtained, presumably from line-tying to the gun electrodes. The combined effects of the plasma gun and of neutral beam injection lead to the high performance FRC operating regime, with FRC lifetimes up to 3 ms and with FRC confinement times improved by factors 2 to 4.

  7. Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers Wiel Wauben R&D Information and Observation Technology, KNMI September 17, 2007 #12;#12;Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic.....................................................................................................1 2. Wind sensors

  8. OIKOS 101: 499504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvertown, Jonathan

    OIKOS 101: 499­504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed size models. ­ Oikos 101: 499­504. ESS for the occupancy of `safe sites' or vegetation gaps. If mortality rates are high and/or frequency-independent, ESS

  9. A COMPARISON OF LABORATORY AND FIELD-TEST MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;A COMPARISON OF LABORATORY AND FIELD-TEST MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS William P a heat pump water heater (HPWH). After developing the HPWH, a field-test plan was implemented whereby 20 evaluate this effect. #12;INTRODUCTION Domestic water heaters account for approximately 2.5 EJ (2.4 x 1015

  10. Design and Application of an Electronic Logbook for Space System Integration and Test Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavelaars, Alicia T.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Dept. Aeronaut. Astronaut.; ,

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In the highly technological aerospace world paper is still widely used to document space system integration and test (I&T) operations. E-Logbook is a new technology designed to substitute the most commonly used paper logbooks in space system I&T, such as the connector mate/demate logbook, the flight hardware and flight software component installation logbook, the material mix record logbook and the electronic ground support equipment validation logbook. It also includes new logbook concepts, such as the shift logbook, which optimizes management oversight and the shift hand-over process, and the configuration logbook, which instantly reports on the global I&T state of the space system before major test events or project reviews. The design of E-Logbook focuses not only on a reliable and efficient relational database, but also on an ergonomic human-computer interactive (HCI) system that can help reduce human error and improve I&T management and oversight overall. E-Logbook has been used for the I&T operation of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). More than 41,000 records have been created for the different I&T logbooks, with no data having been corrupted or critically lost. 94% of the operators and 100% of the management exposed to E-Logbook prefer it to paper logbooks and recommend its use in the aerospace industry.

  11. I(DDQ) testing of field programmable gate arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Lan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    been focused on using the traditional stuck-at fault model. However, recently it has been shown that this model is inadequate as bridging faults play a dominant role in CMOS technology. The objective of this research is to develop an IDDQ-based test...

  12. Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Cliff

    1 Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds Hazmat Spill Center, Nevada Test Site September 19-25, 2001 Clifford K. Ho Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque-filled 55- gallon drum at the Hazmat Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site. Background and Objectives Tens

  13. NREL: Performance and Reliability R&D - Field Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NRELCost of Automotive FuelStandards forField

  14. Negative magnetic eddy diffusivities from test-field method and multiscale stability theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Andrievsky; Axel Brandenburg; Alain Noullez; Vladislav Zheligovsky

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of large-scale magnetic field in the kinematic regime in the absence of an alpha-effect is investigated by following two different approaches, namely the test-field method and multiscale stability theory relying on the homogenisation technique. We show analytically that the former, applied for the evaluation of magnetic eddy diffusivities, yields results that fully agree with the latter. Our computations of the magnetic eddy diffusivity tensor for the specific instances of the parity-invariant flow-IV of G.O. Roberts and the modified Taylor-Green flow in a suitable range of parameter values confirm the findings of previous studies, and also explain some of their apparent contradictions. The two flows have large symmetry groups; this is used to considerably simplify the eddy diffusivity tensor. Finally, a new analytic result is presented: upon expressing the eddy diffusivity tensor in terms of solutions to auxiliary problems for the adjoint operator, we derive relations between magnetic eddy diffusivity tensors that arise for opposite small-scale flows v(x) and -v(x).

  15. Negative magnetic eddy diffusivities from test-field method and multiscale stability theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrievsky, Alexander; Noullez, Alain; Zheligovsky, Vladislav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of large-scale magnetic field in the kinematic regime in the absence of an alpha-effect is investigated by following two different approaches, namely the test-field method and multiscale stability theory relying on the homogenisation technique. We show analytically that the former, applied for the evaluation of magnetic eddy diffusivities, yields results that fully agree with the latter. Our computations of the magnetic eddy diffusivity tensor for the specific instances of the parity-invariant flow-IV of G.O. Roberts and the modified Taylor-Green flow in a suitable range of parameter values confirm the findings of previous studies, and also explain some of their apparent contradictions. The two flows have large symmetry groups; this is used to considerably simplify the eddy diffusivity tensor. Finally, a new analytic result is presented: upon expressing the eddy diffusivity tensor in terms of solutions to auxiliary problems for the adjoint operator, we derive relations between magnetic eddy dif...

  16. Developing and testing an operational framework for assessing quality of life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahy, F. [Department of Geography, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: frances.fahy@nuigalway.ie; O Cinneide, M. [Department of Geography, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Difficulties with operationalising the concept of sustainable development have generated much debate, and have stimulated a good deal of research on the challenging task of assessing progress towards that goal. This paper focuses on quality of life, as one discourse in the sustainable development literature, and reports on the development and testing of an operational framework for the assessment of quality of life in an urban setting. Core principles of sustainable development are translated into a set of operational criteria for investigating quality of life. The process of formulating these criteria and the manner in which they may be linked to policy and practice are outlined. The application of the framework is demonstrated by reference to the experience of implementing it in an urban centre in Ireland.

  17. Overview of Nevada Test Site Radioactive and Mixed Waste Disposal Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.T. Carilli; S.K. Krenzien; R.G. Geisinger; S.J. Gordon; B. Quinn

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is responsible for carrying out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and low-level radioactive mixed waste (MW) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Core elements of this mission are ensuring safe and cost-effective disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the NTS related to LLW and MW. Covered topics include: the first year of direct funding for NTS waste disposal operations; zero tolerance policy for non-compliant packages; the suspension of mixed waste disposal; waste acceptance changes; DOE Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) auditing; the 92-Acre Area closure plan; new eligibility requirements for generators; and operational successes with unusual waste streams.

  18. Operation Cornerstone onsite radiological safety report for announced nuclear tests, October 1988--September 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cornerstone was the name assigned to the series of underground nuclear experiments conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. This report includes those experiments publicly announced. Remote radiation measurements were taken during and after each nuclear experiment by a telemetry system. Radiation Protection Technicians (RPT) with portable radiation detection instruments surveyed reentry routes into ground zeros (GZ) before other planned entries were made. Continuous surveillance was provided while personnel were in radiation areas and appropriate precautions were taken to protect persons from unnecessary exposure to radiation and toxic gases. Protective clothing and equipment were issued as needed. Complete radiological safety and industrial hygiene coverage were provided during drilling and mineback operations. Telemetered and portable radiation detector measurements are listed. Detection instrumentation used is described and specific operational procedures are defined.

  19. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  20. GUIDELINES FOR THE DESIGN, FABRICATION, TESTING, INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF SRF CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theilacker, J.; Carter, H.; Foley, M.; Hurh, P.; Klebaner, A.; Krempetz, K.; Nicol, T.; Olis, D.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Pfund, P.; Pushka, D.; Schmitt, R.; Wands, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) cavities containing cryogens under pressure pose a potential rupture hazard to equipment and personnel. Generally, pressure vessels fall within the scope of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code however, the use of niobium as a material for the SRF cavities is beyond the applicability of the Code. Fermilab developed a guideline to ensure sound engineering practices governing the design, fabrication, testing, installation and operation of SRF cavities. The objective of the guideline is to reduce hazards and to achieve an equivalent level of safety afforded by the ASME Code. The guideline addresses concerns specific to SRF cavities in the areas of materials, design and analysis, welding and brazing, pressure relieving requirements, pressure testing and quality control.

  1. Fabrication and testing of oxidized porous silicon field emitter strips 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madduri, Vasanta Bhanu

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fig. 1 Cross-section of Thin-film Field Emission Structure (After Spindt, et al. [7] ). Mo Silicon dioxide Silicon substrate Axis of rotation ~' Evaporant Aluminum release layer Mo SiO Si Evaporant Deposition for cone formation Etch off... release layer Fig. 2 Fabrication Procedure to Produce Mo Cones silicon substrates with 1-1, 5 pm of thermally grown oxide on them. Holes of 1. 5-2 ltm diameter are micro-machined in the oxide layer using electron beam lithography. Mo serves as an etch...

  2. FIELD INVESTIGATION AT THE FAULTLESS SITE CENTRAL NEVADA TEST

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ," POST RmDIAL8 Rev.FIELD

  3. Integrated Field Testing of Fuel Cells and Micro-Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerome R. Temchin; Stephen J. Steffel

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technical and economic evaluation of the prospects for the deployment of distributed generation on Long Beach Island, New Jersey concluded that properly sited DG would defer upgrading of the electric power grid for 10 years. This included the deployment of fuel cells or microturbines as well as reciprocating engines. The implementation phase of this project focused on the installation of a 120 kW CHP microturbine system at the Harvey Cedars Bible Conference in Harvey Cedars, NJ. A 1.1 MW generator powered by a gas-fired reciprocating engine for additional grid support was also installed at a local substation. This report contains installation and operation issues as well as the utility perspective on DG deployment.

  4. Field testing of the Advanced Worker Protection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.J.E.; Hamill, D.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    AWPS is a life support system that allows a suited worker in operate in a chemically hazardous or radiologically hot environment for up to 2 hours with minimal heat stress and minimal encumbrance from his life support equipment. It consists of 3 parts: a backpack using liquid air to supply breathing gas and cooling power; a liquid cooling garment (LCG) that circulates water chilled from vaporizing and warming the cryogen; and a Level B protective garment which accommodates the low profile of the backpack, permits greater mobility and doesn`t require tape closure. The AWPS backpack and LCG are compatible with commercially available Level A protective garments. A one-hour demonstration of a AWPS prototype was done.

  5. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to assess the applicability of interim remedial measures (IRM) for reducing human health and environmental risks within the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit. The 100-HR-3 Operable Unit is comprised of three subareas; the 100 D Area, the 100 H Area and those portions of the 600 Area between the two reactor areas. The operable unit is one of seven operable units associated with the 100 D and H Areas. Operable units 100-DR-1, 100-DR-2, 100-DR-3, 100-HR-1, 100-HR-2 and 100-IU-4 address contaminant sources while 100-HR-3 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The primary method of field investigation used during this LFI was the installation and sampling of monitoring wells. Samples were collected from the groundwater and soils, and submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the locations and levels of contaminants. All samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all round one, two and three and a minimum of 10% of round four data associated with the LFI were validated. A screening method was used to identify contaminants of potential concern (COPC). This screening method eliminated from further consideration, constituents that were below background. Constituents which are considered non-toxic to humans were eliminated from the human health evaluation. Data consistency and blank contamination were also evaluated in the screening process. These COPC were then evaluated further in the qualitative risk assessment (QRA). A human health QRA was performed using conservative (maximum equilibrated contaminant levels from the LFI) analyses.

  6. Laboratory and field-scale test methodology for reliable characterization of solidified/stabilized hazardous wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, K.E.; Holder, J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for Earth Sciences and Engineering; Mollah, M.Y.A.; Hess, T.R.; Vempati, R.K.; Cocke, D.L. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology for flow through leach testing is proposed and discussed and preliminary testing using strontium doped cement based S/S samples is presented. The complementary and necessary characterization of the S/S matrix before and after testing is discussed and placed in perspective to the total evaluation of the laboratory-field scale leach testing for predicting long term performance and S/S technology design and improvement.

  7. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 3 full-scale additive tests, conducted at IPL's Petersburg Station Unit 2. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2007.

  8. Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years.

  9. Field Tests with Corn at College Station and Beeville.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittuck, B. C.; Connell, J. H.

    1898-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . 4.13 4.69 2.87 * 4.04 2.33 5.33 1.77 2.62 4.43 R ain fa ll in inches for J u ly .................. 2.47 .45 1.36 .75 .45 1.64 1.51 .48 1.45 2.60 Rain fa ll in inches for A u gu stf .......... 1.19 .75 .09 3.99 1.85 7.01 2.81 .60 4.68 .21 * Data... inches in the drill. 2. V arie ty and D istance Test?Embracing 5 varieties, th e d istance varying between rows from 3 feet to 5 feet, and 2 1-2 feet to 3 feet in the drill. SUMMARY OF RESULTS. COLLEGE STATION. Varieties?W ith th e varie...

  10. ENERGY SMART SCHOOLS APPLIED RESEARCH, FIELD TESTING, AND TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Bishop

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This multi-state collaborative project brings together federal, state, and private sector resources in order to move the design and use of high-performance energy technologies in schools to the forefront. NASEO and its contractors continue to make progress on completion of the statement of work. The high watermark for this period is the installation and operation of the micro-turbine in the Canton School District. The school is pleased to begin the monitoring phase of the project and looks forward to a ribbon cutting this Spring. The other projects continue to move forward and NYSERDA has now begun work in earnest. We expect the NASEO/NYSERDA workshop sometime this Spring as well. By the time the next Annual Technical Progress Report is submitted, we plan to have finished all of the work. The next year should be filled with dissemination of information to interested parties on the success of the project in an effort to get others to duplicate the high performance, and energy smart schools initiatives. We expect all of the deliverables to be completed with the possible exception of the high-performance schools retrofits in California. We expect that 2 of the 3 campuses undergoing retrofits will be complete and the third will be nearly complete. All other activities are on schedule for 10/1/03 completion at this time.

  11. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glanville, P.; Rowley, P.; Schroeder, D.; Brand, L.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and in some cases return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential. PARR installed and monitored the performance of one type of ALM controller, the M2G from Greffen Systems, at multifamily sites in the city of Chicago and its suburb Cary, IL, both with existing OTR control. Results show that energy savings depend on the degree to which boilers are over-sized for their load, represented by cycling rates. Also savings vary over the heating season with cycling rates, with greater savings observed in shoulder months. Over the monitoring period, over-sized boilers at one site showed reductions in cycling and energy consumption in line with prior laboratory studies, while less over-sized boilers at another site showed muted savings.

  12. SNS Target Test Facility: Prototype Hg Operations and Remote Handling Tests P. T. Spampinato, T. W. Burgess, J. B. Chesser, V. B. Graves, and S.L. Schrock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SNS Target Test Facility: Prototype Hg Operations and Remote Handling Tests P. T. Spampinato, T. W remote handling techniques and tools for replacing target system components. During the past year and analytical data. These included a welded-tube heat exchanger, an electromagnetic flow meter, a hydraulically

  13. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  14. FIELD TESTING & OPTIMIZATION OF CO2/SAND FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond L. Mazza

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    These contract efforts involved the demonstration of a unique liquid free stimulation technology which was, at the beginning of these efforts, in 1993 unavailable in the US. The process had been developed, and patented in Canada in 1981, and held promise for stimulating liquid sensitive reservoirs in the US. The technology differs from that conventionally used in that liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), instead of water is the base fluid. The CO{sub 2} is pumped as a liquid and then vaporizes at reservoir conditions, and because no other liquids or chemicals are used, a liquid free fracture is created. The process requires a specialized closed system blender to mix the liquid CO{sub 2} with proppant under pressure. These efforts were funded to consist of up to 21 cost-shared stimulation events. Because of the vagaries of CO{sub 2} supplies, service company support and operator interest only 19 stimulation events were performed in Montana, New Mexico, and Texas. Final reports have been prepared for each of the four demonstration groups, and the specifics of those demonstrations are summarized. A summary of the demonstrations of a novel liquid-free stimulation process which was performed in four groups of ''Candidate Wells'' situated in Crockett Co., TX; San Juan Co., NM; Phillips Co., MT; and Blaine Co., MT. The stimulation process which employs CO{sub 2} as the working fluid and the production responses were compared with those from wells treated with conventional stimulation technologies, primarily N{sub 2} foam, excepting those in Blaine Co., MT where the reservoir pressure is too low to clean up spent stimulation liquids. A total of 19 liquid-free CO{sub 2}/sand stimulations were performed in 16 wells and the production improvements were generally uneconomic.

  15. Evaluation of enhanced recovery operations in Smackover fields of southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed geologic and engineering information on enhanced-recovery techniques used in unitized Smackover fields in Alabama. The report also makes recommendations on the applicability of these enhanced-recovery techniques to fields that are not now undergoing enhanced recovery. Eleven Smackover fields in Alabama have been unitized. Three fields were unitized specifically to allow the drilling of a strategically placed well to recover uncontacted oil. Two fields in Alabama are undergoing waterflood projects. Five fields are undergoing gas-injection programs to increase the ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons. Silas and Choctaw Ridge fields were unitized but no enhanced-recovery operations have been implemented.

  16. Officer competency in the Texas Standardized Field Sobriety Testing Program: a quantitative study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merkley, Rodney Joseph

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many law enforcement officers (LEOs) have successfully completed the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) Standardized Field Sobriety Testing (SFST) course to enhance their ability to detect impaired drivers. However, in recent...

  17. DOE-Sponsored Field Test Finds Potential for Permanent Storage of CO2 in Lignite Seams

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A field test sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy has demonstrated that opportunities to permanently store carbon in unmineable seams of lignite may be more widespread than previously documented.

  18. Field Test Best Practices: A Dynamic Web Tool for Practical Guidance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    b y t he A lliance f or S ustainable E nergy, L LC. Field Test Best Practices A dynamic web tool for practical guidance BA Webinar Lieko Earle & Bethany Sparn March 18, 2015...

  19. Results of a Field Test Using R-407C in Split System Heat Pumps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, A.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the results of a field test to determine implications of an R-407C replacement of R-22. A change of refrigerants precipitates other changes in materials, component selection, and processing. In addition, thermodynamic properties...

  20. Brushed permanent magnet DC MLC motor operation in an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, J.; St Aubin, J.; Rathee, S.; Fallone, B. G. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Linac-MR systems for real-time image-guided radiotherapy will utilize the multileaf collimators (MLCs) to perform conformal radiotherapy and tumor tracking. The MLCs would be exposed to the external fringe magnetic fields of the linac-MR hybrid systems. Therefore, an experimental investigation of the effect of an external magnetic field on the brushed permanent magnet DC motors used in some MLC systems was performed. Methods: The changes in motor speed and current were measured for varying external magnetic field strengths up to 2000 G generated by an EEV electromagnet. These changes in motor characteristics were measured for three orientations of the motor in the external magnetic field, mimicking changes in motor orientations due to installation and/or collimator rotations. In addition, the functionality of the associated magnetic motor encoder was tested. The tested motors are used with the Varian 120 leaf Millennium MLC (Maxon Motor half leaf and full leaf motors) and the Varian 52 leaf MKII MLC (MicroMo Electronics leaf motor) including a carriage motor (MicroMo Electronics). Results: In most cases, the magnetic encoder of the motors failed prior to any damage to the gearbox or the permanent magnet motor itself. This sets an upper limit of the external magnetic field strength on the motor function. The measured limits of the external magnetic fields were found to vary by the motor type. The leaf motor used with a Varian 52 leaf MKII MLC system tolerated up to 450{+-}10 G. The carriage motor tolerated up to 2000{+-}10 G field. The motors used with the Varian 120 leaf Millennium MLC system were found to tolerate a maximum of 600{+-}10 G. Conclusions: The current Varian MLC system motors can be used for real-time image-guided radiotherapy coupled to a linac-MR system, provided the fringe magnetic fields at their locations are below the determined tolerance levels. With the fringe magnetic fields of linac-MR systems expected to be larger than the tolerance levels determined, some form of magnetic shielding would be required.

  1. Aperture Test for Internal Target Operation in the JLAB High-current ERL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high current beam transmission test has been successfully completed at the JLAB FEL Facility, culminating in very low-loss transmission of a high current CW beam through a small aperture. The purpose of this test was to determine if an ERL is capable of meeting the stringent requirements imposed by the use of a 1018/cm3 internal gas target proposed for the DarkLight experiment*. Minimal beamline modifications were made to create a machine configuration that is substantially different from those used in routine UV or IR FEL operation. A sustained (8 hour) high power beam run was performed, with clean transmission through a 2 mm transverse aperture of 127 mm length simulating the target configuration. A beam size of 50 um (rms) was measured near the center of the aperture. Experimental data from a week-long test run consistently exhibited beam loss of only a few ppm on the aperture while running 4.5 mA current at 100 MeV -- or nearly 0.5 MW beam power. This surpassed the users? expectation and demonstrated a unique capability of an ERL for this type of experiments. This report presents a summary of the experiment, a brief overview of our activities, and outlines future plans.

  2. Application of Direct Tension Testing to Field Samples to Investigate the Effects of HMA Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, James 1973-

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    . ............................................................................................. 56 FIGURE 22 Eve vs. CA of field samples for US 277 between 2008 and 2011. .............. 58 FIGURE 23 Test setup for (a) LMLC and (b) field samples. ......................................... 65 FIGURE 24 Eve trends for artificially laboratory... the undamaged portion of the test is described in the following paragraphs, Luo et al. (2008) provide a detailed description of the calculations used for determining the damaged mixture properties (15). 8 Determination of the undamaged properties...

  3. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer Pilot Study Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot study is being conducted to support the approval of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) pre-Hanford orchard lands. Based on comments received by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology, the pilot study will evaluate the use of field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry measurements for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of past use of lead arsenate pesticide residue in the OU. The work will be performed in the field during the summer of 2014, and assist in the planning for the characterization activities in the RI/FS.

  4. Evaluation of water resources for enhanced oil recovery operations, Cement Field, Caddo and Grady Counties, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, D.A.; Harrison, W.E.; Luza, K.V.; Prater, L.; Reddy, R.J.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is based on the results of an investigation of the water resources local to the Cement Oil Field in Caddo and Grady Counties, southwestern, Oklahoma. The intent of the report is to present at least a semi-quantitative estimate of the volume, deliverability, and chemistry of the water potentially available for enhanced oil recovery in one or more Oklahoma oil fields. Subsequent to a review of several oil fields, the Cement Field was chosen for study because of its large size (25,000 acres), its extensive subsurface control (over 1850 wells), and its long history of production (since 1952) from several producing formations, some of which are already undergoing extensive waterflood operations. A preliminary review of the available data for this study suggested a threefold categorization of water resources, since the data for each category are distinctly different in nature, and, to some extent, different in source. The three categories are: surface water, ground water, and subsurface water. Flow, volume, and chemical analyses of each source are estimated.

  5. Experimental and Sampling Design for the INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the experimental and sampling design developed to assess sampling approaches and methods for detecting contamination in a building and clearing the building for use after decontamination. An Idaho National Laboratory (INL) building will be contaminated with BG (Bacillus globigii, renamed Bacillus atrophaeus), a simulant for Bacillus anthracis (BA). The contamination, sampling, decontamination, and re-sampling will occur per the experimental and sampling design. This INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test is being planned by the Validated Sampling Plan Working Group (VSPWG). The primary objectives are: 1) Evaluate judgmental and probabilistic sampling for characterization as well as probabilistic and combined (judgment and probabilistic) sampling approaches for clearance, 2) Conduct these evaluations for gradient contamination (from low or moderate down to absent or undetectable) for different initial concentrations of the contaminant, 3) Explore judgment composite sampling approaches to reduce sample numbers, 4) Collect baseline data to serve as an indication of the actual levels of contamination in the tests. A combined judgmental and random (CJR) approach uses Bayesian methodology to combine judgmental and probabilistic samples to make clearance statements of the form "X% confidence that at least Y% of an area does not contain detectable contamination” (X%/Y% clearance statements). The INL-2 experimental design has five test events, which 1) vary the floor of the INL building on which the contaminant will be released, 2) provide for varying the amount of contaminant released to obtain desired concentration gradients, and 3) investigate overt as well as covert release of contaminants. Desirable contaminant gradients would have moderate to low concentrations of contaminant in rooms near the release point, with concentrations down to zero in other rooms. Such gradients would provide a range of contamination levels to challenge the sampling, sample extraction, and analytical methods to be used in the INL-2 study. For each of the five test events, the specified floor of the INL building will be contaminated with BG using a point-release device located in the room specified in the experimental design. Then quality control (QC), reference material coupon (RMC), judgmental, and probabilistic samples will be collected according to the sampling plan for each test event. Judgmental samples will be selected based on professional judgment and prior information. Probabilistic samples were selected with a random aspect and in sufficient numbers to provide desired confidence for detecting contamination or clearing uncontaminated (or decontaminated) areas. Following sample collection for a given test event, the INL building will be decontaminated. For possibly contaminated areas, the numbers of probabilistic samples were chosen to provide 95% confidence of detecting contaminated areas of specified sizes. For rooms that may be uncontaminated following a contamination event, or for whole floors after decontamination, the numbers of judgmental and probabilistic samples were chosen using the CJR approach. The numbers of samples were chosen to support making X%/Y% clearance statements with X = 95% or 99% and Y = 96% or 97%. The experimental and sampling design also provides for making X%/Y% clearance statements using only probabilistic samples. For each test event, the numbers of characterization and clearance samples were selected within limits based on operational considerations while still maintaining high confidence for detection and clearance aspects. The sampling design for all five test events contains 2085 samples, with 1142 after contamination and 943 after decontamination. These numbers include QC, RMC, judgmental, and probabilistic samples. The experimental and sampling design specified in this report provides a good statistical foundation for achieving the objectives of the INL-2 study.

  6. Field Test Protocol: Standard Internal Load Generation in Unoccupied Test Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, X.; Christensen, D.; Barker, G.; Hancock, E.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a simple and general way to generate House Simulation Protocol (HSP)-consistent internal sensible and latent loads in unoccupied homes. It is newly updated based on recent experience, and provides instructions on how to calculate and set up the operational profiles in unoccupied homes. The document is split into two sections: how to calculate the internal load magnitude and schedule, and then what tools and methods should be used to generate those internal loads to achieve research goals.

  7. Technical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Lloyd W.

    Technical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie unmeasured because of the time required to clip plots and process samples, as well as limited access or proximity to a drying oven. We tested the digital photography biomass estimation technique for measuring

  8. Operability test procedure for the TK-900 beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissenfels, R.D.

    1995-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This operability test procedure will verify that the 221-B beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system, installed near the east end of the six inch chemical sewer header, functions as intended by design. An off-line, skid mounted, beta/gamma radiation monitor and pH monitor was installed near stairwell three in the 221-B electrical gallery by Project W-007H. The skid mounted monitoring system includes two radiation detectors and a pH meter, both with local digital displays. Output signals from each monitor are also received and displayed by the Facility Process Monitor and Control System (FPMCS). Pumps, motors, gauges, valves and transport lines complement the skid monitoring system. The system is part of BAT/AKART for the BCE liquid effluent system.

  9. Feasibility of establishing and operating a generic oil shale test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The December 19, 1985, Conference Report on House Joint Resolution 465, Further continuing appropriations for Fiscal Year 1986, included instruction to DOE to conduct a feasibility study for a generic oil shale test facility. The study was completed, as directed, and its findings are documented in this report. To determine the feasibility of establishing and operating such a facility, the following approach was used: examine the nature of the resource, and establish and basic functions associated with recovery of the resource; review the history of oil shale development to help put the present discussion in perspective; describe a typical oil shale process; define the relationship between each oil shale system component (mining, retorting, upgrading, environmental) and its cost. Analyze how research could reduce costs; and determine the scope of potential research for each oil shale system component.

  10. Field Testing of Low-Cost Bio-Based Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test wall built with phase change material (PCM)-enhanced loose-fill cavity insulation was monitored for a period of about a year in the warm-humid climate of Charleston, South Carolina. The test wall was divided into various sections, one of which contained only loose-fill insulation and served as a control for comparing and evaluating the wall sections with the PCM-enhanced insulation. This report summarizes the findings of the field test.

  11. Large-Scale Pumping Test Recommendations for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently assessing aquifer characterization needs to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies (e.g., extraction well pumping rates, pumping schedule/design) in the 200-ZP-1 operable unit (OU), and in particular for the immediate area of the 241 TX-TY Tank Farm. Specifically, CHPRC is focusing on hydrologic characterization opportunities that may be available for newly constructed and planned ZP-1 extraction wells. These new extraction wells will be used to further refine the 3-dimensional subsurface contaminant distribution within this area and will be used in concert with other existing pump-and-treat wells to remediate the existing carbon tetrachloride contaminant plume. Currently, 14 extraction wells are actively used in the Interim Record of Decision ZP-1 pump-and-treat system for the purpose of remediating the existing carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater within this general area. As many as 20 new extraction wells and 17 injection wells may be installed to support final pump-and-treat operations within the OU area. It should be noted that although the report specifically refers to the 200-ZP-1 OU, the large-scale test recommendations are also applicable to the adjacent 200-UP-1 OU area. This is because of the similar hydrogeologic conditions exhibited within these two adjoining OU locations.

  12. Semiclassical circular strings in AdS{sub 5} and 'long' gauge field strength operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, I.Y.; Tirziu, A.; Tseytlin, A.A. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider circular strings rotating with equal spins S{sub 1}=S{sub 2}=S in two orthogonal planes in AdS{sub 5} and suggest that they may be dual to long gauge-theory operators built out of self-dual components of gauge field strength. As was found in hep-th/0404187, the one-loop anomalous dimensions of the such gauge-theory operators are described by an antiferromagnetic XXX{sub 1} spin chain and scale linearly with length L>>1. We find that in the case of rigid rotating string both the classical energy E{sub 0} and the 1-loop string correction E{sub 1} depend linearly on the spin S (within the stability region of the solution). This supports the identification of the rigid rotating string with the gauge-theory operator corresponding to the maximal-spin (ferromagnetic) state of the XXX{sub 1} spin chain. The energy of more general rotating and pulsating strings also happens to scale linearly with both the spin and the oscillation number. Such solutions should be dual to other lower-spin states of the spin chain, with the antiferromagnetic ground state presumably corresponding to the string pulsating in two planes with no rotation.

  13. Using Whole-House Field Tests to Empirically Derive Moisture Buffering Model Inputs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Hancock, E.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building energy simulations can be used to predict a building's interior conditions, along with the energy use associated with keeping these conditions comfortable. These models simulate the loads on the building (e.g., internal gains, envelope heat transfer), determine the operation of the space conditioning equipment, and then calculate the building's temperature and humidity throughout the year. The indoor temperature and humidity are affected not only by the loads and the space conditioning equipment, but also by the capacitance of the building materials, which buffer changes in temperature and humidity. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for use with a more accurate moisture capacitance model (the effective moisture penetration depth model). The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative humidity profile, measure all of the moisture transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air conditioner condensate) and calculate the only unmeasured term: the moisture absorption into the materials. After validating the method with laboratory measurements, we performed the tests in a field house. A least-squares fit of an analytical solution to the measured moisture absorption curves was used to determine the three independent model parameters representing the moisture buffering potential of this house and its furnishings. Follow on tests with realistic latent and sensible loads showed good agreement with the derived parameters, especially compared to the commonly-used effective capacitance approach. These results show that the EMPD model, once the inputs are known, is an accurate moisture buffering model.

  14. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

  15. Results from the Operational Testing of the General Electric Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Barney Carlson; Don Scoffield; Brion Bennett

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the General Electric (GE) smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from GE for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the GE smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  16. Laboratory and field corrosion test results on aluminum-transition-steel systems on automobiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, G.; Baboian, R. [Texas Instruments Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States). Electrochemical and Corrosion Lab.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of steel clad aluminum transition material to join aluminum body panels and structural members to steel is demonstrated. The transition material allows joining of aluminum and steel by conventional techniques such as spot welding and eliminates galvanic corrosion at the joints. Corrosion test results for a wide range of aluminum-transition-steel systems in laboratory tests, atmospheric exposure, and field test plates are presented. The break strength of joints containing two, three, or four members was used as a measure of performance after corrosion testing. Statistical analysis of the results showed that the transition material prevented degradation of the mechanical properties of the joints.

  17. Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

  18. ORNL/Sub-01-4000031065 Field Test and Performance Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ..............................................................8 8 Projected supply air temperature delivered by IADR heat pump option when operated as a 100 with Heat Pump Capability Final Report: Phase 5 Subcontract Number 4000031065 John Fischer SEMCO, Inc. Dr............................................................................................................................v Abstract: Field Verification of IADR with Heat Pump Capability............................ vii 1

  19. FY 1993 progress report on the ANS thermal-hydraulic test loop operation and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G. [and others

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is an experimental facility constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Highly subcooled heavy-water coolant flows vertically upward at a very high mass flux of almost 27 MG/m{sup 2}-s. In a parallel fuel plate configuration as in the ANSR, the flow is subject to a potential excursive static-flow instability that can very rapidly lead to flow starvation and departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) in the ``hot channel``. The current correlations and experimental data bases for flow excursion (FE) and critical heat flux (CHF) seldom evaluate the specific combination of ANSR operating parameters. The THTL facility was designed and built to provide known thermal-hydraulic (T/H) conditions for a simulated full-length coolant subchannel of the ANS reactor core, thus facilitating experimental determination of FE and CHF thermal limits under expected ANSR T/H conditions. A series of FE tests with water flowing vertically upward was completed over a nominal heat flux range of 6 to 17 MW/m{sup 2}, a mass flux range of 8 to 28 Mg/m{sup 2}-s, an exit pressure range of 1.4 to 2.1 MPa, and an inlet temperature range of 40 to 50 C. FE experiments were also conducted using as ``soft`` a system as possible to secure a true FE phenomena (actual secondary burnout). True DNB experiments under similar conditions were also conducted. To the author`s knowledge, no other FE data have been reported in the literature to date that dover such a combination of conditions of high mass flux, high heat flux, and moderately high pressure.

  20. A Test of HTS Power Cable in a Sweeping Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Blowers, J.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Short sample HTS power cable composed of multiple 344C-2G strands and designed to energize a fast-cycling dipole magnet was exposed to a sweeping magnetic field in the (2-20) T/s ramping rate. The B-field orientation toward the HTS strands wide surface was varied from 0{sup 0} to 10{sup 0}, in steps of 1{sup 0}. The test arrangement allowed measurement of the combined hysteresis and eddy current power losses. For the validity of these measurements, the power losses of a short sample cable composed of multiple LTS wire strands were also performed to compare with the known data. The test arrangement of the power cable is described, and the test results are compared with the projections for the eddy and hysteresis power losses using the fine details of the test cable structures.

  1. A Test of HTS Power Cable in a Sweeping Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piekarz, H; Blowers, J; Shiltsev, V

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short sample HTS power cable composed of multiple 344C-2G strands and designed to energize a fast-cycling dipole magnet was exposed to a sweeping magnetic field in the (2-20) T/s rate. The B-field orientation toward the HTS strands wide surface was varied from 0 deg. to 10 deg., in steps of 1 deg.. The test arrangement allowed measurement of the combined hysteresis and eddy current power losses. For the validity of these measurements, the power losses of a short sample cable composed of multiple LTS wire strands were also performed to compare with the known data. The test arrangement of the power cable is described, and the test results are compared with the projections for the eddy and hysteresis power losses using the fine details of the test cable structures.

  2. Propagation of Test Particles and Scalar Fields on a Class of Wormhole Space-Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Taylor

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider the problem of test particles and test scalar fields propagating on the background of a class of wormhole space-times. For test particles, we solve for arbitrary causal geodesics in terms of integrals which are solved numerically. These integrals are parametrized by the radius and shape of the wormhole throat as well as the initial conditions of the geodesic trajectory. In terms of these parameters, we compute the conditions for the geodesic to traverse the wormhole, to be reflected by the wormhole's potential or to be captured on an unstable bound orbit at the wormhole's throat. These causal geodesics are visualized by embedding plots in Euclidean space in cylindrical coordinates. For test scalar fields, we compute transmission coefficients and quasi-normal modes for arbitrary coupling of the field to the background geometry in the WKB approximation. We show that there always exists an unstable mode whenever the coupling constant is greater than 1/2. This analysis is interesting since recent computations of self-interactions of a static scalar field in wormhole space-times reveal some anomalous dependence on the coupling constant, principally, the existence of an infinite discrete set of poles. We show that this pathological behavior of the self-field is an artifact of computing the interaction for values of the coupling constant that do not lie in the domain of stability.

  3. Equation of Motion of a Spinning Test Particle in Gravitational Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wu

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the coupling between the spin of a particle and gravitoelectromagnetic field, the equation of motion of a spinning test particle in gravitational field is deduced. From this equation of motion, it is found that the motion of a spinning particle deviates from the geodesic trajectory, and this deviation originates from the coupling between the spin of the particle and gravitoelectromagnetic field, which is also the origin of Lense-Thirring effects. In post-Newtonian approximations, this equation gives out the same results as those of Papapetrou equation. Effect of the deviation of geodesic trajectory is detectable.

  4. Second Line of Defense, Port of Buenos Aires and Exolgan Container Terminal Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Bryan W.

    2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Megaports project team for Argentina will conduct operational testing and evaluation (OT&E) at Exolgan Container Terminal at the Port of Dock Sud from July 16-20, 2012; and at the Port of Buenos Aires from September 3-7, 2012. SLD is installing radiation detection equipment to screen export, import, and transshipment containers at these locations. The purpose of OT&E is to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the SLD mission and to ensure the system continues to perform as expected in an operational environment with Argentina Customs effectively adjudicating alarms.

  5. Steam tracer experiment at the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Water plays an important role in in-situ coal gasification. To better understand this role, we conducted a steam tracer test during the later stages of the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test. Deuterium oxide was used as the tracer. This report describes the tracer test and the analysis of the data obtained. The analysis indicates that at Hoe Creek the injected steam interacts with a large volume of water as it passes through the underground system. We hypothesize that this water is undergoing continual reflux in the underground system, resulting in a tracer response typical of a well-stirred tank.

  6. A New Method to Determine the Thermal Properties of Soil Formations from In Situ Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.

    2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The geothermal or ground-source heat pump (GHP) has been shown to be a very efficient method of providing heating and cooling for buildings. GHPs exchange (reject or extract) heat with the earth by way of circulating water, rather than by use of circulating outdoor air, as with an air-source heat pump. The temperature of water entering a GHP is generally cooler than that of outdoor air when space cooling is required, and warmer than that of outdoor air when space heating is required. Consequently, the temperature lift across a GHP is less than the lift across an air-source heat pump. The lower temperature lift leads to greater efficiency, higher capacity at extreme outdoor air temperatures, and better indoor humidity control. These benefits are achieved, however, at the cost of installing a ground heat exchanger. In general, this cost is proportional to length of the heat exchanger, and for this reason there is an incentive to install the minimum possible length such that design criteria are met. The design of a ground heat exchanger for a GHP system requires, at a minimum, the operating characteristics of the heat pumps, estimates of annual and peak block loads for the building, and information about the properties of the heat exchanger: the size of the U-tubes, the grouting material, etc. The design also requires some knowledge of the thermal properties of the soil, namely thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and undisturbed soil temperature. In the case of a vertical borehole heat exchanger (BHEx) these properties generally vary with depth; therefore, in the design, effective or average thermal properties over the length of the borehole are usually sought. When the cost of doing so can be justified, these properties are measured in an in situ experiment: a test well is drilled to a depth on the same order as the expected depth of the heat pump heat exchangers; a U-tube heat exchanger is inserted and the borehole is grouted according to applicable state and local regulations; water is heated and pumped through the U-tube (using a field generator to power the equipment, or line voltage where available); and the inlet and outlet water temperatures are measured as a function of time. Data on inlet and outlet temperature, power input to the heater and pump, and water flow rate are collected at regular intervals--typically 1 to 15 min--for the duration of the experiment, which may be as long as 60 h. Two common methods for determining soil thermal properties from such measurements are the line source method and the cylinder source method. Both are based on long-term approximate solutions to the classical heat conduction problem of an infinitely long heat source in an infinite homogeneous medium. Although there are some differences in the way the two methods are implemented, the only difference between the two models is whether the heat source is considered to be a line or a cylinder. In both methods, power input to the water loop is assumed to be constant. The simplicity of these methods makes them attractive, but they also have some disadvantages. First of all, because the line source and cylinder source approximations are inaccurate for early time behavior, some of the initial data from the field test must be discarded. The amount of data discarded can affect the property measurement. Also, both methods assume that the heat transfer to the ground loop is constant. In practice, heat input to the loop may vary significantly over the course of a field test due to rough operation of the generator or short-term sags and swells in power line voltage. Presumably, this variation affects the accuracy of the thermal property measurement, but error analysis is rarely performed. This report presents a new method for determining thermal properties from short-term in situ tests using a parameter estimation technique. Because it is based on numerical solutions to the heat conduction equation, the new method is not affected by short-term variations in heat input. Also, since the model is accurate even for short times, there is no n

  7. Field testing of a probe to measure fouling in an industrial flue gas stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohal, M.S.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology sponsors work in the area of measuring and mitigating fouling in heat exchangers. This report describes the design and fabrication of a gas-side fouling measuring device, and its testing in an industrial environment. The report gives details of the probe fabrication, material used, controllers, other instrumentation required for various measurements, and computer system needed for recording the data. The calibration constants for measuring the heat flux with the heat fluxmeter were determined. The report also describes the field test location, the tests performed, the data collected, and the data analysis. The conclusions of the tests performed were summarized. Although fouling deposits on the probe were minimal, the tests proved that the probe is capable of measuring the fouling in a harsh industrial environment. 17 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. PLANT RESISTANCE Field and Storage Testing Bt Potatoes for Resistance to Potato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    PLANT RESISTANCE Field and Storage Testing Bt Potatoes for Resistance to Potato Tuberworm Lansing, MI 48824 J. Econ. Entomol. 97(4): 1425Đ1431 (2004) ABSTRACT Potato tuberworm, Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller), is the most serious insect pest of potatoes worldwide. The introduction of the Bacillus

  9. On the operation of X-ray polarimeters with a large field of view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muleri, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.muleri@iaps.inaf.it [INAF-IAPS, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of linear polarization is one of the hot topics of high-energy astrophysics. Gas detectors based on the photoelectric effect have paved the way for the design of sensitive instruments, and mission proposals based on them have been presented in the last few years in the energy range from about 2 keV to a few tens of keV. In addition, a number of polarimeters based on Compton scattering are approved or being discussed for launch on board balloons or space satellites at higher energies. These instruments are typically dedicated to pointed observations with narrow field of view telescopes or collimators, but there are also projects aimed at the polarimetry of bright transient sources such as soft gamma repeaters or the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts. Given the erratic appearance of such events in the sky, these polarimeters have large fields of view to catch a reasonable number of them, and as a result, photons may impinge on the detector off-axis. This dramatically changes the response of the instrument to polarization, regardless of whether photoabsorption or Compton scattering is involved. Instead of the simple cosine-squared dependence expected for polarized photons that are incident on-axis, the response is never purely cosinusoidal, and a systematic modulation also appears for unpolarized radiation. We investigate the origin of these differences and present an analytical treatment that proves that such systematic effects are actually a natural consequence of how current instruments operate. Our analysis provides the expected response of photoelectric or Compton polarimeters to photons impinging with any inclination and state of polarization.

  10. Scattered-radiation field of a small betatron in nondestructive testing under nonstationary conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bespalov, V.I.; Lunev, V.I.; Sedoi, A.G.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Shtein, M.M.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scattered-radiation fields of MIB-4 and TB-15 miniature betatrons have been determined experimentally and numerically, with a relative error in each measurement not exceeding 5 percent. An analysis of a three-dimensional topographic map of the scattered radiation field of TB-15 betatron shows that there exist regions near the betatron where the hazard to apparatus or man is a minimum for a given mode of operation. Such regions occur both in the forward (with respect to the direction of the beam) and rear hemispheres. Thus, the radiation dose to equipment and man can be substantially reduced by appropriately selecting a position near the betatron. 17 references.

  11. Operation of an ungated diamond field-emission array cathode in a L-band radiofrequency electron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Accelerator Physics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Brau, C. A.; Gabella, W. E.; Ivanov, B.; Mendenhall, M. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Choi, B. K. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Blomberg, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Panuganti, H. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Jarvis, J. [Advanced Energy Systems, Inc., Medford, New York 11763 (United States); Prieto, P.; Reid, J. [Accelerator Division, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the operation of a field-emitter-array cathode in a conventional L-band radio-frequency electron source. The cathode consisted of an array of ?10{sup 6} diamond tips on pyramids. Maximum current on the order of 15?mA was reached and the cathode did not show appreciable signs of fatigue after weeks of operation. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristics, transverse beam density, and current stability are discussed.

  12. High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Doncker, R.W.A.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other. 3 figs.

  13. High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Doncker, Rik W. A. A. (Schenectady, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other.

  14. Advanced Control Design and Field Testing for Wind Turbines at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-scale wind turbines require active control systems to operate at variable rotational speeds. As turbines become larger and more flexible, advanced control algorithms become necessary to meet multiple objectives such as speed regulation, blade load mitigation, and mode stabilization. At the same time, they must maximize energy capture. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed control design and testing capabilities to meet these growing challenges.

  15. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Field Test Best Practices, BEopt, and the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is the transcript of the Building America webinar, Field Test Best Practices, BEopt, and the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, held on March 18, 2015.

  16. Near-Field Sediment Resuspension Measurement and Modeling for Cutter Suction Dredging Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henriksen, John Christopher

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment resuspension and turbidity created during dredging operations is both an economical and environmental issue. The movement of sediment plumes created from dredging operations has been predicted with numerical modeling, however, these far...

  17. Ground Test Facility for Propulsion and Power Modes of Nuclear Engine Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, WILLIAMS

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing DOE Ground Test Facilities have not been used to support nuclear propulsion testing since the Rover/NERVA programs of the 1960's. Unlike the Rover/NERVA programs, DOE Ground Test facilities for space exploration enabling nuclear technologies can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. The optimal selection of DOE facilities and accompanying modifications for confinement and treatment of exhaust gases will permit the safe testing of NASA Nuclear Propulsion and Power devices involving variable size and source nuclear engines for NASA Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter (JIMO) and Commercial Space Exploration Missions with minimal cost, schedule and environmental impact. NASA site selection criteria and testing requirements are presented.

  18. Evolving Einstein's Field Equations with Matter: The ``Hydro without Hydro'' Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Baumgarte; Scott A. Hughes; Stuart L. Shapiro

    1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We include matter sources in Einstein's field equations and show that our recently proposed 3+1 evolution scheme can stably evolve strong-field solutions. We insert in our code known matter solutions, namely the Oppenheimer-Volkoff solution for a static star and the Oppenheimer-Snyder solution for homogeneous dust sphere collapse to a black hole, and evolve the gravitational field equations. We find that we can evolve stably static, strong-field stars for arbitrarily long times and can follow dust sphere collapse accurately well past black hole formation. These tests are useful diagnostics for fully self-consistent, stable hydrodynamical simulations in 3+1 general relativity. Moreover, they suggest a successive approximation scheme for determining gravitational waveforms from strong-field sources dominated by longitudinal fields, like binary neutron stars: approximate quasi-equilibrium models can serve as sources for the transverse field equations, which can be evolved without having to re-solve the hydrodynamical equations (``hydro without hydro'').

  19. Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartmentEnergyDemonstration DomesticEnergy Management

  20. SEISMIC RESPONSE PREDICTION OF NUPEC'S FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES WITH ADJACENT BUILDING EFFECT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.COSTANTINO,C.HOFMAYER,C.ALI,S.

    2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis computer codes for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model tests to address the dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effect on the seismic response of NPP structures built in close proximity to each other. The program provided field data to study the methodologies commonly associated with seismic analyses considering the DCI effect. As part of a collaborative program between the United States and Japan on seismic issues related to NPP applications, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored a program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform independent seismic analyses which applied common analysis procedures to predict the building response to recorded earthquake events for the test models with DCI effect. In this study, two large-scale DCI test model configurations were analyzed: (1) twin reactor buildings in close proximity and (2) adjacent reactor and turbine buildings. This paper describes the NUPEC DCI test models, the BNL analysis using the SASSI 2000 program, and comparisons between the BNL analysis results and recorded field responses. To account for large variability in the soil properties, the conventional approach of computing seismic responses with the mean, mean plus and minus one-standard deviation soil profiles is adopted in the BNL analysis and the three sets of analysis results were used in the comparisons with the test data. A discussion is also provided in the paper to address (1) the capability of the analysis methods to capture the DCI effect, and (2) the conservatism of the practice for considering soil variability in seismic response analysis for adjacent NPP structures.

  1. Field tests and new design procedure for laterally loaded drilled shafts in clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierschwale, Mark W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and develop a new design procedure for drilled shafts supporting precast panel retaining walls. FIELD LOAD TESTS The prediction of the behavior of laterally loaded shafts involves the determination of the shaft-soil interaction. One approach... 4ft to l3 ft 5 -very stiff red clay(CH) below 5ft I-O zL 128 l30 P IC WA R L I QUI 0 LIMIT CONTENT /o LI Ml T ? + 7 IO 20 30 COHESIVE SHEAR STRENGTH, Cu, 0. 6 0, 8 I 0 I. 2 I, 4 I, 6 I. 8 ~ Unconfined Compression Test + Miniature Vane...

  2. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

  3. Naturalistic Decision Making in Power Grid Operations: Implications for Dispatcher Training and Usability Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Podmore, Robin

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the present study is on improved training approaches to accelerate learning and improved methods for analyzing effectiveness of tools within a high-fidelity power grid simulated environment. A theory-based model has been developed to document and understand the mental processes that an expert power system operator uses when making critical decisions. The theoretical foundation for the method is based on the concepts of situation awareness, the methods of cognitive task analysis, and the naturalistic decision making (NDM) approach of Recognition Primed Decision Making. The method has been systematically explored and refined as part of a capability demonstration of a high-fidelity real-time power system simulator under normal and emergency conditions. To examine NDM processes, we analyzed transcripts of operator-to-operator conversations during the simulated scenario to reveal and assess NDM-based performance criteria. The results of the analysis indicate that the proposed framework can be used constructively to map or assess the Situation Awareness Level of the operators at each point in the scenario. We can also identify the mental models and mental simulations that the operators employ at different points in the scenario. This report documents the method, describes elements of the model, and provides appendices that document the simulation scenario and the associated mental models used by operators in the scenario.

  4. Evidence of Multi-Process Matrix Diffusion in a Single Fracturefrom a Field Tracer Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui-Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur; Molz, Fred J.

    2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Compared to values inferred from laboratory tests on matrix cores, many field tracer tests in fractured rock have shown enhanced matrix diffusion coefficient values (obtained using a single-process matrix-diffusion model with a homogeneous matrix diffusion coefficient). To investigate this phenomenon, a conceptual model of multi-process matrix diffusion in a single-fracture system was developed. In this model, three matrix diffusion processes of different diffusion rates were assumed to coexist: (1) diffusion into stagnant water and infilling materials within fractures, (2) diffusion into a degraded matrix zone, and (3) further diffusion into an intact matrix zone. The validity of the conceptual model was then demonstrated by analyzing a unique tracer test conducted using a long-time constant-concentration injection. The tracer-test analysis was conducted using a numerical model capable of tracking the multiple matrix-diffusion processes. The analysis showed that in the degraded zone, a diffusion process with an enhanced diffusion rate controlled the steep rising limb and decay-like falling limb in the observed breakthrough curve, whereas in the intact matrix zone, a process involving a lower diffusion rate affected the long-term middle platform of slowly increasing tracer concentration. The different matrix-diffusion-coefficient values revealed from the field tracer test are consistent with the variability of matrix diffusion coefficient measured for rock cores with different degrees of fracture coating at the same site. By comparing to the matrix diffusion coefficient calibrated using single-process matrix diffusion, we demonstrated that this multi-process matrix diffusion may contribute to the enhanced matrix-diffusion-coefficient values for single-fracture systems at the field scale.

  5. Field Tests of a NaI(Tl)-Based Vehicle Portal Monitor at Border Crossings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stromswold, David C.; Darkoch, Justin; Ely, James H.; Hansen, Randy R.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Runkle, Robert C.; Sliger, William A.; Smart, John E.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors are commonly used at international border crossings to detect illicit transport of radioactive material. Most monitors use plastic scintillators to detect gamma rays, but next-generation monitors may contain NaI(Tl). In order to directly compare the performance of the two types of detectors, a prototype NaI(Tl) monitor was tested at two international border crossings adjacent to a comparable plastic scintillator monitor. The NaI(Tl) monitor housed four large detectors, each 10.2 cm x 10.2 cm x 41 cm. The empirical data set from the two field tests contains approximately 3800 passages with known cargo loads for each vehicle For a small subset of the vehicles, high purity germanium detector spectra were also collected. During the survey period several vehicles containing commercial products with naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) passed through the monitor. Typical NORM cargo included pottery, large granite slabs, rock-based floor tiles, construction stone blocks, abrasive material, and fertilizer. Non-NORM sources encountered during the field tests included a large source of 60Co (200,000 GBq) and a shipment of uranium oxide, both items being legally transported. The information obtained during the tests provides a good empirical data set to compare the effectiveness of NaI(Tl) and plastic-scintillator portal monitors. The capability to be sensitive to illicit materials, but not alarm on NORM, is a key figure of merit for portal monitors. (PIET-43741-TM-210)

  6. Accumulation of operational history through emulation test to meet proven technology requirement for newly developed I and C technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeong Cheol, Shin; Sung Kon, Kang [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC), Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power(KHNP) P.O. Box Youseong-gu Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han Seong, Son [ENESYS Co., Ltd. 3F, Pianetta Bldg., 337-2, Jangdae-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As new advanced digital I and C technology with potential benefits of higher functionality and better cost effectiveness is available in the market, NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) operators are inclined to use the new technology for the construction of new plant and the upgrade of existing plants. However, this new technology poses risks to the NPP operators at the same time. These risks are mainly due to the poor reliability of newly developed technology. KHNP's past experiences with the new equipment shows many cases of reliability problems. And their consequences include unintended plant trips, lowered acceptance of the new digital technology by the plant I and C maintenance crew, and increased licensing burden in answering for questions from the nuclear regulatory body. Considering the fact that the risk of these failures in the nuclear plant operation is far greater than those in other industry, nuclear power plant operators want proven technology for I and C systems. This paper presents an approach for the emulation of operational history through which a newly developed technology becomes a proven technology. One of the essential elements of this approach is the feedback scheme of running the new equipment in emulated environment, gathering equipment failure, and correcting the design(and test bed). The emulation of environment includes normal and abnormal events of the new equipment such as reconfiguration of control system due to power failure, plant operation including full spectrum of credible scenarios in an NPP. Emulation of I and C equipment execution mode includes normal operation, initialization and termination, abnormal operation, hardware maintenance and maintenance of algorithm/software. Plant specific simulator is used to create complete profile of plant operational conditions that I and C equipment is to experience in the real plant. Virtual operating crew technology is developed to run the simulator scenarios without involvement of actual operators at the emulated environment. Verification and validation are performed for detecting problems of the new technology. Verification of the equipment is done in two ways, one is to evaluate the features of the equipment according to the criteria derived from good practices of well proven I and C products and the second is to evaluate the features of the equipment by I and C experts. Validations are done in two ways, one is to validate the functions and performance of the equipment and the other is to validate the robustness of the equipment by accumulation operational experience. (authors)

  7. Functional and operational requirements document : building 1012, Battery and Energy Storage Device Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johns, William H.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of information, prior studies, and analyses relevant to the development of functional and operational requirements for electrochemical testing of batteries and energy storage devices carried out by Sandia Organization 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D. Electrochemical operations for this group are scheduled to transition from Sandia Building 894 to a new Building located in Sandia TA-II referred to as Building 1012. This report also provides background on select design considerations and identifies the Safety Goals, Stakeholder Objectives, and Design Objectives required by the Sandia Design Team to develop the Performance Criteria necessary to the design of Building 1012. This document recognizes the Architecture-Engineering (A-E) Team as the primary design entity. Where safety considerations are identified, suggestions are provided to provide context for the corresponding operational requirement(s).

  8. Tested by Fire - How two recent Wildfires affected Accelerator Operations at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickermann, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a little more than a decade two large wild fires threatened Los Alamos and impacted accelerator operations at LANL. In 2000 the Cerro Grande Fire destroyed hundreds of homes, as well as structures and equipment at the DARHT facility. The DARHT accelerators were safe in a fire-proof building. In 2011 the Las Conchas Fire burned about 630 square kilometers (250 square miles) and came dangerously close to Los Alamos/LANL. LANSCE accelerator operations Lessons Learned during Las Conchas fire: (1) Develop a plan to efficiently shut down the accelerator on short notice; (2) Establish clear lines of communication in emergency situations; and (3) Plan recovery and keep squirrels out.

  9. Design and operation of a counter-rotating aspirated compressor blowdown test facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, David V. (David Vickery)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique counter-rotating aspirated compressor was tested in a blowdown facility at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at MIT. The facility expanded on experience from previous blowdown turbine and blowdown compressor experiments. ...

  10. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deforest, Thomas J.; VanDyke, Damon S.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica was written for the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phase of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports system supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) located at the Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) of the Port of Kingston, Jamaica to the Government of Jamaica (GOJ). Activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports system can be operated effectively in real time by Jamaica Customs and KCT personnel to the satisfaction of the DOE/NNSA. These activities will also determine if the Megaports system, as installed and accepted, is performing according to the Megaports Program objectives such that the system is capable of executing the mission of the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The OT&E phase of the project also provides an opportunity to consider potential improvements to the system and to take remedial action if performance deficiencies are identified during the course of evaluation. Changes to the system should be considered under an appropriate change-control process. DOE/NNSA will determine that OT&E is complete by examining whether the Megaports system is performing as intended and that the GOJ is fully capable of operating the system independently without continued onsite support from the U.S. team.

  11. Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aglan, H.

    2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test procedure which could lead to the certification of building materials and systems as flood damage resistant.

  12. Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

  13. Testing gravity to second post-Newtonian order: a field-theory approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibault Damour; Gilles Esposito-Farese

    1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, field-theory-based framework for discussing and interpreting tests of gravity, notably at the second post-Newtonian (2PN) level, is introduced. Contrary to previous frameworks which attempted at parametrizing any conceivable deviation from general relativity, we focus on the best motivated class of models, in which gravity is mediated by a tensor field together with one or several scalar fields. The 2PN approximation of these "tensor-multi-scalar" theories is obtained thanks to a diagrammatic expansion which allows us to compute the Lagrangian describing the motion of N bodies. In contrast with previous studies which had to introduce many phenomenological parameters, we find that the 2PN deviations from general relativity can be fully described by only two new 2PN parameters, epsilon and zeta, beyond the usual (Eddington) 1PN parameters beta and gamma. It follows from the basic tenets of field theory, notably the absence of negative-energy excitations, that (beta-1), epsilon and zeta (as well as any new parameter entering higher post-Newtonian orders) must tend to zero with (gamma-1). It is also found that epsilon and zeta do not enter the 2PN equations of motion of light. Therefore, light-deflection or time-delay experiments cannot probe any theoretically motivated 2PN deviation from general relativity, but they can give a clean access to (gamma-1), which is of greatest significance as it measures the basic coupling strength of matter to the scalar fields. Because of the importance of self-gravity effects in neutron stars, binary-pulsar experiments are found to constitute a unique testing ground for the 2PN structure of gravity. A simplified analysis of four binary pulsars already leads to significant constraints: |epsilon| < 7x10^-2, |zeta| < 6x10^-3.

  14. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO/sub 2/ oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO/sub 2/ pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs.

  15. Detecting internal corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines: field tests of probes and systems for real-time corrosion measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Kane, R.D. (InterCorr International); Meidinger, B. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of automated, multi-technique electrochemical corrosion-rate monitoring devices and probes for detecting corrosion in environments similar to those found in natural gas transmission pipelines. It involved measurement of real-time corrosion signals from operating pipelines. Results and interpretation were reported from four different field test locations. Standard flush-mount and custom flange probes were used in four different environments at a gas-gathering site and one environment but two different probe orientations at a natural gas site. These sites were selected to represent normal and upset conditions common in gas transmission pipelines. The environments consisted of two different levels of humidified natural gas, liquid hydrocarbon, and water from natural gas. Probe locations included the 6 and 12 o?clock positions of a natural gas pipeline carrying 2-phase gas/liquid flow. The probe data was monitored using completely remote solar powered systems that provided real-time data transmission via wireless back to a pipeline control station. Data are also presented comparing the ECR probe data to that for coupons used to determine corrosion rate and to detect the presence of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

  16. Rapid field testing of low-emittance coated glazings for product verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Brent; Kohler, Christian; Goudey, Howdy; Turler, Daniel; Arasteh, Dariush

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes prospects for developing a test device suitable for field verification of the types of low-emittance (low-e) coatings present on high-performance window products. Test devices are currently available that can simply detect the presence of low-e coatings and that can measure other important characteristics of high-performance windows, such as the thickness of glazing layers or the gap in dual glazings. However, no devices have yet been developed that can measure gas concentrations or distinguish among types of coatings. This paper presents two optical methods for verification of low-e coatings. The first method uses a portable, fiber-optic spectrometer to characterize spectral reflectances from 650 to 1,100 nm for selected surfaces within an insulated glazing unit (IGU). The second method uses an infrared-light-emitting diode and a phototransistor to evaluate the aggregate normal reflectance of an IGU at 940 nm. Both methods measure reflectance in the near (solar) infrared spectrum and are useful for distinguishing between regular and spectrally selective low-e coatings. The infrared-diode/phototransistor method appears promising for use in a low-cost, hand-held field test device.

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground coal gasification data base. [US DOE-supported field tests; data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cena, R. J.; Thorsness, C. B.

    1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has sponsored a number of field projects to determine the feasibility of converting the nation's vast coal reserves into a clean efficient energy source via underground coal gasification (UCG). Due to these tests, a significant data base of process information has developed covering a range of coal seams (flat subbituminous, deep flat bituminous and steeply dipping subbituminous) and processing techniques. A summary of all DOE-sponsored tests to data is shown. The development of UCG on a commercial scale requires involvement from both the public and private sectors. However, without detailed process information, accurate assessments of the commercial viability of UCG cannot be determined. To help overcome this problem the DOE has directed the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a UCG data base containing raw and reduced process data from all DOE-sponsored field tests. It is our intent to make the data base available upon request to interested parties, to help them assess the true potential of UCG.

  18. Development of Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines for Large Commercial Parabolic Trough Solar Fields: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.; Mehos, M.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the EPC contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of engineering code developed for this purpose, NREL has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to utilize an analytical performance model in the acceptance process. These factors bring into play the need to establish methods to measure steady state performance, potential impacts of transient processes, comparison to performance model results, and the possible requirement to test, or model, multi-day performance within the scope of the acceptance test procedure. The power block and BOP are not within the boundaries of this guideline. The current guideline is restricted to the solar thermal performance of parabolic trough systems and has been critiqued by a broad range of stakeholders in CSP development and technology.

  19. Discrete Sampling Test Plan for the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Mark D.

    2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Discrete Groundwater Sampling Project is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on behalf of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company. The project is focused on delivering groundwater samples from proscribed horizons within select groundwater wells residing in the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit (200-BP-5 OU) on the Hanford Site. This document provides the scope, schedule, methodology, and other details of the PNNL discrete sampling effort.

  20. Maintenance-free Operation of WDM Quantum Key Distribution System through a Field Fiber over 30 Days

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken-ichiro Yoshino; Takao Ochi; Mikio Fujiwara; Masahide Sasaki; Akio Tajima

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintenance-free wavelength-division-multiplexing quantum key distribution for 30 days was achieved through a 22-km field fiber. Using polarization-independent interferometers and stabilization techniques, we attained a quantum bit error rate as low as 1.70% and a key rate as high as 229.8 kbps, making the record of total secure key of 595.6 Gbits accumulated over an uninterrupted operation period.

  1. 2-D Stellar Evolution Code Including Arbitrary Magnetic Fields. I. Mathematical Techniques and Test Cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. H. Li; P. Ventura; S. Basu; S. Sofia; P. Demarque

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-precision two-dimensional stellar evolution code has been developed for studying solar variability due to structural changes produced by varying internal magnetic fields of arbitrary configurations. Specifically, we are interested in modeling the effects of a dynamo-type field on the detailed internal structure and on the global parameters of the Sun. The high precision is required both to model very small solar changes (of order of $10^{-4}$) and short time scales (or order of one year). It is accomplished by using the mass coordinate to replace the radial coordinate, by using fixed and adjustable time steps, a realistic stellar atmosphere, elements diffusion, and by adjusting the grid points. We have also built into the code the potential to subsequently include rotation and turbulence. The current code has been tested for several cases, including its ability to reproduce the 1-D results.

  2. Field tests of probes for detecting internal corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Cayard, Michael S. (Intercorr International Inc.); Kane, Russell D. (Intercorr International Inc.); Meidinger, Brian (RMOTC-DOE)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes for detecting corrosion in environments similar to those found in natural gas transmission pipelines. Results and interpretation will be reported from four different field tests. Flange and flush-mount probes were used in four different environments at a gas-gathering site and one environment but two different orientations at a natural gas plant. These sites were selected to represent normal and upset conditions in a gas transmission pipeline. The environments consisted of 2 different levels of humidified natural gas/organic/water mixtures removed from natural gas, and the environments at the 6 and 12 o'clock positions of a natural gas pipeline carrying 2-phase gas/liquid flow. Data are also presented comparing the ECR probe data to that for coupons used to determine corrosion rate and to detect the presence of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

  3. Field test of a new method for determining soil formation thermal conductivity and borehole resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Beck, J.V.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of determining soil thermal properties from in-situ tests has been developed. Based on a one-dimensional numerical heat transfer model, the method uses parameter estimation techniques to determine soil thermal conductivity and borehole resistance from field-collected data. This paper presents the results of analysis of data from three tests performed in Lincoln, Nebraska, in order to validate the method. The one-dimensional method was found to agree well with line source and cylindrical source thermal conductivity estimates derived from the same data sets. The method was also able to measure the resistance of the three borehole heat exchangers. The measured resistances lie within the expected range of resistances for the given grouting materials. A further benefit of the method is its relative insensitivity to changes in power input caused by short-term voltage fluctuations.

  4. MAGNET ENGINEERING AND TEST RESULTS OF THE HIGH FIELD MAGNET R AND D PROGRAM AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COZZOLINO,J.; ANERELLA,M.; ESCALLIER,J.; GANETIS,G.; GHOSH,A.; GUPTA,R.; HARRISON,M.; JAIN,A.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PARKER,B.; SAMPSON,W.; SOIKA,R.; WANDERER,P.

    2002-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been carrying out design, engineering, and technology development of high performance magnets for future accelerators. High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) play a major role in the BNL vision of a few high performance interaction region (IR) magnets that would be placed in a machine about ten years from now. This paper presents the engineering design of a ''react and wind'' Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet that will provide a 12 Tesla background field on HTS coils. In addition, the coil production tooling as well as the most recent 10-turn R&D coil test results will be discussed.

  5. New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; Rijk, G. de; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P. [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, Meyrin 1211, Geneva 23, CH (Switzerland); Hanzelka, P. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the ASCR, Kralovopolska 147, 612 64 Brno, CZ (Czech Republic)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the R and D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m{sup 3} helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

  6. Field testing results for the strategic petroleum reserve pipeline corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; Hinkebein, T.E.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of two studies conducted as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Pipeline Corrosion Control Program are reported. These studies focused on evaluation of rotary-applied concrete materials for internal pipeline protection against the erosive and corrosive effects of flowing brine. The study also included evaluation of liners applied by hand on pipe pieces that cannot be lined by rotary methods. Such pipe pieces include tees, elbows and flanged pipe sections. Results are reported from a corrosion survey of 17 different liner formulations tested at the-Big-Rill SPR Site. Testing consisted of electrochemical corrosion rate measurements made on lined pipe sections exposed, in a test manifold, to flowing SPR generated fluids. Testing also involved cumulative immersion exposure where samples were exposed to static site-generated brine for increasing periods of time. Samples were returned to the laboratory for various diagnostic analyses. Results of this study showed that standard calcium silicate concrete (API RP10E) and a rotary calcium aluminate concrete formulation were excellent performers. Hand-lined pipe pieces did not provide as much corrosion protection. The focus of the second part of the study was on further evaluation of the calcium silicate, calcium aluminate and hand-applied liners in actual SPR equipment and service. It was a further objective to assess the practicality of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for field corrosion monitoring of concrete lined pipe compared to the more well-known linear polarization technique. This study showed that concrete linings reduced the corrosion rate for bare steel from 10 to 15 mils per year to 1 mil per year or less. Again, the hand-applied liners did not provide as much corrosion protection as the rotary-applied liners. The EIS technique was found to be robust for field corrosion measurements. Mechanistic and kinetic corrosion rate data were reliably obtained.

  7. The probability of intersystem LOCA: impact due to leak testing and operational changes. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, M.P.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) identified the potential intersystem LOCA in a pressurized water reactor as a significant contributor to the risk resulting from core melt. Similar scenarios are also possible in boiling water reactors. This report evaluates various pressure isolation valve configurations used in reactors to determine the probability of intersystem LOCA. It is shown that periodic leak testing of these valves can substantially reduce intersystem LOCA probability. Specific analyses of the high pressure/low pressure interfaces in the Sequoyah (PWR) and Alan B. Barton (BWR) plants show that periodic leak testing of the pressure isolation check valves will reduce the intersystem LOCA probability to below 0.000001 per year.

  8. On the Definition of Gauge Field Operators in Lattice Gauge-Fixed Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Giusti; M. L. Paciello; S. Petrarca; B. Taglienti; M. Testa

    1998-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the problem of defining the gluon field on the lattice in terms of the natural link variables. Different regularized definitions are shown, through non perturbative numerical computation, to converge towards the same continuum renormalized limit.

  9. HIGH POWER TEST OF A 3.9 GHZ 5-CELL DEFLECTING-MODE CAVITY IN A CRYOGENIC OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Young-Min; Church, Michael

    2013-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A 3.9 GHz deflecting mode (S, TM110) cavity has been long used for six-dimensional phase-space beam manipulation tests [1-5] at the A0 Photo-Injector Lab (16 MeV) in Fermilab and their extended applications with vacuum cryomodules are currently planned at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) user facility (> 50 MeV). Despite the successful test results, the cavity, however, demonstrated limited RF performance during liquid nitrogen (LN2) ambient operation that was inferior to theoretical prediction. We have been performing full analysis of the designed cavity by analytic calculation and comprehensive system simulation analysis to solve complex thermodynamics and mechanical stresses. The re-assembled cryomodule is currently under the test with a 50 kW klystron at the Fermilab A0 beamline, which will benchmark the modeling analysis. The test result will be used to design vacuum cryomodules for the 3.9 GHz deflecting mode cavity that will be employed at the ASTA facility for beam diagnostics and phase-space control.

  10. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE FINAL GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION, TEST AREA NORTH, OPERABLE UNIT 1-07B, FISCAL YEAR 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FORSYTHE, HOWARD S

    2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Report presents the data and evaluates the progress of the three-component remedy implemented for remediation of groundwater contamination at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Overall, each component is achieving progress toward the goal of total plume remediation. In situ bioremediation operations in the hot spot continue to operate as planned. Progress toward the remedy objectives is being made, as evidenced by continued reduction in the amount of accessible residual source and decreases in downgradient contaminant flux, with the exception of TAN-28. The injection strategy is maintaining effective anaerobic reductive dechlorination conditions, as evidenced by complete degradation of trichloroethene and ethene production in the biologically active wells. In the medial zone, the New Pump and Treat Facility operated in standby mode. Trichloroethene concentrations in the medial zone wells are significantly lower than the historically defined concentration range of 1,000 to 20,000 ?g/L. The trichloroethene concentrations in TAN-33, TAN-36, and TAN-44 continue to be below 200 ?g/L. Monitoring in the distal zone wells outside and downgradient of the plume boundary demonstrate that some plume expansion has occurred, but less than the amount allowed in the Record of Decision Amendment. Additional data need to be collected for wells in the monitored natural attenuation part of the plume to confirm that the monitored natural attenuation part of the remedy is proceeding as predicted in the modeling.

  12. Developing an Innovative Field Expedient Fracture Toughness Testing Protocol for Concrete Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Liu, Ken C [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test (SNTT) was developed recently to determine the intrinsic fracture toughness (KIC) of structural materials. The SNTT system operates by applying pure torsion to uniform cylindrical specimens with a notch line that spirals around the specimen at a 45? pitch. KIC values are obtained with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element computer code, TOR3D-KIC. The SNTT method is uniquely suitable for testing a wide variety of materials used extensively in pressure vessel and piping structural components and weldments. Application of the method to metallic, ceramic, and graphite materials has been demonstrated. One important characteristic of SNTT is that neither a fatigue precrack or a deep notch are required for the evaluation of brittle materials, which significantly reduces the sample size requirement. In this paper we report results for a Portland cement-based mortar to demonstrate applicability of the SNTT method to cementitious materials. The estimated KIC of the tested mortar samples with compressive strength of 34.45 MPa was found to be 0.19 MPa m.

  13. U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, environmental data report for the Nevada Test Site -- 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.; Kinnison, R.R.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` establishes environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for DOE operations. These mandates require compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection regulations. During calendar year (CY) 1995 environmental protection and monitoring programs were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) managed sites in Nevada and across the United States. A detailed discussion of these environmental protection and monitoring programs, and summary data and assessments for environmental monitoring results at these sites in CY 1995 are provided in the DOE/NV, Annual Site Environmental Report--1995, (ASER) DOE/NV/11718-037. A brief description of the scope of this environmental monitoring is provided below, categorized by ``on-NTS`` and ``off-NTS`` monitoring.

  14. Line operators in theories of class $\\mathcal{S}$, quantized moduli space of flat connections, and Toda field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coman, Ioana; Teschner, Joerg

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-perturbative aspects of $\\mathcal{N}=2$ supersymmetric gauge theories of class $\\mathcal{S}$ are deeply encoded in the algebra of functions on the moduli space $\\mathcal{M}_\\text{flat}$ of flat $SL(N)$-connections on Riemann surfaces. Expectation values of Wilson and 't Hooft line operators are related to holonomies of flat connections, and expectation values of line operators in the low-energy effective theory are related to Fock-Goncharov coordinates on $\\mathcal{M}_\\text{flat}$. Via the decomposition of UV line operators into IR line operators, we determine their noncommutative algebra from the quantization of Fock-Goncharov Laurent polynomials, and find that it coincides with the skein algebra studied in the context of Chern-Simons theory. Another realization of the skein algebra is generated by Verlinde network operators in Toda field theory. Comparing the spectra of these two realizations provides non-trivial support for their equivalence. Our results can be viewed as evidence for the generalization...

  15. Characterization ReportOperational Closure Covers for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada Geotechnical Sciences

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The Area 3 RWMS is located in south-central Yucca Flat and the Area 5 RWMS is located about 15 miles south, in north-central Frenchman Flat. Though located in two separate topographically closed basins, they are similar in climate and hydrogeologic setting. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste, while the Area 3 RWMS uses subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons for the disposal of packaged and unpackaged bulk waste. Over the next several decades, most waste disposal units at both the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are anticipated to be closed. Closure of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs will proceed through three phases: operational closure, final closure, and institutional control. Many waste disposal units at the Area 5RWMS are operationally closed and final closure has been placed on one unit at the Area 3 RWMS (U-3ax/bl). Because of the similarities between the two sites (e.g., type of wastes, environmental factors, operational closure cover designs, etc.), many characterization studies and data collected at the Area 3 RWMS are relevant and applicable to the Area 5 RWMS. For this reason, data and closure strategies from the Area 3 RWMS are referred to as applicable. This document is an interim Characterization Report – Operational Closure Covers, for the Area 5 RWMS. The report briefly describes the Area 5 RWMS and the physical environment where it is located, identifies the regulatory requirements, reviews the approach and schedule for closing, summarizes the monitoring programs, summarizes characterization studies and results, and then presents conclusions and recommendations.

  16. Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria north east field in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karingithi, C.W. [Kenya Power Company Ltd., Naivasha (Kenya)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer and injection tests were performed in the Olkaria North East Field with the objective to reduce uncertainty in the engineering design and to determine the suitability of well OW-704 as a re-injection well for the waste brine from the steam field during production. An organic dye (sodium fluorescein) was injected into well OW-704 as a slug. The tracer returns were observed in well OW-M2 which is 580 m deep, 620 m from well OW-704 and well OW-716 which is 900 m from well OW-704. The other wells on discharge, OW-714, and OW-725 did not show any tracer returns. However, other chemical constituents suggested., that well OW-716 experienced a chemical breakthrough earlier than OW-M2. Tracer return velocities of 0.31 m/hr and 1.3 m/hr were observed. Results of the tracer and injection tests indicate that OW-704 may be used as a re-injection well provided a close monitoring program is put in place.

  17. Design, Development, Pre-Testing and Preparation for Full Scale Cold Testing of a System for Field Remediation of Vertical Pipe Units at the Hanford Site 618-10 Burial Grounds -12495

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliwell, Stephen [VJ Technologies Inc. 89 Carlough Road, Bohemia, New York, 11716 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford site, in the 1950's and 60's, radioactive waste materials, including Transuranic (TRU) wastes from a number of laboratories were stored in vertical pipe units (VPUs) in what are now the 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds. Although the current physical condition of the VPUs is unknown, initial R and D studies had shown that in-ground size reduction and stabilization of VPU contents was feasible. This paper describes the R and D work and testing activities to validate the concept of in-ground size reduction and stabilization of VPU contents, and the design and pre-testing of major plant items and augering systems on full size simulated VPUs. The paper also describes the full size prototype equipment which will be used in full size cold testing of simulated VPUs off the Hanford site, to prove the equipment, develop operating procedures, and train operators prior to deployment on site. Safe and effective field remediation, removal and disposal of the VPUs in the 600 area are critical to the success of the River Corridor Closure Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Safe and effective field remediation, removal and disposal of the VPUs in the 600 area are critical to the success of the River Corridor Closure Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. (authors)

  18. Combined cosmological tests of a bivalent tachyonic dark energy scalar field model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoltán Keresztes; László Á. Gergely

    2014-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently investigated tachyonic scalar field dark energy dominated universe exhibits a bivalent future: depending on initial parameters can run either into a de Sitter exponential expansion or into a traversable future soft singularity followed by a contraction phase. We also include in the model (i) a tiny amount of radiation, (ii) baryonic matter ($\\Omega _{b}h^{2}=0.022161$, where the Hubble constant is fixed as $h=0.706$) and (iii) cold dark matter (CDM). Out of a variety of six types of evolutions arising in a more subtle classification, we identify two in which in the past the scalar field effectively degenerates into a dust (its pressure drops to an insignificantly low negative value). These are the evolutions of type IIb converging to de Sitter and type III hitting the future soft singularity. We confront these background evolutions with various cosmological tests, including the supernova type Ia Union 2.1 data, baryon acoustic oscillation distance ratios, Hubble parameter-redshift relation and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) acoustic scale. We determine a subset of the evolutions of both types which at 1$\\sigma $ confidence level are consistent with all of these cosmological tests. At perturbative level we derive the CMB temperature power spectrum to find the best agreement with the Planck data for $\\Omega _{CDM}=0.22$. The fit is as good as for the $\\Lambda $CDM model at high multipoles, but the power remains slightly overestimated at low multipoles, for both types of evolutions. The rest of the CDM is effectively generated by the tachyonic field, which in this sense acts as a combined dark energy and dark matter model.

  19. Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria East Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambusso, Willis J.

    1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of a six month Injection and Tracer test done in Olkaria East Geothermal Field The Injection tests show that commencement of injection prior to onset of large drawdown in the reservoir leads to greater sustenance of well production and can reduce well cycling which is a common feature of wells in Olkaria East Field. For cases where injection is started after some drawdown has occurred in the reservoir, injection while leading to improvement of well output can also lead to increase in well cycling which is a non desirable side effect. Tracer tests reveal slow rate of fluid migration (< 5 m/hr). However estimates of the cumulative tracer returns over the period of injection is at least 31% which is large and reveals the danger of late time thermal drawdown and possible loss of production. It is shown in the discussion that the two sets of results are consistent with a reservoir where high permeability occurs along contact surfaces which act as horizontal "fractures" while the formations between the "fractures" have low permeability. This type of fracture system will lead to channeled flow of injected fluid and therefore greater thermal depletion along the fractures while formations further from the fracture would still be at higher temperature. In an attempt to try and achieve a more uniform thermal depletion in the reservoir, it is proposed that continuous injection be done for short periods (~2 years) and this be followed by recovery periods of the nearly the same length of time before resumption of injection again.

  20. DTE Energy Technologies With Detroit Edison Co. and Kinectrics Inc.: Distributed Resources Aggregation Modeling and Field Configuration Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the work of DTE Energy Technologies, Detroit Edison, and Kinectrics, under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to develop distributed resources aggregation modeling and field configuration testing.

  1. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  2. Converter-Modulator Design and Operations for the ILC L-band Test Stand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reass, William A.; /Los Alamos; Burkhart, C.; Adolphsen, Chris E.; Beukers, T.; Cassel, R.; de Lira, A.; Papas, C.; Nguyen, M.; Went, R.; /SLAC; Anderson, David E.; /Oak

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To facilitate a rapid response to the International Linear Collider (ILC) L-band development program at SLAC, a spare converter-modulator was shipped from LANL. This modulator was to be a spare for the spallation neutron source (SNS) accelerator at ORNL. The ILC application requires a 33% higher peak output power (15 MW) and output current (120 Amp). This presents significant design challenges to modify the existing hardware and yet maintain switching parameters and thermal cycling within the semiconductor component ratings. To minimize IGBT commutation and free-wheeling diode currents, a different set of optimizations, as compared to the SNS design, were used to tune the resonant switching networks. Additional complexities arose as nanocrystalline cores with different performance characteristics (as compared to SNS), were used to fabricate the resonant 'boost' transformers. This paper will describe the electrical design, modeling efforts, and resulting electrical performance as implemented for the ILC L-band test stand.

  3. Local changes of work function near rough features on Cu surfaces operated under high external electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djurabekova, Flyura, E-mail: flyura.djurabekova@helsinki.fi; Ruzibaev, Avaz; Parviainen, Stefan [Helsinki Institute of Physics and Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Holmström, Eero [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences, UCL Earth Sciences, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hakala, Mikko [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal surfaces operated under high electric fields produce sparks even if they are held in ultra high vacuum. In spite of extensive research on the topic of vacuum arcs, the mystery of vacuum arc origin still remains unresolved. The indications that the sparking rates depend on the material motivate the research on surface response to extremely high external electric fields. In this work by means of density-functional theory calculations we analyze the redistribution of electron density on (100) Cu surfaces due to self-adatoms and in presence of high electric fields from ?1?V/nm up to ?2?V/nm (?1 to ?2 GV/m, respectively). We also calculate the partial charge induced by the external field on a single adatom and a cluster of two adatoms in order to obtain reliable information on charge redistribution on surface atoms, which can serve as a benchmarking quantity for the assessment of the electric field effects on metal surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the modifications of work function around rough surface features, such as step edges and self-adatoms.

  4. Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Test 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G. E.; Barner, J. O.; Hesson, G. M.; Wilson, C. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Cunningham, M. E.; Marshall, R. K.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects on pressurized water reactor (PWR) test fuel bundles. This Experiment Operation Plan (EOP) Addendum 2, together with the referenced EOP, describes the desired operating conditions and additional hazards review associated with the four-part MT-2 experiment. The primary portions of the experiment, MT-2.2 and MT-2.3, will evaluate the following: 1) the mechanical deformation of pressurized fuel rods subjected to a slow LOCA, using reflood water for temperature control, that is designed to produce cladding temperatures in the range from 1033 to 1089K (1400 to 1500°F) for an extended time, and 2) the effects of the deformed and possibly failed cladding on the thermal-hydraulic performance of the test assembly during simulated LOCA heating and reflooding. The secondary portions of the experiment, MT-2.1 and MT-2.4, are intended to provide thermal-hydraulic calibration information during two-stage reflood conditions for 1) relatively low cladding temperatures, <839K (1050°F), on nondeformed rods, and 2) moderately high cladding temperatures, <1089K (1500°F), on deformed rods.

  5. The Conversion of CESR to Operate as the Test Accelerator, CesrTA, Part 1: Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billing, M G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cornell's electron/positron storage ring (CESR) was modified over a series of accelerator shutdowns beginning in May 2008, which substantially improves its capability for research and development for particle accelerators. CESR's energy span from 1.8 to 5.6 GeV with both electrons and positrons makes it ideal for the study of a wide spectrum of accelerator physics issues and instrumentation related to present light sources and future lepton damping rings. Additionally a number of these are also relevant for the beam physics of proton accelerators. This paper outlines the motivation, design and conversion of CESR to a test accelerator, CesrTA, enhanced to study such subjects as low emittance tuning methods, electron cloud (EC) effects, intra-beam scattering, fast ion instabilities as well as general improvements to beam instrumentation. While the initial studies of CesrTA focussed on questions related to the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring design, CesrTA is a very flexible storage ring, capabl...

  6. Requirements for Computer Based-Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Field Operators Results from a Qualitative Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although computer-based procedures (CBPs) have been investigated as a way to enhance operator performance on procedural tasks in the nuclear industry for almost thirty years, they are not currently widely deployed at United States utilities. One of the barriers to the wide scale deployment of CBPs is the lack of operational experience with CBPs that could serve as a sound basis for justifying the use of CBPs for nuclear utilities. Utilities are hesitant to adopt CBPs because of concern over potential costs of implementation, and concern over regulatory approval. Regulators require a sound technical basis for the use of any procedure at the utilities; without operating experience to support the use CBPs, it is difficult to establish such a technical basis. In an effort to begin the process of developing a technical basis for CBPs, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory are partnering with industry to explore CBPs with the objective of defining requirements for CBPs and developing an industry-wide vision and path forward for the use of CBPs. This paper describes the results from a qualitative study aimed at defining requirements for CBPs to be used by field operators and maintenance technicians.

  7. Narrowband Emission in Compton/Thomson Sources Operating in the High-Field Regime

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Terzic, Balsa; Deitrick, Kirsten E.; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kraff, Geoffrey A.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel and quite general analysis of the interaction of a high-field chirped laser pulse and a relativistic electron, in which exquisite control of the spectral brilliance of the upshifted Thomson-scattered photon is shown to be possible. Normally, when Thomson scattering occurs at high field strengths, there is ponderomotive line broadening in the scattered radiation. This effect makes the bandwidth too large for some applications, and reduces the spectral brilliance. In this paper we show that such broadening can be corrected and eliminated by suitable frequency modulation of the incident laser pulse. Further, we suggest a practical realizationmore »of this compensation idea in terms of a chirped-beam driven FEL oscillator configuration, and show that significant compensation can occur, even with the imperfect matching to be expected in these conditions.« less

  8. Narrowband Emission in Compton/Thomson Sources Operating in the High-Field Regime

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Terzic, Balsa [JLAB; Deitrick, Kirsten E. [JLAB; Hofler, Alicia S. [JLAB; Kraff, Geoffrey A. [JLAB

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel and quite general analysis of the interaction of a high-field chirped laser pulse and a relativistic electron, in which exquisite control of the spectral brilliance of the upshifted Thomson-scattered photon is shown to be possible. Normally, when Thomson scattering occurs at high field strengths, there is ponderomotive line broadening in the scattered radiation. This effect makes the bandwidth too large for some applications, and reduces the spectral brilliance. In this paper we show that such broadening can be corrected and eliminated by suitable frequency modulation of the incident laser pulse. Further, we suggest a practical realization of this compensation idea in terms of a chirped-beam driven FEL oscillator configuration, and show that significant compensation can occur, even with the imperfect matching to be expected in these conditions.

  9. Field Operations Organization | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,,of ScienceCurrentEmergencyU.S.U.S. DOEField Operations

  10. Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. A. Martinez; D. L. Finnegan; Joseph L. Thompson; K. S. Kung

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we describe the work done in FY 1998 at Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMA) funded by the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE/NV). The major part of our research effort was to measure radionuclides present in water or soil samples collected from near nuclear tests. We report our measurements for materials collected in both saturated and unsaturated horizons adjacent to nuclear test cavities or collapse chimneys and from within several cavities. Soil samples collected from above the cavities formed by the Halfbeak, Jerboa, and Bobac tests contained no radioactivity, although a test similar to Bobac in the same area had been contaminated with {sup 137}Cs. Water samples from near the Shoal test contained no measurable radionuclides, whereas those from near Faultless and Aleman had concentrations similar to previous measurements. Water from the Tybo-Benham site was similar to earlier collections at that site; this year, we added {sup 241}Am to the list of radionuclides measured at this location. Two Bennett pumps in tandem were used to extract water from the piezometer tube in the cavity of the Dalhart event. This extraction is a significant achievement in that it opens the possibility of purging similar tubes at other locations on the NTS. The Cheshire post shot hole was reconfigured and pumped from two horizons for the first time since mid-1980. We are especially interested in examining water from the level of the working point to determine the hydrologic source term in a cavity filled with groundwater for over 20 years. We devoted much time this year to examining the colloid content of NTS groundwater. After developing protocols for collecting, handling, and storing groundwater samples without altering their colloid content, we analyzed water from the Tybo-Benham and from the Cheshire sites. Whereas the colloid concentration did not vary much with depth at Tybo-Benham, there were 20 times more colloids in groundwater from the Cheshire cavity than were found a few hundred meters higher. Electron micrographs show the wide variety of colloid sizes and shapes present in NTS groundwater. Our experiences with filtration of groundwater samples illustrate the difficulties of colloid size characterization using this methodology. Our report ends with a description of our consultative and educational activities and a list of recent publications.

  11. Field drilling tests on improved geothermal unsealed roller-cone bits. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, R.R.; Jones, A.H.; Winzenried, R.W.; Maish, A.B.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and field testing of a 222 mm (8-3/4 inch) unsealed, insert type, medium hard formation, high-temperature bit are described. Increased performance was gained by substituting improved materials in critical bit components. These materials were selected on bases of their high temperature properties, machinability and heat treatment response. Program objectives required that both machining and heat treating could be accomplished with existing rock bit production equipment. Six of the experimental bits were subjected to air drilling at 240/sup 0/C (460/sup 0/F) in Franciscan graywacke at the Geysers (California). Performances compared directly to conventional bits indicate that in-gage drilling time was increased by 70%. All bits at the Geysers are subjected to reaming out-of-gage hole prior to drilling. Under these conditions the experimental bits showed a 30% increase in usable hole drilled, compared with the conventional bits. The materials selected improved roller wear by 200%, friction per wear by 150%, and lug wear by 150%. These tests indicate a potential well cost savings of 4 to 8%. Savings of 12% are considered possible with drilling procedures optimized for the experimental bits.

  12. Release model for in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas treatment system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pafford, D.J.; Tung, V.X.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual model for the vapor and aerosol transport and deposition in the in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas system (OGS) has been developed. This model can be used to predict the emissions from the OGS under normal and off-normal conditions. Results generated by the model can be used to evaluate design and/or procedural modifications, define tests, and predict results. The OGS vapor and aerosol transport and deposition is modeled using the PULSE/MOD-ISV/VER 1.0.0 developmental computer code. Input data requirements for this code include the specific geometries of the OGS components; the composition, rate, and temperature of the vapors and aerosols entering the OGS; and the OGS component surface temperatures or heat fluxes. Currently, not all of these model inputs are available. Therefore, conceptual input parameters are developed. Using this input data, preliminary calculations with the code have been performed. These calculations include a demonstration that the code predicts convergent results, a comparison of predicted results with performance data for one of the OGS components, and a preliminary sensitivity study of the complete model.

  13. The development and operational testing of an experimental reactor for gas-liquid-solid reaction systems at high temperatures and pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, Richard Kenneth

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT AND OPERATIONAL TESTING OF AN EXPERIMENTAL REACTOR FOR GAS-LIQUID-SOLID REACTION SYSTEMS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES AND PRESSURES A Thesis by RICHARD KENNETH HESS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT AND OPERATIONAL TESTING OF AN EXPERIMENTAL REACTOR FOR GAS-LIQUID-SOLID REACTION SYSTEMS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES...

  14. Smart Parking Mangement Field Test: A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) District Parking Demonstration Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan; Kemmerer, Charlene

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pollution. Although local pol- lution is negligible, they do operate on electricity generated mainly from coal-?

  15. TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. O'Brien; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

  16. Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

    2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by ľ of a mile toward the north and is located over ˝ mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and temperatures of 270 to 310 oF), intermediate (elevation 2800 to 3700 ft and temperatures 270 to 320 oF ) and deep (elevations < 1000 ft and temperatures 323 to 337 oF) components. In the south part of the field, near Phipps #2 the shallow and deep components are present. In the central part of the field, near OH-1 the shallow and intermediate components are present and presumably the deep component is also present. In the north part of the field, the intermediate and deep components are present. Most or all of the fractures in the core have dips between 45 degrees and vertical and no strong stratigraphic control on the resource has yet been demonstrated. Conceptually, the Lake City geothermal resource seems to be located along the north-south trending range front in a relatively wide zone of fractured rock. The individual fractures do not seem to be associated with any readily identifiable fault. In fact, no major hydraulically conductive faults were identified by the core drilling.

  17. Dirac point and transconductance of top-gated graphene field-effect transistors operating at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopf, T.; Vassilevski, K. V., E-mail: k.vasilevskiy@ncl.ac.uk; Escobedo-Cousin, E.; King, P. J.; Wright, N. G.; O'Neill, A. G.; Horsfall, A. B.; Goss, J. P. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Wells, G. H.; Hunt, M. R. C. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Top-gated graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) have been fabricated using bilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the Si-face of 4H-SiC substrates by thermal decomposition of silicon carbide in high vacuum. Graphene films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy, and Hall measurements to estimate graphene thickness, morphology, and charge transport properties. A 27?nm thick Al?O? gate dielectric was grown by atomic layer deposition with an e-beam evaporated Al seed layer. Electrical characterization of the GFETs has been performed at operating temperatures up to 100?°C limited by deterioration of the gate dielectric performance at higher temperatures. Devices displayed stable operation with the gate oxide dielectric strength exceeding 4.5 MV/cm at 100?°C. Significant shifting of the charge neutrality point and an increase of the peak transconductance were observed in the GFETs as the operating temperature was elevated from room temperature to 100?°C.

  18. Floquet-Liouville supermatrix approach: Time development of density-matrix operator and multiphoton resonance fluorescence spectra in intense laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tak-San; Wang, Kwanghsi; Chu, Shih-I

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Floquet-Liouville supermatrix (FLSM) approach is presented for nonperturbative treatment of the time development of the density-matrix operator of atoms and molecules exposed to intense polychromatic fields. By extending ...

  19. Field tests of a vertical-fluted-tube condenser in the prototype power plant at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, R.W.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical-fluted-tube condenser was designed, fabricated, and tested with isobutane as the shell-side working fluid in a binary prototype power plant at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site. After shakedown and contamination removal operations were completed, the four-pass water-cooled unit (with 102 outside-fluted Admiralty tubes) achieved performance predictions while operating with the plant surface evaporator on-line. A sample comparison shows that use of this enhanced condenser concept offers the potential for a reduction of about 65% from the size suggested by corresponding designs using conventional horizontal-smooth-tube concepts. Subsequent substitution of a direct-contact evaporator for the surface evaporator brought drastic reductions in system performance, the apparent consequence of high concentrations of noncondensible gases introduced by the brine/working-fluid interaction.

  20. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

  1. Solar system tests and interpretation of gauge field and Newtonian prepotential in general covariant Ho?ava-Lifshitz gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Lin; Shinji Mukohyama; Anzhong Wang

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study spherically symmetric, stationary vacuum configurations in general covariant theory (U(1) extension) of Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity with the projectability condition and an arbitrary coupling constant $\\lambda$, and obtain all the solutions in closed forms. If the gauge field $A$ and the Newtonian prepotential $\\varphi$ do not directly couple to matter fields, the theory is inconsistent with solar system tests for $\\lambda\

  2. BNL PREDICTION OF NUPECS FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES SUBJECT TO SMALL TO MODERATE MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

    2003-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis codes for NPP structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model test programs to ensure the adequacy of methodologies employed for seismic analyses of NPP structures. A collaborative program between the United States and Japan was developed to study seismic issues related to NPP applications. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its contractor, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), are participating in this program to apply common analysis procedures to predict both free field and soil-structure interaction (SSI) responses to recorded earthquake events, including embedment and dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effects. This paper describes the BNL effort to predict seismic responses of the large-scale realistic model structures for reactor and turbine buildings at the NUPEC test facility in northern Japan. The NUPEC test program has collected a large amount of recorded earthquake response data (both free-field and in-structure) from these test model structures. The BNL free-field analyses were performed with the CARES program while the SSI analyses were preformed using the SASS12000 computer code. The BNL analysis includes both embedded and excavated conditions, as well as the DCI effect, The BNL analysis results and their comparisons to the NUPEC recorded responses are presented in the paper.

  3. BNL PREDICTION OF NUPECS FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES SUBJECT TO SMALL TO MODERATE MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

    2003-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis codes for NPP structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model test programs to ensure the adequacy of methodologies employed for seismic analyses of NPP structures. A collaborative program between the United States and Japan was developed to study seismic issues related to NPP applications. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its contractor, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), are participating in this program to apply common analysis procedures to predict both free field and soil-structure Interaction (SSI) responses to recorded earthquake events, including embedment and dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effects. This paper describes the BNL effort to predict seismic responses of the large-scale realistic model structures for reactor and turbine buildings at the NUPEC test facility in northern Japan. The NUPEC test program has collected a large amount of recorded earthquake response data (both free-field and in-structure) from these test model structures. The BNL free-field analyses were performed with the CARES program while the SSI analyses were preformed using the SASS12000 computer code. The BNL analysis includes both embedded and excavated conditions, as well as the DCI effect, The BNL analysis results and their comparisons to the NUPEC recorded responses are presented in the paper.

  4. Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

  5. Development of a Simple Field Test for Vehicle Exhaust to Detect Illicit Use of Dyed Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

    2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of tax-free dyed fuel on public highways in the United States provides a convenient way of evading taxes. Current enforcement involves visual inspection for the red azo dye added to the fuel to designate its tax-free status. This approach has shortcomings such as the invasive nature of the tests and/or various deceptive tactics applied by tax evaders. A test designed to detect dyed fuel use by analyzing the exhaust would circumvent these shortcomings. This paper describes the development of a simple color spot test designed to detect the use of tax-free (dyed) diesel fuel by analyzing the engine exhaust. Development first investigated the combustion products of C.I. Solvent Red 164 (the azo dye formulation used in the United States to tag tax-free fuel). A variety of aryl amines were identified as characteristic molecular remnants that appear to survive combustion. A number of microanalytical color tests specific for aryl amines were then investigated. One test based on the use of 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde seemed particularly applicable and was used in a proof-of-principle experiment. The 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde color spot test was able to clearly distinguish between engines burning regular and dyed diesel fuel. Further development will refine this color spot test to provide an easy-to-use field test for Internal Revenue Service Field Compliance specialists.

  6. Possibilities for Measurement and Compensation of Stray DC Electric Fields Acting on Drag-Free Test Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Weber; L. Carbone; A. Cavalleri; R. Dolesi; C. D. Hoyle; M. Hueller; S. Vitale

    2003-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    DC electric fields can combine with test mass charging and thermal dielectric voltage noise to create significant force noise acting on the drag-free test masses in the LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) gravitational wave mission. This paper proposes a simple technique to measure and compensate average stray DC potentials at the mV level, yielding substantial reduction in this source of force noise. We discuss the attainable resolution for both flight and ground based experiments.

  7. C-H surface diamond field effect transistors for high temperature (400?°C) and high voltage (500?V) operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawarada, H., E-mail: kawarada@waseda.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Institute of Nano-Science and Nano-Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Material Science and Technology, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Tsuboi, H.; Naruo, T.; Yamada, T.; Xu, D.; Daicho, A.; Saito, T. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Hiraiwa, A. [Institute of Nano-Science and Nano-Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    By forming a highly stable Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide on a C-H bonded channel of diamond, high-temperature, and high-voltage metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) has been realized. From room temperature to 400?°C (673?K), the variation of maximum drain-current is within 30% at a given gate bias. The maximum breakdown voltage (V{sub B}) of the MOSFET without a field plate is 600?V at a gate-drain distance (L{sub GD}) of 7 ?m. We fabricated some MOSFETs for which V{sub B}/L{sub GD}?>?100?V/?m. These values are comparable to those of lateral SiC or GaN FETs. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was deposited on the C-H surface by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 450?°C using H{sub 2}O as an oxidant. The ALD at relatively high temperature results in stable p-type conduction and FET operation at 400?°C in vacuum. The drain current density and transconductance normalized by the gate width are almost constant from room temperature to 400?°C in vacuum and are about 10 times higher than those of boron-doped diamond FETs.

  8. A procedure for testing across-condition rhythmic spike-field association change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepage, Kyle Q.

    Many experiments in neuroscience have compared the strength of association between neural spike trains and rhythms present in local field potential (LFP) recordings. The measure employed in these comparisons, “spike-field ...

  9. Coupled optical/thermal/fluid analysis and design requirements for operation and testing of a supercritical CO2 solar receiver.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khivsara, Sagar [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalor (India)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have evaluated closed-loop supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) Brayton cycles to be a higher energy-density system in comparison to conventional superheated steam Rankine systems. At turbine inlet conditions of 923K and 25 MPa, high thermal efficiency (~50%) can be achieved. Achieving these high efficiencies will make concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies a competitive alternative to current power generation methods. To incorporate a s-CO2 Brayton power cycle in a solar power tower system, the development of a solar receiver capable of providing an outlet temperature of 923 K (at 25 MPa) is necessary. To satisfy the temperature requirements of a s-CO2 Brayton cycle with recuperation and recompression, it is required to heat s-CO2 by a temperature of ~200 K as it passes through the solar receiver. Our objective was to develop an optical-thermal-fluid model to design and evaluate a tubular receiver that will receive a heat input ~1 MWth from a heliostat field. We also undertook the documentation of design requirements for the development, testing and safe operation of a direct s-CO2 solar receiver. The main purpose of this document is to serve as a reference and guideline for design and testing requirements, as well as to address the technical challenges and provide initial parameters for the computational models that will be employed for the development of s-CO2 receivers.

  10. Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank and field experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    et al., 1992]. Thermal monitoring downgradient or in the vicinity of an artificial heat source has (TRTs) are a common field method in shallow geothermics to estimate thermal properties of the ground. During the test, a constantly heated fluid is circulated in closed tubes within a vertical borehole heat

  11. 2 15.10.2013 Enrico Fraccari, Emerson Climate Technologies GmbH Analysis of Field Test data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    kW Ambient Temperature ºC Load [kW] Heat pump Bin [hrs] Monovalent Application ­ 15kW @ -10ºC ZH of an Air-to-Water Heat Pump equipped with a Variable Speed Scroll Compressor Enrico Fraccari & Eric WinandyH Content Unit Technology Field test Locations Types Analysis SCOP calculation method (EN14825) Results

  12. Design, construction, and operation of a life-cycle test system for the evaluation of flue gas cleanup processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H.W.; Yeh, James T.; Hoffman, J.S. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Longton, E.J.; Vore, P.A.; Resnik, K.P.; Gromicko, F.N. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Library, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has designed, constructed, and operated a Life-Cycle Test Systems (LCTS) that will be used primarily for the investigation of dry, regenerable sorbent flue gas cleanup processes. Sorbent continuously cycles from an absorber reactor where the pollutants are removed from the flue gas, to a regenerator reactor where the activity of the spent sorbent is restored and a usable by-product stream of gas is produced. The LCTS will initially be used to evaluate the Moving-Bed Copper Oxide Process by determining the effects of various process parameters on SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removals. The purpose of this paper is to document the design rationale and details, the reactor/component/instrument installation, and the initial performance of the system. Although the Moving-Bed Copper Oxide Process will be investigated initially, the design of the LCTS evolved to make the system a multipurpose, versatile research facility. Thus, the unit can be used to investigate various other processes for pollution abatement of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulates, air toxics, and/or other pollutants.

  13. Field Test and Evaluation Report Five Photovoltaic Power Systems for the City of Tucson

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Members of the DOE solar energy Tiger Team tested five municipally owned, grid connected photovoltaic (PV) power systems for the City of Tucson on March 26 and 27, 2008. The five PV systems tested were Southeast Service Center, Clements Fitness Center, and Thonydale water treatment plant systems 1, 2, and 3. During all tests, skies were virtually cloudless with only occasional, high cirrus present, and none during array testing.

  14. Outdoor Burning Field Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , or Warmth 4 Fires for Disposal or Land Clearing 5 Prescribed Burns 8 Pipeline Breaks and Oil Spills 8 Other, the regulated community, and responsible state and local officials. This document covers all aspects nuisance condi- tions through the sensible regulation of outdoor burning. Summary of the Rule The Outdoor

  15. The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

  16. In situ vitrification application to buried waste: Final report of intermediate field tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callow, R.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Loehr, C.A.; Bates, S.O. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Thompson, L.E.; McGrail, B.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes two in situ vitrification field tests conducted on simulated buried waste pits during June and July 1990 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification, an emerging technology for in place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form, is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to access the general suitability of the process to remediate waste structures representative of buried waste found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests, as part of a treatability study, were designed to provide essential information on the field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology successfully processed the high metal content waste. Test results indicate the process is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 33 refs., 109 figs., 39 tabs.

  17. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, L. O.

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

  18. Underground coal gasification: Development of theory, laboratory experimentation, interpretation, and correlation with the Hanna field tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunn, R.D.; Krantz, W.B.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report is a description of a 7 year effort to develop a theoretical understanding of the underground coal gasification process. The approach used is one of the mathematical model development from known chemical and principles, simplification of the models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models with laboratory experiments and field test data. Chapter I contains only introductory material. Chapter II describes the development of two models for reverse combustion: a combustion model and a linearized model for combustion front instability. Both models are required for realistic field predictions. Chapter III contains a discussion of a successful forward gasification model. Chapter IV discusses the spalling-enhanced-drying model is applicable to prediction of cavity growth and subsidence. Chapter VI decribes the correct use of energy and material balances for the analysis of UCG field test data. Chapter VII shows how laboratory experiments were used to validate the models for reverse combustion and forward gasification. It is also shown that laboratory combustion tube experiments can be used to simulate gas compositions expected from field tests. Finally, Chapter VII presents results from a comprehensive economic analysis of UCG involving 1296 separate cases. 37 refs., 49 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  20. Field performance of residential refrigerators: A comparison with the laboratory test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, A.; Jansky, R.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field electricity use of 209 refrigerators was compared to their labeled consumption. The mean field use of all units was 1009 kWh/year, 882 kWh/year for top-freezers, and 1366 kWh/year for side-by-sides. There was considerable scatter in the results but, in general, the label overpredicted field use. The relationship could be best described with the formula, Annual Field Use = 0.94 [times] (Annual Label Us) - 85. For a typical unit with a labeled use of 1160 kWh/year, the field use was about 15% lower. There was considerable seasonality in energy use: the peak weeks generally occurred around the beginning of August. However, there was no simple relationship between the label value and the peak-week consumption.

  1. Field performance of residential refrigerators: A comparison with the laboratory test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, A.; Jansky, R.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field electricity use of 209 refrigerators was compared to their labeled consumption. The mean field use of all units was 1009 kWh/year, 882 kWh/year for top-freezers, and 1366 kWh/year for side-by-sides. There was considerable scatter in the results but, in general, the label overpredicted field use. The relationship could be best described with the formula, Annual Field Use = 0.94 {times} (Annual Label Us) - 85. For a typical unit with a labeled use of 1160 kWh/year, the field use was about 15% lower. There was considerable seasonality in energy use: the peak weeks generally occurred around the beginning of August. However, there was no simple relationship between the label value and the peak-week consumption.

  2. RECONSTRUCTING THE INITIAL DENSITY FIELD OF THE LOCAL UNIVERSE: METHODS AND TESTS WITH MOCK CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Huiyuan [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Mo, H. J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Yang Xiaohu [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Shanghai 200030 (China); Van den Bosch, Frank C., E-mail: whywang@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Our research objective in this paper is to reconstruct an initial linear density field, which follows the multivariate Gaussian distribution with variances given by the linear power spectrum of the current cold dark matter model and evolves through gravitational instabilities to the present-day density field in the local universe. For this purpose, we develop a Hamiltonian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to obtain the linear density field from a posterior probability function that consists of two components: a prior of a Gaussian density field with a given linear spectrum and a likelihood term that is given by the current density field. The present-day density field can be reconstructed from galaxy groups using the method developed in Wang et al. Using a realistic mock Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7, obtained by populating dark matter halos in the Millennium simulation (MS) with galaxies, we show that our method can effectively and accurately recover both the amplitudes and phases of the initial, linear density field. To examine the accuracy of our method, we use N-body simulations to evolve these reconstructed initial conditions to the present day. The resimulated density field thus obtained accurately matches the original density field of the MS in the density range 0.3{approx}<{rho}/ {rho}-bar {approx}<20 without any significant bias. In particular, the Fourier phases of the resimulated density fields are tightly correlated with those of the original simulation down to a scale corresponding to a wavenumber of {approx}1 h Mpc{sup -1}, much smaller than the translinear scale, which corresponds to a wavenumber of {approx}0.15 h Mpc{sup -1}.

  3. UONPR No. 1, Elk Hills, 26R Reservoir, Elk Hills oil and gas field, Kern County, California: Management Review: Surface operations and measurements of production and injection volumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evans, Carey and Crozier was given the task to conduct a Management Review of the Surface Operations of the 26R Reservoir in UONPR No. 1, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California. The MER strategy for this reservoir is to maintain pressure, and toward this end, gas injection volumes are scheduled to amount to 110% of calculated withdrawals. In spite of this, however, reservoir pressure continues to decline. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine if, and to what extent, field operating practices and accounting procedures may be contributing to this dilemma and to make appropriate recommendations pertaining to correcting any deficiencies which may have been found.

  4. MASON LAB B-7 WIND TUNNEL OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS Our wind tunnel is a low speed tunnel with a test section 15"x24" It has a digital controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    MASON LAB B-7 WIND TUNNEL OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS Our wind tunnel is a low speed tunnel with a test up to a maximum velocity of about 39M/s (~130 feet/s , 88mph) We have a 2 axis force balance that can measure lift (~25 N) and drag (~8 N) PRECAUTIONS: ALL OBJECTS MUST BE SECURED BEFORE STARTING WIND TUNNEL

  5. Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Tests 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G. E.; Wilson, C. L.; Marshall, R, K.; King, L. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Pilger, J. P.; Hesson, G. M.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects of LOCA conditions on pressurized water reactor test fuel bundles. This experiment operation plan for the second and third experiments of the program will provide peak fuel cladding temperatures of up to 1172K (1650{degree}F) and 1061K (1450{degree}) respectively. for a long enough time to cause test fuel cladding deformation and rupture in both. Reflood coolant delay times and the reflooding rates for the experiments were selected from thermal-hydraulic data measured in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor facilities and test train assembly during the first experiment.

  6. First-of-a-Kind Sequestration Field Test Begins in West Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) began today in a first-of-a-kind field trial of enhanced coalbed methane recovery with simultaneous CO2 sequestration in an unmineable coal seam.

  7. Steam turbine field testing techniques using a computerized data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, H.S.; Cotton, K.C.; Kellyhouse, W.W.; Smith, D.P.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic data acquisition system for conducting full-scale ASME (1) acceptance tests of large steam turbine-generators is described. This includes the instrumentation, the interfacing hardware for analog to digital conversion and transmission of the data to the trailer mounted computer, the software that controls the acquisition of the data, and the calculation of test results. In addition, the application of this automatic data acquisition system for conducting the ASME acceptance test at Consumers Power Company's J.H. Campbell Unit 3 is discussed.

  8. Phase I Field Test Results of an Innovative DNAPL Remediation Technology: The Hydrophobic Lance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative technology for recovery of pure phase DNAPL was deployed in the subsurface near the M-Area Settling Basin, continuing the support of the A/M Area Ground Water Corrective Action Program (per Part B requirements). This technology, the Hydrophobic Lance, operates by placing a neutral/hydrophobic surface (Teflon) in contact with the DNAPL. This changes the in situ conditions experienced by the DNAPL, allowing it to selectively drain into a sump from which it can be pumped. Collection of even small amounts of DNAPL can save years of pump-and-treat operation because of the generally low solubility of DNAPL components.

  9. Conceptual design for the field test and evaluation of the gas-phase UF/sub 6/ enrichment meter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strittmatter, R.B.; Leavitt, J.N.; Slice, R.W.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-line enrichment monitor is being developed to provide real-time enrichment data for the gas-phase UF/sub 6/ feed stream of an enrichment plant. Data from proof-of-principle measurements using a laboratory prototype system are presented. A conceptual design for an enrichment monitor to be field tested and evaluated at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant is reported.

  10. Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

  11. Results of toxicity tests and chemical analyses conducted on sediments collected from the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit, July 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to provide unit specific toxicity data that will be used to address critical uncertainty in the ecological risk assessment (ERA) for the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit (TNXOD OU), sediments were collected from eight locations in the Inner Swamp portion of the operable unit and two unit specific background locations. These samples were analyzed for total mercury, total uranium, and sediment toxicity.

  12. 9977 TYPE B PACKAGING INTERNAL DATA COLLECTION FEASIBILITY TESTING - MAGNETIC FIELD COMMUNICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shull, D.

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to document the findings from proof-of-concept testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R&D Engineering and Visible Assets, Inc. for the DOE Packaging Certification Program (PCP) to determine if RuBee (IEEE 1902.1) tags and readers could be used to provide a communication link from within a drum-style DOE certified Type B radioactive materials packaging. A Model 9977 Type B Packaging was used to test the read/write capability and range performance of a RuBee tag and reader. Testing was performed with the RuBee tags placed in various locations inside the packaging including inside the drum on the outside of the lid of the containment vessel and also inside of the containment vessel. This report documents the test methods and results. A path forward will also be recommended.

  13. Test Results of HD2, A High Field Nb3Sn Dipole with A 36 MM Bore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferracin, Paolo

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed the 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2. With tilted (flared) ends to avoid obstructing a 36 mm clear bore, HD2 represents a step towards the use of block-type coils in high-field accelerator magnets. The coil design has been optimized to minimize geometric harmonics and reduce the conductor peak field in the end region, resulting in an expected short sample dipole field of 15 T. The support structure is composed by an external aluminum shell pre-tensioned with pressurized bladders and interference keys, and by two stainless steel end plates compressing the coil ends through four aluminum axial rods. We report on magnet design, assembly, and test results, including training performance, quench locations, and strain gauge measurements.

  14. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) Thermal Control Systems (TCS) operate by applying an electric field to a dielectric fluid that, in turn, generates a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) Thermal Control Systems (TCS) operate by applying an electric field to a dielectric fluid that, in turn, generates a force that can be used to pump fluids and separate liquid Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) Based Thermal Control Subsytems at NASAGSFC Jeffrey R. Didion Mathew Showalter NASA Goddard

  15. Cw rf operation of the FMIT RFQ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fazio, M.V.; Brandeberry, F.E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 80-MHz RFQ for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility prototype accelerator has been rf conditioned for cw operation to the design field level of 17.5 MV/m (1.68 x Kilpatrick limit). Experimental results and operating experience will be discussed.

  16. Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

  17. EIS-0302: Transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) operations at the Mound Site near Miamisburg, Ohio, to an alternative DOE site.

  18. Results from field tests of the one-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of field experiments were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the one dimensional time encoded imaging system. The significant detection of a Cf252 fission radiation source was demonstrated at a stand-off of 100 meters. Extrapolations to different quantities of plutonium equivalent at different distances are made. Hardware modifications to the system for follow on work are suggested.

  19. A Test to Verify the Speed Change of Light in the Gravitational Field of the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mei Xiaochun

    2006-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the Schwarzschild solution of the Einstein equation of gravitational field, it is proved that the speed of light speed would change and isotropy of light speed would be violated in gravitational field with spherical symmetry. On the surface of the earth, the speed of light vertical to the surface is 0.2m/s less than that parallel to the surface. It is suggested to use the method of the Michelson Morley interference to verify the change of light speed and the violation of isotropy in the gravitational field of the earth. In the proposed experiment, one arm of interferometer is vertical to the earth surface while another is parallel to the surface. When two arms are turned over 90 degree, the shift of about 0.07 interference stripe would be caused which can be observed directly. So this experiment can be considered as a new verification for general relativity in the gravitational field with spherical symmetry. If the experiment shows that gravitation would change the speed of light and violate the isotropy of light speed, the result would cause great effects on foundational physics, astrophysics and cosmolo

  20. Testing a Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Extrapolation Code with the Titov-Demoulin Magnetic Flux Rope Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Chaowei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the solar corona, magnetic flux rope is believed to be a fundamental structure accounts for magnetic free energy storage and solar eruptions. Up to the present, the extrapolation of magnetic field from boundary data is the primary way to obtain fully three-dimensional magnetic information of the corona. As a result, the ability of reliable recovering coronal magnetic flux rope is important for coronal field extrapolation. In this paper, our coronal field extrapolation code (CESE-MHD-NLFFF, Jiang & Feng 2012) is examined with an analytical magnetic flux rope model proposed by Titov & Demoulin (1999), which consists of a bipolar magnetic configuration holding an semi-circular line-tied flux rope in force-free equilibrium. By using only the vector field in the bottom boundary as input, we test our code with the model in a representative range of parameter space and find that the model field is reconstructed with high accuracy. Especially, the magnetic topological interfaces formed between the flux rop...

  1. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work performed in the fourth quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: second field test; test data analysis for the first field test; operational optimization plans.

  2. Building America Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, thus driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

  3. DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind.

  4. FOCUS: HARSH ENVIRONMENT MASS SPECTROMETRY Field Testing of Lake Water Chemistry with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    ) are tested for the measurement of volatile substances, such as hydrocarbons and metabolic gases, in natural compared to that of conventional analysis. The AUV-mounted NEREUS additionally provided rapid spatial and obtaining the requested data. However, conventional water sampling and labo- ratory analysis often involve

  5. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  6. LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program: Presentation Summary of the State Capitol Complex Building Operation and Maintenance Field Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Houcek, J. K.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Turner Mr. John K. Houcek Dr. Mingsheng Liu Dr. David E. Claridge, Principal Investigator June 9, 1993 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Department of Mechanical Engineer Texas Engineering Experiment Stati Texas A&M University System ESL-TR-93/06-01 State Capitol..." was transmitted to the same GSC and GEO personnel.1 The O&M cost saving opportunities, identified in the previous report, are summarized in the following table. The largest savings opportunities identified are the unoccupied period shut down of the central air...

  7. Use and Storage of Test and Operations Data from the High Temperature Test Reactor Acquired by the US Government from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Gougar

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the use and storage of data from the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) acquired from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) by the U.S. Government for high temperature reactor research under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project.

  8. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Parker, Jack C [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  9. Precision timing of PSR J1012+5307 and strong-field GR tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosmas Lazaridis; Norbert Wex; Axel Jessner; Michael Kramer; J. Anton Zensus; Ben W. Stappers; Gemma H. Janssen; Mark B. Purver; Andrew G. Lyne; Christine A. Jordan; Gregory Desvignes; Ismael Cognard; Gilles Theureau

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the high precision timing analysis of the pulsar-white dwarf binary PSR J1012+5307. Using 15 years of multi-telescope data from the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) network, a significant measurement of the variation of the orbital period is obtained. Using this ideal strong-field gravity laboratory we derive theory independent limits for both the dipole radiation and the variation of the gravitational constant.

  10. Field tests and new design procedure for laterally loaded drilled shafts in clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierschwale, Mark W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is reduced by the construct1on operation. 5. Failures of a drilled shaft can be expensive because a single shaft is usually designed to car ry a load of large magnitude. Behavior of Laterall Loaded Drilled Shafts The problem of a drilled shaft subjected... method based on elastic theory, for the solution of lateral load behavior of rigid shafts. The results of this study indicated that, for deflections up to 0. 5 in. (12. 7 mm) the finite-difference approach produced good agreement. However, for large...

  11. Field Test of Combined Desiccant-Evaporator Cycle Providing Lower Dew Points and Enhanced Dehumidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cromer, C. J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1939 2262 2585 2908 3231 AmbientF AmbientRH Return F Return RH Figure 11. One Month MODEL C Operational Data. Set Points Are 76 F and 45 % RH. Each Data Point Represents A 15 Minute Average. The Fan Is Set on “Auto”, That Is, It Cycles On and Off... with the better humidistat. The MODEL C unit provided excellent humidity control at the 45% RH set point, with occasional overcooling at night of several degrees (when the building is unoccupied). No reheat was used. For control, the unit was cycled...

  12. Testing non-linear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolations with the Titov-Demoulin equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Wiegelmann; Bernd Inhester; Bernhard Kliem; Gherardo Valori; Thomas Neukirch

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    CONTEXT: As the coronal magnetic field can usually not be measured directly, it has to be extrapolated from photospheric measurements into the corona. AIMS: We test the quality of a non-linear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolation code with the help of a known analytical solution. METHODS: The non-linear force-free equations are numerically solved with the help of an optimization principle. The method minimizes an integral over the force-free and solenoidal condition. As boundary condition we use either the magnetic field components on all six sides of the computational box in Case I or only on the bottom boundary in Case II. We check the quality of the reconstruction by computing how well force-freeness and divergence-freeness are fulfilled and by comparing the numerical solution with the analytical solution. The comparison is done with magnetic field line plots and several quantitative measures, like the vector correlation, Cauchy Schwarz, normalized vector error, mean vector error and magnetic energy. RESULTS: For Case I the reconstructed magnetic field shows good agreement with the original magnetic field topology, whereas in Case II there are considerable deviations from the exact solution. This is corroborated by the quantitative measures, which are significantly better for Case I. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the strong nonlinearity of the considered force-free equilibrium, the optimization method of extrapolation is able to reconstruct it; however, the quality of reconstruction depends significantly on the consistency of the input data, which is given only if the known solution is provided also at the lateral and top boundaries, and on the presence or absence of flux concentrations near the boundaries of the magnetogram.

  13. The Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System: Spectral Variation on Kuiper Belt Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraser, Wesley C; Glass, Florian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we present additional photometry of targets observed as part of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. 12 targets were re-observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 in optical and NIR wavebands designed to compliment those used during the first visit. Additionally, all observations originally presented by Fraser and Brown (2012) were reanalyzed through the same updated photometry pipeline. A reanalysis of the optical and NIR colour distribution reveals a bifurcated optical colour distribution and only two identifiable spectral classes, each of which occupies a broad range of colours and have correlated optical and NIR colours, in agreement with our previous findings. We report the detection of significant spectral variations on 5 targets which cannot be attributed to photometry errors, cosmic rays, point spread function or sensitivity variations, or other image artifacts capable of explaining the magnitude of the variation. The spectrally variable objects are found to have ...

  14. Test Plan for Field Experiments to Support the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Performance Assessment at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bacon, Diana H.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the data collected to support the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) simulations have been obtained in the laboratory on a relatively small scale (less than 10 cm). In addition, the PA simulations themselves are currently the only means available to integrate the chemical and hydrologic processes involved in the transport of contaminants from the disposal facility into the environment. This report describes the test plan for field experiments to provide data on the hydraulic, transport, and geochemical characteristics of the near-field materials on a more representative (i.e., larger) scale than the laboratory data currently available. The experiments will also provide results that encompass a variety of transport processes likely to occur within the actual disposal facility. These experiments will thus provide the first integrated data on the ILAW facility performance and will provide a crucial dataset to evaluate the simulation-based estimates of overall facility performance used in the PA.

  15. Macroscopic and Microscopic Paradigms for the Torsion Field: from the Test-Particle Motion to a Lorentz Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakia Carlevaro; Orchidea Maria Lecian; Giovanni Montani

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Torsion represents the most natural extension of General Relativity and it attracted interest over the years in view of its link with fundamental properties of particle motion. The bulk of the approaches concerning the torsion dynamics focus their attention on their geometrical nature and they are naturally led to formulate a non-propagating theory. Here we review two different paradigms to describe the role of the torsion field, as far as a propagating feature of the resulting dynamics is concerned. However, these two proposals deal with different pictures, i.e., a macroscopic approach, based on the construction of suitable potentials for the torsion field, and a microscopic approach, which relies on the identification of torsion with the gauge field associated with the local Lorentz symmetry. We analyze in some detail both points of view and their implications on the coupling between torsion and matter will be investigated. In particular, in the macroscopic case, we analyze the test-particle motion to fix the physical trajectory, while, in the microscopic approach, a natural coupling between torsion and the spin momentum of matter fields arises.

  16. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913| DepartmentSLIDESHOW:Design and Field

  17. Polarization operator in the 2+1 dimensional quantum electrodynamics with a nonzero fermion density in a constant uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. R. Khalilov; I. V. Mamsurov

    2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarization operator (tensor) for planar charged fermions in constant uniform magnetic field is calculated in the one-loop approximation of the 2+1 dimensional quantum electrodynamics (QED$_{2+1}$) with a nonzero fermion density. We construct the Green function of the Dirac equation with a constant uniform external magnetic field in the QED$_{2+1}$ at the finite chemical potential, find the imaginary part of this Green function and then obtain the polarization tensor related to the combined contribution from real particles occupying the finite number of energy levels and magnetic field. We expect that some physical effects under consideration seem to be likely to be revealed in a monolayer graphene sample in the presence of external constant uniform magnetic field $B$ perpendicular to it.

  18. Polarization operator in the 2+1 dimensional quantum electrodynamics with a nonzero fermion density in a constant uniform magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. R. Khalilov; I. V. Mamsurov

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarization operator (tensor) for planar charged fermions in constant uniform magnetic field is calculated in the one-loop approximation of the 2+1 dimensional quantum electrodynamics (QED$_{2+1}$) with a nonzero fermion density. We construct the Green function of the Dirac equation with a constant uniform external magnetic field in the QED$_{2+1}$ at the finite chemical potential, find the imaginary part of this Green function and then obtain the polarization tensor related to the combined contribution from real particles occupying the finite number of energy levels and magnetic field. We expect that some physical effects under consideration seem to be likely to be revealed in a monolayer graphene sample in the presence of external constant uniform magnetic field $B$ perpendicular to it.

  19. The Development and Field Testing of a High Temperature Ceramic Recuperator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childs, F. W.; Sohal, M. S.

    for this demonstration unit. One of the goals of the design process for tub ular ceramic heat exchangers was to minimize the number of tubes and hence, tube-to-header plate joints. Sohio/Carborundum had fabricated internally finned tubes with a cruciform pattern out... of Ilexoloy-SA by an extrusion process. Hexoloy-SA is SOhio/Carborundum's sintered alpha-silicon carbide material. This was identified as the most promising tube material during the prototype recuperator fab "ication and testing. A photograph of a sample...

  20. Field corrosion testing and performance of cable shielding materials in soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, G.; Baboian, R. (Texas Instruments Inc., Electrochemical and Corrosion Lab., 34 Forest St., Mail Station 10-13, Attleboro, MA (US))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the importance of corrosion resistance in cable-shielding materials, describes the mechanisms of shielding corrosion that occur in buried telephone cable, and evaluates the results of the six-year REA Horry Cooperative buried telephone cable corrosion test. In this study, both active and static cables were included. Withdrawals were made over a six-year period. These cables were evaluated for cable-shielding corrosion. Special attention was paid to the comparative behavior of active and static cables. Results indicate that steel shieldings are most susceptible to the effects of alternating current (AC) in active cables. Results of a wide range of shieldings are presented and evaluated.

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - Aircraft Integration and Flight Testing of 4STAR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2,govCampaignsAircraft Integration and Flight Testing

  2. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was limited to sediment depths of 10 cm or greater, which is outside of the primary zone of biological activity. Further, exposure to site sediments did not have any effects on test organisms, and macroinvertebrate communities did not indicate impairment at the oil production site as compared to a reference site. In situ experiments with H. azteca and C. fluminea, indicated a sublethal site effect (on growth of both species), but these could not be definitively linked with produced water infiltration. Severe weather conditions (drought followed by flooding) negatively influenced the intensity of lake sampling aimed at delineating produced water infiltration. Due to the lack of clear evidence of produced water infiltration into the sub-littoral zone of the lake, it was not possible to assess whether the laboratory bioassays of produced water effectively indicate risk in the receiving system. However, the acutely toxic nature of the produced water and general lack of biological effects in the lake at the oil production site suggest minimal to no produced water infiltration into surficial lake sediments and the near-shore water column. This study was able to demonstrate the utility of ion toxicity modeling to support data from toxicity identification evaluations aimed at identifying key toxic constituents in produced water. This information could be used to prioritize options for treating produced water in order to reduce toxic constituents and enhance options for reuse. The study also demonstrated how geographic information systems, toxicity modeling, and toxicity assessment could be used to facilitate future site assessments.

  3. Longevity evaluation for optimum development in a liquid dominated geothermal field; Effects of interaction of reservoir pressure and fluid temperature on steam production at operating conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanano, M.; Takahashi, M. (Japan Metals and Chemicals Co., Ltd., 24 Ukai, Takizawa-mura, Iwate 020-01 (JP)); Hirako, Y.; Nakamura, H. (Japan Metals and Chemicals Co., Ltd., 8-4 Koami-cho, Nihonbashi, Chuo-ku. Tokyo 103 (JP)); Fuwa, S. (Cosco Co., Ltd., 4-9-12 Takatanobaba, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160 (JP)); Itoi, R. (Geothermal Research Center, Kyushu Univ., 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816 (JP))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steam production rate of a well at fixed operating conditions in a liquid-dominated geothermal field is reduced at first by a decline in reservoir pressure and then by a decrease in fluid temperature, if reinjected water returns to the production well. In many cases, the fluid temperature decrease reduces the steam production rate more than does the reservoir pressure decline. Those effects should therefore be taken into due account in the evaluation of the longevity of an area, because sufficient longevity and recoverable electric energy are the minimum requirements for planning field development.

  4. Testing fluidized bed incinerators for energy-efficient operation for the Southtowns Sewage Treatment Agency. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods for improving the energy efficiency of fluidized bed sludge incinerators were evaluated. The first method used paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents for municipal sludge instead of lime and ferric chloride. Automatic control of the incinerator was the second method evaluated for energy savings. To evaluate the use of paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents, varying quantities of paper pulp were added to the liquid sludge to determine the optimal sludge-to-paper pulp ratio. The effect of the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge on plant operations also was evaluated. When compared to sludge conditioned with lime and ferric chloride, the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge had similar cake release and feed characteristics, higher BTU values for the dry sludge solids, required less auxiliary fuel for incineration, and generated less ash for disposal. The paper pulp and polymer did not have any appreciable negative effects on the operation of the wastewater treatment plant. It was estimated that processing and incinerating the sludge conditioned with paper pulp and polymer resulted in a cost savings of up to $91.73 per dry ton of activated sludge solids. To evaluate the effect of automatic control, all the incinerator operating parameters including air flow rates, fuel oil feed rates, and sludge feed rates, were automatically monitored and controlled to minimize auxiliary fuel oil use and to keep the incinerator running at optimal conditions. Although effective, the estimated cost savings for automatic control of the incinerator were small.

  5. Chemical flood progress evaluation test, South Pass Block 27 field, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Final report, September 28, 1979-May 16, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, J. R.; Guillory, A. J.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field test of a surfactant flooding process has been designed for a reservoir located in the South Pass Block 27 field, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. The objectives of the test are to continue chemical flooding research by applying the process in a reservoir which is a candidate for this enhanced oil recovery technique if the process is proved economically viable. The plan is to acquire field data which will lead to a better understanding of how the process works under reservoir conditions at a well-to-well distance intermediate to laboratory floods and economic well spacing. The initial step in starting the field test began late in 1979 when the first pilot injection-residual oil saturation determination well was drilled and pressured cored in the selected test reservoir, the N/sub 4/ sand Reservoir B, at about 8000 feet. A log-inject-log measurement in this well has also been completed to provide an added evaluation. This report documents the results of the N/sub 4/, sand residual oil saturation measurements in Well SL 1011 No. 88. The Shell-DOE contract is restricted to this phase of the field test. Results indicate a waterswept residual oil saturation less than 20% at the objective location based on coring and PNC log-inject-log measurements. The value is lower than anticipated. Consequently, an alternate test site must be selected if the field test plans are continued.

  6. Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

  7. Baseline information development for energy smart schools -- applied research, field testing and technology integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tengfang; Piette, Mary Ann

    2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The original scope of work was to obtain and analyze existing and emerging data in four states: California, Florida, New York, and Wisconsin. The goal of this data collection was to deliver a baseline database or recommendations for such a database that could possibly contain window and daylighting features and energy performance characteristics of Kindergarten through 12th grade (K-12) school buildings (or those of classrooms when available). In particular, data analyses were performed based upon the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) databases to understand school energy use, features of window glazing, and availability of daylighting in California K-12 schools. The outcomes from this baseline task can be used to assist in establishing a database of school energy performance, assessing applications of existing technologies relevant to window and daylighting design, and identifying future R&D needs. These are in line with the overall project goals as outlined in the proposal. Through the review and analysis of this data, it is clear that there are many compounding factors impacting energy use in K-12 school buildings in the U.S., and that there are various challenges in understanding the impact of K-12 classroom energy use associated with design features of window glazing and skylight. First, the energy data in the existing CEUS databases has, at most, provided the aggregated electricity and/or gas usages for the building establishments that include other school facilities on top of the classroom spaces. Although the percentage of classroom floor area in schools is often available from the databases, there is no additional information that can be used to quantitatively segregate the EUI for classroom spaces. In order to quantify the EUI for classrooms, sub-metering of energy usage by classrooms must be obtained. Second, magnitudes of energy use for electricity lighting are not attainable from the existing databases, nor are the lighting levels contributed by artificial lighting or daylight. It is impossible to reasonably estimate the lighting energy consumption for classroom areas in the sample of schools studied in this project. Third, there are many other compounding factors that may as well influence the overall classroom energy use, e.g., ventilation, insulation, system efficiency, occupancy, control, schedules, and weather. Fourth, although we have examined the school EUI grouped by various factors such as climate zones, window and daylighting design features from the California databases, no statistically significant associations can be identified from the sampled California K-12 schools in the current California CEUS. There are opportunities to expand such analyses by developing and including more powerful CEUS databases in the future. Finally, a list of parameters is recommended for future database development and for use of future investigation in K-12 classroom energy use, window and skylight design, and possible relations between them. Some of the key parameters include: (1) Energy end use data for lighting systems, classrooms, and schools; (2) Building design and operation including features for windows and daylighting; and (3) Other key parameters and information that would be available to investigate overall energy uses, building and systems design, their operation, and services provided.

  8. Standard practice for in situ examination of ferromagnetic Heat-Exchanger tubes using remote field testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice describes procedures to be followed during remote field examination of installed ferromagnetic heat-exchanger tubing for baseline and service-induced discontinuities. 1.2 This practice is intended for use on ferromagnetic tubes with outside diameters from 0.500 to 2.000 in. [12.70 to 50.80 mm], with wall thicknesses in the range from 0.028 to 0.134 in. [0.71 to 3.40 mm]. 1.3 This practice does not establish tube acceptance criteria; the tube acceptance criteria must be specified by the using parties. 1.4 Units—The values stated in either inch-pound units or SI units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system may not be exact equivalents; therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. Combining values from the two systems may result in nonconformance with the standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this practice to establ...

  9. Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

  10. Assembly and Test of HD2, a 36 mm bore high field Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferracin, P.; Bingham, B.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W,.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Godeke, A.; Hafalia, A. R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G.; Trillaud, F.; Wang, X.

    2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the fabrication, assembly, and test of the Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2. The magnet, aimed at demonstrating the application of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor in high field accelerator-type dipoles, features a 36 mm clear bore surrounded by block-type coils with tilted ends. The coil design is optimized to minimize geometric harmonics in the aperture and the magnetic peak field on the conductor in the coil ends. The target bore field of 15 T at 4.3 K is consistent with critical current measurements of extracted strands. The coils are horizontally pre-stressed during assembly using an external aluminum shell pre-tensioned with water-pressurized bladders. Axial pre-loading of the coil ends is accomplished through two end plates and four aluminum tension rods. The strain in coil, shell, and rods is monitored with strain gauges during assembly, cool-down and magnet excitation, and compared with 3D finite element computations. Magnet's training performance, quench locations, and ramp-rate dependence are then analyzed and discussed.

  11. Groundwater restoration field test at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordin, J.S.; Barrash, W.; Nolan, B.T.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three underground coal gasification burns were conducted at the Hoe Creek Site in the Powder River Basin. Some contaminants were released in the groundwater. The Department of Energy (DOE) analyzed the water from a network of wells. Two million gallons of groundwater were pumped from wells adjacent to the Hoe Creek II underground coal gasification cavity, passed through filters and carbon adsorbers, and reinjected into the cavity. Phenol was the target compound of the water treatment system. The phenol concentration pumped from well WS-10 decreased from 974 parts per billion (ppB) when treatment began on July 2, 1987, to about 200 ppB when treatment ceased on August 29, 1987. Phenol concentrations pumped from well WS-22 fluctuated during the tests, but they decreased to the 150 to 200 ppB range by the time treatment was terminated. The phenol concentration of treated water reinjected into the Hoe Creek II cavity was below detectable limits (less than 20 ppB). Pumping rates were about 18 gallons per minute (gpm) from well WS-10 and 6 to 8 gpm from well WS-22. Hoe Creek is located approximately 20 miles southwest of Gillette, Wyoming. 12 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  13. Energy Smart Schools--Applied Research, Field Testing, and Technology Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nebiat Solomon; Robin Vieira; William L. Manz; Abby Vogen; Claudia Orlando; Kimberlie A. Schryer

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) in conjunction with the California Energy Commission, the Energy Center of Wisconsin, the Florida Solar Energy Center, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and the Ohio Department of Development's Office of Energy Efficiency conducted a four-year, cost-share project with the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to focus on energy efficiency and high-performance technologies in our nation's schools. NASEO was the program lead for the MOU-State Schools Working group, established in conjunction with the USDOE Memorandum of Understanding process for collaboration among state and federal energy research and demonstration offices and organizations. The MOU-State Schools Working Group included State Energy Offices and other state energy research organizations from all regions of the country. Through surveys and analyses, the Working Group determined the school-related energy priorities of the states and established a set of tasks to be accomplished, including the installation and evaluation of microturbines, advanced daylighting research, testing of schools and classrooms, and integrated school building technologies. The Energy Smart Schools project resulted in the adoption of advanced energy efficiency technologies in both the renovation of existing schools and building of new ones; the education of school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide about the energy-saving, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improved the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in classrooms. It also provided an opportunity for states to share and replicate successful projects to increase their energy efficiency while at the same time driving down their energy costs.

  14. Battery testing for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, T.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battery testing for photovoltaic (PV) applications is funded at Sandia under the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Photovoltaic Balance of Systems (BOS) Program. The goal of the PV BOS program is to improve PV system component design, operation, reliability, and to reduce overall life-cycle costs. The Sandia battery testing program consists of: (1) PV battery and charge controller market survey, (2) battery performance and life-cycle testing, (3) PV charge controller development, and (4) system field testing. Test results from this work have identified market size and trends, PV battery test procedures, application guidelines, and needed hardware improvements.

  15. Fourier-based schemes with modified Green operator for computing the electrical response of heterogeneous media with accurate local fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Fourier-based schemes with modified Green operator for computing the electrical response of Fourier-based numerical schemes commonly used for computing the electrical or thermal response the discretization of Green's function, which is consistent with the pixel grid while retaining the local nature

  16. Test report for photonic sensors used in electric-field measurement of simulated electromagnetic pulses. Final report, 28-30 Aug 90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blocksom, R.; Bucholz, R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of tests to record and analyze the characteristic response of three photonic Electric field, E-field sensors to simulated Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP), compared to that of a reference metallic sensor. Work was performed under Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) contract N00014-89-C-2033, sponsored by Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR). Tasks included: (1) selection of candidate sensors capable of measuring the E-field content (intensity and frequency spectrum) of simulated EMP phenomena generated by the Horizontally Polarized Dipole (HPD) EMP simulator at the Naval Air Test Center (NATC), Patuxent River, MD; (2) liaison with sensor designers, NATC personnel, and others as necessary to delineate test requirements and constraints; (3) development of a sensor test plan; (4) sensor tests in the HPD EMP simulation; (5) analysis of the test data; and (6) generation of the Test Report. The activities discussed herein were performed during the period of March 1990-January 1991. Since 1985, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and ARC Professional Services Group Defense Systems Division (ARC) have conducted an RD effort to produce a prototype fiber optic sensor system for application to EMP field measurement. The work was sponsored under Fleet Aircraft Assessment for Navy Testing and Analysis for EMP Limitation (FAANTAEL) project managed by NAVAIR Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3) Branch, AIR-5161.

  17. ``Problem Set Six'' (1) In free scalar field theory in four dimensions, with mass m, calculate the operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Problem Set Six'' (1) In free scalar field theory in four dimensions, with mass m, calculate ij + \\Sigma ij , where \\Sigma ij , the ``self­energy,'' is to be computed from loops. A very fundamental property of \\Sigma ij is that in momentum space k i \\Sigma ij (k) = 0. (An explanation of why

  18. Ensemble Results of Solute Transport in 2D Operator-Stable Random Fields Nathan Monnig, David Benson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by a scalar Hurst coefficient). Motivated by field measurements, recent techniques were developed to handle explored. Due to the rapid advance of computational power, numerical models can now be created in multiple in the K structure. This continuity can be defined by a probability measure on the unit circle in 2D

  19. Quantum Operator Design for Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Lichtl

    2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A previously-proposed method of constructing spatially-extended gauge-invariant three-quark operators for use in Monte Carlo lattice QCD calculations is tested, and a methodology for using these operators to extract the energies of a large number of baryon states is developed. This work is part of a long-term project undertaken by the Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration to carry out a first-principles calculation of the low-lying spectrum of QCD. The operators are assemblages of smeared and gauge-covariantly-displaced quark fields having a definite flavor structure. The importance of using smeared fields is dramatically demonstrated. It is found that quark field smearing greatly reduces the couplings to the unwanted high-lying short-wavelength modes, while gauge field smearing drastically reduces the statistical noise in the extended operators.

  20. NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY Operated by Florida State University, University of Florida, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    cords in use at the Lab. Supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the State of Florida #12 cords you purchase. This means that representative samples of the cord have been tested for foreseeable wire) · As a safety feature, extension cords and most appliances have polarized plugs (one blade wider

  1. Twist operators in higher dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling-Yan Hung; Robert C. Myers; Michael Smolkin

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study twist operators in higher dimensional CFT's. In particular, we express their conformal dimension in terms of the energy density for the CFT in a particular thermal ensemble. We construct an expansion of the conformal dimension in power series around n=1, with n being replica parameter. We show that the coefficients in this expansion are determined by higher point correlations of the energy-momentum tensor. In particular, the first and second terms, i.e. the first and second derivatives of the scaling dimension, have a simple universal form. We test these results using holography and free field theory computations, finding agreement in both cases. We also consider the `operator product expansion' of spherical twist operators and finally, we examine the behaviour of correlators of twist operators with other operators in the limit n ->1.

  2. Permeation Dispersal of Treatment Agents for In Situ Remediation in Low Permeability Media: 1. Field Studies in Unconfined Test Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Smuin, D.R.; Korte, N.E.; Greene, D.W.; Pickering, D.A.; Lowe, K.S.; Strong-Gunderson, J.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorocarbons like trichloroethylene (TCE) are common contaminants of concern at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and industrial sites across the US and abroad. These contaminants of concern are present in source areas and in soil and ground water plumes as dissolved or sorbed phase constituents as well as dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs). These DNAPL compounds can be released to the environment through a variety of means including leaks in storage tanks and transfer lines, spills during transportation, and land treatment of wastes. When DNAPL compounds are present in low permeability media (LPM) like silt and clay layers or deposits, there are major challenges with assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective in situ remediation technologies. This report describes a field demonstration that was conducted at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) Clean Test Site (CTS) to evaluate the feasibility of permeation and dispersal of reagents into LPM. Various reagents and tracers were injected at seven test cells primarily to evaluate the feasibility of delivery, but also to evaluate the effects of the injected reagents on LPM. The various reagents and tracers were injected at the PORTS CTS using a multi-port injection system (MPIS) developed and provided by Hayward Baker Environmental, Inc.

  3. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Vandel

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medical zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This plan details management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility. As identified in the remedial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action. This work plan was originally prepared as an early implementation of the final Phase C remediation. At that time, The Phase C implementation strategy was to use this document as the overall Phase C Work Plan and was to be revised to include the remedial actions for the other remedial zones (hotspot and distal zones). After the completion of Record of Decision Amendment: Technical Support Facility Injection Well (TSF-05) and Surrounding Groundwater Contamination (TSF-23) and Miscellaneous No Action Sites, Final Remedial Action, it was determined that each remedial zone would have it own stand-alone remedial action work plan. Revision 1 of this document converts this document to a stand-alone remedial action plan specific to the implementation of the New Pump and Treat Facility used for plume remediation within the medical zone of the OU 1-07B contaminated plume.

  4. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  5. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  6. In situ testing to determination field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of UMTRA Project disposal cell covers, liners, and foundation areas. Special study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This special study was conducted to prepare a guidance document for selecting in situ hydraulic conductivity (K) tests, comparing in situ testing methods, and evaluating the results of such tests. This report may be used as a practical decision-making tool by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project staff to determine which testing method will most efficiently achieve the field-saturated K results needed for long-term planning. A detailed section on near-surface test methods discusses each method which may be applicable to characterization of UMTRA disposal cell covers, liners and foundation materials. These potentially applicable test methods include the sealed double-ring infiltrometer (SDRI), the air-entry permeameter (AEP), the guelph permeameter, the two-stage borehole technique (TSB), the pressure infiltrometer, and the disk permeameter. Analytical solutions for these methods are provided, and limitations of these solutions are discussed, and a description of testing equipment design and installation are provided.

  7. Accelerated Testing Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, Rangachary; James, Greg; Davey, John; Langlois, David; Torraco, Dennis; Yoon, Wonseok; Weber, Adam Z; Borup, Rodney L.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Fuel Cell technical team recommended ASTs were performed on 2 different MEAs (designated P5 and HD6) from Ballard Power Systems. These MEAs were also incorporated into stacks and operated in fuel cell bus modules that were either operated in the field (three P5 buses) in Hamburg, or on an Orange county transit authority drive cycle in the laboratory (HD6 bus module). Qualitative agreement was found in the degradation mechanisms and rates observed in the AST and in the field. The HD6 based MEAs exhibited lower voltage degradation rates (due to catalyst corrosion) and slower membrane degradation rates in the field as reflected by their superior performance in the high potential hold and open-circuit potential AST tests. The quantitative correlation of the degradation rates will have to take into account the various stressors in the field including temperature, relative humidity, start/stops and voltage cycles.

  8. Use of oil-emulsion mud in the Sivells Bend Field: Gas and gas condensate operations for the independent producer. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Echols, Walter Harlan

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Deyartnsnh or Stndszk kdriser) LIBRARY A A M COLLESE OF TEXAS USE OF OIL EHULSICM 1%D Ig THE SIVELL8 HEEB FIEKB GAS AHD Gkg COHDENSkTE OPERATIOES FOR THE IEMPEMDEHT PRODUCER Prior Pah1Leatione Accepted in Id. su of Thesis HALTER HARLAN ECHOLS I I I..., Iuc, printed in USA 2 USE OP OIL-EMULSION MUD IN THE SIVELLS BEND I&IELD sand fields in North Texas indicate that they are rather consistently of the dis- solved gas-drive type, resulting in short flowing lives, comparatively long pumping lives...

  9. The over 20 year operating experience with carbon steel tubings at Abu Attifel Field. Problems and solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheldi, T. [ENI-AGIP Div., Milan (Italy); Rumash, K. [AGIP Oil, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Bazzoni, B. [Cescor srl, Milan (Italy)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abu Attifel onshore oil field (Libya) was discovered in 1968 and put in production in November 1972. The total average production is nowadays about 140,000 BOPD (22,260 m{sup 3}/d) with 46 producing wells. All the production wells were originally completed with carbon steel tubing, although the produced fluids contain CO{sub 2}-4% in the gas phase. After several years of production with minor downhole corrosion problems, several corrosion failures started to occur in the nineties at extremely high corrosion rate. In some cases corrosion attacks occurred although the water cut was negligible (lower than 1%). A detailed corrosion study was initiated to investigate the problem in order to identify the most critical production wells and the priority of intervention for well; this paper reports the corrosion assessment results and the actions undertaken to control the corrosion. A occurred corrosion events is also reported.

  10. Treatability Study Operational Testing Program and Implementation Plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support future decision making of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Operable Unit (OU) remedy selection, the Department of Energy (DOE) is performing a Treatability Study (TS), consistent with the EPA guidance for Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) treatability studies. The study will inform stakeholders about various waste removal technologies and the cost of potential remediation approaches, particularly the cost associated with sluicing and the reduction in risk to human health and the environment from tank content removal. As part of the GAAT OU remedy, a series of studies and technology tests will be preformed. These may address one or more of the following areas, characterization, removal, treatment, and transfer of wastes stored in the GAAT OU.

  11. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  12. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of ?14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS’ System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  13. A high-field 3He Metastability Exchange Optical Pumping polarizer operating in a 1.5 T medical scanner for lung MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, G; Wojna, A; G?owacz, B; Suchanek, M; Olejniczak, Z; Dohnalik, T

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After being hyperpolarized using the technique of Metastability Exchange Optical Pumping (MEOP), 3He can be used as a contrast agent for lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MEOP is usually performed at low magnetic field (~ 1 mT) and low pressure (~ 1 mbar), which results in a low magnetization production rate. A delicate polarization-preserving step of compression is also required. It was demonstrated in sealed cells that high nuclear polarization values can be obtained at higher pressures with MEOP, if performed at high magnetic field (non-standard conditions). In this work the feasibility of building a high-field polarizer that operates within a commercial 1.5 T scanner was evaluated. Preliminary measurements of nuclear polarization with sealed cells filled at different 3He gas pressures (1.33 to 267 mbar) were performed. The use of an annular shape for the laser beam increased by 25 % the achievable nuclear polarization equilibrium value (Meq) at 32 and 67 mbar as compared to a Gaussian beam shape. Meq...

  14. Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or biotransform hazardous organic contaminants to environmentally safe levels in soils, subsurface materials, water, sludges, and residues.. While bioremediation technology is promising, DOE managers and non-DOE scientists have recognized that the fundamental scientific information needed to develop effective bioremediation technologies for cleanup of the legacy waste sites is lacking in many cases. DOE believes that field-based research is needed to realize the full potential of bioremediation. The Department of Energy faces a unique set of challenges associated with cleaning up waste at its former weapons production and research sites. These sites contain complex mixtures of contaminants in the subsurface, including radioactive compounds. In many cases, the fundamental field-based scientific information needed to develop safe and effective remediation and cleanup technologies is lacking. DOE needs fundamental research on the use of microorganisms and their products to assist DOE in the decontamination and cleanup of its legacy waste sites. The existing NABIR program to-date has focused on fundamental scientific research in the laboratory. Because subsurface hydrologic and geologic conditions at contaminated DOE sites cannot easily be duplicated in a laboratory, however, the DOE needs a field component to permit existing and future laboratory research results to be field-tested on a small scale in a controlled outdoor setting. Such field-testing needs to be conducted under actual legacy waste field conditions representative of those that DOE is most in need of remediating. Ideally, these field conditions should be as representative as practicable of the types of subsurface contamination conditions that resulted from legacy wastes from the nuclear weapons program activities. They should also be representative of the types of hydrologic and geologic conditions that exist across the DOE complex.

  15. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. T. Urbon

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning site is located in the southeast portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site (Figure 1). This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 23, 2001. Because of questionable representativeness and precision of the results, the site was resampled on June 12, 2001. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the December 1997 Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1997). If after six years the rate of degradation appears to be so slow that the greatest concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) present at the site would not decay within 30 years of the site closure, the site will be reevaluated with consideration to enriching the impacted soil at the site to enhance the degradation process. A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report, samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in TPH concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, the data results from 2000 were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2001 consisted of the following: Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2); Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]); Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs; and Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  16. Development of Improved Oil Field Waste Injection Disposal Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terralog Technologies USA Inc.

    2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this DOE sponsored project are to: (1) assemble and analyze a comprehensive database of past waste injection operations; (2) develop improved diagnostic techniques for monitoring fracture growth and formation changes; (3) develop operating guidelines to optimize daily operations and ultimate storage capacity of the target formation; and (4) to test these improved models and guidelines in the field.

  17. Operations Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest and EvaluationOperational ManagementCenterOperations

  18. CERTIFICATE OF FIELD VERIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTING CF-4R-ENV-22 Quality Insulation Installation (QII) -Insulation Stage Checklist (Page 1 of 3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERTIFICATE OF FIELD VERIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTING CF-4R-ENV-22 Quality Insulation Installation (QII) - Insulation Stage Checklist (Page 1 of 3) Site Address: Enforcement Agency: Permit Number: ____________ 2008 Residential Compliance Forms May 2012 All structural framing areas shall be insulated in a manner

  19. Experimental Studies: sensor strip attachment and electroplating embedding The wireless system was tested in the presence of an electromagnetic field at a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    system was tested in the presence of an electromagnetic field at a commercial steel company and was shown casting, this sensor will monitor the thermal condition of the mold. The sensors inside the fiber function system causes the wavelength of light emitted along the fiber to depend on thermal strain, which varies

  20. Forced Vibration Testing of a Four-Story Reinforced Concrete Building Utilizing the nees@UCLA Mobile Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Eunjong; Skolnik, Derek; Whang, Daniel H.; Wallace, John W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing and Analytical Modeling of a Four-Story Reinforced ConcreteForced Vibration Testing of a Four-Story Reinforced Concretetesting capabilities of the nees@UCLA Site were deployed on a four-story reinforced concrete

  1. CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery: Bald Unit Test Site, Mumford Hills Oil Field, Posey County, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frailey, Scott M.; Krapac, Ivan G.; Damico, James R.; Okwen, Roland T.; McKaskle, Ray W.

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a small-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in a sandstone within the Clore Formation (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) in order to gauge the large-scale CO2 storage that might be realized from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) of mature Illinois Basin oil fields via miscible liquid CO2 flooding. As part of the MGSC�������¢����������������s Validation Phase (Phase II) studies, the small injection pilot test was conducted at the Bald Unit site within the Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, which was chosen for the project on the basis of site infrastructure and reservoir conditions. Geologic data on the target formation were extensive. Core analyses, porosity and permeability data, and geophysical logs from 40 wells were used to construct cross sections and structure contour and isopach maps in order to characterize and define the reservoir architecture of the target formation. A geocellular model of the reservoir was constructed to improve understanding of CO2 behavior in the subsurface. At the time of site selection, the Field was under secondary recovery through edge-water injection, but the wells selected for the pilot in the Bald Unit had been temporarily shut-in for several years. The most recently shut-in production well, which was surrounded by four nearby shut-in production wells in a five-spot pattern, was converted to CO2 injection for this pilot. Two additional wells outside the immediate five-spot pattern, one of which was an active producer, were instrumented to measure surface temperature and pressure. The CO2 injection period lasted from September 3, 2009, through December 14, 2010, with one three-month interruption caused by cessation of CO2 deliveries due to winter weather. Water was injected into the CO2 injection well during this period. A total of 6,300 tonnes (6,950 tons) of CO2 were injected into the reservoir at rates that generally ranged from 18 to 32 tonnes (20 to 35 tons) per day. The CO2 injection bottomhole pressure generally remained at 8.3 to 9.0 MPag (1,200 to 1,300 psig). The CO2 injection was followed by continued monitoring for nine months during post-CO2 water injection. A monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) program was designed to determine the fate of injected CO2. Extensive periodic sampling and analysis of brine, groundwater, and produced gases began before CO2 injection and continued through the monitored waterflood periods. Samples were gathered from production wells and three newly installed groundwater monitoring wells. Samples underwent geochemical and isotopic analyses to reveal any CO2-related changes. Groundwater and kinetic modeling and mineralogical analysis were also employed to better understand the long-term dynamics of CO2 in the reservoir. No CO2 leakage into groundwater was detected, and analysis of brine and gas chemistry made it possible to track the path of plume migration and infer geochemical reactions and trapping of CO2. Cased-hole logging did not detect any CO2 in the near-wellbore region. An increase in CO2 concentration was first detected in February 2010 from the gas present in the carboy during brine sampling; however, there was no appreciable gas volume associated with the detection of CO2. The first indication of elevated gas rates from the commingled gas of the pilot�������¢����������������s production wells occurred in July 2010 and reached a maximum of 0.36 tonnes/day (0.41 tons/day) in September 2010. An estimated 27 tonnes (30 tons) of CO2 were produced at the surface from the gas separator at the tank battery from September 3, 2009, through September 11, 2011, representing 0.5% of the injected CO2. Consequently, 99.5%

  2. Application for Permit to Operate a Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The site will be used for the disposal of refuse, rubbish, garbage, sewage sludge, pathological waste, Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM), industrial solid waste, hydrocarbon-burdened soil, hydrocarbon-burdened demolition and construction waste, and other inert waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids or regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), excluding Polychlorinated Biphenyl [PCB], Bulk Product Waste (see Section 6.2.5) and ACM (see Section 6.2.2.2) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The disposal site will be used as the sole depository of permissible waste which is: (1) Generated by entities covered under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (2) Generated at sites identified in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO); (3) Sensitive records and media, including documents, vugraphs, computer disks, typewriter ribbons, magnetic tapes, etc., generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors; (4) ACM generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors according to Section 6.2.2.2, as necessary; (5) Hydrocarbon-burdened soil and solid waste from areas covered under the EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (6) Other waste on a case-by-case concurrence by NDEP/BFF. The generator of permissible waste is responsible for preparing documentation related to waste acceptance criteria, waste characterization, and load verification. Waste and Water (WW) personnel are responsible for operating the disposal site and reviewing documentation to determine if the waste is acceptable.

  3. Dansk Gasteknisk Center a/s Dr. Neergaards Vej 5B 2970 Hrsholm Tlf. 2016 9600 Fax 4516 1199 www.dgc.dk dgc@dgc.dk Field test of hydrogen in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4516 1199 · www.dgc.dk · dgc@dgc.dk Field test of hydrogen in the natural gas grid EFP05 J.nr. 033001/33031-0053 Project Report August 2010 #12;Field test of hydrogen in the natural gas grid EFP05 J.nr. 033001/33031-0053 Henrik Iskov Danish Gas Technology Centre Hørsholm 2010 #12;Title : Field test of hydrogen in the natural

  4. Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blue, Thomas; Windl, Wolfgang; Dickerson, Bryan

    2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica�s optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and the interplay of rate effects with the effects of annealing, to accurately predict the fibers� reliability and expected lifetime

  5. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

  6. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 12 and 13 entitled: Large scale field test of the Lasagna{trademark} process, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athmer, C.J.; Ho, Sa V.; Hughes, B.M. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. This technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to instant degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electroosmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. This topical report summarizes the results of the field experiment conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, KY. The test site covered 15 feet wide by 10 feet across and 15 feet deep with steel panels as electrodes and wickdrains containing granular activated carbon as treatment zone& The electrodes and treatment zones were installed utilizing innovative adaptation of existing emplacement technologies. The unit was operated for four months, flushing TCE by electroosmosis from the soil into the treatment zones where it was trapped by the activated carbon. The scale up from laboratory units to this field scale was very successful with respect to electrical parameters as weft as electroosmotic flow. Soil samples taken throughout the site before and after the test showed over 98% TCE removal, with most samples showing greater than 99% removal.

  7. Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    services market. Regulation energy is used to control systemfollowing and regulation, with application to wind energy,”from the campus energy manager for regulation tests at this

  8. Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

  9. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the ''Management Plan for the Disposal of Low-Level Waste with Regulated Asbestos Waste.'' A requirement of the authorization was that on or before October 9, 1999, a permit was required to be issued. Because of NDEP and NNSA/NSO review cycles, the final permit was issued on April 5, 2000, for the operation of the Area 5 Low-Level Waste Disposal Site, utilizing Pit 7 (P07) as the designated disposal cell. The original permit applied only to Pit 7, with a total design capacity of 5,831 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (157,437 cubic feet [ft{sup 3}]). NNSA/NSO is expanding the SWDS to include the adjacent Upper Cell of Pit 6 (P06), with an additional capacity of 28,037 yd{sup 3} (756,999 ft{sup 3}) (Figure 3). The proposed total capacity of ALLW in Pit 7 and P06 will be approximately 33,870 yd{sup 3} (0.9 million ft{sup 3}). The site will be used for the disposal of regulated ALLW, small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The only waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM). The term asbestiform is used throughout this document to describe this waste. Other TSCA waste (i.e., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]) will not be accepted for disposal at the SWDS. The disposal site will be used as a depository of permissible waste generated both on site and off site. All generators designated by NNSA/NSO will be eligible to dispose regulated ALLW at the Asbestiform Low-Level Waste Disposal Site in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) 325

  10. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keller, A.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test`s ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  11. A TEST TO DEMONSTRATE A DIGITAL WEB-BASED OILFIELD DATA COLLECTION SERVICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rochelle, J.

    2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy and HIS Energy tested a web-based field data collection service, FieldDIRECT, at NPR-3. FieldDIRECT provided a way to digitally collect oil and gas data from the field, transfer it quickly, accurately and securely via the Internet, and utilize it immediately to generate executive, operational and administrative reports.

  12. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Keller, A.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test's ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  13. Using finite element analysis of retroreflective raised pavement markers to recommend testing procedures for simulating their field performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Ravi Prakash

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    procedures that can better simulate field conditions. This requires identifying critical locations and magnitudes of stresses inside the markers during the tire-marker impacts that happen on roads. The goal of this research was to identify critical magnitudes...

  14. Design and testing of an electron cyclotron resonance heating ion source for use in high field compact superconducting cyclotrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artz, Mark E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of axial injection of a high brightness beam from an Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source into a high magnetic field cyclotron. Axial injection from an ion ...

  15. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  16. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, December 1997 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-19-01, A12 Fleet Ops Steam Cleaning Efflu. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  17. Deep in Data: Empirical Data Based Software Accuracy Testing Using the Building America Field Data Repository: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Roberts, D.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An opportunity is available for using home energy consumption and building description data to develop a standardized accuracy test for residential energy analysis tools. That is, to test the ability of uncalibrated simulations to match real utility bills. Empirical data collected from around the United States have been translated into a uniform Home Performance Extensible Markup Language format that may enable software developers to create translators to their input schemes for efficient access to the data. This may facilitate the possibility of modeling many homes expediently, and thus implementing software accuracy test cases by applying the translated data. This paper describes progress toward, and issues related to, developing a usable, standardized, empirical data-based software accuracy test suite.

  18. Inverse problem for the identification of Chaos representa-tions of random fields using experimental vibrational tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to be identified by using an experimental database constituted of vibrational tests related to 100 speci- mens in the frequency band [0-50]kHz. There are 60 sensors measuring accelerations. All the specimens are excited

  19. P h y s i c a l O c e a n o g r a p h y D i v i s i o n Shipboard Surveys of Regional and Worldwide Field Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ 5. Operations typically involve a CTD survey along 20şW and the annual servicing of three PIRATAP h y s i c a l O c e a n o g r a p h y D i v i s i o n Shipboard Surveys of Regional and Worldwide Field Operations PhOD personnel spend on average a total of 420 days at sea every year. The following

  20. Comparing State-Space Multivariable Controls to Multi-SISO Controls for Load Reduction of Drivetrain-Coupled Modes on Wind Turbines through Field-Testing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P. A.; van Wingerden, J. W.; Wright, A. D.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the structure of an ongoing controller comparison experiment at NREL's National Wind Technology Center; the design process for the two controllers compared in this phase of the experiment, and initial comparison results obtained in field-testing. The intention of the study is to demonstrate the advantage of using modern multivariable methods for designing control systems for wind turbines versus conventional approaches. We will demonstrate the advantages through field-test results from experimental turbines located at the NWTC. At least two controllers are being developed side-by-side to meet an incrementally increasing number of turbine load-reduction objectives. The first, a multiple single-input, single-output (m-SISO) approach, uses separately developed decoupled and classicially tuned controllers, which is, to the best of our knowledge, common practice in the wind industry. The remaining controllers are developed using state-space multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) techniques to explicity account for coupling between loops and to optimize given known frequency structures of the turbine and disturbance. In this first publication from the study, we present the structure of the ongoing controller comparison experiment, the design process for the two controllers compared in this phase, and initial comparison results obtained in field-testing.

  1. New observations of infiltration through fractured alluvium in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site: A preliminary field investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, C.S. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Smith, D.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); McKinnis, W.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Mercury, NV (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional tectonics coupled with the subsurface detonation of nuclear explosives has caused widespread fracturing of the alluvium of Yucca Flat. Fractures deeper than 30 meters have been observed in boreholes. Some of these fractures are large enough to capture significant amounts of runoff during storm events. Evidence of stream capture by fractures and observations of runoff flowing into open fractures give qualitative evidence of infiltration to depths greater than several meters and possibly to the saturated zone. Our field observations contradict the assumption that little infiltration occurs on Yucca Flat. The larger, hydrologically important fractures are associated with geologic faults or the regional stress field. Additional field studies are needed to investigate the impact of fractures on the transport of contaminants.

  2. Microgrid Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

  3. Test of the superluminality of supercurrents induced by a local electric field in a superconducting-core coaxial cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Chiao

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment is proposed to test the prediction that induced supercurrents in a superconductor can become superluminal, as was predicted in the paper by S.J. Minter, K. Wegter-McNelly, R.Y. Chiao, Physica E 42 (2010) 234.

  4. CRADA Final Report For CRADA NO. CR-12-006 [Operation and Testing of an SO{sub 2}-depolarized Electrolyzer (SDE) for the Purpose of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, W. A.; Colon-Mercado, H. R.; Steimke, J. L.; Zahn, Steffen

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has led a team of collaborators under the Department of Energy’s (DOE) nuclear hydrogen production program to develop the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process. HyS is a 2-step water-splitting process consisting of high temperature decomposition of sulfuric acid to generate SO{sub 2}, followed by the electrolysis of aqueous SO{sub 2} to generate hydrogen and sulfuric acid. The latter is fed back into the high temperature reactor. SRNL designed and built an SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) and a test facility. Over 40 SDE’s were tested using different catalysts, membranes and other components. SRNL demonstrated that an SDE could be operated continuously for approximately 200 hours under certain conditions without buildup of sulfur at the SDE’s cathode, thus solving a key technical problem with SDE technology. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) is a major supplier of hydrogen production systems, and they have proprietary technology that could benefit from the SDE developed by SRNS, or some improved version thereof. However, to demonstrate that SRNL’s SDE is a truly viable approach to the electrolyzer design, continuous operation for far greater periods of time than 200 hours must be demonstrated, and the electrolyzer must be scaled up to greater hydrogen production capacities. SRNL and Air Products entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the objective of demonstrating the effectiveness of the SDE for hydrogen and sulfuric acid production and to demonstrate long-term continuous operation so as to dramatically increase the confidence in the SDE design for commercial operation. SRNL prepared a detailed technical report documenting previous SDE development, including the current SDE design and operating conditions that led to the 200-hour sulfurfree testing. SRNL refurbished its single cell SDE test facility and qualified the equipment for continuous operation. A new membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was fabricated and installed in the single cell electrolyzer (60 cm{sup 2} active cell area). Shakedown testing was conducted, and several modifications were made to the test facility equipment. Seven different MEAs were used during testing. Beginning on May 20, 2013, SRNL was able to test the SDE continuously for 1200 hours, including 1000 hours under power to generate hydrogen at an average rate of 10.8 liters per hour. The SDE was not removed or repaired during the 50-day test and was successfully restarted after each shutdown. The test was intentionally stopped after 1200 hours (1000 hours of hydrogen production) due to funding constraints. Post-test examination of the MEA using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis (EDAX) showed no elemental sulfur deposits or sulfur layer inside the cell, thus successfully achieving the test goals. The results demonstrated that the SDE could be operated for extended periods without major performance degradation or the buildup of sulfur inside the MEA. Air Products conducted an assessment of the economic viability of the SDE based on the “as tested” design. The results indicated that the SDE faces significant economic obstacles in its current state. Further development and scale-up are necessary before the SDE is ready for commercialization.

  5. Honeywell Modular Automation System Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STUBBS, A.M.

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) is to verify the operability of the three new furnaces as controlled by the new Honeywell Modular Automation System (MAS). The Honeywell MAS is being installed in PFP to control the three thermal stabilization furnaces in glovebox HA-211. The ATP provides instructions for testing the configuration of the Honeywell MAS at the Plutonium Finishing Plant(PFP). The test will be a field test of the analog inputs, analog outputs, and software interlocks. The interlock test will check the digital input and outputs. Field equipment will not be connected forth is test. Simulated signals will be used to test thermocouple, limit switch, and vacuum pump inputs to the PLUMAS.

  6. The MuCool Test Area and RF Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torun, Y.; Huang, D.; /IIT, Chicago; Norem, J.; /Argonne; Palmer, Robert B.; Stratakis, Diktys; /Brookhaven; Bross, A.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Moretti, A.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab; Li, D.; /LBL, Berkeley /Jefferson Lab

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MuCool RF Program focuses on the study of normal conducting RF structures operating in high magnetic field for applications in muon ionization cooling for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. Here we give an overview of the program, which includes a description of the test facility and its capabilities, the current test program, and the status of a cavity that can be rotated in the magnetic field, which allows for a detailed study of the maximum stable operating gradient vs. magnetic field strength and angle.

  7. The MuCool Test Area and RF Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, A D; Jansson, A; Moretti, A; Yonehara, K; Huang, D; Torun, Y; Li, D; Norem, J; Palmer, R B; Stratakis, D

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MuCool RF Program focuses on the study of normal conducting RF structures operating in high magnetic field for applications in muon ionization cooling for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. This paper will give an overview of the program, which will include a description of the test facility and its capabilities, the current test program, and the status of a cavity that can be rotated in the magnetic field which allows for a more detailed study of the maximum stable operating gradient vs. magnetic field strength and angle.

  8. New downhole steam generator tested

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Completion of 2 field tests of a new-model down-hole steam generator paves the way for further evaluation and development of a system destined to increase California's heavy oil production. Current air pollution restrictions there prevent installation of conventional steam generators in several areas of interest to oil operators. The current series of tests, conducted by Chemical Oil Recovery Co. (CORCO) of Bakersfield, California, follows an earlier prototype operation conducted by Sandia National Laboratories in conjunction with the US Department of Energy. The CORCO tests were conducted on the surface with the generator's output going into Tenneco Oil Exploration and Production Co.'s overland-Riokern Well No. 80, located in the Kern River field 4 miles north of Bakersfield. The first test was concluded with just under 1000 bbl of steam injected, less than planned due to a higher-than-expected injection pressure. The unit operated at less than 25% capacity because of the air compressor limitation. Compressor output was only 285 psi, not enough to inject the desired volumes into the reservoir. Test data shows that injection amounted to 150 bpd of 90 to 95% quality steam at 225-psi wellhead pressure. After injection, the well was shut in for 3 days to allow soaking, then put on production. Initial production was 40 bopd at 175 F.

  9. Laser spectroscopy of hyperfine structure in highly-charged ions: a test of QED at high fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. F. A. Winters; M. Vogel; D. M. Segal; R. C. Thompson; W. Noertershaeuser

    2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is presented of laser spectroscopy experiments with cold, trapped, highly-charged ions, which will be performed at the HITRAP facility at GSI in Darmstadt (Germany). These high-resolution measurements of ground state hyperfine splittings will be three orders of magnitude more precise than previous measurements. Moreover, from a comparison of measurements of the hyperfine splittings in hydrogen- and lithium-like ions of the same isotope, QED effects at high electromagnetic fields can be determined within a few percent. Several candidate ions suited for these laser spectroscopy studies are presented.

  10. Principal Field Agronomist (Research Associate I or II) Position Summary: Research Associate I or II (Principal Field Agronomist) responsible for all field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including taking primary responsibility for maintenance and repair of all equipment, buildings, and tools or II (Principal Field Agronomist) responsible for all field operations for the CSU Crops Testing with farmers, scientists, government representatives, and crop commodity groups. The normal annual work demands

  11. Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    StaJc Mechanical Structural failures All Load Broken glass Cry---Si & TF (SimulaJon of wind Broken interconnect ribbons All and snow load) Broken Cells Cry---Si & CPV Electrical...

  12. Improvement of operations and maintenance techniques research program: an evaluation of the standard elutriate test as an estimator of contaminant release at the point of dredging. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, D.D.; Sherrad, J.H.; Amende, R.A.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While release of contaminants during dredged material disposal operations has long been the subject of environmental concern for some projects, the potential release of pollutants during the dredging process has recently come under the scrutiny of Federal and State regulatory agencies. Maintenance of shipping channels may require the removal of sediments suspected to contain high concentrations of contaminants. During any dredging operation, sediments become resuspended to varying degrees according to sediment type, hydrologic conditions, type of dredging equipment used, and operational procedures employed. Contaminants may be released in soluble form directly to the water column, or they may remain adsorbed to the fine resuspended sediment particles. The primary mode of environmental impact is from the soluble fraction, since dissolved forms of pollutants are more available for aquatic biota uptake than those that remain adsorbed to sediment particles.

  13. Comparing State-Space Multivariable Controls to Multi-SISO Controls for Load Reduction of Drivetrain-Coupled Modes on Wind Turbines Through Field-Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P. A.; Van Wingerden, J. W.; Wright, A. D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present results from an ongoing controller comparison study at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The intention of the study is to demonstrate the advantage of using modern multivariable methods for designing control systems for wind turbines versus conventional approaches. We will demonstrate the advantages through field-test results from experimental turbines located at the NWTC. At least two controllers are being developed side-by-side to meet an incrementally increasing number of turbine load-reduction objectives. The first, a multiple single-input, single-output (m-SISO) approach, uses separately developed decoupled and classicially tuned controllers, which is, to the best of our knowledge, common practice in the wind industry. The remaining controllers are developed using state-space multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) techniques to explicity account for coupling between loops and to optimize given known frequency structures of the turbine and disturbance. In this first publication from the study, we present the structure of the ongoing controller comparison experiment, the design process for the two controllers compared in this phase, and initial comparison results obtained in field-testing.

  14. TIGER: A data analysis pipeline for testing the strong-field dynamics of general relativity with gravitational wave signals from coalescing compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalis Agathos; Walter Del Pozzo; Tjonnie G. F. Li; Chris Van Den Broeck; John Veitch; Salvatore Vitale

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct detection of gravitational waves with upcoming second-generation gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Virgo will allow us to probe the genuinely strong-field dynamics of general relativity (GR) for the first time. We present a data analysis pipeline called TIGER (Test Infrastructure for GEneral Relativity), which is designed to utilize detections of compact binary coalescences to test GR in this regime. TIGER is a model-independent test of GR itself, in that it is not necessary to compare with any specific alternative theory. It performs Bayesian inference on two hypotheses: the GR hypothesis $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm GR}$, and $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm modGR}$, which states that one or more of the post-Newtonian coefficients in the waveform are not as predicted by GR. By the use of multiple sub-hypotheses of $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm modGR}$, in each of which a different number of parameterized deformations of the GR phase are allowed, an arbitrarily large number of 'testing parameters' can be used without having to worry about a model being insufficiently parsimonious if the true number of extra parameters is in fact small. TIGER is well-suited to the regime where most sources have low signal-to-noise ratios, again through the use of these sub-hypotheses. Information from multiple sources can trivially be combined, leading to a stronger test. We focus on binary neutron star coalescences, for which sufficiently accurate waveform models are available that can be generated fast enough on a computer to be fit for use in Bayesian inference. We show that the pipeline is robust against a number of fundamental, astrophysical, and instrumental effects, such as differences between waveform approximants, a limited number of post-Newtonian phase contributions being known, the effects of neutron star spins and tidal deformability on the orbital motion, and instrumental calibration errors.

  15. Two-vertex loop diagrams in the two-dimensional subspace induced by a superstrong magnetic field: polarization operator and photon and axion decay to neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skobelev, V. V., E-mail: v.skobelev@inbox.ru [Moscow State Industrial University (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The absence of divergences and singularities in effectively two-dimensional field theory induced by a superstrong magnetic field is demonstrated for the example where loop diagrams involving two vector and two pseudovector vertices are calculated. The form of effective low-energy Lagrangians for ({gamma}{nu}{nu}) and (a{nu}{nu}) interactions in a superstrong magnetic field is presented. The role of photon and axion decays to neutrinos in the early universe is discussed.

  16. Final Report: Mobile Surveillance and Wireless Communication Systems Field Operational Test Volume 2: FOT Objectives, Organization, System Design, Results, Conclusions and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Lawrence

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    obstacle to using solar power to charge the ramp metersystem do utilize solar power to supplement power supplied

  17. Evaluation of light microscopy and rapid diagnostic test for the detection of malaria under operational field conditions: a household survey in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endeshaw, Tekola; Gebre, Teshome; Ngondi, Jeremiah; Graves, Patricia M; Shargie, Estifanos B; Ejigsemahu, Yeshewamebrat; Ayele, Berhan; Yohannes, Gedeon; Teferi, Tesfaye; Messele, Ayenew; Zerihun, Mulat; Genet, Asrat; Mosher, Aryc W; Emerson, Paul M; Richards, Frank O Jr

    2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    .4 (3.4–8.5) 4.5 1.7 6.2 (3.6–10.2) Total 11,504 2.2 1.6 0.3 4.1 (3.4–5.0) 2.1 1.1 3.3 (2.6–4.1) Pf, Plasmodium falciparum; Pv, Plasmodium vivax Table 3: Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of blood slide...

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - UAV Field Test IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- PolarizationgovCampaignsSummer Single Column ModelRSP

  19. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The NTS is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. NNSA/NSO is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and NSTec is the Management & Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The U10C Disposal Site is located in the northwest corner of Area 9 at the NTS (Figure 1) and is located in a subsidence crater created by two underground nuclear events, one in October 1962 and another in April 1964. The disposal site opened in 1971 for the disposal of rubbish, refuse, pathological waste, asbestos-containing material, and industrial solid waste. A Notice of Intent form to operate the disposal site as a Class II site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 26, 1994, and was acknowledged in a letter to the DOE on February 8, 1994. It operated as a state of Nevada Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS) until it closed on October 5, 1995, for retrofit as a Class III SWDS. The retrofit consisted of the installation of a minimum four-foot compacted soil layer to segregate the different waste types and function as a liner to inhibit leachate and water flow into the lower waste zone. Five neutron monitoring tubes were installed in this layer to monitor possible leachate production and water activity. Upon acceptance of the installed barrier and approval of an Operating Plan by NDEP/BFF, the site reopened in January 1996 as a Class III SWDS for the disposal of industrial solid waste and other inert waste.

  20. Fuel Efficiency Automobile Test Quality Assurance Narrative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Fuel Efficiency Automobile Test Quality Assurance Narrative Standard Operating Procedures Help ........................................................................................................... 3 FEAT Standard Operating Procedures...................................................................................................................24 Maintenance Items

  1. Field Test and Performance Verification: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Installed in a School - Final Report: Phase 4A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, J

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a field verification pilot site investigation that involved the installation of a hybrid integrated active desiccant/vapor-compression rooftop heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) unit at an elementary school in the Atlanta Georgia area. For years, the school had experienced serious humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) problems that had resulted in occupant complaints and microbial (mold) remediation. The outdoor air louvers of the original HVAC units had been closed in an attempt to improve humidity control within the space. The existing vapor compression variable air volume system was replaced by the integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) system that was described in detail in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report published in 2004 (Fischer and Sand 2004). The IADR system and all space conditions have been monitored remotely for more than a year. The hybrid system was able to maintain both the space temperature and humidity as desired while delivering the outdoor air ventilation rate required by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Standard 62. The performance level of the IADR unit and the overall system energy efficiency was measured and found to be very high. A comprehensive IAQ investigation was completed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute before and after the system retrofit. Before-and-after data resulting from this investigation confirmed a significant improvement in IAQ, humidity control, and occupant comfort. These observations were reported by building occupants and are echoed in a letter to ORNL from the school district energy manager. The IADR system was easily retrofitted in place of the original rooftop system using a custom curb adapter. All work was completed in-house by the school's maintenance staff over one weekend. A subsequent cost analysis completed for the school district by the design engineer of record concluded that the IADR system being investigated was actually less expensive to install than other less-efficient options, most of which were unable to deliver the required ventilation while maintaining the desired space humidity levels.

  2. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  3. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTNG NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalle; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work performed in the third quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: first field test; test data analysis.

  4. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter.

  5. Operations & Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations and Maintenance Operations OASIS: OATI (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) Contact Information...

  6. Operations & Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates Operations & Maintenance Operations OASIS: WACM (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) wesTTrans Common...

  7. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A SUSTAINABLE AND ENERGY EFFICIENT RE-ROOFING TECHNOLOGY USING FIELD-TEST DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three test attics were constructed to evaluate a new sustainable method of re-roofing utilizing photo-voltaic (PV) laminates, metal roofing panels, and PCM heat sink in the Envelope Systems Research Apparatus (ESRA) facility in the ORNL campus. Figure 1 is a picture of the three attic roofs located adjacent to each other. The leftmost roof is the conventional shingle roof, followed by the metal panel roof incorporating the cool-roof coating, and third from left is the roof with the PCM. On the PCM roof, the PV panels are seen as well; they're labelled from left-to-right as panels 5, 6 and 7. The metal panel roof consists of three metal panels with the cool-roof coating; in further discussion this is referred to as the infrared reflective (IRR) metal roof. The IRR metal panels reflect the incoming solar radiation and then quickly re-emit the remaining absorbed portion, thereby reducing the solar heat gain of the attic. Surface reflectance of the panels were measured using a Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. In the 0.35-2.0 {mu}m wavelength interval, which accounts for more than 94% of the solar energy, the IRR panels have an average reflectance of 0.303. In the infrared portion of the spectrum, the IRR panel reflectance is 0.633. The PCM roof consists of a layer of macro-encapsulated bio-based PCM at the bottom, followed by a 2-cm thick layer of dense fiberglass insulation with a reflective surface on top, and metal panels with pre-installed PV laminates on top. The PCM has a melting point of 29 C (84.2 F) and total enthalpy between 180 and 190 J/g. The PCM was macro-packaged in between two layers of heavy-duty plastic foil forming arrays of PCM cells. Two air cavities, between PCM cells and above the fiberglass insulation, helped the over-the-deck natural air ventilation. It is anticipated that during summer, this extra ventilation will help in reducing the attic-generated cooling loads. The extra ventilation, in conjunction with the PCM heat sink, are used to minimize thermal stresses due to the PV laminates on sunny days. In PV laminates sunlight is converted into electricity and heat simultaneous. In case of building integrated applications, a relatively high solar absorption of amorphous silicon laminates can be utilized during the winter for solar heating purposes with PCM providing necessary heat storage capacity. However, PV laminates may also generate increased building cooling loads during the summer months. Therefore, in this project, the PCM heat sink was to minimize summer heat gains as well. The PCM-fibreglass-PV assembly and the IRR metal panels are capable of being installed directly on top of existing shingle roofs during re-roofing, precluding the need for recycling or disposal of waste materials. The PV laminates installed on the PCM attic are PVL-144 models from Uni-Solar. Each laminate contains 22 triple junction amorphous silicon solar cells connected in series. The silicon cells are of dimensions 356 mm x 239 mm (14-in. x 9.4-in.). The PVL-144 laminate is encapsulated in durable ETFE (poly-ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) high light-transmissive polymer. Table 1 lists the power, voltage and current ratings of the PVL-144 panel.

  8. RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the loss of residual heat removal during midloop operation experiment conducted at the ROSA-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Sibashis Sanatkumar

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. The experiment was conducted at the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA)-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The experiment involved a 5% cold leg break along with the loss of the RHR system-The transient was simulated...

  9. Characterization methods for ultrasonic test systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busse, L.J.; Becker, F.L.; Bowey, R.E.; Doctor, S.R.; Gribble, R.P.; Posakony, G.J.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for the characterization of ultrasonic transducers (search units) and instruments are presented. The instrument system is considered as three separate components consisting of a transducer, a receiver-display, and a pulser. The operation of each component is assessed independently. The methods presented were chosen because they provide the greatest amount of information about component operation and were not chosen based upon such conditions as cost, ease of operation, field implementation, etc. The results of evaluating a number of commercially available ultrasonic test instruments are presented.

  10. Solar Total Energy Project final test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.F.; Abney, L.O.; Towner, M.L. (Georgia Power Co., Shenandoah, GA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP), a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Georgia Power Company (GPC) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, has undergone several design modifications based on experience from previous operations and test programs. The experiences encountered were discussed in detail in the Solar Total Energy Project Summary Report'' completed in 1987 for DOE. Most of the proposed changes discussed in this report were installed and tested in 1987 as part of two 15-day test programs (SNL Contract No. 06-3049). However, several of the suggested changes were not completed before 1988. These plant modifications include a new distributed control system for the balance of plant (BOP), a fiber a optical communications ring for the field control system, and new control configuration reflecting the new operational procedures caused by the plant modifications. These modifications were tested during a non-consecutive day test, and a 60-day field test conducted during the autumn of 1989. These test were partially funded by SNL under Contract No. 42-4859, dated June 22, 1989. Results of these tests and preliminary analysis are presented in this test summary report. 9 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Measurement and calculation of doses in and around north-west labyrinth in TFTR test cell shielding for D-T operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A.; Eggleston, J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science; Kugel, H.W.; Ascione, G.; Elwood, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    TFTR test cell has a major penetration that exists on the inner side of the north-west corner of the test cell wall. There is no known direct line of sight from the plasma source to the door. The biological doses were measured at various locations inside both the legs of the labyrinth, in addition to, scattered locations on outer segments of the labyrinth facing the TFTR D-T plasma. In addition, six sets of activation foil detectors were placed covering the south-to-north leg, labyrinth entrance, and west-to-east leg. The doses have been calculated using 3-D monte carlo code MCNP with ENDF/B-VI. The calculations reproduce the broad features of the measured data. However, the authors find significant differences in the calculations for a number of locations. The possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  12. Electronic field permeameter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Mark A. (Madison, WI); Goggin, David J. (Austin, TX); Horne, Patrick J. (Austin, TX); Kocurek, Gary G. (Roundrock, TX); Lake, Larry W. (Austin, TX)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For making rapid, non-destructive permeability measurements in the field, a portable minipermeameter of the kind having a manually-operated gas injection tip is provided with a microcomputer system which operates a flow controller to precisely regulate gas flow rate to a test sample, and reads a pressure sensor which senses the pressure across the test sample. The microcomputer system automatically turns on the gas supply at the start of each measurement, senses when a steady-state is reached, collects and records pressure and flow rate data, and shuts off the gas supply immediately after the measurement is completed. Preferably temperature is also sensed to correct for changes in gas viscosity. The microcomputer system may also provide automatic zero-point adjustment, sensor calibration, over-range sensing, and may select controllers, sensors, and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements. Electronic sensors may provide increased accuracy and precision. Preferably one microcomputer is used for sensing instrument control and data collection, and a second microcomputer is used which is dedicated to recording and processing the data, selecting the sensors and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements, and instructing the user how to set-up and operate the minipermeameter. To provide mass data collection and user-friendly operation, the second microcomputer is preferably a lap-type portable microcomputer having a non-volatile or battery-backed CMOS memory.

  13. Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

  14. Operator pencil passing through a given operator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, A., E-mail: khudian@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: adam.biggs@student.manchester.ac.uk; Khudaverdian, H. M., E-mail: khudian@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: adam.biggs@student.manchester.ac.uk [School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Let ? be a linear differential operator acting on the space of densities of a given weight ?{sub 0} on a manifold M. One can consider a pencil of operators ?-circumflex(?)=(?{sub ?}) passing through the operator ? such that any ?{sub ?} is a linear differential operator acting on densities of weight ?. This pencil can be identified with a linear differential operator ?-circumflex acting on the algebra of densities of all weights. The existence of an invariant scalar product in the algebra of densities implies a natural decomposition of operators, i.e., pencils of self-adjoint and anti-self-adjoint operators. We study lifting maps that are on one hand equivariant with respect to divergenceless vector fields, and, on the other hand, with values in self-adjoint or anti-self-adjoint operators. In particular, we analyze the relation between these two concepts, and apply it to the study of diff?(M)-equivariant liftings. Finally, we briefly consider the case of liftings equivariant with respect to the algebra of projective transformations and describe all regular self-adjoint and anti-self-adjoint liftings. Our constructions can be considered as a generalisation of equivariant quantisation.

  15. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Testing and Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test. Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  16. RMOTC offers unique test facility to oil industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opsal, C.M. [Fluor Daniel NPOSR-CUW, Inc., Casper, WY (United States). Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing laboratory developed new tools and techniques in actual field conditions before commercialization has long been a significant problem. Working lab models may fail in the first field applications because of handling, incompatibility with existing equipment, or natural elements such as wind, humidity, or temperature. Further, the risk of damage to the operators wellbore, production, or other operations can be costly and embarrassing. As research dollars are becoming harder to obtain, a neutral, non-competitive, and user friendly test site is needed. This type of facility has been developed at the US Department of Energy`s Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), near Casper, Wyoming, through the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). New technologies and processes field tested at this facility include those related to drilling production/lifting costs, P and A methods, and environmental control and remediation.

  17. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joe; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Stevens, John; Klapp, Dave; Volkommer, Harry; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean

    2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of generating sources less than 100kW. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation, islanding the microgrid's load from a disturbance, thereby maintaining a higher level of service, without impacting the integrity of the utility's electrical power grid; 2) an approach to electrical protection within a limited source microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications between sources. These techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations,and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults. The results from these tests are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or more of the CERTS Microgrid concepts. Future planned microgrid work involves unattended continuous operation of the microgrid for 30 to 60 days to determine how utility faults impact the operation of the microgrid and to gage the power quality and reliability improvements offered by microgrids.

  18. FIELD TEST OF THE WATER-WHEEL IR (WIR) SPECTROMETER ON EVAPORATIVE SALT DEPOSITS AT TIBETAN PLATEAU. P. Sobron, J. J. Freeman, Alian Wang, Dept Earth and Planetary Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "contact survey", i.e., to install a WIR unit inside of a well set into the middle wheel of a pla- netary of WIR has a size of 10x7.5x6.5cm, mass of 450 grams, power consump- tion of 4W, and output data through transformed into a rugged, field portable NIR reflectance spectrometer that is able to operate in tough field

  19. Use the drop-down search menus and operators (AND, OR, NOT) to customize your search. Search by topic, author, journal title, publication year, and other fields.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    by topic, author, journal title, publication year, and other fields. Topic Enter your search words, joined, and subject terms; choose Title from the drop-down search menu to restrict your search to document titles only for the most comprehensive search. 1.To find all articles by Francis Harry Compton Crick, click , enter Crick F

  20. Use of data obtained from core tests in the design and operation of spent brine injection wells in geopressured or geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorda, R.M.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of formation characteristics on injection well performance are reviewed. Use of data acquired from cores taken from injection horizons to predict injectivity is described. And methods for utilizing data from bench scale testing of brine and core samples to optimize injection well design are presented. Currently available methods and equipment provide data which enable the optimum design of injection wells through analysis of cores taken from injection zones. These methods also provide a means of identifying and correcting well injection problems. Methods described in this report are: bulk density measurement; porosity measurement; pore size distribution analysis; permeability measurement; formation grain size distribution analysis; core description (lithology) and composition; amount, type and distribution of clays and shales; connate water analysis; consolidatability of friable reservoir rocks; grain and pore characterization by scanning electron microscopy; grain and pore characterization by thin section analysis; permeability damage and enhancement tests; distribution of water-borne particles in porous media; and reservoir matrix acidizing effectiveness. The precise methods of obtaining this information are described, and their use in the engineering of injection wells is illustrated by examples, where applicable. (MHR)