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1

Field test of cosurfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To demonstrate that cosurfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding is viable in recovering waterflood residual oil from sandstone reservoirs in the near-offshore Gulf of Mexico, a series of tests is being conducted in the White Caste field, Louisiana. The strategy adopted was to pilot the technology in three stages: (1) a flood without polymer to prove features of the process unrelated to achieving mobility control, (2) a test of process polymer injectivity in the same reservoir, and (3) a full process demonstration in a shallower sand. The first phase of the pilot is described in this paper; pilot design, slug formulation, and operations are summarized and key responses are documented and interpreted. Ref. 2 describes the polymer injectivity test. The final pilot stage has not been initiated yet.

Falls, A.H.; Thigpen, D.R.; Nelson, R.C.; Ciaston, J.W.; Lawson, J.B.; Good, P.A.; Ueber, R.C.; Shahin, G.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Tucker sand from Hepler field, Crawford County, Kansas, was characterized using routine and advanced analytical methods. The characterization is part of a chemical flooding pilot test to be conducted in the field, which is classified as a DOE Class I (fluvial-dominated delta) reservoir. Routine and advanced methods of characterization were compared. Traditional wireline logs indicate that the reservoir is vertically compartmentalized on the foot scale. Routine core analysis, X-ray computed tomography (CT), minipermeameter measurement, and petrographic analysis indicate that compartmentalization and lamination extend to the microscale. An idealized model of how the reservoir is probably structured (complex layering with small compartments) is presented. There was good agreement among the several methods used for characterization, and advanced characterization methods adequately explained the coreflood and tracer tests conducted with short core plugs. Tracer and chemical flooding tests were conducted in short core plugs while monitoring with CT to establish flow patterns and to monitor oil saturations in different zones of the core plugs. Channeling of injected fluids occurred in laboratory experiments because, on core plug scale, permeability streaks extended the full length of the core plugs. A graphic example of how channeling in field core plugs can affect oil recovery during chemical injection is presented. The small scale of compartmentalization indicated by plugs of the Tucker sand may actually help improve sweep between wells. The success of field-scale waterflooding and the fluid flow patterns observed in highly heterogeneous outcrop samples are reasons to expect that reservoir flow patterns are different from those observed with short core plugs, and better sweep efficiency may be obtained in the field than has been observed in laboratory floods conducted with short core plugs.

French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Measurements of magnetic field alignment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

1987-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

4

ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report, July--September, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) quantify the effect of chemical slug volume on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) determine the economics of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) forecast the results of injecting an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. A geological study of 72 Minnelusa field surrounding the West Kiehl is complete. Of the 72 fields, 35 were studied in detail and, from these 35 fields, Prairie Creek South and Simpson Ranch were selected for numerical simulation as representative of Minnelusa waterfloods and polymer floods, respectively. This report documents the numerical simulation waterflood, polymer flood, alkaline-surfactant flood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood predictions from the West Kiehl, Simpson Ranch and Prairie Creek South fields.

Pitts, M.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and its application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Annual report for the period January 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the most advanced application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. A preliminary analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil of 20% of the original stock tank oil in place will be produced above waterflooding. The cost of the incremental oil will be less than $2.50 per incremental barrel. A statistical analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 200 million barrels. {open_quotes}Detailed Evaluation of the West Kiehl Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Field Project and Its Application to Mature Minnelusa Waterfloods{close_quotes} objective is to evaluate both the field performance of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer enhanced oil recovery technology as well as its potential application to other Minnelusa oil fields.

Pitts, M.J.; Surkalo, H.; Mundorf, W.R.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and its application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the first application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. The following analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil greater than waterflooding was produced at a cost of less than $2.00 per incremental barrel. A analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the total original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 130 million barrels. The goals of ``Detailed Evaluation of the West Kield Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Field Project and It`s Application to Mature Minnelusa Waterfloods`` are to evaluate both the field performance of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer enhanced oil recovery technology as well as its potential application to other Minnelusa oil fields.

Pitts, M.J.; Surkalo, H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Annual technical report, January 1993--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the most advanced application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. A preliminary analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil of 20% of the original stock tank oil in place will be produced above waterflooding. The cost of the incremental oil will be less than $2.50 per incremental barrel. A statistical analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 200 million barrels. This project (1) evaluates the geological deposition environment of West Kiehl and adjacent Minneluse sand reservoirs; (2) compares the production performance results of the best geologic and reservoir performance analogs and select two fields for future study; (3) compares the two best field analogs to the west Kiehl field using numerical simulation; (4) predict results of applying the enhancement technology on two mature Minneluse waterflood analog units using engineering and numerical simulation; (5) predict waterflood and polymer flood performance of the West Kiehl field using numerical simulation.

Pitts, M.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report for the period of April--June, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study of the West Kiehl is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) quantify the effect of chemical slug volume on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) determine the economics of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) forecast the results of injecting an alkaline--surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. This report will document the numerical simulation waterflood, polymer flood, alkaline-surfactant flood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood predictions from the West Kiehl and Prairie Creek South fields.

Pitts, M.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Lunar magnetic field measurements with a cubesat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a mission concept that uses 3-unit cubesats to perform new measurements of lunar magnetic fields, less than 100 meters above the Moon’s surface. The mission calls for sending the cubesats on impact ...

Garrick-Bethell, Ian

12

Alkaline battery  

SciTech Connect

A zinc alkaline secondary battery is described having an excellent cycle characteristic, having a negative electrode which comprises a base layer of zinc active material incorporating cadmium metal and/or a cadmium compound and an outer layer made up of cadmium metal and/or a cadmium compound and applied to the surface of the base layer of zinc active material.

Furukawa, N.; Inoue, K.; Murakami, S.

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

13

Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coherent Doppler lidar has been used in an aircraft to measure the 2-dimensional wind field in a number of different atmospheric situations. The lidar, a pulsed CO2 system, was installed in the NASA Convair 990. Galileo II, and flown in a ...

J. Bilbro; G. Fichtl; D. Fitzjarrald; M. Krause; R. Lee

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

HEAT CAPACITY MEASUREMENTS IN PULSED MAGNETIC FIELDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(World Scientific, to be published) The new NHMFL 60T quasi-continuous magnet produces a flat-top field for a period of 100 ms at 60 Tesla, and for longer time at lower fields, e.g. 0.5 s at 35 Tesla. We have developed for the first time the capability to measure heat capacity at very high magnetic fields in the NHMFL 60T quasi-continuous magnet at LANL, using a probe built out of various plastic materials. The field plateau allows us to utilize a heat-pulse method to obtain heat capacity data. Proof-of-principle heat capacity experiments were performed on a variety of correlated electron systems. Both magnet performance characteristics and physical properties of various materials studied hold out a promise of wide application of this new tool. 1 I. TECHNIQUE The 60 Tesla Long-Pulse (60TLP) magnet was recently commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This magnet produces a flat-top field for a period of 100 ms at 60

M. Jaime; R. Movshovich; J. L. Sarrao; J. Kim; G. Stewart; W. P. Beyermann

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood  

SciTech Connect

Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses were used to better understand porosity and permeability trends in the region and to characterize barriers and define flow units. Diagenetic alterations that impact porosity and permeability include development of quartz overgrowths, sutured quartz grains, dissolution of feldspar grains, formation of clay mineral coatings on grains, and calcite cementation. Many of these alterations are controlled by facies. Mapping efforts identified distinct flow units in the northern part of the field showing that the Pennsylvanian Bridgeport consists of a series of thick incised channel fill sequences. The sandstones are about 75-150 feet thick and typically consist of medium grained and poorly sorted fluvial to distributary channel fill deposits at the base. The sandstones become indistinctly bedded distributary channel deposits in the main part of the reservoir before fining upwards and becoming more tidally influenced near their top. These channel deposits have core permeabilities ranging from 20 md to well over 1000 md. The tidally influenced deposits are more compartmentalized compared to the thicker and more continuous basal fluvial deposits. Fine grained sandstones that are laterally equivalent to the thicker channel type deposits have permeabilities rarely reaching above 250 md. Most of the unrecovered oil in Lawrence Field is contained in Pennsylvanian Age Bridgeport sandstones and Mississippian Age Cypress sandstones. These reservoirs are highly complex and compartmentalized. Detailed reservoir characterization including the development of 3-D geologic and geocellular models of target areas in the field were completed to identify areas with the best potential to recover remaining reserves including unswept and by-passed oil. This project consisted of tasks designed to compile, interpret, and analyze the data required to conduct reservoir characterization for the Bridgeport and Cypress sandstones in pilot areas in anticipation of expanded implementation of ASP flooding in Lawrence Field. Geologic and geocellular modeling needed for reservoir characterization and res

Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Polarization bispectrum for measuring primordial magnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the potential of polarization bispectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to constrain primordial magnetic fields (PMFs). We compute all possible bispectra between temperature and polarization anisotropies sourced by PMFs and show that they are weakly correlated with well-known local-type and secondary ISW-lensing bispectra. From a Fisher analysis it is found that, owing to E-mode bispectra, in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment the expected uncertainty in the amplitude of magnetized bispectra is 80% improved in comparison with an analysis in terms of temperature auto-bispectrum alone. In the $\\mathit{Planck}$ or the proposed PRISM experiment cases, we will be able to measure PMFs with strength 2.6 or 2.2 nG. PMFs also generate bispectra involving B-mode polarization, due to tensor-mode dependence. We also find that the B-mode bispectrum can reduce the uncertainty more drastically and hence PMFs comparable to or less than 1 nG may be measured in a PRISM-like experiment.

Maresuke Shiraishi

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

17

Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification Title Measuring Residential Ventilation System...

18

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) The first edition of this report, released in October 1982, presented physical-characteristic information for the various DOE radiologic-instrument calibration facilities located throughout the U.S. Three subsequent editions have been released in an effort to update information regarding the current status of the facilities. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) More Documents & Publications Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)

19

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combine to indicate uranium enrichment of an alkaline magma.uranium, the Ilfmaussaq intrusion contains an unusually high enrichment

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Field Emission Measurements from Niobium Electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Increasing the operating voltage of a DC high voltage photogun serves to minimize space charge induced emittance growth and thereby preserve electron beam brightness, however, field emission from the photogun cathode electrode can pose significant problems: constant low level field emission degrades vacuum via electron stimulated desorption which in turn reduces photocathode yield through chemical poisoning and/or ion bombardment and high levels of field emission can damage the ceramic insulator. Niobium electrodes (single crystal, large grain and fine grain) were characterized using a DC high voltage field emission test stand at maximum voltage -225kV and electric field gradient > 10MV/m. Niobium electrodes appear to be superior to diamond-paste polished stainless steel electrodes.

M. BastaniNejad, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, S. Covert, J. Hansknecht, C. Hernandez-Garcia, R. Mammei, M. Poelker

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alkaline injection for enhanced oil recovery: a status report  

SciTech Connect

In the past several years, there has been renewed interest in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by alkaline injection. Alkaline solutions also are being used as preflushes in micellar/polymer projects. Several major field tests of alkaline flooding are planned, are in progress, or recently have been completed. Considerable basic research on alkaline injection has been published recently, and more is in progress. This paper summarizes known field tests and, where available, the amount of alkali injected and the performance results. Recent laboratory work, much sponsored by the U.S. DOE, and the findings are described. Alkaline flood field test plans for new projects are summarized.

Mayer, E.H.; Berg, R.L.; Carmichael, J.D.; Weinbrandt, R.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

NNSA's Aerial Measuring System at Rickenbacker Field in Ohio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerial Measuring System at Rickenbacker Field in Ohio | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

23

Estimating Advective Tendencies from Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to estimate horizontal advective tendencies of environmental variables from measurements at a finite set of observation points has been evaluated. The observation points include a central point plus from three to six boundary points ...

Paul Michael

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Field power measurements of imaging equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inkjet device having the lowest power consumption, followedsomewhat lower power consumptions. The device configured aspower consumption or measurement. For products with E NERGY S TAR labels on the device,

McWhinney, Marla; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard; Roberson, Judy; Nordman, Bruce; Busch, John

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Megnetic Field Based Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchronous phasor measurements are critical for the wide area monitoring and control of a large interconnected power system. However, only a small number of Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) have been installed in the North America, mostly because of the large installation and maintenance costs of a classical PMU that uses current transformers (CT) to obtain current signal and potential transformers (PT) to obtain voltage input signals. The classical PMUs use technology developed more than 20 years ago. I...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Analyses of Magnetic-Field Peak-Exposure Summary Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past emphasis on exposure characterization and analyses for magnetic fields has been on measures of central tendency, such as long-term time-weighted average (TWA) exposure. Past emphasis on exposure characterization and analyses for magnetic fields has been on measures of central tendency such as long-term time-weighted average (TWA) exposure. This report examines peak exposure measures such as the maximum and 99th percentile of measurements during a day. EPRI sponsored this study to enhance industry kn...

2003-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) The first edition of this report, released in October 1982, presented physical-characteristic information for the various DOE radiologic-instrument calibration facilities located throughout the U.S. Three subsequent editions have been released in an effort to update information regarding the current status of the facilities. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) More Documents & Publications Calibration Model Assignments expressed as U3O8, Summary Table ES-1 Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,

28

Molecular-scale measurements of electric fields at electrochemical interfaces.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatially resolved measurements of electric fields at electrochemical interfaces would be a critical step toward further understanding and modeling the detailed structure of electric double layers. The goal of this project was to perform proof-of-principle experiments to demonstrate the use of field-sensitive dyes for optical measurements of fields in electrochemical systems. A confocal microscope was developed that provides sensitive detection of the lifetime and high resolution spectra of excited fluorescence for dyes tethered to electrically conductive surfaces. Excited state lifetimes for the dyes were measured and found to be relatively unquenched when linked to indium tin oxide, but strongly quenched on gold surfaces. However, our fluorescence detection is sufficiently sensitive to measure spectra of submonolayer dye coatings even when the fluorescence was strongly quenched. Further work to create dye labeled interfaces on flat, uniform and durable substrates is necessary to make electric field measurements at interfaces using field sensitive dyes.

Hayden, Carl C.; Farrow, Roger L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Anodes for alkaline electrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev (Latham, NY)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Zinc alkaline secondary battery  

SciTech Connect

A zinc alkaline secondary battery with improved service life in which a multi-layer separator is interposed between the negative and positive electrodes and the quantity of the alkaline electrolyte in the layer of the separator adjacent to the negative electrode is less than that of the electrolyte in the layer of the separator adjacent to the positive electrode.

Furukawa, N.; Nishizawa, N.

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

31

Laser-Acoustic Hygrometer: Procedure and Results of Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trial field measurements of humidity fluctuations are taken by a laser-acoustic hygrometer consisting of a CO laser, a mechanical modulator, a detector, an audio-frequency amplifier, and a device for processing signals. The proposed method is ...

Boris S. Agrovskii; Alexandre S. Gurvich; Vitaly P. Kukharets; Valery V. Vorob’ev

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Interpretation of Field Measurements Made with a Portable Albedometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A small portable albedometer with direct readout of albedo values is described. The instrument is designed for surveying natural fields on foot. It was used on glaciers in Austria and Greenland, not for precision measurements on the ...

J. C. H. van der Hage

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Measuring Helical FCG Voltage with an Electric Field Antenna  

SciTech Connect

A method of measuring the voltage produced by a helical explosive flux compression generator using a remote electric field antenna is described in detail. The diagnostic has been successfully implemented on several experiments. Measured data from the diagnostic compare favorably with voltages predicted using the code CAGEN, validating our predictive modeling tools. The measured data is important to understanding generator performance, and is measured with a low-risk, minimally intrusive approach.

White, A D; Anderson, R A; Javedani, J B; Reisman, D B; Goerz, D A; Ferriera, A J; Speer, R D

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple and compact method and apparatus for detecting high frequency electric fields, particularly in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 100 MHz, uses a compact toroidal antenna. For typical geophysical applications the sensor will be used to detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from about 1 MHz, in particular in the frequency range between 1 to 100 MHz, to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Time-varying magnetic fields associated with time-varying electric fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroidal coil. The electric field at the center of (and perpendicular to the plane of) the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroidal coil one can easily and accurately determine the electric field.

Lee, Ki Ha (Lafayette, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Determination of far-field antenna patterns from near-field measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstracf-In many cases, it is impractical or impossible to make antenna patfern measurements on a conventional far-field range; the distance to the radiating far field may be too long, it may be impractical to move the antenna from its operating environment to an antenna range, or the desired amount of pattern data may require too much time on a far-field range. For these and other reasons, it is often desirable or necessary to determine far-field antenna patterns from measurements made in the radiating near-field region; three basic techniques for accomplishing this have proven to be successful. In the 6rst technique, the aperture phase and amplitude distributions are sampled by a scanning field probe, and then the measured distributions are transformed to the far field. In the second technique, a plane wave that is approximately uniform in amplitude is created by a feed and large reflector in the immediate vicinity of the test antenna. And in the third technique, the test antenna is focused within the radiating near-field region, patterns are measured at the reduced range, and then the antenna is refocused to infinity. Each of these techniques is discussed, and the various advantages and limitations of each technique are presented.

Richard C. Johnson; H. Allen Ecrer; J. Searcy Hollis

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Measurements With SOLARC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct solar coronal magnetic field measurements have become possible since recent development of high-sensitivity infrared detection technology. The SOLARC instrument installed on Mt. Haleakala is such a polarimetric coronagraph that was designed for routinely observing Stokes parameter profiles in near infrared (NIR) wavelengthes. The Fe$^{+12}$ 1075 nm forbidden coronal emission line (CEL) is potential for weak coronal magnetic field detection. As a first step the potential field model has been used to compare with the SOLARC observation in the Fe$^{+12}$ 1075 nm line (Liu and Lin 2008). It's found that the potential fields can be a zeroth-order proxy for approaching the observed coronal field above a simple stable sunspot. In this paper we further discuss several nodi that are hampering the progress for reconstructing the real coronal magnetic field structures. They include the well-known Van Vleck effect in linear polarization signals, ignorance of the information of the NIR emission sources (i.e., inversion problem of coronal magnetic fields), a fat lot of global non-linear force-free field tools available for better modeling coronal magnetic fields, and so on.

Y. Liu; H. Lin

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

Magnetic Field Measurements and Analysis For an Aladdin Dipole Magnet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Measurements and Analysis Field Measurements and Analysis For an Aladdin Dipole Magnet by Kenneth M. Thompson Electromagnetic Technology Program Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, 1L 60439 L8-40 November 21, 1985 Table of Contents Summary i A. Introduction *..*.**.***.....****...**.*..*...*..***.......*..... 1 1. Magnet Description 2. Measuring System 3. Data Descriptions 1 1 3 B. Equipment **********************.***.******.*************..******* 5 1. Probe Positioning System a. Description b. Calibration 2. Field Probe a. Calibration b. Probe Center 1. Method 2. Repeatability c. Hall Gaussmeter Parameters 3. Auxiliary Probes 4. Optical Alignment Equipment 5. Power Supply 6. Magnet Cooling Water System 7. Support a. Magnet b. Manipulator 5 5 7 7 8 9 9 9 10 10 13 13

38

Estimating of pulsed electric fields using optical measurements.  

SciTech Connect

We performed optical electric field measurements ion nanosecond time scales using the electrooptic crystal beta barium borate (BBO). Tests were based on a preliminary bench top design intended to be a proofofprinciple stepping stone towards a modulardesign optical Efield diagnostic that has no metal in the interrogated environment. The long term goal is to field a modular version of the diagnostic in experiments on large scale xray source facilities, or similarly harsh environments.

Flanagan, Timothy McGuire; Chantler, Gary R.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below is disclosed. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations. 8 figs.

Stallard, B.R.; Kaushik, S.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

40

Field Measurements of Wind Turbine Wakes with Lidars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field measurements of the wake flow produced from a 2-MW Enercon E-70 wind turbine were performed using three scanning Doppler wind lidars. A GPS-based technique was used to determine the position of the wind turbine and the wind lidar locations, ...

Giacomo Valerio Iungo; Yu-Ting Wu; Fernando Porté-Agel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

Hacker, Kirsten

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

SciTech Connect

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Alkaline storage battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkaline storage battery having located in a battery container a battery element comprising a positive electrode, a negative electrode, a separator and a gas ionizing auxiliary electrode, in which the gas ionizing electrode is contained in a bag of microporous film, is described.

Suzuki, S.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

LIDAR wind speed measurements of evolving wind fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor’s frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor’s hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios. Nomenclature a decay parameter for exponential coherence al decrement parameter for transverse coherence (l ? {u, v, w}) bl offset parameter for transverse coherence (l ? {u, v, w}) D longitudinal distance between two points or measurement preview distance F focal distance f frequency (Hz) ? LIDAR measurement angle off of longitudinal direction k wind velocity wavenumber (m?1) ? wavelength (m) R range along LIDAR beam r scan radius for spinning LIDAR scenario ri,j distance between two points in the yz plane U mean wind speed (m/s) ?i,j average mean wind speed between two points in the yz plane ? azimuth angle in the rotor plane ?2 xy(f) Coherence between signals x and y

Eric Simley; Lucy Y. Pao; Neil Kelley; Bonnie Jonkman; Rod Frehlich

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Flow Field Measurement Protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

Henderson, H.; Dentz, J.; Doty, C.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems that are designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed the validity of physicist G.I. Taylor's 1938 frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) 5-megawatt turbine model to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution was applied to a frozen wind field that was used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements were also evaluated using a large eddy simulation (LES) of a stable boundary layer that was provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The LIDAR measurement scenario investigated consists of a hub-mounted LIDAR that scans a circle of points upwind of the turbine in order to estimate the wind speed component in the mean wind direction. Different combinations of the preview distance that is located upwind of the rotor and the radius of the scan circle were analyzed. It was found that the dominant source of measurement error for short preview distances is the detection of transverse and vertical wind speeds from the line-of-sight LIDAR measurement. It was discovered in previous studies that, in the absence of wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances is the spatial averaging caused by the LIDAR's sampling volume. However, by introducing wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances was found to be the coherence loss caused by evolving turbulence. Different measurement geometries were compared using the bandwidth for which the measurement coherence remained above 0.5 and also the area under the measurement coherence curve. Results showed that, by increasing the intensity of wind evolution, the measurement coherence decreases. Using the coherence bandwidth metric, the optimal preview distance for a fixed-scan radius remained almost constant for low and moderate amounts of wind evolution. For the wind field with the simple wind evolution model introduced, the optimal preview distance for a scan radius of 75% blade span (47.25 meters) was found to be 80 meters. Using the LES wind field, the optimal preview distance was 65 meters. When comparing scan geometries using the area under the coherence curve, results showed that, as the intensity of wind evolution increases, the optimal preview distance decreases.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.; Kelley, N.; Jonkman, B.; Frehlich, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Full field imaging based instantaneous hyperspectral absolute refractive index measurement  

SciTech Connect

Multispectral refractometers typically measure refractive index (RI) at discrete monochromatic wavelengths via a serial process. We report on the demonstration of a white light full field imaging based refractometer capable of instantaneous multispectral measurement of absolute RI of clear liquid/gel samples across the entire visible light spectrum. The broad optical bandwidth refractometer is capable of hyperspectral measurement of RI in the range 1.30 1.70 between 400nm 700nm with a maximum error of 0.0036 units (0.24% of actual) at 414nm for a = 1.50 sample. We present system design and calibration method details as well as results from a system validation sample.

Baba, Justin S [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Measurements of insolation variation over a solar collector field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The experiment described in this report makes observations to determine the direct insolation every 16 sec at corners of a quadrilateral approximately 600 meters in size located near Barstow, California. This size approximates the collector field of the solar power plant to be built near Barstow. Data from the first three months of operation of this experiment indicate cloudy conditions, capable of affecting the operation of a solar power plant, occurred during 15% of the daylight hours of some months. Patterns of insolation variation over the experiment area indicate shadows often exist with dimensions less than the projected size of the collection field for the 10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal power plant. Detailed statistical summaries of four partly cloudy events are included. Rates of insolation change on an individual sensor greater than or equal to 30 Wm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ have been observed, but these rate measurements have probably been limited by the response time of the experimental system. Spatial averaging of the measured insolation over the sensor field lowers the rate of insolation change.

Not Available

1978-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (June 1994)

51

System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Blue Springs, MO)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Repeatability of measurements of residential magnetic fields and wire codes  

SciTech Connect

Several epidemiological studies have been based on wire codes (i.e., categories of electrical wiring configurations near residences) or on in-home spot measurements of magnetic flux density (MFD) as surrogates for short- and long-term exposure of children and adults to residential magnetic fields. We used wire code and MFD measurements that were made in 81 Colorado homes in 1985 and again in 1990 to assess their repeatability over periods of 0-24 h and 5 years. These homes, a subset of those lived in by subjects from the case-control study of Savitz et al. [Am J Epidemiol 128:21-38, 1988], were divided into four approximately equally sized groups that were differentiated by wire code and by case-control status. Eight homes were assigned wire codes in 1990 that differed from the 1985 coding of Savitz and colleagues [1988]; of these, seven were coded as high-current configuration (HCC) and one as low-current configuration (LCC) in 1985. Overall, 37 homes were coded as HCC in 1990 compared with 38 homes in 1985. Coding differences were due to differing distance measurements (four homes), differing thick vs. thin categorization of primary-distribution line-conductor sizes (two homes), differing first-span vs. second-span categorization of secondary wires (one home), and physical changes in proximate electrical wiring (one home). Coefficients of correlation between MFD spot measurements that were separated in time by 0-24 h range between 0.70 and 0.90. The coefficient between spot measurements made in 1985 and then again in 1990 is 0.70. These coefficients are similar for HCC and LCC homes and do not depend on whether residential appliances were turned on or off. The data show (at least for the portion of Colorado studied) that residential wire code and, more surprisingly, spot MFD measurements, are fairly reliable over 0-24-h and 5-year periods.

Dovan, T.; Kaune, W.T.; Savitz, D.A. (ENERTECH Consultants, Campbell, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Chemical telemetry of OH observed to measure interstellar magnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present models for the chemistry in gas moving towards the ionization front of an HII region. When it is far from the ionization front, the gas is highly depleted of elements more massive than helium. However, as it approaches the ionization front, ices are destroyed and species formed on the grain surfaces are injected into the gas phase. Photodissociation removes gas phase molecular species as the gas flows towards the ionization front. We identify models for which the OH column densities are comparable to those measured in observations undertaken to study the magnetic fields in star forming regions and give results for the column densities of other species that should be abundant if the observed OH arises through a combination of the liberation of H2O from surfaces and photodissociation. They include CH3OH, H2CO, and H2S. Observations of these other species may help establish the nature of the OH spatial distribution in the clouds, which is important for the interpretation of the magnetic field results.

S. Viti; T. W. Hartquist; P. C. Myers

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

54

Picosecond Electric Field CARS; A Diagnostic Technique to Measure the Electric Field Development within Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Plasmas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a novel technique is presented to take measurements of an electric field which develops and changes rapidly in time. The motivation arises… (more)

Goldberg, Benjamin M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Measurement of gas temperature field in a flame spreading over solid fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An experimental measurement is developed to measure the gas temperature field in a flame spreading downward over thermally thin filter paper. A flame stabilizer apparatus… (more)

Alghamdi, Abdulaziz Othman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Correction of Motional Electric Field Measurements for Galvanic Distortion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interactions between motional electric fields and lateral gradients in electrical conductivity (e.g., seafloor topography) produce boundary electric charges and galvanic (i.e., noninductive) secondary electric fields that result in frequency-...

Alan D. Chave; Douglas S. Luther; Christopher S. Meinen

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Antenna Parameter Measurement by Near-Field Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Lab Tour. Thursday, September 20th. ... Lab Tour. September 20th. Ron Wittmann (Spherical Near-Field Theory); Michael Francis (Uncertainty Analysis ...

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

Measurement of Power System Magnetic Fields by Waveform Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An instrumentation and software package has been developed to characterize an extensive range of temporal, spatial, and frequency parameters associated with magnetic fields.The MultiWave (TM) System can capture the actual magnetic field waveform and coexisting power system environmental conditions in residential, nonresidential, and transient capture applications.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Flame Temperature Field Measurement Using Improved Generalized Cross Validation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The image quality is a crucial factor for calculating flame temperature field based on the color CCD method. However, much unknown noise in flame images would prevent from obtaining the temperature with accuracy. To eliminate noise, the wavelet denoising ...

Yinghui Zhou; Dezhong Zheng

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hazard surveillance for workplace magnetic fields. 1: Walkaround sampling method for measuring ambient field magnitude; 2: Field characteristics from waveform measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent epidemiologic research has suggested that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF) may be associated with leukemia, brain cancer, spontaneous abortions, and Alzheimer`s disease. A walkaround sampling method for measuring ambient ELF-MF levels was developed for use in conducting occupational hazard surveillance. This survey was designed to determine the range of MF levels at different industrial facilities so they could be categorized by MF levels and identified for possible subsequent personal exposure assessments. Industries were selected based on their annual electric power consumption in accordance with the hypothesis that large power consumers would have higher ambient MFs when compared with lower power consumers. Sixty-two facilities within thirteen 2-digit Standard Industrial Classifications (SIC) were selected based on their willingness to participate. A traditional industrial hygiene walkaround survey was conducted to identify MF sources, with a special emphasis on work stations.

Methner, M.M.; Bowman, J.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Large-Scale Hybrid Dynamic Simulation Employing Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation and measurements are two primary ways for power engineers to gain understanding of system behaviors and thus accomplish tasks in system planning and operation. Many well-developed simulation tools are available in today's market. On the other hand, large amount of measured data can be obtained from traditional SCADA systems and currently fast growing phasor networks. However, simulation and measurement are still two separate worlds. There is a need to combine the advantages of simulation and measurements. In view of this, this paper proposes the concept of hybrid dynamic simulation which opens up traditional simulation by providing entries for measurements. A method is presented to implement hybrid simulation with PSLF/PSDS. Test studies show the validity of the proposed hybrid simulation method. Applications of such hybrid simulation include system event playback, model validation, and software validation.

Huang, Zhenyu; Guttromson, Ross T.; Hauer, John F.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

THE ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS MISSION FOR GLOBAL WIND FIELD MEASUREMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prime aim of the Atmospheric Dynamics Mission is to demonstrate measurements of vertical wind profiles from space. Extensive studies conducted by the European Space Agency over the past 15 years have culminated in the selection of a high-...

Ad Stoffelen; Jean Pailleux; Erland Källén; J. Michael Vaughan; Lars Isaksen; Pierre Flamant; Werner Wergen; Erik Andersson; Harald Schyberg; Alain Culoma; Roland Meynart; Martin Endemann; Paul Ingmann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Inference of Subsurface Thermohaline Structure from Fields Measurable by Satellite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellites now provide global measurements of the ocean's surface height and temperature. Ocean climatologies for the northwest Pacific and northwest Atlantic Oceans that relate sea surface height, sea surface temperature, day of the year, ...

Michael R. Carnes; William J. Teague; Jim L. Mitchell

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A field measurement system for the study of thermal comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal screen. A platinum RTD measured air sors usedin theAir Temperature platinum RTD IVlEASURENIENT ACCURACY,Surface Temperature platinum RTD M: 06 m N/A N/A -+ 0 5°C

Benton, C.; Bauman, Fred; Fountain, M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Uncertainties in Achieving Energy Savings from HVAC Maintenance Measures in the Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainties in Achieving Energy Savings from HVAC Maintenance Measures in the Field Kristin Group, Davis, CA, USA 4 Southern California Edison, Irwindale, CA, USA ABSTRACT HVAC maintenance utilities across the nation to include HVAC maintenance measures in energy efficiency programs

California at Davis, University of

67

Savannah River Site Experiences in In Situ Field Measurements of Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses some of the field gamma-ray measurements made at the Savannah River Site, the equipment used for the measurements, and lessons learned during in situ identification and characterization of radioactive materials.

Moore, F.S.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

68

Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

Hobbs, D.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Method and means for measuring the anisotropy of a plasma in a magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Anisotropy is measured of a free-free-bremsstrahlungradiation-generating plasma in a magnetic field by collimating the free-free bremsstrahlung radiation in a direction normal to the magnetic field and scattering the collimated free- free bremsstrahlung radiation to resolve the radiation into its vector components in a plane parallel to the electric field of the bremsstrahlung radiation. The scattered vector components are counted at particular energy levels in a direction parallel to the magnetic field and also normal to the magnetic field of the plasma to provide a measure of anisotropy of the plasma. (Official Gazette)

Shohet, J.L.; Greene, D.G.S.

1973-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

70

Field Partial Discharge Measurements on Extruded Dielectric Transmission Cable Systems - State of the Art  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a review of technical literature, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical reports, and industry guides to determine the current state of the art for field partial discharge (PD) measurements on extruded dielectric transmission cable systems. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of field PD measurement test results.

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

Zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte is unusual in that supersaturated zincate solutions can form during discharge and spongy or mossy zinc deposits can form on charge at low overvoltages. The effect of additives on regular pasted ZnO electrodes and calcium zincate electrodes is discussed. The paper also reports on in situ x-ray absorption (XAS) results on mossy zinc deposits.

McBreen, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Experimental Measurement of the Flow Field of Heavy Trucks  

SciTech Connect

Flat flaps that enclose the trailer base on the sides and top are known to reduce truck drag and reduce fuel consumption. Such flapped-truck geometries have been studied in laboratory wind tunnels and in field tests. A recent review of wind tunnel data for a variety of truck geometries and flow Reynolds numbers show roughly similar values of peak drag reduction, but differ in the determination of the optimum flap angle. Optimum angles lie in the range 12 degrees-20 degrees, and may be sensitive to Reynolds number and truck geometry. The present field test is undertaken to provide additional estimates of the magnitude of the savings to be expected on a typical truck for five flap angles 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 degrees. The flaps are constructed from a fiberglass-epoxy-matrix material and are one-quarter of the base width in length (about 61 cm, or 2 feet). They are attached along the rear door hinge lines on either side of the trailer, so that no gap appears at the joint between the flap and the side of the trailer The flap angle is adjusted by means of two aluminum supports. The present test is performed on the NASA Crows Landing Flight Facility at the northern end of the San Joaquin valley in California. The main runway is approximately 2400 meters in length, and is aligned approximately in a north-south direction The test procedure is to make a series of runs starting at either end of the runway. All runs are initiated under computer control to accelerate the truck to a target speed of 60 mph (96 6 km/hr), to proceed at the target speed for a fixed distance, and to decelerate at the far end of the runway. During a run, the broadcast fuel rate, the engine rpm, forward speed, elapsed time--as well as several other parameters (10 in all)--are digitized at a rate of 100 digitizations per second. Various flapped-conditions are interspersed with the ''no flaps'' control, and are sequenced in a different order on different days. Approximately 310 runs are accumulated over the 5-day test period, May 17-21, 2004. The runway slopes rather uniformly upward from north-to-south. Over the distance of 2424 meters between our two ''start'' markers at either end of the runway, the net change in elevation is a little over ten meters. Test results clearly show the greater fuel consumption required to lift the truck against gravity in the southbound direction For this reason, it is important that the tests be averaged over a round trip circuit--that is, a run in both directions over the identical portion of the roadway. Northbound-southbound averages require an overlap segment of the runway (near the middle of the runway) where the truck--starting from either end--has achieved its target speed. For the target truck speed of 60 mph, this overlap region is approximately 700 meters in length. Typically a run and the return run are accomplished within a time interval of 6 minutes. Analysis of the data show fuel consumption savings at all flap angle settings tested, when compared to the ''no flaps'' condition. The most beneficial flap angle appears to be 13 degrees, for which the fuel consumption is 0.3778 {+-} 0.0025 liters/km compared to the ''no flaps'' control of 0.3941 {+-} 0.0034 liters/km. The error bounds expressed above mark the 99% confidence interval in the mean values given. That is, additional estimates of the mean fuel consumption would be expected to lie within the bounds given, approximately 99% of the time. The fuel consumption saving is--to reasonable accuracy--about 1.63 liters/100 kilometers. These savings represent the increment associated only with the change in drag due to the presence or absence of flaps. The result will hold for any truck of similar size and shape and engine performance regardless of the loading of the truck or the rolling resistance. The economy achieved by use of base flaps can be compared to the economy resulting from driving two trucks in a tandem configuration. In December 2003, such fuel consumption tests were performe

Fred Browand; Charles Radovich

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Direct measurement of the quantum state of the electromagnetic field in a superconducting transmission line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an experimental procedure to directly measure the state of an electromagnetic field inside a resonator, corresponding to a superconducting transmission line, coupled to a Cooper-pair box (CPB). The measurement protocol is based on the use of a dispersive interaction between the field and the CPB, and the coupling to an external classical field that is tuned to resonance with either the field or the CPB. We present a numerical simulation that demonstrates the feasibility of this protocol, which is within reach of present technology.

F. de Melo; L. Aolita; F. Toscano; L. Davidovich

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Evaluation of Smart Phone Apps Used to Measure AC Magnetic Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two specific objectives for this project. The first is to understand the characteristics of the magnetic field sensors used for measuring magnetic fields incorporated in smart phones as well as the integrated circuit in which the sensors are embedded. More specifically, since the design of both the sensor and the integrated circuit in which it is embedded affect the capability of the system to provide accurate magnetic field data, this design should be understood. The second is to learn as much ..

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Field Experiment for Measurement of the Radiative Characteristics of a Hazy Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical two-and three-dimensional solutions to the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. A field experiment was conducted to test this theory. in the experiment the upward radiance was measured above ...

Y. J. Kaufman; T. W. Brakke; E. Eloranta

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Measuring the effects of online advertising on human behavior using natural and field experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the effects of online advertising on human behavior: clicks, new-account sign-ups, and retail sales. Five chapters cover natural and field experiments used to measure these effects for both display ...

Lewis, Randall A. (Randall Aaron)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Microprocessor Field Impactometer Calibration: Do We Measure Drops’ Momentum or Their Kinetic Energy?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the construction and calibration of a low-cost piezoelectric microprocessor impactometer designed for the field measurements of the rainfall kinetic energy (KE) flux. Its precise calibration was performed in laboratory ...

Pawe? Licznar; Janusz ?omotowski; S?awomir B?o?ski; Grzegorz J. Ciach

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Initial Field Measurements of Atmospheric Absorption at 9–11 ?m Wavelengths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field adapted spectrophone system employing a tuneable CO2 laser source (over wavelengths 9.2–10.8 ?m) was used to measure atmospheric gaseous and particulate absorption at an isolated desert location in the southwestern United States. ...

C. W. Bruce; Y. P. Yee; B. D. Hinds; R. J. Brewer; J. Minjares; R. G. Pinnick

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS FROM TRAMS, TRAINS AND HYBRID CARS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electric and magnetic fields emitted from Australian trams, trains and hybrid cars were investigated cars are now electrically operated, therefore emitting less CO2 and less pollution into the environmentMEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS FROM TRAMS, TRAINS AND HYBRID CARS Malka N

Halgamuge, Malka N.

80

Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines.

Ghoshal, P. K. [Oxford Instruments NanoScience, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX13 5QX (United Kingdom); Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M. [Department of Engineering, Electrical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Electric field measurement in microwave discharge ion thruster with electro-optic probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to understand the internal phenomena in a microwave discharge ion thruster, it is important to measure the distribution of the microwave electric field inside the discharge chamber, which is directly related to the plasma production. In this study, we proposed a novel method of measuring a microwave electric field with an electro-optic (EO) probe based on the Pockels effect. The probe, including a cooling system, contains no metal and can be accessed in the discharge chamber with less disruption to the microwave distribution. This method enables measurement of the electric field profile under ion beam acceleration. We first verified the measurement with the EO probe by a comparison with a finite-difference time domain numerical simulation of the microwave electric field in atmosphere. Second, we showed that the deviations of the reflected microwave power and the beam current were less than 8% due to inserting the EO probe into the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. Finally, we successfully demonstrated the measurement of the electric-field profile in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. These measurements show that the electric field distribution in the thruster dramatically changes in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration as the propellant mass flow rate increases. These results indicate that this new method using an EO probe can provide a useful guide for improving the propulsion of microwave discharge ion thrusters.

Ise, Toshiyuki; Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki [The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Togo, Hiroyoshi [Microsystem Integration Laboratories, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone, Morinosato, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Kuninaka, Hitoshi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

TVA's 500-kV electric and magnetic fields: measurements and analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the 500-kV electric and magnetic fields data project, performed by the Electrical Systems Group of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The objectives of the project were to measure, record, and analyze electric and magnetic fields in the vicintiy of TVA's 500-kV transmission lines. Also the effects of transmission line fields on the growth and development of selected agricultural and forest plant species were to be investigated. This report contains only the categorization and the statistical analysis of the fields data.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

CALIBRATING 100 YEARS OF POLAR FACULAE MEASUREMENTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF THE HELIOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the Sun's polar magnetic fields are thought to provide important clues for understanding the 11 year sunspot cycle, including the observed variations of its amplitude and period, the current database of high-quality polar field measurements spans relatively few sunspot cycles. In this paper, we address this deficiency by consolidating Mount Wilson Observatory polar faculae data from four data reduction campaigns, validating it through a comparison with facular data counted automatically from Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) intensitygrams, and calibrating it against polar field measurements taken by the Wilcox Solar Observatory and average polar field and total polar flux calculated using MDI line-of-sight magnetograms. Our results show that the consolidated polar facular measurements are in excellent agreement with both polar field and polar flux estimates, making them an ideal proxy to study the evolution of the polar magnetic field. Additionally, we combine this database with sunspot area measurements to study the role of the polar magnetic flux in the evolution of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF). We find that there is a strong correlation between HMF and polar flux at solar minimum and that, taken together, polar flux and sunspot area are better at explaining the evolution of the HMF during the last century than sunspot area alone.

Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; DeLuca, Edward E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sheeley, Neil R. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Zhang, Jie, E-mail: amunoz@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: edeluca@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: neil.sheeley@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

84

Calculation methods and detection techniques for electric and magnetic fields from power lines with measurement verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accurate determination and characterization of electric and magnetic fields produced by power lines is a complex task. Different models must be used for far fields and for near fields. This study is centered on computation and measurement aspects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields in the direct proximity of the conductors of power lines, situated well above the ground level. Conventional approximation of a sagged wire as a straight horizontal conductor of infinite length has been substituted with a periodical catenary model of the conductors A series of measurements performed with all electric utility bucket truck provide unique magnetic field data very close to the conductors. A conceptual design of a power line proximity detector is proposed as a result of these studies.

Mamishev, Alexander V

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Measurement of flow field and local heat transfer distribution on a scraped heat exchanger crystalliser surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of flow field and local heat transfer distribution on a scraped heat exchanger.ravelet@laposte.net Geert-Jan Witkamp G.J.Witkamp@xs4all.nl Abstract In a cylindrical scraped heat exchanger crystallizer exchanger surface has been studied by direct measurements of the heat exchanger surface temperature

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

86

Rapid Field Measurement of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Based on CO{sub 2} Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is commonly measured in water and is an important parameter for understanding carbonate equilibrium, carbon cycling, and water-rock interaction. While accurate measurements can be made in the analytical laboratory, we have developed a rapid, portable technique that can be used to obtain accurate and precise data in the field as well.

VESPER, DJ, Edenborn, Harry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Autonomous Above-Water Radiance Measurements from an Offshore Platform: A Field Assessment Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An autonomous system for making above-water radiance measurements has been produced by adding a new measurement scenario to a CIMEL CE-318 sun photometer. The new system, called the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Photometer ...

G. Zibordi; S. B. Hooker; J. F. Berthon; D. D'Alimonte

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002/03): Field Measurements of Snowpack Properties and Soil Moisture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field measurement program was undertaken as part NASA’s Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). Extensive snowpack and soil measurements were taken at field sites in Colorado over four study periods during the two study years (2002 and 2003). ...

Kelly Elder; Don Cline; Glen E. Liston; Richard Armstrong

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Instantaneous spatially local projective measurements are consistent in a relativistic quantum field  

SciTech Connect

Suppose the postulate of measurement in quantum mechanics can be extended to quantum field theory; then a local projective measurement at some moment on an object locally coupled with a relativistic quantum field will result in a projection or collapse of the wavefunctional of the combined system defined on the whole time-slice associated with the very moment of the measurement, if the relevant degrees of freedom have nonzero correlations. This implies that the wavefunctionals in the same Hamiltonian system but defined in different reference frames would collapse on different time-slices passing through the same local event where the measurement was done. Are these post-measurement states consistent with each other? We illustrate that the quantum states of the Raine-Sciama-Grove detector-field system started with the same initial Gaussian state defined on the same initial time-slice, then collapsed by the measurements on the pointlike detectors on different time-slices in different frames, will evolve to the same state of the combined system up to a coordinate transformation when compared on the same final time-slice. Such consistency is guaranteed by the spatial locality of interactions and the general covariance in a relativistic system, together with the spatial locality of measurements and the linearity of quantum dynamics in its quantum theory. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatially local quantum measurements in detector-field models are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local quantum measurement collapses the wavefunctional on the whole time-slice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In different frames wavefunctionals of a field would collapse on different time-slices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer States collapsed by the same measurement will be consistent on the same final slice.

Lin, Shih-Yuin, E-mail: sylin156@gmail.com

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors  

SciTech Connect

Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

91

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Quantum-limited measurement of magnetic-field gradient with entangled atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method to detect the microwave magnetic-field gradient by using a pair of entangled two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. We consider the two spatially separated condensates to be coupled to the two different magnetic fields. The magnetic-field gradient can be determined by measuring the variances of population differences and relative phases between the two-component condensates in two wells. The precision of measurement can reach the Heisenberg limit. We study the effects of one-body and two-body atom losses on the detection. We find that the entangled atoms can outperform the uncorrelated atoms in probing the magnetic fields in the presence of atom losses. The effect of atom-atom interactions is also discussed.

H. T. Ng

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Electrochemistry of Enargite: Reactivity in Alkaline Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactivity of enargite samples from Montana, US and Quiruvilca, Peru were studied under alkaline conditions, pH range of 8-13, using a cyclic voltammetry ...

94

Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction.

Hobbs, David T. (1867 Lodgepole Ave., N. Augusta, SC 29841)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

VELOCITY-FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF A SHOCK-ACCELERATED FLUID INSTABILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cylinder of heavy gas (SF{sub 6}) in air is hit by a Mach 1.2 shock. The resultant Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is observed as it propagates through the test section of the shock tube. Six images are taken after shock impact, and the velocity field at one time is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The images of the density field show the development of a secondary instability in the cylinder. The velocity field provides us with information about the magnitudes of the velocities as well as the magnitude of the vorticity in the flow.

K. PRESTRIDGE; C. ZOLID; ET AL

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-pol

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The effect of small field output factor measurements on IMRT dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate how changes in the measured small field output factors affect the doses in intensity-modulated treatment planning. Methods: IMRT plans were created using Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The plans were optimized to treat a cylindrical target 2 cm in diameter and 2 cm in length. Output factors for 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 and 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2} field sizes were changed by {+-}5%, {+-}10%, and {+-}20% increments from the baseline measurements and entered into the planning system. The treatment units were recommissioned in the treatment planning system after each modification of the output factors and treatment plans were reoptimized. All plans were delivered to a solid water phantom and dose measurements were made using an ionization chamber. The percentage differences between measured and computed doses were calculated. An Elekta Synergy and a Varian 2300CD linear accelerator were separately evaluated. Results: For the Elekta unit, decreasing the output factors resulted in higher measured than computed doses by 0.8% for -5%, 3.6% for -10%, and 8.7% for -20% steps. Increasing the output factors resulted in lower doses by 2.9% for +5%, 5.4% for +10%, and 8.3% for +20% steps. For the Varian unit no changes were observed for either increased or decreased output factors. Conclusions: The measurement accuracy of small field output factors are of importance especially when the treatment plan consists of small segments as in IMRT. The method proposed here could be used to verify the accuracy of the measured small field output factors for certain linear accelerators as well as to test the beam model. The Pinnacle treatment planning system model uses output factors as a function of jaw setting. Consequently, plans using the Elekta unit, which conforms the jaws to the segments, are sensitive to small field measurement accuracy. On the other hand, for the Varian unit, jaws are fixed and segments are modeled as blocked fields hence, the impact of small field output factors on IMRT monitor unit calculation is not evaluable by this method.

Azimi, Rezvan; Alaei, Parham; Higgins, Patrick [Department of Therapeutic Radiology-Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Recommendations for Guidelines for Environment-Specific Magnetic-Field Measurements, Rapid Program Engineering Project #2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to document widely applicable methods for characterizing the magnetic fields in a given environment, recognizing the many sources co-existing within that space. The guidelines are designed to allow the reader to follow an efficient process to (1) plan the goals and requirements of a magnetic-field study, (2) develop a study structure and protocol, and (3) document and carry out the plan. These guidelines take the reader first through the process of developing a basic study strategy, then through planning and performing the data collection. Last, the critical factors of data management, analysis reporting, and quality assurance are discussed. The guidelines are structured to allow the researcher to develop a protocol that responds to specific site and project needs. The Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) is based on exposure to magnetic fields and the potential health effects. Therefore, the most important focus for these magnetic-field measurement guidelines is relevance to exposure. The assumed objective of an environment-specific measurement is to characterize the environment (given a set of occupants and magnetic-field sources) so that information about the exposure of the occupants may be inferred. Ideally, the researcher seeks to obtain complete or "perfect" information about these magnetic fields, so that personal exposure might also be modeled perfectly. However, complete data collection is not feasible. In fact, it has been made more difficult as the research field has moved to expand the list of field parameters measured, increasing the cost and complexity of performing a measurement and analyzing the data. The guidelines address this issue by guiding the user to design a measurement protocol that will gather the most exposure-relevant information based on the locations of people in relation to the sources. We suggest that the "microenvironment" become the base unit of area in a study, with boundaries defined by the occupant's activity patterns and the field variation from the sources affecting the area. Such a stratification allows the researcher to determine which microenvironment are of most interest, and to methodically focus the areas, in order to gather the most relevant set of data.

Electric Research and Management, Inc.; IIT Research Institute; Magnetic Measurements; Survey Research Center, University of California; T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to a process for extracting technetium from nuclear wastes and more particularly to a process for extracting technetium from alkaline waste solutions containing technetium and high concentrations of alkali metal nitrates. A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate comprises the steps of: contacting the aqueous alkaline solution with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent, the diluent being a water-immiscible organic liquid in which the crown ether is soluble, for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution into the solvent; separating the solvent containing the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution; and stripping the technetium values from the solvent by contacting the solvent with water.

Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Space-Borne Measurements of the Time-Dependent Geostrophic Ocean Flow Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented that can provide high-resolution (in space and time) satellite measurements of the absolute and time-varying surface geostrophic flow field. Based on the analysis of a high-resolution circulation model of the North Atlantic, ...

Detlef Stammer; Christian Dieterich

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Using behavioral measures to assess counter-terrorism training in the field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of behavioral pattern recognition and analysis skills is an essential element of counter-terrorism training, particularly in the field. Three classes of behavioral measures were collected in an assessment of skill acquisition during a US ... Keywords: behavioral observations, knowledge-skills-attitudes, profiling, scenarios, situational judgment tests, tracking

V. Alan Spiker; Joan H. Johnston

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Field Measurements of Heating System Efficiency in Nine Electrically-Heated Manufactured Homes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency performed on nine manufactured homes sited in the Pacific Northwest. The testing procedure collects real-time data on heating system energy use and heating zone temperatures, allowing direct calculation of heating system efficiency.

Davis, Bob; Siegel, J.; Palmiter, L.; Baylon, D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The hyperspectral irradiometer, a new instrument for long-term and unattended field spectroscopy measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable time series of vegetation optical properties are needed to improve the modeling of the terrestrial carbon budget with remote sensing data. This paper describes the development of an automatic spectral system able to collect continuous long-term in-field spectral measurements of spectral down-welling and surface reflected irradiance. The paper addresses the development of the system

M. Meroni; A. Barducci; S. Cogliati; F. Castagnoli; M. Rossini; L. Busetto; M. Migliavacca; E. Cremonese; M. Galvagno; R. Colombo; U. Morra di Cella

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Field Tests of a New Type of Graphite-Fiber Electrode for Measuring Motionally Induced Voltages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the basis of a field experiment in a tidal channel, comparisons have been undertaken between a new type of graphite-fiber electrode and conventional Ag/AgCl sensors for measurements of motionally induced voltages. The fiber electrode works ...

Lennart Crona; Tim Fristedt; Peter Lundberg; Peter Sigray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Magnetic field characterization of electrical appliances as point sources through in situ measurements  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that magnetic field exposure from a point source can be studied by characterizing the source with a magnetic dipole. A technique based on in situ measurements of amplitude and phase angle of three orthogonal components of the magnetic field at three points at different distances from the source was developed. The method to determine the center and the real and imaginary components of the dipole moment along the three aces is described. The characterization of the source allows the prediction of the field at any distance and along any direction from the source. The effects of background fields and of the source dimensions and complexity on the accuracy of the results are discussed.

Zaffanella, L.E.; Sullivan, T.P. [Enertech Consultants, Lee, MA (United States); Visintainer, I. [CESI, Milan (Italy)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Advancing weatherization performance: Measured results from the North Carolina field test of an advanced measure selection technique  

SciTech Connect

The field performance of weatherizations based on a newly-developed advanced residential energy conservation measure selection technique was tested alongside current Retro-Tech-based weatherizations in North Carolina. The two weatherization approaches were compared based on implementation ease, measures installed, labor and cost requirements, and energy savings achieved. One-hundred twenty low-income, single-family households served by three different weatherization agencies participated in the field test which was conducted between June 1989 and August 1991. Average heating energy savings were 33% for weatherizations based on the new technique and 23% for Retro-Tech-based weatherizations. Weatherizations based on the new technique achieved 43% more heating energy savings, cost around 10% less at two weatherization agencies and considerably more at the third, and were near equivalent in labor requirements. Major findings from the study include: (1) the advanced audit will install some measures in near identical quantities as Retro-Tech-based weatherizations and others in dramatically different quantities, (2) the advanced audit can significantly increase heating energy savings, (3) blower-door-directed air sealing can more than double the air leakage reductions achieved from standard air sealing techniques, (4) North Carolina low-income houses have much higher average leakage rates than similar New York houses but can be sealed as well or better, and (5) using the advanced audit will not increase weatherization costs and may actually lower costs for most weatherization agencies.

Sharp, T.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ion energy and plasma measurements in the near field of an ICRF antenna  

SciTech Connect

Plasma properties and ion energies have been measured in the near field of an ICRF antenna to determine the effects of rf fields in a magnetized plasma sheath on the energy of ions incident on the surface of the Faraday shield. A resonant loop antenna with a two- tier Faraday shield was used on the RF Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The magnetic field near the antenna is /approximately/2 kG, and the plasma density is /approximately/10/sup 11/ cm/sup /minus/3/ with an electron temperature of 6-10 eV. The time-varying floating potential was measured with a capacitively coupled probe, and the time-averaged electron temperature, electron density, and floating potential were measured with a Langmuir probe. Both probes were scanned poloidally in front of the antenna, parallel to the current strap. Diagnostics for measuring ion energies included a gridded energy analyzer located directly below the antenna. Measured ion energies are compared with predictions from a computational model for determining the energy and angular distribution of ions incident on a surface in a magnetized plasma sheath with a time-varying plasma potential. 7 refs., 3 figs.

Caughman, J.B.O. II; Ruzic, D.N.; Hoffman, D.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Heisenberg-limited measurement of magnetic-field gradient with multipartite entangled states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method to detect the magnetic-field gradient using an atomic spin chain. We consider to use W-states, which are a specific class of multipartite entangled states, for precision measurement. The magnetic-field gradient can be determined by measuring the coherence of the state. We find that the Heisenberg-limited measurement can be obtained even using imperfect W-states and in the presence of various types of noises, respectively. We discuss the implementations of the schemes with trapped ions and ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Our proposal can be realized by using an order of several tens of trapped ions with current technology. This robust method may be useful to the applications of magnetic resonance imaging.

H. T. Ng; K. Kim

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

109

Axis Measurements, Field Quality and Quench Performance of the First LHC Short Straight Sections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The series testing at 1.9 K of the 360 Short Straight Sections (SSS) for the Large Hadron Collider have started at CERN in September 2003. The SSS contain the lattice quadrupoles and correction magnets in a common cryostat. The lattice quadrupoles feature two collared coils with 56 mm bore assembled in a common yoke. The coils are wound in two-layers from 15.1 mm wide NbTi cable, insulated with polyimide tape. The paper reviews the main test results performed in superfluid helium. The magnetic field and magnetic center position of the quadrupoles and associated correctors were measured with two independent systems, namely an automated scanner and a single stretched wire technique. The quench training, the field quality and the magnetic alignment measurements are presented and discussed in terms of the specifications and expected performances of these magnets in the LHC. We discuss in detail the field quality in terms of multipole errors measured at injection and nominal field and decomposed into geometric an...

Sanfilippo, S; Calvi, M; Chohan, V; Durante, M; Hagen, P; Pugnat, P; Smirnov, N; Schnizer, P; Sammut, N; Siemko, A; Simon, F; Stafiniak, A; Todesco, Ezio; Tortschanoff, Theodor; Walckiers, L; 10.1109/TASC.2005.849504

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Monthly Diurnal Global Atmospheric Circuit Estimates Derived from Vostok Electric Field Measurements Adjusted for Local Meteorological and Solar Wind Influences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Local temperature, wind speed, pressure, and solar wind–imposed influences on the vertical electric field observed at Vostok, Antarctica, are evaluated by multivariate analysis. Local meteorology can influence electric field measurements via local ...

G. B. Burns; B. A. Tinsley; A. V. Frank-Kamenetsky; O. A. Troshichev; W. J. R. French; A. R. Klekociuk

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries for electric vehicles Title Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries for electric vehicles...

112

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Summary of Field Measurement on UF6 Cylinders Using Electro-Mechanically Cooled Systems  

SciTech Connect

Measurement of the enrichment of solid state UF6 stored within large metal cylinders is a task commonly performed by plant operators and inspectors. The measurement technologies typically used range from low-resolution, high-efficiency sodium iodide detectors to high-resolution, moderate-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The technology used and methods deployed are dependent upon the material being measured, environmental conditions, time constraints, and measurement-precision requirements. Operators and inspectors typically use specially designed, HPGe detectors that are cooled with liquid nitrogen in situations where high-resolution measurements are required. However, the requirement for periodically refilling the system with liquid nitrogen makes remote usage cumbersome and slow. The task of cooling the detector reduces the available time for the inspector to perform other safeguards activities while on site. If the inspector has to reduce the count time for each selected cylinder to ensure that all preselected cylinders are measured during the inspection, the resulting measurement uncertainties may be increased, making it more difficult to detect and verify potential discrepancies in the operator's declarations. However, recent advances in electromechanically cooled HPGe detectors may provide the inspector with an improved verification tool by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen. This report provides a summary of test results for field measurements performed using electromechanically cooled HPGe detectors on depleted, natural, and low-enriched uranium cylinders. The results of the study provide valuable information to inspectors and operators regarding the capabilities and limitations of electromechanically cooled systems based on true field-measurement conditions.

McGinnis, Brent R [ORNL; Smith, Steven E [ORNL; Solodov, Alexander A [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Morgan, James B [ORNL; MayerII, Richard L. [USEC; Montgomery, J. Brent [U.S. Enrichment Corporation Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

ANL/APS/TB-32 Test of Horizontal Field Measurements Using Two-Axis Hall  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Test of Horizontal Field Measurements Using Two-Axis Hall Probes at the APS Magnetic Measurement Facility I. Vasserman Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 1. Introduction The free-electron laser (FEL) project at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) will use a 400-MeV particle beam from the APS linac with RMS beam transverse size of 100 µm and requires very high performance of the insertion devices in order to achieve high intensity radiation. Averaged over period, the trajectory must deviate from the ideal on-axis trajectory by not more than 10% of the RMS beam size. Meaning that the second field integral should be straight within ±1300 G-cm 2 over the length of the device for both horizontal and vertical directions for the 400-MeV particle

117

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Optimal design of measurement network for neutronic activity field reconstruction by data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using data assimilation framework, to merge information from model and measurement, an optimal reconstruction of the neutronic activity field can be determined for a nuclear reactor core. In this paper, we focus on solving the inverse problem of determining an optimal repartition of the measuring instruments within the core, to get the best possible results from the data assimilation reconstruction procedure. The position optimisation is realised using Simulated Annealing algorithm, based on the Metropolis-Hastings one. Moreover, in order to address the optimisation computing challenge, algebraic improvements of data assimilation have been developed and are presented here.

Bertrand Bouriquet; Jean-Philippe Argaud; Romain Cugnart

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

119

MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD FROM FARADAY ROTATION MEASURES OF DIFFUSE POLARIZED EMISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a study of the magnetic field of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), carried out using diffuse polarized synchrotron emission data at 1.4 GHz acquired at the Parkes Radio Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The observed diffuse polarized emission is likely to originate above the LMC disk on the near side of the galaxy. Consistent negative rotation measures (RMs) derived from the diffuse emission indicate that the line-of-sight magnetic field in the LMC's near-side halo is directed coherently away from us. In combination with RMs of extragalactic sources that lie behind the galaxy, we show that the LMC's large-scale magnetic field is likely to be of quadrupolar geometry, consistent with the prediction of dynamo theory. On smaller scales, we identify two brightly polarized filaments southeast of the LMC, associated with neutral hydrogen arms. The filaments' magnetic field potentially aligns with the direction toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We suggest that tidal interactions between the SMC and the LMC in the past 10{sup 9} years are likely to have shaped the magnetic field in these filaments.

Mao, S. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; McConnell, D. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Haverkorn, M. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9010, 6500-GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Beck, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Wolleben, M. [Square Kilometre Array South Africa, The Park, Pinelands 7405 (South Africa); Stanimirovic, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Dickey, J. M. [Physics Department, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Staveley-Smith, L., E-mail: mao@astro.wisc.edu [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Harmonic voltages and currents on two Greek islands with photovoltaic stations: Study and field measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the harmonic distortion present to the electric grid of two small Greek islands (Arki and Antikythera) where Photovoltaic Stations are installed, to study their inverters harmonic behavior and to present the measurements of the harmonic voltages and currents obtained at field tests on these two islands. It is shown that the harmonics injected by the Photovoltaic Stations to the electric grid are not very high and at most cases they can not cause significant problems to the appliances to he customers. On the other had, a theoretical analysis of the installed inverters technology is also presented, showing that the results from the measurements and those of the presented analysis are quite identical. From both measurements and theoretical analysis remarkable conclusions concerning the problem of harmonics are drawn.

Vokas, G.A.; Machias, A.V. [National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Electric Power Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Measurement of a Magnetic Field in a Leading Arm High Velocity Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a recent catalogue of extragalactic Faraday rotation derived from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey we have found an agreement between Faraday rotation structure and the HI emission structure of a High Velocity Cloud (HVC) associated with the Leading Arm of the Magellanic System. We suggest that this morphological agreement is indicative of Faraday rotation through the HVC. Under this assumption we have used 48 rotation measures through the HVC, together with estimates of the electron column density from H-\\alpha\\ measurements and QSO absorption lines to estimate a strength for the line-of-sight component of the coherent magnetic field in the HVC of > 6 {\\rm \\mu G}$. A coherent magnetic field of this strength is more than sufficient to dynamically stabilize the cloud against ram pressure stripping by the Milky Way halo and may also provide thermal insulation for the cold cloud. We estimate an upper limit to the ratio of random to coherent magnetic field of $B_{r}/B_{||} < 0.8$, which suggests that the random ...

McClure-Griffiths, N M; Gaensler, B M; McConnell, D; Schnitzeler, D H F M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

ORNL DAAC GLOBAL LEAF AREA INDEX DATA FROM FIELD MEASUREMENTS, 1932-2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Data > Regional/Global > Vegetation Collections > Guide Home > Data > Regional/Global > Vegetation Collections > Guide Document GLOBAL LEAF AREA INDEX DATA FROM FIELD MEASUREMENTS, 1932-2000 Get Data Summary: Approximately 1000 published estimates of leaf area index (LAI) from nearly 400 unique field sites, covering the period 1932-2000, have been compiled into a single data set. LAI is a key parameter for global and regional models of biosphere/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide, water vapor, etc. This data set provides a benchmark of typical values and ranges of LAI for a variety of biomes and land cover types, in support of model development and validation of satellite-derived remote sensing estimates of LAI and other vegetation parameters. The LAI data are linked to a bibliography of over 300 original-source references.

124

Indirect biological measures of consciousness from field studies of brains as dynamical systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carried by beta-gamma activity fields may approach thecortical fields of the relevant macroscopic beta events aredelays giving beta. Neural field dynamics and consciousness

Freeman, Walter J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Improving chemical flood efficiency with micellar/alkaline/polymer processes  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory study was undertaken to find more efficient, lower-cost chemical systems for the recovery of waterflood residual oil. The authors' investigation emphasized alkaline-augmented processes because alkali is much less expensive than surfactant. The strategy was to replace some of or all the high-cost surfactants in a micellar formulation with lower-cost alkali and still maintain the high tertiary oil recoveries obtained with micellar flooding. Baseline oil recoveries in Berea corefloods were determined for two interfacially active crude oils with micellar/polymer (MP) and alkaline/polymer (AP) systems. A combination process was then developed in which a small micellar slug is injected first, followed by a larger AP slug. This process is referred to as a micellar/alkaline/polymer (MAP) flood. Phase-behavior studies guided the design and optimization of all three chemical processes in the coreflood experiments. Detailed effluent analyses and in-situ mobility measurements provided information about possible oil recovery mechanisms.

Shuler, P.J.; Kuehne, D.L.; Lerner, R.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Earth stress measurements in the South Belridge oil field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The authors report earth stress magnitudes in the South Belridge oil field, determined from integrated density logs and microhydraulic fracturing test. They indicate that the vertical stress is generally the intermediate principal stress, except possibly at the deepest zone tested (2,100 ft (640 m)), where it is approximately equal to the lesser compressive horizontal stress. Azimuth of the greater horizontal stress and of induced hydraulic fractures, as measured or inferred by several different techniques, is N15{sup 0}E+-15{sup 0}.

Hansen, K.S.; Purcell, W.R. (Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (US))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The inner structure of collisionless magnetic reconnection: The electron-frame dissipation measure and Hall fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It was recently proposed that the electron-frame dissipation measure, the energy transfer from the electromagnetic field to plasmas in the electron's rest frame, identifies the dissipation region of collisionless magnetic reconnection [Zenitani et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195003 (2011)]. The measure is further applied to the electron-scale structures of antiparallel reconnection, by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The size of the central dissipation region is controlled by the electron-ion mass ratio, suggesting that electron physics is essential. A narrow electron jet extends along the outflow direction until it reaches an electron shock. The jet region appears to be anti-dissipative. At the shock, electron heating is relevant to a magnetic cavity signature. The results are summarized to a unified picture of the single dissipation region in a Hall magnetic geometry.

Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex; Black, Carrie; Kuznetsova, Masha [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Field Measurements of Heating Efficiency of Electric Forced-Air Furnaces in Six Manufactured Homes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency for six manufactured homes in the Pacific Northwest heated with electric forced-air systems. This is the first in a series of regional and national efforts to measure in detail the heating efficiency of manufactured homes. Only six homes were included in this study because of budgetary constraints; therefore this is not a representative sample. These investigations do provide some useful information on the heating efficiency of these homes. Useful comparisons can be drawn between these study homes and site-built heating efficiencies measured with a similar protocol. The protocol used to test these homes is very similar to another Ecotope protocol used in the study conducted in 1992 and 1993 for the Bonneville Power Administration to test the heating efficiency of 24 homes. This protocol combined real-time power measurements of furnace energy usage with energy usage during co-heat periods. Accessory data such as house and duct tightness measurements and tracer gas measurements were used to describe these homes and their heating system efficiency. Ensuring that manufactured housing is constructed in an energy and resource efficient manner is of increasing concern to manufactured home builders and consumers. No comparable work has been done to measure the heating system efficiency of MCS manufactured homes, although some co-heat tests have been performed on manufactured homes heated with natural gas to validate HUD thermal standards. It is expected that later in 1994 more research of this kind will be conducted, and perhaps a less costly and less time-consuming method for testing efficiencies will be develops.

Davis, Bob; Palmiter, Larry S.; Siegel, Jeff

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

129

The development of a versatile field program for measuring tritium in real-time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robust sample handling and liquid scintillation counting procedures have been developed to routinely monitor tritium in the field relative to the 20,000 pCi/L drinking water standard. This procedure allows tritium to be monitored hourly during 24 hour drilling operations at depths in the saturated zone potentially contaminated by sub-surface nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site. Using retrofitted shock hardened and vibration damped counters and strict analytical protocols, tritium may be measured rapidly in the field under hostile conditions. Concentration standards and ``dead`` tritium backgrounds are prepared weekly in a central laboratory and delivered to remote monitoring locations where they are recounted daily as a check on counter efficiency and calibration. Portable counters are located in trailers and powered off a battery pack and line filter fed by mobile generator. Samples are typically ground-waters mixed with drilling fluids returned after circulation through a drill string. Fluids are aerated and ``de-foamed,`` filtered, mixed with scintillation cocktail and subsequently dark-adapted before counting. Besides meeting regulatory requirements, ``real-time`` monitoring affords drilling and field personnel maximum protection against potential exposure to radionuclides; for routine operations, tritium activities may not exceed a 10,000 pCi/L threshold.

Rego, J.H.; Smith, D.K.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Field measurement of the interactions between heat pumps and attic duct systems in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts to improve residential heat-pump performance have tended to focus on laboratory and theoretical studies of the machine itself, with some limited field research having been focused on in-situ performance and installation issues. One issue that has received surprisingly little attention is the interaction between the heat pump and the duct system to which it is connected. This paper presents the results of a field study that addresses this interaction. Field performance measurements before and after sealing and insulating the duct systems were made on three heat pumps. From the pre-retrofit data it was found that reductions in heat-pump capacity due to low outdoor temperatures and/or coil frosting are accompanied by lower duct-system energy delivery efficiencies. The conduction loss reductions, and thus the delivery temperature improvements, due to adding duct insulation were found to vary widely depending on the length of the particular duct section, the thermal mass of that duct section, and the cycling characteristics of the heat-pump. In addition, it was found that the use of strip-heat back-up decreased after the retrofits, and that heat-pump cycling increased dramatically after the retrofits, which respectively increase and decrease savings due to the retrofits. Finally, normalized energy use for the three systems which were operated consistently pre- and post-retrofit showed an average reduction of 19% after retrofit, which corresponds to a chance in overall distribution-system efficiency of 24%.

Modera, M.P.; Jump, D.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

Singh, David Joseph

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

Measurement of the poloidal magnetic field in the PBX-M tokamak using the motional Stark effect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polarimetry measurements of the Doppler-shifted H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission from a hydrogen neutral beam on the PBX-M tokamak have been employed in a novel technique for obtaining q(0) and poloidal magnetic field profiles. The electric field from the beam particle motion across the magnetic field (E = V/sub beam/ /times/ B) causes a wavelength splitting of several angstroms, and polarization of the emitted radiation (Stark effect). Viewed transverse to the fields, the emission is linearly polarized with the angle of polarization related to the direction of the magnetic field. 14 refs., 5 figs.

Levinton, F.M.; Fonck, R.J.; Gammel, G.M.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.W.; Powell, E.T.; Roberts, D.W.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Measurement of Temperature and Velocity Fields in a Heater Unit by Liquid Crystal Thermometry and Particle Image Velocimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperature and velocity fields in a heating unit for automobiles are measured through a model experiment in water tunnel using flow visualizations and image analysis to investigate the mixing mechanism of the flow that has passed through the heater ... Keywords: flow measurement, flow visualization, heater unit, liquid crystal, particle image velocimetry, temperature measurement

N. Fujisawa; H. Ikeda; R. Saito; M. Yokota

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction. 2 figs.

Hobbs, D.T.

1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

135

Earth stress measurements in the South Belridge oil field, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within Sections 33 and 34 of the South Belridge oil field, where the principal earth stresses are assumed to lie in vertical or horizontal planes, the azimuth of the greater horizontal earth stress as measured or inferred by several different techniques is N15/sup 0/E +. 15/sup 0/. This agrees with values reported in the literature for the regional stress orientation, which range from N-S to NNE-SSW. At depths of about 850 and 1300 feet, the magnitude of the vertical stress (overburden) lies between those of the greater and lesser horizontal stresses determined from open-hole microfrac tests. At about 2100 feet, however, the vertical and lesser horizontal stresses are equal, to within the limits of accuracy of the authors' measurements. If trends of stress versus depth established at the three measurement points continue downward, there is the possibility that at depths below 2100 feet the minimum stress may be vertical. The most reliable methods used for determining in-situ stress orientation at South Belridge are surface tiltmeters and orientation of out-of-round (elliptical) boreholes. Study of natural fractures in the nearby Chico-Martinez Creek outcrop provided important supporting evidence of stress orientation. Impression packers run during the microfrac tests and seismic data recorded during routine hydraulic fracturing procedures yielded much less definitive information concerning fracture and stress direction.

Hansen, K.S.; Purcell, W.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Comparison of Measured and Modeled Broadband Fluxes from Aircraft Data during the ICE '89 Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1989 intensive field campaign of the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE) over the North Sea, broadband radiative fluxes were measured in, above, and below cirrus cloud by a number of European meteorological research aircraft. One ...

R. W. Saunders; G. Brogniez; J. C. Buriez; R. Meerkötter; P. Wendling

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Vertical Structure of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer over a Sloping Bed: Theory and Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical solutions for the wave bottom boundary layer (WBL) over a sloping bed are compared with field measurements in the nearshore zone. The WBL theory is constructed using both viscoelastic–diffusion and conventional eddy viscosity ...

Qingping Zou; Alex E. Hay

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations during the MCMA-2006 field campaign – Part 2: Model comparison and radical budget  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals were made during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) field campaign as part of the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) ...

Dusanter, S.

139

Corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites: field studies of biointrusion barriers and erosion control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field research program involving corrective measures technologies for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Results of field testing of a biointrusion barrier installed at a close-out waste disposal site (Area B) at Los Alamos are presented. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments were measured, and the interaction between erosion control and subsurface water dynamics is discussed relative to waste management.

Nyhan, J.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Lopez, E.A.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Field Instruments for Real Time In-Situ Crude Oil Concentration Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Water Resources Institute awarded a Mill Scholarship to M.C. Sterling, Jr in 2002. This project describes five sensors for rapid monitoring of crude oil concentrations in an aquatic system. These measurements are critical for monitoring plume transport. They are also useful for estimating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) exposure concentrations as a component of toxicity risk assessments. A submersible multi-angle laser scattering instrument (LISST-100, Sequoia Instruments), an ex-situ single wavelength fluorometer (AU-10 field fluorometer, Turner Designs), an in-situ single wavelength fluorometer (Flashlamp, WET Labs), and two in-situ multiple wavelength fluorometers (ECO-FL3 and SAFire, WET Labs) are evaluated for sensitivity and bias. For each instrument, a brief discussion of its operating principles is presented. Crude oil emulsions of various concentrations were analyzed using the above instruments. The implications of potential interferences and instrument limits are discussed relative to their importance for real time monitoring of crude oil spills.

Fuller, C. B.; Bonner, J. S.; Page, C. A.; Arrambide, G.; Sterling Jr., M. C.; Ojo, T.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Measuring output factors of small fields formed by collimator jaws and multileaf collimator using plastic scintillation detectors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: As the practice of using high-energy photon beams to create therapeutic radiation fields of subcentimeter dimensions (as in intensity-modulated radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery) grows, so too does the need for accurate verification of beam output at these small fields in which standard practices of dose verification break down. This study investigates small-field output factors measured using a small plastic scintillation detector (PSD), as well as a 0.01 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber. Specifically, output factors were measured with both detectors using small fields that were defined by either the X-Y collimator jaws or the multileaf collimator (MLC). Methods: A PSD of 0.5 mm diameter and 2 mm length was irradiated with 6 and 18 MV linac beams. The PSD was positioned vertically at a source-to-axis distance of 100 cm, at 10 cm depth in a water phantom, and irradiated with fields ranging in size from 0.5x0.5 to 10x10 cm{sup 2}. The field sizes were defined either by the collimator jaws alone or by a MLC alone. The MLC fields were constructed in two ways: with the closed leaves (i.e., those leaves that were not opened to define the square field) meeting at either the field center line or at a 4 cm offset from the center line. Scintillation light was recorded using a CCD camera and an estimation of error in the median-filtered signals was made using the bootstrapping technique. Measurements were made using a CC01 ionization chamber under conditions identical to those used for the PSD. Results: Output factors measured by the PSD showed close agreement with those measured using the ionization chamber for field sizes of 2.0x2.0 cm{sup 2} and above. At smaller field sizes, the PSD obtained output factors as much as 15% higher than those found using the ionization chamber by 0.6x0.6 cm{sup 2} jaw-defined fields. Output factors measured with no offset of the closed MLC leaves were as much as 20% higher than those measured using a 4 cm leaf offset. Conclusions: The authors' results suggest that PSDs provide a useful and possibly superior alternative to existing dosimetry systems for small fields, as they are inherently less susceptible to volume-averaging and perturbation effects than larger, air-filled ionization chambers. Therefore, PSDs may provide more accurate small-field output factor determination, regardless of the collimation mechanism.

Klein, David M.; Tailor, Ramesh C.; Archambault, Louis; Wang, Lilie; Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Radio Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States) and Departement de Radio Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

36Cl/Cl ratios in geothermal systems: preliminary measurements from the Coso Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The {sub 36}Cl/Cl isotopic composition of chlorine in geothermal systems can be a useful diagnostic tool in characterizing hydrologic structure, in determining the origins and age of waters within the systems, and in differentiating the sources of chlorine (and other solutes) in the thermal waters. The {sub 36}Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples from the Coso, California geothermal field have been measured for these purposes. The results indicate that most of the chlorine is not derived from the dominant granitoid that host the geothermal system. If the chlorine was originally input into the Coso subsurface through meteoric recharge, that input occurred at least 1-1.25 million years ago. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic sources. In either case, the results indicate that most of the chlorine in the thermal waters has existed within the granitoid host rocks for no more than about 100,00-200,00 years. this residence time for the chlorine is similar to residence times suggested by other researchers for chlorine in deep groundwaters of the Mono Basin north of the Coso field.

Nimz, G.J.; Moore, J.N.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Tomographic imaging system for measuring impurity line emission in a field-reversed configuration  

SciTech Connect

A 16 chord optical tomography system has been developed and implemented in the flux coil generated-field reversed configuration (FRC). The chords are arranged in two fans of eight, which cover {approx}35% of the vessel area at the midplane. Each illuminate separate photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) which are fitted with narrow band-pass filters. In this case, filters are centered at 434.8 nm to measure emission from singly ionized argon. PMT crosstalk is negligible. Background noise due to electron radiation and H{sub {gamma}} line radiation is <10% of argon emission. The spatial resolution of the reconstruction is 1.5 cm. Argon is introduced using a puff valve and tube designed to impart the gas into the system as the FRC is forming. Reconstruction of experimental data results in time-dependent, 2D emissivity profiles of the impurity ions. Analysis of these data show radial, cross-field diffusion to be in the range of 10-10{sup 3} m{sup 2}/s during FRC equilibrium.

Roche, T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McWilliams, R. [University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Bolte, N.; Garate, E.; Wessel, F. [University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements  

SciTech Connect

The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

145

ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENT OF FUNDAMENTAL AND HIGHER-ORDER MODES FOR 7-CELL CAVITY OF PETRA-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The booster synchrotron for NSLS-II will include a 7-cell PETRA cavity, which was manufactured for the PETRA-II project at DESY. The cavity fundamental frequency operates at 500 MHz. In order to verify the impedances of the fundamental and higher-order modes (HOM), which were calculated by computer code, we measured the magnitude of the electromagnetic field of the fundamental acceleration mode and HOM using the bead-pull method. To keep the cavity body temperature constant, we used a chiller system to supply cooling water at 20 degrees C. The bead-pull measurement was automated with a computer. We encountered some issues during the measurement process due to the difficulty in measuring the electromagnetic field magnitude in a multi-cell cavity. We describe the method and apparatus for the field measurement, and the obtained results.

Kawashima, Y.; Blednykh, A.; Cupolo, J.; Davidsaver, M.; Holub, B.; Ma, H.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

Conformal field theory at central charge c=0: a measure of the indecomposability (b) parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A good understanding of conformal field theory (CFT) at c=0 is vital to the physics of disordered systems, as well as geometrical problems such as polymers and percolation. Steady progress has shown that these CFTs should be logarithmic, with indecomposable operator product expansions, and indecomposable representations of the Virasoro algebra. In one of the earliest papers on the subject, V. Gurarie introduced a single parameter b to quantify this indecomposability in terms of the logarithmic partner t of the stress energy tensor T. He and A. Ludwig conjectured further that b=-5/8 for polymers and b=5/6 for percolation. While a lot of physics may be hidden behind this parameter - which has also given rise to a lot of discussions - it had remained very elusive up to now, due to the lack of available methods to measure it experimentally or numerically, in contrast say with the central charge. We show in this paper how to overcome the many difficulties in trying to measure b. This requires control of a lattice scalar product, lattice Jordan cells, together with a precise construction of the state L_{-2}|0>. The final result is that b=5/6 for polymers. For percolation, we find that b=-5/8 within an XXZ or supersymmetric representation. In the geometrical representation, we do not find a Jordan cell for L_0 at level two (finite-size Hamiltonian and transfer matrices are fully diagonalizable), so there is no b in this case.

Jerome Dubail; Jesper Lykke Jacobsen; Hubert Saleur

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

Mass-resolved retarding field energy analyzer and its measurement of ion energy distribution in helicon plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass-resolved retarding field energy analyzer and its measurement of ion energy distribution) are measured at rf power of 1000 W. The results show that the fairly broad energy distributions of different analyzer; Ion energy distribution; Helicon plasma 1. Introduction It is well recognized that ion

Zexian, Cao

148

Measuring Dark Energy with the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph (WFMOS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark energy is one of the greatest scientific challenges of the 21st century. One of the key questions facing cosmologists is whether dark energy is either a breakdown of General Relativity on large scales or a new form of matter in the Universe with a negative effective pressure. This question can only be answered through a suite of different observations as a function of redshift. In this paper, I briefly review various dark energy reports published in the last year, which all highlight the importance of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) for probing the "dark physics" of the Universe. I also summarize the recent measurements of the BAO in large galaxy redshift surveys. I then look forward to a new instrument planned by the Subaru and Gemini communities called the "Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph" (WFMOS) for the Subaru telescope. The baseline design of this facility includes ~4500 spectroscopic fibers over a field-of-view of 1.5 degree diameter, covering a wavelength range of 0.39 to 1 microns. The instrument is schedule for first-light early next decade and will perform massive spectroscopic surveys of both distant galaxies and faint stars in our own Galaxy. The WFMOS dark energy surveys will deliver ~1% errors on the angular-diameter distance and Hubble parameter to high redshift. WFMOS will also be a unique user-facility allowing astronomers to address a host of astrophysical problems like galaxy evolution, the intergalactic medium and calibrate photometric redshifts. The WFMOS archive will also provide a rich resource for further ancillary science much like the present-day SDSS archive.

Robert Nichol

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

149

Radio-frequency measurements of UNiX compounds (X= Al, Ga, Ge) in high magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

We performed radio-frequency (RF) skin-depth measurements of antiferromagnetic UNiX compounds (X=Al, Ga, Ge) in magnetic fields up to 60 T and at temperatures between 1.4 to {approx}60 K. Magnetic fields are applied along different crystallographic directions and RF penetration-depth was measured using a tunnel-diode oscillator (TDO) circuit. The sample is coupled to the inductive element of a TDO resonant tank circuit, and the shift in the resonant frequency {Delta}f of the circuit is measured. The UNiX compounds exhibit field-induced magnetic transitions at low temperatures, and those transitions are accompanied by a drastic change in {Delta}f. The results of our skin-depth measurements were compared with previously published B-T phase diagrams for these three compounds.

Mielke, Charles H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcdonald, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zapf, Vivien [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Altarawneh, Moaz M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lacerda, Alex H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adak, Sourav [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Karunakar, Kothapalli [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nakotte, Heinrich [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chang, S [NIST; Alsmadi, A M [HASHEMITE UNIV; Alyones, S [HASHEMIT UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Environmental Measurement While Drilling System for Real-Time Field Screening of Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling during environmental drilling is essential to fully characterize the spatial distribution and migration of subsurface contaminants. However, analysis of the samples is expensive and time-consuming: off-site laboratory analysis can take weeks or months. Real-time information on environmental conditions, drill bit location and temperature during drilling is valuable in many environmental restoration operations. This type of information can be used to provide field screening data and improved efficiency of site characterization activities. The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) System represents an innovative blending of new and existing technology in order to obtain real-time data during drilling. The system consists of two subsystems. The down-hole subsystem (at the drill bit) consists of sensors, a power supply, a signal conditioning and transmitter board, and a radio-frequency (RF) coaxial cable. The up-hole subsystem consists of a battery pack/coil, pickup coil, receiver, and personal computer. The system is compatible with fluid miser drill pipe, a directional drilling technique that uses minimal drilling fluids and generates little to no secondary waste. In EMWD, downhole sensors are located behind the drill bit and linked by a high-speed data transmission system to a computer at the surface. Sandia-developed Windows{trademark}-based software is used for data display and storage. As drilling is conducted, data is collected on the nature and extent of contamination, enabling on-the-spot decisions regarding drilling and sampling strategies. Initially, the downhole sensor consisted of a simple gamma radiation detector, a Geiger-Mueller tube (GMT). The design includes data assurance techniques to increase safety by reducing the probability of giving a safe indication when an unsafe condition exists. The EMWD system has been improved by the integration of a Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) in place of the GMT. The GRS consists of a sodium iodide-thallium activated crystal coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The output of the PMT goes to a multichannel analyzer (MCA).The MCA data is transmitted to the surface via a signal conditioning and transmitter board similar to that used with the GMT. The EMWD system is described and the results of the GRS field tests and field demonstration are presented.

Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Williams, C.V.

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

151

Method and apparatus for steady-state magnetic measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the steady-state measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma, where the tokamak is configured with respect to a cylindrical coordinate system having z, phi (toroidal), and r axes. The method is based on combining the two magnetic field principles of induction and torque. The apparatus includes a rotor assembly having a pair of inductive magnetic field pickup coils which are concentrically mounted, orthogonally oriented in the r and z directions, and coupled to remotely located electronics which include electronic integrators for determining magnetic field changes. The rotor assembly includes an axle oriented in the toroidal direction, with the axle mounted on pivot support brackets which in turn are mounted on a baseplate. First and second springs are located between the baseplate and the rotor assembly restricting rotation of the rotor assembly about its axle, the second spring providing a constant tensile preload in the first spring. A strain gauge is mounted on the first spring, and electronic means to continually monitor strain gauge resistance variations is provided. Electronic means for providing a known current pulse waveform to be periodically injected into each coil to create a time-varying torque on the rotor assembly in the toroidal direction causes mechanical strain variations proportional to the torque in the mounting means and springs so that strain gauge measurement of the variation provides periodic magnetic field measurements independent of the magnetic field measured by the electronic integrators.

Woolley, Robert D. (Hillsborough, NJ)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method and apparatus for steady-state magnetic measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the steady-state measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma, where the tokamak is configured with respect to a cylindrical coordinate system having z, phi (toroidal), and r axes. The method is based on combining the two magnetic field principles of induction and torque. The apparatus includes a rotor assembly having a pair of inductive magnetic field pickup coils which are concentrically mounted, orthogonally oriented in the r and z directions, and coupled to remotely located electronics which include electronic integrators for determining magnetic field changes. The rotor assembly includes an axle oriented in the toroidal direction, with the axle mounted on pivot support brackets which in turn are mounted on a baseplate. First and second springs are located between the baseplate and the rotor assembly restricting rotation of the rotor assembly about its axle, the second spring providing a constant tensile preload in the first spring. A strain gauge is mounted on the first spring, and electronic means to continually monitor strain gauge resistance variations is provided. Electronic means for providing a known current pulse waveform to be periodically injected into each coil to create a time-varying torque on the rotor assembly in the toroidal direction causes mechanical strain variations proportional to the torque in the mounting means and springs so that strain gauge measurement of the variation provides periodic magnetic field measurements independent of the magnetic field measured by the electronic integrators.

Woolley, R.D.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Measurement and analysis of the surface energy budget for ARM field experiments. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to conduct experiments to investigate the scaling properties of surface-atmosphere interactions and feedbacks as they relate to regional fluxes of heat and water vapor. This is part of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. To achieve this objective, two field campaigns were conducted in northeastern Oregon during June 1991 and June 1992. Analysis of the data collected during these campaigns revealed the following: (1) fluxes over a dry, semi-arid grass/brush area show only small spatial heterogeneity; (2) fluxes over an irrigated farm were dependent on crop type and stage of development. In particular, fluxes over row crops such as potatoes and corn were very similar to each other, but somewhat different than fluxes over wheat and alfalfa. In general, higher latent and lower sensible heat fluxes were experienced over wheat and alfalfa compared to corn and potatoes; (3) meteorological factors had a major influence on fluxes. In particular, significantly higher latent heat fluxes were experienced on days with moderate winds compared to days with light winds over the irrigated farm. This was presumably due to the advection of sensible heat from the surrounding dry rangeland.

Kunkel, K.E. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN); Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Guillorn, Michael (Brooktondale, NY)

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

156

Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual  

SciTech Connect

In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Scanning retarding field analyzer for plasma profile measurements in the boundary of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak  

SciTech Connect

A new Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) head has been created for the outer-midplane scanning probe system on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The new probe head contains back-to-back retarding field analyzers aligned with the local magnetic field. One faces 'upstream' into the field-aligned plasma flow and the other faces 'downstream' away from the flow. The RFA was created primarily to benchmark ion temperature measurements of an ion sensitive probe; it may also be used to interrogate electrons. However, its construction is robust enough to be used to measure ion and electron temperatures up to the last-closed flux surface in C-Mod. A RFA probe of identical design has been attached to the side of a limiter to explore direct changes to the boundary plasma due to lower hybrid heating and current drive. Design of the high heat flux (>100 MW/m{sup 2}) handling probe and initial results are presented.

Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D. [MIT PSFC Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Wave-Follower Field Measurements of the Wind-Input Spectral Function. Part I: Measurements and Calibrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study of wind energy and momentum input into finite-depth wind waves was undertaken at Lake George, New South Wales, Australia. To measure microscale oscillations of induced pressure above surface waves, a high-precision wave-...

Mark A. Donelan; Alexander V. Babanin; Ian R. Young; Michael L. Banner; Cyril McCormick

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Internal Electric Field Investigations of a Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detector Using Synchrotron X-ray Mapping and Pockels Effect Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) has remained a major focus of research due to its promising application as a room-temperature nuclear radiation detector material. Among the several parameters that substantially affect the detectors' performance, an important one is the distribution of the internal electric field. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) employed synchrotron x-ray microscale mapping and measurements of the Pockels effect to investigate the distribution of the internal electric field in a CZT strip detector. Direct evidence that dislocations can distort the internal electric field of the detector was obtained. Furthermore, it was found that 'star' defects in the CZT crystal, possibly ascribed to dislocation loop punching, cause charge trapping.

Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A; Camarda, G; Cui, Y; Hossain, A; Yao, H; James, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

DENSITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS IN THE TORMAC IV-c PLASMA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current waveforms 2.26 Ouput of subtraction circuit (flux exclusion) 2.27 Small probes 2.29 Vacuum magnetic field

Coonrod Jr., John Walter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Inferring immobile and in-situ water saturation from laboratory and field measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of experimental data and numerical simulation results of dynamic boiling experiments revealed that there is an apparent correlation between the immobile water saturation and the shape of the steam saturation profile. An elbow in the steam saturation profile indicates the sudden drop in steam saturation that marks the transition from steam to two-phase conditions inside the core during boiling. The immobile water saturation can be inferred from this elbow in the steam saturation profile. Based on experimental results obtained by Satik (1997), the inferred immobile water saturation of Berea sandstone was found to be about 0.25, which is consistent with results of relative permeability experiments reported by Mahiya (1999). However, this technique may not be useful in inferring the immobile water saturation of less permeable geothermal rocks because the elbow in the steam saturation profile is less prominent. Models of vapor and liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that were developed based on Darcy's law and material and energy conservation equations proved to be useful in inferring the in-situ and immobile water saturations from field measurements of cumulative mass production, discharge enthalpy, and downhole temperature. Knowing rock and fluid properties, and the difference between the stable initial, T{sub o}, and dry-out, T{sub d}, downhole temperatures, the in-situ and immobile water saturations of vapor-dominated reservoirs can be estimated. On the other hand, the in-situ and immobile water saturations, and the change in mobile water content of liquid-dominated reservoirs can be inferred from the cumulative mass production, {Delta}m, and enthalpy, h{prime}, data. Comparison with two-phase, radial flow, numerical simulation results confirmed the validity and usefulness of these models.

Belen, Rodolfo P., Jr.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differentia

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Effects of Alkaline Sorbents on ESP Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many energy companies need to reduce sulfur trioxide (SO3) emissions and/or sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Injection of an alkaline sorbent into the boiler or into the duct after the air heater is a relatively simple and inexpensive means of meeting this need. These processes can, however, have a negative effect on the performance of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) most plants are equipped with for particulate control. Hence, there is a need to understand and be able to predict the impact of these ...

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

Noble metal alkaline zeolites for catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for producing a noble-metal containing zeolite suitable for catalytic reforming contacting a zeolite selected from alkaline faujasites and L zeolites and zeolites and zeolites isostructural thereto, with a noble-metal compound selected from Pt(acetylacetonate){sub 2} and Pd(acetylacetonate){sub 2} for a effective amount of time to incorporate Pt and/or Pd into the pore surface regions of the zeolite, but not to disperse the Pt and/or Pd throughout the entire zeolite; and calcining the so treated zeolite at a temperature from about 250 {degrees} C, to about 600 {degrees} C for an effective amount of time.

Schweizer, A.E.

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

167

Non-invasive Field Measurements of Soil Water Content Using a Pulsed 14 MeV Neutron Generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current techniques of soil water content measurement are invasive and labor-intensive. Here, we demonstrate that an in situ soil carbon (C) analyzer with a multi-elemental analysis capability, developed for studies of terrestrial C sequestration, can be used concurrently to non-invasively measure the water content of large-volume ({approx}0.3 m{sup 3}) soil samples. Our objectives were to investigate the correlations of the hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) signals with water to the changes in the soil water content in laboratory experiments, and in an agricultural field. Implementing prompt gamma neutron activation analyses we showed that in the field, the signal from the H nucleus better indicates the soil water content than does that from the O nucleus. Using a field calibration, we were able to use the H signal to estimate a minimum detectable change of {approx}2% volumetric water in a 0-30 cm depth of soil.

Mitra S.; Wielopolski L.; Omonode, R.; Novak, J.; Frederick, J.; Chan, A.

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

A model of the AGS based on stepwise ray-tracing through the measured field maps of the main magnets  

SciTech Connect

Two-dimensional mid-plane magnetic field maps of two of the main AGS magnets were produced, from Hall probe measurements, for a series of different current settings. The analysis of these data yielded the excitation functions [1] and the harmonic coefficients [2] of the main magnets which have been used so far in all the models of the AGS. The constant increase of the computation power makes it possible today to directly use a stepwise raytracing through these measured field maps with a reasonable computation time. We describe in detail how these field maps have allowed the generation of models of the 6 different types of AGS main magnets, and how they are being handled with the Zgoubi ray-tracing code [3]. We give and discuss a number of results obtained regarding both beam and spin dynamics in the AGS, and we provide comparisons with other numerical and analytical modelling methods.

Dutheil Y.; Meot, F.; Tsoupas, N.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wave-Follower Field Measurements of the Wind-Input Spectral Function. Part II: Parameterization of the Wind Input  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nearly all of the momentum transferred from wind to waves comes about through wave-induced pressure acting on the slopes of waves: known as form drag. Direct field measurements of the wave-induced pressure in airflow over water waves are ...

Mark A. Donelan; Alexander V. Babanin; Ian R. Young; Michael L. Banner

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite for wind retrieval over the Great Lakes on a daily basis. We use data acquired by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT (QSCAT) satellite launched in June 1999 to derive wind speeds and directions over

171

Irradiators for measuring the biological effects of low dose-rate ionizing radiation fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological response to ionizing radiation differs with radiation field. Particle type, energy spectrum, and dose-rate all affect biological response per unit dose. This thesis describes methods of spectral analysis, ...

Davidson, Matthew Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Measuring response of extruded scintillator to UV LED in magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The experimental results on the performance of the extruded scintillator and WLS fiber, and various LEDs in the magnetic fields of 1.8T and 2.3T respectively, are reported. The methodic used is being described.

Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Rykalin, V.; /Northern Illinois U.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab; Zutshi, V.; /Northern Illinois U.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Equilibrium and stability studies of plasmas confined in a dipole magnetic field using magnetic measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is the first experiment of its kind to use a levitated current ring to confine a plasma in a dipole magnetic field. Unlike most other confinement devices, plasma compressibility ...

Karim, Ishtak

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

OH Field Measurements: A Critical Input into Model Calculations on Atmospheric Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a European program, a field campaign was carried out in May 1994 at the Izaña Station, Tenerife, Canary Islands, to study the influence of European emissions on the oxidizing capacity of a clean tropospheric environment. This paper ...

F. J. Comes; O. Forberich; J. Walter

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

Delegard, C.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Method of measuring the dc electric field and other tokamak parameters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method including a brief, deliberate perturbation of hot tokamak electrons which produces a transient synchrotron radiation signal, in frequency-time space, and the inference, using very fast algorithms, of plasma parameters including the effective ion charge state Z{sub eff}, the direction of the magnetic field, and the position and width in velocity space of the brief heating, and, in particular, the dc toroidal electric field.

Fisch, N.J.; Kritz, A.H.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Field Comparisons of Direct and Component Measurements of Net Radiation under Clear Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate measurements of net radiation are basic to all studies of the surface energy budget. In preparation for an energy budget experiment significant differences were found between direct and component measurement of net radiation, which ...

Claude E. Duchon; Gregory E. Wilk

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Program on Technology Innovation: Electric Field-Based Phasor Measurement Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The popularity of phasor measurement units (PMUs) comes from their ability to synchronize the voltage and current phasor measurements in interconnected power systems. Those synchronized phasor measurements are critical for wide area power system monitoring and control. However, the prevailing PMU technology was developed more than 20 years ago and is usually accompanied by high installation and maintenance costs.

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

SP-19: Electrochemistry of Enargite: Reactivity in Alkaline Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactivity of enargite samples from Montana, US and Quiruvilca, Peru were studied under alkaline conditions, pH range of 8-13, using a cyclic voltammetry ...

180

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells, Prof. Andrew Herring, Colorado School of Mines Electrocatalysis in Alkaline Electrolytes, Prof. Sanjeev...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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181

Rechargeable Zn-MnO sub 2 alkaline batteries  

SciTech Connect

In this paper progress in the development of rechargeable alkaline zinc-manganese dioxide cells is described. The advantages and limitations of the system are evaluated. Laboratory tests run on commercial primary alkaline cells as well as model simulations of a bipolar MnO{sub 2} electrode show that the rechargeable alkaline battery may be able to compete with lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and secondary lithium cells for low- to moderate-rate applications. However, because of this poor performance at high rates and low temperatures, the alkaline MnO{sub 2} battery is not suitable for present automotive starting applications.

Wruck, W.J.; Reichman, B.; Bullock, K.R.; Kao, W.H. (Corporate Applied Research, Johnson Controls, Inc., Milwaukee, WI (US))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Salt Fluxes for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001... for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from Molten Aluminum ... Solid chloride salts containing MgC2 can be used to remove alkali ...

183

New magnetic field measurements of beta Cephei stars and Slowly Pulsating B stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of the continuation of our magnetic survey with FORS1 at the VLT of a sample of B-type stars consisting of confirmed or candidate beta Cephei stars and Slowly Pulsating B (hereafter SPB) stars, along with a small number of normal B-type stars. A weak mean longitudinal magnetic field of the order of a few hundred Gauss was detected in three beta Cephei stars and two stars suspected to be beta Cephei stars, in five SPB stars and eight stars suspected to be SPB stars. Additionally, a longitudinal magnetic field at a level larger than 3sigma has been diagnosed in two normal B-type stars, the nitrogen-rich early B-type star HD52089 and in the B5 IV star HD153716. Roughly one third of beta Cephei stars have detected magnetic fields: Out of 13 beta Cephei stars studied to date with FORS1, four stars possess weak magnetic fields, and out of the sample of six suspected beta Cephei stars two show a weak magnetic field. The fraction of magnetic SPBs and candidate SPBs is found to be higher: roughl...

Hubrig, S; De Cat, P; Schöller, M; Morel, T; Ilyin, I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Determination of Optical-Field Ionization Dynamics in Plasmas through the Direct Measurement of the Optical Phase Change  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The detailed dynamics of an atom in a strong laser field is rich in both interesting physics and potential applications. The goal of this project was to develop a technique for characterizing high-field laser-plasma interactions with femtosecond resolution based on the direct measurement of the phase change of an optical pulse. The authors developed the technique of Multi-pulse Interferometric Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (MI-FROG), which recovers (to all orders) the phase difference between pumped and unpumped probe pulses, enabling the determination of sub-pulsewidth time-resolved phase and frequency shifts impressed by a pump pulse on a weak probe pulse. Using MI-FROG, the authors obtained the first quantitative measurements of high-field ionization rates in noble gases and diatomic molecules. They obtained agreement between the measured ionization rates an d those calculated for the noble gases and diatomic nitrogen and hydrogen using a one-dimensional fluid model and rates derived from tunneling theory. However, much higher rates are measured for diatomic oxygen than predicted by tunneling theory calculations.

Taylor, A.J.; Omenetto, G.; Rodriguez, G.; Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Downer, C.

1999-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

Magnetic Field Test and Renovation Measures of 240kA Aluminum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis tells that the original configuration of bas bar cannot meet the requirements of hydro magnetic stability. And some transformation measures have ...

186

Evaluation of similarity measures for knowledge profiles from an expert directory: a field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expert directories describe the knowledge of the staff. From field data of an implementation of such an expert directory we calculated weighted connections between employees based on their shared topics. These relations will be used for recommending ... Keywords: expert directories, expert recommender, expert recommender systems, knowledge management, knowledge profile similarity

Wilko Kraß; Ulrich Försterling

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Deconvolution of Wide-Field-of-View Measurements of Reflected Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide-field-of-view (WFOV) radiometers have been flown as part of the Earth Radiation Budget instrument on the Nimbus 6 and 7 spacecraft and as part of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments aboard the ERBE spacecraft and also ...

G. Louis Smith; David Rutan

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A Field Air-Exclusion System for Measuring the Effects of Air Pollutants on Crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In two years of field testing, an electronically regulated prototype proved more realistic for southwestern conditions than conventional systems for exposing plants to controlled amounts of pollutants. A mobile version of the experimental system, developed on the basis of the test results, is transportable to remote sites.

1985-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

Multi-scale Full-field Optical Measurement of Crack Growth and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... Abstract Scope, We report on the use of stereo digital image correlation (DIC) for investigations of ... The Cooling Rate Control in Laser Beam Welding of TiAl-based Alloy Assisted by Temperature Field Simulation ... Contact programming@programmaster.org.

190

Energy consumption and usage characteristics from field measurements of residential dishwashers, clothes washers and clothes dryers  

SciTech Connect

The measured energy consumption and usage characteristics for household dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers for ten townhouses at Twin Rivers, N.J., are presented. Whenever the dishwashers and/or clothes washers were in use, the energy consumption, water consumption, frequency of usage, and water temperature were measured by a data acquisition system. The electrical energy of electric clothes dryers and the gas consumption of gas clothes dryers were measured, as well as their frequency and duration of use, and exhaust temperature. Typical household usage patterns of these major appliances are included.

Chang, Y.L.; Grot, R.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Field Trial of an In Situ Probe for Continuous Ammonia Slip Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the broad-based deployment of post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technologies, continuous measurement of associated ammonia slip levels has gained increased importance with respect to potential balance-of-plant impacts and direct process control. Because many sites do not have optically aligned sets of ports or physical access to both sides of a duct, it is important that continuous measurements can also be achieved with single-port access through the use of an in situ measurement probe an...

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

Magnetic field pitch-angle measurments in the PBX-M tokamak using the motional Stark effect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polarimetry measurements of the Doppler-shifted H{sub {alpha}} emission from a neutral hydrogen beam on the PBX-M tokamak have been employed in a novel technique for obtaining {ital q}({ital r}) and magnetic field pitch-angle profiles using the Stark effect. The resulting {ital q}({ital r}) profile is very broad and its central value, {ital q}(0), is significantly below 1, which has important implications for theoretical models of sawteeth.

Levinton, F.M. (JAYCOR, Plasma Technology Division, 3547 Voyager Street, Torrance, California 90503 (USA)); Fonck, R.J.; Gammel, G.M.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.W.; Powell, E.T.; Roberts, D.W. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (USA))

1989-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

193

Wall scanning probe for high-field side plasma measurements on Alcator C-Mod  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new, high-field side scanning probe has been added to Alcator C-Mod's complement of edge diagnostics. The wall scanning probe is designed to provide all the benefits of a linear plunge, multielectrode scanning probe while working from the confined space of the inner tokamak wall. The drive mechanism is an embedded coil which produces a torque with the ambient toroidal magnetic field when energized, thus allowing the probe to plunge to different preprogramed depths at different times during a plasma discharge. The probe tip is designed for easy replacement and is presently configured to operate as a modified, high heat-flux ''Gundestrup-type'' probe with four tungsten electrodes. The probe has demonstrated the ability to obtain cross-field profiles for electron temperature, density, floating potential, and plasma flow information (parallel and perpendicular to B) up to a depth of a few millimiters inside the last-closed flux surface in standard C-Mod discharges. The tungsten-tipped probe has proved very robust and shows little or no damage though it routinely handles surface heat fluxes on the order of 100 MW/m{sup 2} at peak insertion.

Smick, Noah; LaBombard, Brian [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Lift, drag and flow-field measurements around a small ornithopter  

SciTech Connect

The aerodynamics of a flight-worthy, radio controlled ornithopter is investigated using a combination of Particle-Image Velocimetry (PIV), load cell measurements, and high-speed photography of smoke visualizations. The lift and thrust forces of the ornithopter are measured at various flow speeds, flapping frequencies and angles of attack to characterize the flight performance. These direct force measurements are then compared with forces estimated using control volume analysis on PIV data. High-speed photography of smoke streaks is used to visualize the evolution of leading edge vortices, and to qualitatively infer the effect of wing deformation on the net downwash. Vortical structures in the wake are compared to previous studies on root flapping, and direct measurements of flapping efficiency are used to argue that the current ornithopter operates sub-optimally in converting the input energy into propulsive work.

Balakumar, B J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez - Alarcon, Ramiro [NMSU; Shu, Fangjun [NMSU

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

195

Profiler Contributions to Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Ground Validation Field Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doppler radar profilers are widely used for routine measurement of wind, especially in the lower troposphere. The same profilers with minor modifications are useful tools for precipitation research. Specifically, the profilers are now ...

Kenneth S. Gage; Christopher R. Williams; Wallace L. Clark; Paul E. Johnston; David A. Carter

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Field Testing of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Analyzers Measuring Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prevalent methods for making high-accuracy tower-based measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio, notably nondispersive infrared spectroscopy (NDIR), require frequent system calibration and sample drying. Wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down ...

Scott J. Richardson; Natasha L. Miles; Kenneth J. Davis; Eric R. Crosson; Chris W. Rella; Arlyn E. Andrews

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Plume Dispersion in the Convective Boundary Layer. Part I: CONDORS Field Experiment and Example Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project CONDORS (CONvective Diffusion Observed by Remote Sensors) measured the dispersion of a nonbuoyant plume in the highly convective boundary layer. Laboratory and numerical models have predicted vertical profiles of a passive tracer that are ...

W. L. Eberhard; W. R. Moninger; G. A. Briggs

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Measurement of Doppler Wind Fields with Fast Scanning Radars: Signal Processing Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses signal processing techniques being developed for making Doppler wind velocity measurements using airport surveillance radars. Techniques are presented and evaluated for velocity estimation using fast-rotating radars. In ...

John R. Anderson

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Advances in the Estimation of Ice Particle Fall Speeds Using Laboratory and Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate estimates for the fall speed of natural hydrometeors are vital if their evolution in clouds is to be understood quantitatively. In this study, laboratory measurements of the terminal velocity ?t for a variety of ice particle models ...

A. J. Heymsfield; C. D. Westbrook

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Laboratory and Field Measurements of Electrical Resistivity to Determine Saturation and Detect Fractures in a Heated Rock Mass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of intact and fractured representative geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to infer saturation and fracture location in a large-scale field test. Measurements were performed to simulate test conditions with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures to 145 C. Measurements presented are a first step toward making the search for fractures using electrical methods quantitatively. Intact samples showed a gradual resistivity increase when pore pressure was decreased below the phase-boundary pressure of free water, while fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling. The resistivity change is greatest for samples with the most exposed surface area. Analysis of a field test provided the opportunity to evaluate fracture detection using electrical methods at a large scale. Interpretation of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) images of resistivity contrasts, aided by laboratory derived resistivity-saturation-temperature relationships, indicates that dynamic saturation changes in a heated rock mass are observable and that fractures experiencing drying or resaturation can be identified. The same techniques can be used to locate fractures in geothermal reservoirs using electrical field methods.

Roberts, J J; Ramirez, A; Carlson, S; Ralph, W; Bonner, B P

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

Schulz, Wallace W. (Richland, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Statistical analysis of magnetic field reversals in laboratory dynamo and in paleomagnetic measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical properties of the temporal distribution of polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are commonly assumed to be a realization of a renewal Poisson process with a variable rate. However, it has been recently shown that the polarity reversals strongly depart from a local Poisson statistics, because of temporal clustering. Such clustering arises from the presence of long-range correlations in the underlying dynamo process. Recently achieved laboratory dynamo also shows reversals. It is shown here that laboratory and paleomagnetic data are both characterized by the presence of long-range correlations.

Sorriso-Valvo, L; Bourgoin, M; Odier, P; Plihon, N; Volk, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Downhole pressure, temperature and flowrate measurements in steam wells at the Geysers field  

SciTech Connect

Recently developed pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) tools are used to collect reliable downhole measurements in geothermal systems, such as at The Geysers. PTS surveys in several flowing Geysers steam wells were used to quantify steam entry location and magnitude, wellbore heat loss, pressure drop due to friction, thermodynamic properties of the steam, and maximum rock temperature. Interwell cross flow/interference was identified in one well. Finally, a single-phase saturated steam wellbore model used to compare calculated to measured downhole values, was found to adequately predict the flowing pressure versus depth curves in vapor filled holes.

Enedy, Kathleen L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System for Real-Time Field Screening of Contaminants  

SciTech Connect

Sampling during environmental drilling is essential to fully characterize the spatial distribution and migration of near surface contaminants. However, analysis of the samples is expensive and time-consuming: off-site laboratory analysis can take weeks or months. An alternative screening technology, Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD), could save money and valuable time by quickly distinguishing between contaminated and uncontaminated areas. Real time measurements provided by an EMWD system enable on-the-spot decisions to be made regarding sampling strategies. The system also enhances worker safety and provides the added flexibility of being able to steer a drill bit in or out of hazardous zones.

Bishop, L.B.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Selph, M.M.; Williams, C.V.

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

205

Measurements of Nonlinear Hall-Driven Reconnection in the Reversed Field Pinch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by using the USB Microscope. 2. Introduce the LED and bulb as an efficient alternative to conventional. Provide hands-on experience with the measurement of the time-dependence of light output from LED bulb. 5 of a 40 lumen equivalent LED bulb (cluster of single LEDs) attached , the Lamp specifications spreadsheet

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

206

Assessment of cover systems at the Grand Junction, Colorado, uranium mill tailings pile: 1987 field measurements  

SciTech Connect

Four Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientists and a technician conducted an onsite evaluation of radon gas exhalation, water content profiles, and plant and animal intrusion for a series of cover systems located on the uranium mill tailings pile at Grand Junction, Colorado. These six plots were sampled extensively down to the radon control layer (e.g., asphalt or wet clay) for soil moisture content and permeability. Radon gas emission through the surface was measured. Soil samples were collected and analyzed in the lab for particle-size distribution, particle density, bulk density, and ambient water content. Prairie dog burrows were excavated to discover the extent to which they penetrated the barriers. Plant type, density, and cover characteristics were measured.

Gee, G.W.; Campbell, M.D.; Freeman, H.D.; Cline, J.F.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Field monitoring of solar domestic hot water systems based on simple tank temperature measurement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By dynamically measuring solar storage tank temperature(s), the solar storage tank effectively becomes a dynamic calorimeter to measure the energy flows in a solar system. The energy flows include solar loop gain, tank losses, and potentially draw extraction. With one-channel temperature loggers storing data over several days to several weeks, this approach provides low-cost, modest-accuracy performance assessment, useful for determination of savings persistence and diagnostics. Analysis is based upon the tank energy balance, identifying solar gain during the day and tank losses at night. These gains and losses can be compared to expectations based upon prior knowledge, and estimated weather conditions. Diagnostics include controller and pump operation, and excessive nighttime losses. With one point temperature logger, solar gain accuracy is expected to be 20 to 50%, depending on draw frequency and volume. Two examples are shown, a properly operating system and a system with excessive nighttime losses.

Burch, J.; Xie, Yuantao [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Murley, C.S. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Evaluation of methane emissions from Palermo municipal landfill: Comparison between field measurements and models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane (CH{sub 4}) diffuse emissions from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills represent one of the most important anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas. CH{sub 4} is produced by anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter in landfilled MSW and constitutes a major component of landfill gas (LFG). Gas recovery is a suitable method to effectively control CH{sub 4} emissions from landfill sites and the quantification of CH{sub 4} emissions represents a good tool to evaluate the effectiveness of a gas recovery system in reducing LFG emissions. In particular, LFG emissions can indirectly be evaluated from mass balance equations between LFG production, recovery and oxidation in the landfill, as well as by a direct approach based on LFG emission measurements from the landfill surface. However, up to now few direct measurements of landfill CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions have been reported in the technical literature. In the present study, both modeling and direct emission measuring methodologies have been applied to the case study of Bellolampo landfill located in Palermo, Italy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions, based on direct measurements carried out with the flux accumulation chamber (static, non-stationary) method, as well as to obtain the CH{sub 4} contoured flux map of the landfill. Such emissions were compared with the estimate achieved by means of CH{sub 4} mass balance equations. The results showed that the emissions obtained by applying the flux chamber method are in good agreement with the ones derived by the application of the mass balance equation, and that the evaluated contoured flux maps represent a reliable tool to locate areas with abnormal emissions in order to optimize the gas recovery system efficiency.

Di Bella, Gaetano, E-mail: dibella@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Di Trapani, Daniele, E-mail: ditrapani@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Viviani, Gaspare, E-mail: gviv@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Cropland Field Monitoring: MMV Page 1 Montana Cropland Enrolled Farm Fields Carbon Sequestration Field Sampling, Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification: Application of Visible-Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (VNIR) and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)  

SciTech Connect

There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laboratory based soil characterization typically requires significant soil processing, which is time and resource intensive. This severely limits application for large-region soil characterization. Thus, development of rapid and accurate methods for characterizing soils are needed to map soil properties for precision agriculture applications, improve regional and global soil carbon (C) stock and flux estimates and efficiently map sub-surface metal contamination, among others. The greatest gains for efficient soil characterization will come from collecting soil data in situ, thus minimizing soil sample transportation, processing, and lab-based measurement costs. Visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VisNIR) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are two complementary, yet fundamentally different spectroscopic techniques that have the potential to meet this need. These sensors have the potential to be mounted on a soil penetrometer and deployed for rapid soil profile characterization at field and landscape scales. Details of sensor interaction, efficient data management, and appropriate statistical analysis techniques for model calibrations are first needed. In situ or on-the-go VisNIR spectroscopy has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive tool for intensively mapping soil texture and organic carbon (SOC). While lab-based VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for estimating various soil properties, few experiments have compared the predictive accuracy of on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Eight north central Montana wheat fields were intensively interrogated using on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Lab-based spectral data consistently provided more accurate predictions than on-the-go data. However, neither in situ nor lab-based spectroscopy yielded even semi-quantitative SOC predictions. There was little SOC variability to explain across the eight fields, and on-the-go VisNIR was not able to capture the subtle SOC variability in these Montana soils. With more variation in soil clay content compared to SOC, both lab and on-the-go VisNIR showed better explanatory power. There are several potential explanations for poor on-the-go predictive accuracy: soil heterogeneity, field moisture, consistent sample presentation, and a difference between the spatial support of on-the-go measurements and soil samples collected for laboratory analyses. Though the current configuration of a commercially available on-the-go VisNIR system allows for rapid field scanning, on-the-go soil processing (i.e. drying, crushing, and sieving) could improve soil carbon predictions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging elemental analysis technology with the potential to provide rapid, accurate and precise analysis of soil constituents, such as carbon, in situ across landscapes. The research team evaluated the accuracy of LIBS for measuring soil profile carbon in field-moist, intact soil cores simulating conditions that might be encountered by a probe-mounted LIBS instrument measuring soil profile carbon in situ. Over the course of three experiments, more than120 intact soil cores from eight north central Montana wheat fields and the Washington State University (WSU) Cook Agronomy Farm near Pullman, WA were interrogated with LIBS for rapid total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), and SOC determination. Partial least squares regression models were derived and independently validated at field- and regional scales. Researchers obtained the best LIBS validation predictions for IC followed by TC and SOC. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is fundamentally an elemental analysis technique, yet LIBS PLS2 models appeared to discriminate IC from TC. Regression coefficients from initial models suggested a reliance upon stoichiometric relationships between carbon (247.8 nm) and other elements

Lee Spangler; Ross Bricklemyer; David Brown

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cropland Field Monitoring: MMV Page 1 Montana Cropland Enrolled Farm Fields Carbon Sequestration Field Sampling, Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification: Application of Visible-Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (VNIR) and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laboratory based soil characterization typically requires significant soil processing, which is time and resource intensive. This severely limits application for large-region soil characterization. Thus, development of rapid and accurate methods for characterizing soils are needed to map soil properties for precision agriculture applications, improve regional and global soil carbon (C) stock and flux estimates and efficiently map sub-surface metal contamination, among others. The greatest gains for efficient soil characterization will come from collecting soil data in situ, thus minimizing soil sample transportation, processing, and lab-based measurement costs. Visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VisNIR) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are two complementary, yet fundamentally different spectroscopic techniques that have the potential to meet this need. These sensors have the potential to be mounted on a soil penetrometer and deployed for rapid soil profile characterization at field and landscape scales. Details of sensor interaction, efficient data management, and appropriate statistical analysis techniques for model calibrations are first needed. In situ or on-the-go VisNIR spectroscopy has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive tool for intensively mapping soil texture and organic carbon (SOC). While lab-based VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for estimating various soil properties, few experiments have compared the predictive accuracy of on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Eight north central Montana wheat fields were intensively interrogated using on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Lab-based spectral data consistently provided more accurate predictions than on-the-go data. However, neither in situ nor lab-based spectroscopy yielded even semi-quantitative SOC predictions. There was little SOC variability to explain across the eight fields, and on-the-go VisNIR was not able to capture the subtle SOC variability in these Montana soils. With more variation in soil clay content compared to SOC, both lab and on-the-go VisNIR showed better explanatory power. There are several potential explanations for poor on-the-go predictive accuracy: soil heterogeneity, field moisture, consistent sample presentation, and a difference between the spatial support of on-the-go measurements and soil samples collected for laboratory analyses. Though the current configuration of a commercially available on-the-go VisNIR system allows for rapid field scanning, on-the-go soil processing (i.e. drying, crushing, and sieving) could improve soil carbon predictions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging elemental analysis technology with the potential to provide rapid, accurate and precise analysis of soil constituents, such as carbon, in situ across landscapes. The research team evaluated the accuracy of LIBS for measuring soil profile carbon in field-moist, intact soil cores simulating conditions that might be encountered by a probe-mounted LIBS instrument measuring soil profile carbon in situ. Over the course of three experiments, more than120 intact soil cores from eight north central Montana wheat fields and the Washington State University (WSU) Cook Agronomy Farm near Pullman, WA were interrogated with LIBS for rapid total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), and SOC determination. Partial least squares regression models were derived and independently validated at field- and regional scales. Researchers obtained the best LIBS validation predictions for IC followed by TC and SOC. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is fundamentally an elemental analysis technique, yet LIBS PLS2 models appeared to discriminate IC from TC. Regression coefficients from initial models suggested a reliance upon stoichiometric relationships between carbon (247.8 nm) and other elements

Lee Spangler; Ross Bricklemyer; David Brown

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Method Evaluation And Field Sample Measurements For The Rate Of Movement Of The Oxidation Front In Saltstone  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to develop and evaluate a series of methods and validate their capability to measure differences in oxidized versus reduced saltstone. Validated methods were then applied to samples cured under field conditions to simulate Performance Assessment (PA) needs for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Four analytical approaches were evaluated using laboratory-cured saltstone samples. These methods were X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), chemical redox indicators, and thin-section leaching methods. XAS and thin-section leaching methods were validated as viable methods for studying oxidation movement in saltstone. Each method used samples that were spiked with chromium (Cr) as a tracer for oxidation of the saltstone. The two methods were subsequently applied to field-cured samples containing chromium to characterize the oxidation state of chromium as a function of distance from the exposed air/cementitious material surface.

Almond, P. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Kaplan, D. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Stefanko, D. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Spencer, W. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Hatfield, A. [Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Arai, Y. [Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

212

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

Hsu, Chia-lin W. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress  

SciTech Connect

The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

Hsu, Chia-lin W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Electrocatalytic oxidation of glycerol; 1: Behavior of palladium electrode in alkaline medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct oxidation of organic compounds derived from biomass, such as alcohols, in a fuel cell is a very attractive way for converting chemical energy into electrical energy. The electrocatalytic oxidation of glycerol has been investigated at palladium electrodes in alkaline medium by electro-chemical and spectroscopic techniques. The kinetic parameters measured, together with other experimental data, allow one to suggest a mechanism. Diffusion is involved in the rate-determining step.

Yildiz, G.; Kadirgan, F. (Istanbul Teknik Univ. (Turkey))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Field Evaluation of a Novel Sorbent Trap Method for Measuring Metal and Halogen Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owners of fossil fuel-fired power plants face the challenge of measuring stack emissions of trace metals and acid gases at much lower levels than in the past as a result of increasingly stringent regulations. In the United States, the current reference methods for trace metals and halogens are wet-chemistry methods, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 29 for trace metals and 26 and 26A for halogens. As a possible alternative to the EPA methods, the Energy and Environmental Research ...

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

217

Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

Shearer, J.A.; Turner, C.B.; Johnson, I.

1980-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

218

Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

Shearer, John A. (Chicago, IL); Turner, Clarence B. (Shorewood, IL); Johnson, Irving (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Global Leaf Area Index Data from Field Measurements, 1932-2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published estimates of leaf area index (LAI), covering the period Published estimates of leaf area index (LAI), covering the period 1932-2000, have been compiled at the ORNL DAAC into a single data set to support model development and EOS MODIS product validation. Like net primary productivity (NPP), leaf area index (LAI) is a key parameter for global and regional models of biosphere/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide, water vapor, etc. This data set provides a benchmark of typical values and ranges of LAI for a variety of biomes and land cover types, in support of model development and validation of satellite-derived remote-sensing estimates of LAI and other vegetation parameters. For example, maximum values for point measurements are unlikely to be approached or exceeded for area-weighted LAI, which is what satellites and

220

Total Carbon Measurement in Soils Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Results from the Field and Implications for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Carbon Measurement in Soils using Laser-Induced Breakdown Total Carbon Measurement in Soils using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Results from the Field and Implications for Carbon Sequestration Michael H. Ebinger (mhe@lanl.gov, 505-667-3147) Environmental Dynamics and Spatial Analysis Group (EES-10), MS J495 Earth and Environmental Sciences Division Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA. David A. Cremers (cremers_david@lanl.gov, 505-665-4180) Advanced Chemical Diagnostics and Instrumentation Group, MS J565 Chemistry Division Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 David D. Breshears (daveb@lanl.gov, 505-665-2803) Environmental Dynamics and Spatial Analysis Group (EES-10), MS J495 Earth and Environmental Sciences Division Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Welcome and OverviewInnovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Welcome and Overview Innovation for Our Energy Future Bryan Pivovar National Renewable Energy Laboratory AMFC Workshop May 8, 2011 Innovation for Our Energy Future 2 Welcome - Your participation is appreciated - Date of Workshop Innovation for Our Energy Future 3 Meeting Location Innovation for Our Energy Future Workshop Agenda SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011 1:00 pm - 1:15 pm Welcome and Opening Remarks (Salon H) 1:15 pm - 1:45 pm Workshop Overview: Dr. Bryan Pivovar, NREL (Salon H) 1:45 pm - 2:15 pm Alkaline Membrane Research Overview: Prof. Andy Herring, Colorado School of Mines (Salon H) 2:15 pm - 2:45 pm Alkaline Electrocatalysis Research Overview: Prof. Sanjeev Mukerjee, Northeastern University (Salon H) 2:45 pm - 3:15 pm AMFCs: Tokuyama Perspective:

222

Research on separators for alkaline zinc batteries. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is concerned with the research and development of a hybrid separator as an improved battery separator in alkaline zinc secondary batteries. Particular emphasis has been directed toward mitigating the failure of zinc electrodes by controlling the permselectivity of the separator. Hybrid separators were synthesized and fabricated. These separators consist of a microporous film, radiation-grafted with a monomer containing ion-exchange groups. The new separator incorporates the favorable aspects of both ion-exchange membranes and microporous separators. Such a hybrid separator should ideally be highly specific for fast transport of electrolyte while inhibiting zincate diffusion. Hybrid separators with a wide range of percent graft (0 to 60%) were made by varying the monomer concentration and radiation time. The grafting of these ionic groups imparts the ion selectivity of the separators. The electrolyte uptake of hybrid separators is ca. 60 wt %. The higher the percent graft of the separator, the higher the water uptake and the lower the KOH uptake that are observed. The permeabilities of zincate ions were measured for a series of hybrid separators.

Yeo, R.S.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time ({approximately}1 {micro}s to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired.

Famiano, M.A.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

Field Results from a Second-Generation Ocean/Lake Surface Contact Heat Flux, Solar Irradiance, and Temperature Measurement Instrument—The Multisensor Float  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from two field programs that support development of a wave-following surface contact multisensor float (MSF) designed to simultaneously measure net surface heat flux, net solar irradiance, and water temperature. The ...

J. P. Boyle

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements made by PTR-MS, DOAS and GC-FID during the MCMA 2003 Field Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements is reported for the CENICA supersite in the district of Iztapalapa during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field experiment in April 2003 (MCMA 2003). Data from three ...

Jobson, B. T.

226

Detecting internal corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines: field tests of probes and systems for real-time corrosion measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of automated, multi-technique electrochemical corrosion-rate monitoring devices and probes for detecting corrosion in environments similar to those found in natural gas transmission pipelines. It involved measurement of real-time corrosion signals from operating pipelines. Results and interpretation were reported from four different field test locations. Standard flush-mount and custom flange probes were used in four different environments at a gas-gathering site and one environment but two different probe orientations at a natural gas site. These sites were selected to represent normal and upset conditions common in gas transmission pipelines. The environments consisted of two different levels of humidified natural gas, liquid hydrocarbon, and water from natural gas. Probe locations included the 6 and 12 o?clock positions of a natural gas pipeline carrying 2-phase gas/liquid flow. The probe data was monitored using completely remote solar powered systems that provided real-time data transmission via wireless back to a pipeline control station. Data are also presented comparing the ECR probe data to that for coupons used to determine corrosion rate and to detect the presence of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Kane, R.D. (InterCorr International); Meidinger, B. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Near-field heat transfer at the spent fuel test-climax: a comparison of measurements and calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spent Fuel Test in the Climax granitic stock at the DOE Nevada Test Site is a test of the feasibility of storage and retrieval of spent nuclear reactor fuel in a deep geologic environment. Eleven spent fuel elements, together with six thermally identical electrical resistance heaters and 20 peripheral guard heaters, are emplaced 420 m below surface in a three-drift test array. This array was designed to simulate the near-field effects of thousands of canisters of nuclear waste and to evaluate the effects of heat alone, and heat plus ionizing radiation on the rock. Thermal calculations and measurements are conducted to determine thermal transport from the spent fuel and electrical resistance heaters. Calculations associated with the as-built Spent Fuel Test geometry and thermal source histories are presented and compared with thermocouple measurements made throughout the test array. Comparisons in space begin at the spent fuel canister and include the first few metres outside the test array. Comparisons in time begin at emplacement and progress through the first year of thermal loading in this multi-year test.

Patrick, W.C.; Montan, D.N.; Ballou, L.B.

1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

228

POISON SPIDER FIELD CHEMICAL FLOOD PROJECT, WYOMING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reservoir engineering and geologic study concluded that approximate 7,852,000 bbls of target oil exits in Poison Spider. Field pore volume, OOIP, and initial oil saturation are defined. Potential injection water has a total dissolved solids content of 1,275 mg/L with no measurable divalent cations. If the Lakota water consistently has no measurable cations, the injection water does not require softening to dissolve alkali. Produced water total dissolved solids were 2,835 mg/L and less than 20 mg/L hardness as the sum of divalent cations. Produced water requires softening to dissolve chemicals. Softened produced water was used to dissolve chemicals in these evaluations. Crude oil API gravity varies across the field from 19.7 to 22.2 degrees with a dead oil viscosity of 95 to 280 cp at 75 F. Interfacial tension reductions of up to 21,025 fold (0.001 dyne/cm) were developed with fifteen alkaline-surfactant combinations at some alkali concentration. An additional three alkaline-surfactant combinations reduced the interfacial tension greater than 5,000 fold. NaOH generally produced the lowest interfacial tension values. Interfacial tension values of less than 0.021 dyne/cm were maintained when the solutions were diluted with produced water to about 60%. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} when mixed with surfactants did not reduce interfacial tension values to levels at which incremental oil can be expected. NaOH without surfactant interfacial tension reduction is at a level where some additional oil might be recovered. Most of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions producing ultra low interfacial tension gave type II- phase behavior. Only two solutions produced type III phase behavior. Produced water dilution resulted in maintenance of phase type for a number of solutions at produced water dilutions exceeding 80% dilution. The average loss of phase type occurred at 80% dilution. Linear corefloods were performed to determine relative permeability end points, chemical-rock compatibility, polymer injectivity, dynamic chemical retention by rock, and recommended injected polymer concentration. Average initial oil saturation was 0.796 Vp. Produced water injection recovered 53% OOIP leaving an average residual oil saturation of 0.375 Vp. Poison Spider rock was strongly water-wet with a mobility ratio for produced water displacing the 280 cp crude oil of 8.6. Core was not sensitive to either alkali or surfactant injection. Injectivity increased 60 to 80% with alkali plus surfactant injection. Low and medium molecular weight polyacrylamide polymers (Flopaam 3330S and Flopaam 3430S) dissolved in either an alkaline-surfactant solution or softened produced water injected and flowed through Poison Spider rock. Recommended injected polyacrylamide concentration is 2,100 mg/L for both polymers for a unit mobility ratio. Radial corefloods were performed to evaluate oil recovery efficiency of different chemical solutions. Waterflood oil recovery averaged 46.4 OOIP and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery averaged an additional 18.1% OIP for a total of 64.6% OOIP. Oil cut change due to injection of a 1.5 wt% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} plus 0.05 wt% Petrostep B-100 plus 0.05 wt% Stepantan AS1216 plus 2100 mg/L Flopaam 3430S was from 2% to a peak of 23.5%. Additional study might determine the impact on oil recovery of a lower polymer concentration. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood field implementation outline report was written.

Douglas Arnell; Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

New topics in coherent anti-stokes raman scattering gas-phase diagnostics : femtosecond rotational CARS and electric-field measurements.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss two recent diagnostic-development efforts in our laboratory: femtosecond pure-rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for thermometry and species detection in nitrogen and air, and nanosecond vibrational CARS measurements of electric fields in air. Transient pure-rotational fs-CARS data show the evolution of the rotational Raman polarization in nitrogen and air over the first 20 ps after impulsive pump/Stokes excitation. The Raman-resonant signal strength at long time delays is large, and we additionally observe large time separation between the fs-CARS signatures of nitrogen and oxygen, so that the pure-rotational approach to fs-CARS has promise for simultaneous species and temperature measurements with suppressed nonresonant background. Nanosecond vibrational CARS of nitrogen for electric-field measurements is also demonstrated. In the presence of an electric field, a dipole is induced in the otherwise nonpolar nitrogen molecule, which can be probed with the introduction of strong collinear pump and Stokes fields, resulting in CARS signal radiation in the infrared. The electric-field diagnostic is demonstrated in air, where the strength of the coherent infrared emission and sensitivity our field measurements is quantified, and the scaling of the infrared signal with field strength is verified.

Lempert, Walter R. (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Barnat, Edward V.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Serrano, Justin Raymond

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part II: Field Measurements of Surface Heat Flux and Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI) described by Sromovsky et al. (Part I, this issue) was field-tested in a combination of freshwater and ocean deployments. Solar irradiance monitoring and field calibration techniques were ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

TIME DELAY OF CASCADE RADIATION FOR TeV BLAZARS AND THE MEASUREMENT OF THE INTERGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD  

SciTech Connect

Recent claims that the strength B{sub IGMF} of the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) is {approx}> 10{sup -15} G are based on upper limits to the expected cascade flux in the GeV band produced by blazar TeV photons absorbed by the extragalactic background light. This limit depends on an assumption that the mean blazar TeV flux remains constant on timescales {approx}> 2(B{sub IGMF}/10{sup -18}G){sup 2}/(E/10 GeV){sup 2} yr for an IGMF coherence length {approx}1 Mpc, where E is the measured photon energy. Restricting TeV activity of 1ES 0229+200 to {approx}3-4 years during which the source has been observed leads to a more robust lower limit of B{sub IGMF} {approx}> 10{sup -18} G, which can be larger by an order of magnitude if the intrinsic source flux above {approx}5-10 TeV from 1ES 0229+200 is strong.

Dermer, Charles D.; Razzaque, Soebur; Finke, Justin D. [Space Science Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Cavadini, Massimo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita dell'Insubria, via Valleggio 11, 22100, Como (Italy); Chiang, James [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lott, Benoit, E-mail: charles.dermer@nrl.navy.mil [CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, Gradignan, 33175 (France)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Research on separators for alkaline zinc batteries. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is concerned with the research and development of a hybrid separator as an improved battery separator in alkaline zinc secondary batteries. Particular emphasis has been directed toward increasing the cycle life of zinc electrodes by controlling the permselectivity of the separator.

Yeo, R.S.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Development of an alkaline/surfactant/polymer compositional reservoir simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mathematical formulation of a generalized three-dimensional compositional reservoir simulator for high-pH chemical flooding processes is presented in this work. The model assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium with respect to both reaction chemistry and phase behavior and calculates equilibrium electrolyte and phase compositions as a function of time and position. The reaction chemistry considers aqueous electrolytic chemistry, precipitation/dissolution of minerals, ion exchange reactions on matrix surface, reaction of acidic components of crude oil with the bases in the aqueous solution and cation exchange reactions with the micelles. The simulator combines this detailed reaction chemistry associated with these processes with the extensive physical and flow property modeling schemes of an existing chemical flood simulator (UTCHEM) to model the multiphase, multidimensional displacement processes. The formulation of the chemical equilibrium model is quite general and is adaptable to simulate a variety of chemical descriptions. In addition to its use in the simulation of high-pH chemical flooding processes, the model will find application in the simulation of other reactive flow problems like the ground water contamination, reinjection of produced water, chemical waste disposal, etc. in one, two or three dimensions and under multiphase flow conditions. In this work, the model is used to simulate several hypothetical cases of high-pH chemical floods, which include cases from a simple alkaline preflush of a micellar/polymer flood to surfactant enhanced alkaline-polymer flooding and the results are analyzed. Finally, a few published alkaline, alkaline-polymer and surfactant-alkaline-polymer corefloods are simulated and compared with the experimental results.

Bhuyan, D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Case for Employing Near-field Measurements to Detect Important Effluents from Nuclear Material Processing Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General discussion of effluents from nuclear material reprocessing operations and the opportunity to detect important effluents in the near-field domain.

Hartman, John S.; Kelly, James F.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

A High-Accuracy Multiwavelength Radiometer for In Situ Measurements in the Thermal Infrared. Part II: Behavior in Field Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performances of the new conveyable low-noise infrared radiometer for measurements of atmosphere and ground surface targets, or CLIMAT, are presented for in situ measurements. For this, quantitative analyses were carried out on measurements ...

Gérard Brogniez; Christophe Pietras; Michel Legrand; Philippe Dubuisson; Martial Haeffelin

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance and longer lifetime for alkaline membrane fuel cells.

Not Available

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Kerr electro-optic measurements for electric field and space charge distributions using similar and dissimilar electrode pairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electrical breakdown strength of insulating materials is a major limiting factor of reliability in electric power, medical devices, and other high electric field applications. Electrical breakdown strength increase ...

Nowocin, John Kendall

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

An Upper Threshold of Enhanced Global Shortwave Irradiance in the Troposphere Derived from Field Measurements in Tropical Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraordinarily high values of global irradiance (up to 1832 W m?2) incident upon a horizontal surface were observed during a 4-yr meteorological field campaign in the southern Ecuadorian Andes Mountains (4°S). The unexpected magnitude gave rise ...

P. Emck; M. Richter

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Characterization of the Thermal Structure inside an Urban Canyon: Field Measurements and Validation of a Simple Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of measurement campaigns are analyzed to investigate the thermal structure in an urban canyon and to validate a simplified model simulating the air and surface temperatures from surface energy budgets. Starting from measurements at ...

Lorenzo Giovannini; Dino Zardi; Massimiliano de Franceschi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Functionality of alkaline cooked corn bran on tortilla texture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of pericarp and nixtamalized corn bran (NCB) level on corn tortilla attributes was evaluated. The effect of varying pH (4, 9 and 11) on fresh and dry mesa flour (pH 5, 7 and 10) tortillas was also evaluated. Nixtamal was washed at three different levels to obtain tortillas containing about 0, 50 and 100% pericarp. Fumaric acid and lime solutions were used to produce acidic and alkaline tortillas respectively. Tortilla texture was evaluated at 0, 1 and 7 days of storage objectively using a texture analyzer and subjectively using a solvability test. As pericarp content and pH increased tortillas were softer, more flexible and extensible with a darker yellow color. Acidic tortillas were harder with a white color. Pericarp improved texture of tortillas during storage. Commercial corn bran was alkaline treated to obtain NCB with functionality similar to nixtamalized corn pericarp. Dry masa flour (DMF) (1 kg) was mixed with 0, 50 and 100 g dry basis of NCB and processed into tortillas. Tortillas containing NCB had a pH of 9, were more flexible and rollable than control tortillas. Alkaline pH tortillas puffed during baking; these tortillas were yellow with a soft, moist texture. Tortillas containing nixtamalized rice and wheat brans were soft and flexible. A sensory panel found that tortillas containing nixtamalized cereal brans had a strong alkaline flavor and aroma and a blistered surface, with a soft, moist texture. NCB tortillas had the highest overall acceptability scores. Pericarp from nixtamal and alkaline pH slowed the staling mechanisms of tortillas. Nixtamalized commercial brans significantly improved the texture of corn tortillas during storage and enhanced the color, flavor and aroma of DMF tortillas. Nixtamalized cereal brans can be used as an effective additive to extend shelf stability of tortillas and enhance the flavor of DMF products. Tortillas containing NCB could be used in products such as wraps and fried tacos where the bright color and stronger flavor could be an advantage.

Guajardo Flores, Sara

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Comparisons of computed and measured three-dimensional velocity fields in a motored two-stroke engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computer simulations are compared with measurements of the three-dimensional, unsteady scavenging flows of a motored two-stroke engine. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements were made on a modified Suzuki DT-85 ported engine. Calculations were performed using KIVA-3, a computer program that efficiently solves the intake and exhaust port flows along with those in the cylinder. Measured and computed cylinder pressures and velocities are compared. Pressures agree well over the cycle as do the velocities at the intake ports. In-cylinder velocities differ in detail, but the tumbling motion in the cylinder is well replicated in vertical plane passing through the cylinder axis. 20 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Amsden, A.A.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Butler, T.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Meintjes, K.; Fansler, T.D. (General Motors Research Labs., Warren, MI (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Measurement of the Hydraulic Conductivity of Gravels Using a Laboratory Permeameter and Silty Sands Using Field Testing with Observation Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new laboratory permeameter was developed for measuring the hydraulic conductivity of gravels ranging from 0.1 to 2 m/s. The release of pneumatic pressure applied… (more)

Judge, Aaron

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Evaluation of a Triple-Axis Coherent Doppler Velocity Profiler for Measuring Near-Bed Flow: A Field Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collocated detailed measurements of near-bed turbulent and intrawave flow are important for studying sediment transport processes and seabed evolution. Existing commercially available triple-axis profiling instruments do not provide collocated ...

K. F. E. Betteridge; P. S. Bell; P. D. Thorne; J. J. Williams

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A workshop addressing the current state-of-the-art in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs) was held May 8-9, 2011, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop was the second of its kind, with the first being held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2011 workshop and associated workshop report were created to assess the current state of AMFC technology (taking into account recent advances), investigate the performance potential of AMFC systems across all possible power ranges and applications, and identify the key research needs for commercial competitiveness in a variety of areas.

Pivovar, B.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Transpassive electrodissolution of depleted uranium in alkaline electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

To aid in removal of oralloy from the nuclear weapons stockpile, scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility are decontaminating oralloy parts by electrodissolution in neutral to alkaline electrolytes composed of sodium nitrate and sodium sulfate. To improve the process, electrodissolution experiments were performed with depleted uranium to understand the effects of various operating parameters. Sufficient precipitate was also produced to evaluate the feasibility of using ultrafiltration to separate the uranium oxide precipitates from the electrolyte before it enters the decontamination fixture. In preparation for the experiments, a potential-pH diagram for uranium was constructed from thermodynamic data for fully hydrated species. Electrodissolution in unstirred solutions showed that uranium dissolution forms two layers, an acidic bottom layer rich in uranium and an alkaline upper layer. Under stirred conditions results are consistent with the formation of a yellow precipitate of composition UO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, a six electron process. Amperometric experiments showed that current efficiency remained near 100% over a wide range of electrolytes, electrolyte concentrations, pH, and stirring conditions.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Schake, A.R.; Morgan, A.N.; Purdy, G.M.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Catalytic reforming process using noble metal alkaline zeolites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes improvement in a process wherein a gasoline boiling range hydrocarbonaceous feedstock is catalytically reformed in the presence of hydrogen in a reforming process unit comprised of serially connected reactors wherein each of the reactors contains a supported noble metal-containing catalyst. The improvement comprises the noble-metal catalyst of at least one reactor being selected from the group consisting of alkaline faujasite zeolite, L zeolite and zeolites isostructural thereto, which catalysts are prepared by a: contacting an alkaline faujasite zeolite, L zeolite, or zeolite isostructural thereto, with a noble metal composition selected from Pt(acetylacetonate){sub 2} or Pd(acetylacetonate){sub 2} for an effective amount of time to form a substantially homogeneous mixture and to incorporate the platinum and/or palladium into the near surface regions of the zeolite, but not to disperse the platinum and/or palladium throughout the entire zeolite; and calcining the so treated zeolite at a temperature from about 250 {degrees} C to about 600 {degrees} C for an effective amount of time.

Schweizer, A.E.

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

247

Flow Distortion by a Solent Sonic Anemometer: Wind Tunnel Calibration and Its Assessment for Flux Measurements over Forest and Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Main flow distortion effects caused by the sonic probe (i.e., deflection and attenuation/amplification of the wind vector) as a function of the azimuth angle of the incoming flow were examined by means of wind tunnel measurements at four ...

A. Grelle; A. Lindroth

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Divergence-Free Spatial Velocity Flow Field Interpolator for Improving Measurements from ADCP-Equipped Small Unmanned Underwater Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applying a two-dimensional (2D) divergence-free (DF) interpolation to a one-person deployable unmanned underwater vehicle’s (UUV) noisy moving-vessel acoustic Doppler current profiler (MV-ADCP) measurements improves the results and increases the ...

Jamie MacMahan; Ross Vennell; Rick Beatson; Jenna Brown; Ad Reniers

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields  

SciTech Connect

In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Pilot-scale HCl control by dry alkaline injection for emissions from refuse incinerators. Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One method of removing the HCl in an exhaust-gas stream is to directly inject finely divided sorbent particles into the gas stream upstream from particulate collection equipment, allowing enough time for the HCl to react with the sorbent in the duct. The study proposed to provide data on HCl removal from a simulated incinerator exhaust stream as a function of the in-duct reaction/residence time, the reaction temperature, and the sorbent-to-gas ratio. A 500-acfm pilot-scale HCl control system utilizing dry powdered sorbent was tested at the University of Washington. Powdered alkaline reagents including sodium bicarbonate and calcium hydroxide were injected into boiler flue gas spiked with hydrogen chloride gas. The acid gas reacts with the injected sorbent in a 20-inch diameter by 26-foot high vertical, down-flow vessel. HCl removal efficiency was measured as a function of sorbent stoichiometry, gas residence time in reactor, and reaction temperature.

Moore, D.; Pilat, M.

1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

251

FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF [O III] EMISSION FROM Ly{alpha} SELECTED FIELD GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3.1  

SciTech Connect

We present the first spectroscopic measurements of the [O III] 5007 A line in two z {approx} 3.1 Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies (LAEs) using the new near-infrared instrument LUCIFER1 on the 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope. We also describe the optical imaging and spectroscopic observations used to identify these LAEs. Using the [O III] line we have measured accurate systemic redshifts for these two galaxies, and discovered a velocity offset between the [O III] and Ly{alpha} lines in both, with the Ly{alpha} line peaking 342 and 125 km s{sup -1} redward of the systemic velocity. These velocity offsets imply that there are powerful outflows in high-redshift LAEs. They also ease the transmission of Ly{alpha} photons through the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium around the galaxies. By measuring these offsets directly, we can refine both Ly{alpha}-based tests for reionization, and Ly{alpha} luminosity function measurements where the Ly{alpha} forest affects the blue wing of the line. Our work also provides the first direct constraints on the strength of the [O III] line in high-redshift LAEs. We find [O III] fluxes of 7 and 36 x10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} in two z {approx} 3.1 LAEs. These lines are strong enough to dominate broadband flux measurements that include the line (in this case, K{sub s} -band photometry). Spectral energy distribution fits that do not account for the lines would therefore overestimate the 4000 A (and/or Balmer) break strength in such galaxies, and hence also the ages and stellar masses of such high-z galaxies.

McLinden, Emily M.; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Hibon, Pascale; Richardson, Mark L. A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Finkelstein, Steven L. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Cresci, Giovanni [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Quirrenbach, Andreas [ZAH, Landessternwarte, Universitaet Heidelberg, Koenigstuhl 12, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pasquali, Anna [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Woodward, Charles E. [Department of Astronomy, 351 Tate Laboratory of Physics, 116 Church Street, S. E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Alkaline Pressure Oxidation of Pyrite in the Presence of Silica – Characterization of the Passivating Film.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Alkaline pressure oxidation, particularly in the presence of trona as additive, can be used to oxidize high carbonate refractory gold ores as it prevents the… (more)

Dani, Anirudha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Optical isotope shift and hyperfine structure measurements in preparation of the ultra-sensitive detection of krypton atoms using stepwise laser excitation and field ionization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the scope of the ultra sensitive detection project the operation of the collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy apparatus and data acquisition was learned and optimized with respect to the reduction of stray laser light and the charge exchange process. Major contributions to fluctuations and drifts in the measurements have been investigated. The present data is evaluated using only the relativistically correct expressions with Microcal ORIGIN and the IMSL subroutines to perform a least squares fit to the hyperfine structure data when evaluating the hyperfine structure constants A and B. The results are the hyperfinestructure constants and isotope shifts in two transitions from the 5s'[1/2]0' , IS3 , and three transitions from the 5s[3/212' , I S5 , metastable state of krypton. The results of the isotope shift measurements in the 892 nm line of Kr have not been published previously. For the further development of the trace detection of Kr isotopes the work resulted in the construction and installation of the necessary ion-optics and detectors. Changes have been prepared as a result of the ongoing measurements. These are quasicollinear excitation of the Kr beam, avoiding optical pumping and stark shifts, shortening the distance between optical excitation and field ionization and foremost a two order of magnitude improvement of the vacuum conditions in the region the Rydberg atoms traverse by differential pumping. The overall project goal of two step resonant excitation and field ionization seems to be in close reach .

Lassen, Jens

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source  

SciTech Connect

The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 ?m square pixels, and 15 ?m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/?E?10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager.

M. J. Haugh and M. B. Schneider

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Thermal performance measurements of sealed insulating glass units with low-E coatings using the MoWiTT (Mobile Window Thermal Test) field-test facility  

SciTech Connect

Using data obtained in a mobile field-test facility, measured performance of clear and low-emissivity double-glazing units is presented for south-facing and north-facing orientations. The changes in U-value and shading coefficient resulting from addition of the low-E coating are found to agree with theoretical expectations for the cold spring test conditions. Accurate nighttime U-values were derived from the data and found to agree with calculations. Expected correlation between U-value and wind speed was not observed in the data; a plausible experimental reason for this is advanced.

Klems, J.; Keller, H.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the report for the time period April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. During the current period, process economic estimates were developed, comparing the costs of the furnace magnesium hydroxide slurry injection process tested as part of this project to a number of other candidate SO{sub 3}/sulfuric acid control technologies for coal-fired power plants. The results of this economic evaluation are included in this progress report.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Geochemistry of Extremely Alkaline (pH[ 12) Ground Water in Slag-Fill Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an alkaline sodium metasilicate/sodium carbonate (Na2SiO3/Na2CO3) solution and deoxidized in a nitric acid in alkaline Li salt solution involves two simultaneous processes: dissolution of aluminum and deposition effect. When the oxidizing species were used in the hydrotalcite coating bath, the aluminum dissolution

Bethke, Craig

258

An update of the polymer-augmented alkaline flood at the Isenhour unit, Sublette County, Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Almy sand polymer-augmented alkaline flood at the Isenhour Unit, Sublette County, WY, is reviewed. This paper updates process technology, including the use of clay stabilization, sweep improvement, soda ash alkaline agent (to reduce interfacial tension (IFT) and mobilize residual oil), and anionic-polymer-blend mobility buffer. Oil production has been increasing at 20%/yr since the process start.

Doll, T.E.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Amplitude and frequency experimental field measurements of a rotating?imbalance seismic source associated with changes in lithology surrounding a borehole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field measurements of the vibration amplitude of a rotating?imbalance seismic source in a liquid?filled borehole are described. The borehole was a cased oil well that had been characterized by gamma?ray cement bond and compensated neutron litho?density/gamma?ray logs. The well logs indicated an abrupt transition from shale to limestone at a depth of 2638 ft. The vibration amplitude and frequency of a rotating?imbalance seismic source was measured versus applied voltage as the source was raised from 2654 to 2618 ft through the shale–limestone transition. It was observed that the vibration amplitude changed by approximately 10% in magnitude and the frequency changed approximately 15% as the source passed the shale–limestone transition. The measurements were compared to predictions provided by a two?dimensional analytical model of a rotating?imbalance source located in a liquid?filled bore hole. It was observed that the sensitivity of the experimentally measured vibration amplitude of the seismic source to the properties of the surrounding geologic media was an order of magnitude greater than that predicted by the two?dimensional analytical model.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Self-diffusion measurements of methanol and 1-decanol in supercritical CO{sub 2} by {sup 13}C pulsed field gradient NMR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small amount of a highly polar compound, such as methanol, is frequently added to supercritical fluid (SCF) carbon dioxide to enhance its ability to dissolve polar molecules in SCF separation technology. Few diffusion coefficients in SCF mixtures have been reported in the literature. The pulsed field gradient spin-echo technique (PGSE) has been used extensively to measure self-diffusion in neat monohydric alcohols under pressure. Hurle et al. and Luedemann et al. showed that the experimental diffusion coefficients of methanol may be explained by a rough hard-sphere model (RHS) with a roughness parameter, A. In this paper, diffusion measurements are reported for CO{sub 2}-methanol and CO{sub 2}-decanol mixtures in supercritical fluids. Since methanol in CO{sub 2} is primarily monomeric at low concentration, the RHS model, that is accurate for most simple, non-associated liquids, should apply. Previous nuclear spin-lattice relaxation studies in SCF CO{sub 2} suggest a large local solvent density enhancement, or solvent clustering, near a alcohol solute molecule under SCF conditions. If solvent clustering occurs in the vicinity of alcohol solute molecules, it should affect the diffusion coefficients. The authors have made the requisite measurements and found that they corroborate their previous spin-relaxation data.

Bai, S.; Mayne, C.L.; Grant, D.M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Taylor, C.M.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Organic Analytical Chemistry Group

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Measurement of the photon field, {ital E}{gt}150thinspeV on Sandia{close_quote}s Z Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Z Facility at Sandia National Laboratories utilizes {ital z}-pinch implosions to produce up to 2 MJ of x rays. On Z, bremsstrahlung radiation is produced in various parts of the machine as a product of both power flow electrons and those accelerated in the pinch region. An understanding of the energy spectra and intensity of this radiation is important to both the explanation of the {ital z}-pinch physics and the design of new diagnostics. A technique has been developed using a differential absorption spectrometer to measure the photon field for energies greater that 150 eV for bremsstrahlung from the {ital z}-pinch or the vacuum transmission lines. This article describes the techniques and results used to date. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Rochau, G.E.; Derzon, M.; Fehl, D.; Rochau, G.A.; Sweeney, M.A.; Tabor, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Lazier, S.E. [KTech Corporation, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Droemer, D.; Helvin, T.; Starbird, R. [Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193 (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Field Measurement of Am241 and Total Uranium at a Mixed Oxide Fuel Facility with Variable Uranium Enrichments Ranging from 0.3% to 97% U235  

SciTech Connect

The uranium and transuranic content of site soils and building rubble can be accurately measured using a NaI(Tl) well counter, without significant soil preparation. Accurate measurements of total uranium in uranium-transuranic mixtures can be made, despite a wide range (0.3% to 97%) of uranium enrichment, sample mass, and activity concentrations. The appropriate uranium scaling factors needed to include the undetected uranium isotopes, particularly U 234 can be readily determined on a sample by sample basis as a part of the field analysis, by comparing the relative response of the U 235 186 keV peak versus the K shell X rays of U 238 , U 235, and their immediate ingrowth daughters. The ratio of the two results is a sensitive and accurate predictor of the uranium enrichment and scaling factors. The case study will illustrate how NaI(Tl) gamma spectrometry was used to provide rapid turnaround uranium and transuranic activity levels for soil and building rubble with sample by sample determination of the appropriate scaling factor to include the U234 and Uranium238 content.

Conway, K. C.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

An evaluation of the Gilian TRACEAIR Organic Vapor Monitoring Diffusive Badge in measuring short-term exposure levels of benzene under field conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to evaluate the performance of the Gilian TRACEAIR Organic Vapor Monitoring I (OVMI) Diffusive Badge in measuring short-term benzene exposures under field conditions. In general, a diffusive badge is a device which is capable of taking samples of gas or vapor pollutants from the atmosphere at a rate controlled by a physical process such as diffusion through a static layer. Diffusive badges continue to flood the industrial hygiene market as an alternative means to charcoal tubes for sampling organic vapors. The OVMI badge has been on the market since 1990, and is the only diffusive sampler that offers dual sampling rates for measuring organic vapors. This dual sampling rate feature allows one the flexibility of sampling at 3 5 to I 00 mL/@n depending on the vapors being sampled. The OVM I badge has been designed to monitor short-term exposure limits (STEL) and long-term limits with only negligible modifications to the badge housing. Side-by-side benzene STEL concentrations were measured in a Texas Gulf Coast refinery implementing two OVM I badges, an SKC charcoal tube, and a Tedlar bag used for gas chromatograph analyses. The results of the study indicated that a) no significant concentration differences were found between the badges; b) the badges overestimated the charcoal tube on average by 54%, although their performance comparisons were highly predictable based on linear regression; and c) the results of the Tedlar baga?s chromatograph comparisons were inconclusive. Factors which might have contributed to the discrepancy between the charcoal tube and badges are possible concentration gradients and starvation effects occurring at the samplers' inlet face, interference from other competing vapors, and an overestimated badge sampling rate when sampling at the maximum uptake rate. Collectively, the outcomes of this research suggests that a correction factor in the badge's sampling rate might prove useful as a means of correcting for short-term overestimations when sampling for benzene under field conditions. It is hoped that the contents of this research serve as an useful aid for those specifically interested in the OVMI badge and for those whose line of work involve passive sampling.

Pierce, Mark Edward

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP Unit 3, and the second was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant test provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. A final task in the project was to compare projected costs for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries to estimated costs for other potential sulfuric acid control technologies. Estimates were developed for reagent and utility costs, and capital costs, for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries and seven other sulfuric acid control technologies. The estimates were based on retrofit application to a model coal-fired plant.

Gary M. Blythe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Experimental data developed to support the selection of a treatment process for West Valley alkaline supernatant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied alternative treatment processes for the alkaline PUREX waste presently being stored in Tank 8D2 at West Valley, New York. Five tasks were completed during FY 1983: (1) simulation and characterization of the alkaline supernatant and sludge from the tank. The radiochemical and chemical distributions between the aqueous and solid phase were determined, and the efficiency of washing sludge with water to remove ions such as Na/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was investigated; (2) evaluation of a sodium tetraphenylboron (Na-TPB) precipitation process to recover cesium (Cs) and a sodium titanate (Na-TiA) sorption process to recover strontium (Sr) and plutonium (Pu) from the West Valley Alkaline supernatant. These processes were previously developed and tested at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant; (3) evaluation of an organic cation-exchange resin (Duolite CS-100) to recover Cs and Pu from the alkaline supernatant followed by an organic macroreticular cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRC-718) to recover Sr; (4) evaluation of an inorganic ion exchanger (Linde Ionsiv IE-95) to recover Cs, Sr, and Pu from the alkaline supernatant; and (5) evaluation of Dowex-1,X8 organic anion exchange resin to recover technetium (Tc) from alkaline supernatant. The findings of these tasks are reported. 21 references, 36 figures, 34 tables.

Bray, L.A.; Holton, L.K.; Myers, T.R.; Richardson, G.M.; Wise, B.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Palladium and Tin Alloyed Catalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction in an Alkaline Medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a study of a series of carbon-supported Pd-Sn binary alloyed catalysts prepared through a modified Polyol method as anode electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cell reactions in an alkaline medium. Transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy were used to characterize the Pd-Sn/C catalysts, where homogeneous Pd-Sn alloys were determined to be present with the surface Sn being partially oxidized. Among various Pd-Sn catalysts, Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C catalysts showed much enhanced current densities in cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric measurements, compared to commercial Pd/C (Johnson Matthey). The overall rate law of ethanol oxidation reaction for both Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C and commercial Pd/C were also determined, which clearly showed that Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C was more favorable in high ethanol concentration and/or high pH environment. Density functional theory calculations also confirmed Pd-Sn alloy structures would result in lower reaction energies for the dehydrogenation of ethanol, compared to the pure Pd crystal.

Su D.; Du W.; Mackenzie K.E.; Milano D.F.; Deskins N.A.; Teng X.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-conditioning electricity savings from standard energy conservation measures, radiant barriers, and high-efficiency window air conditioners  

SciTech Connect

A field test Involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMS) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) programs directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption should be targeted at clients with high consumption to improve cost effectiveness; (2) replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency units should be considered an option in a weatherization program directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption; (3) ECMs currently being installed under the Oklahoma WAP (chosen based on effectiveness at reducing space-heating energy consumption) should continue to be justified based on their space-heating energy savings potential only; and (4) attic radiant barriers should not be included in the Oklahoma WAP if alternatives with verified savings are available or until further testing demonstrates energy savings or other benefits in this typo of housing.

Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Enhanced Oil Recovery Using the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkaline Surfactant Polymer (ASP) process is a tertiary method of oil recovery that has promising results for future development. It has already been implemented in different areas of the United States such as Wyoming, west Texas, also in Canada and China. The success of this process depends on the proper combination of alkali, surfactant, and polymer and their compatibility with a reservoir. Therefore, the main objective of the proposed research is to identify chemical interactions between ASP chemicals and reservoir fluids and rock. I hypothesize that testing different alkalis, polymers and surfactants will result not only in getting different profiles of rheological properties of ASP system, but also analyzing compatibility degrees of chemicals with formation fluids and rock properties such as rock wettability, oil mobility and sweep efficiency which will be affected by the designed ASP system. In this paper the results of chemical interactions between ASP chemicals and reservoir fluids are presented and the phenomena occurred are described. The experiments conducted are considered to be unique for a selected oil sample with certain values of API gravity, viscosity, and chemical composition. Lab experiments conducted show the effect of polymer, alkali and surfactant addition to an aqueous solution. Polymers were tested with alkali as a function of shear rate for the purposes of the buildup water viscosity in EOR. Different types of alkali at different concentrations are tested for alkali optimal concentration determination. The effect of adding surfactant at different concentrations has been tested, and acidic number of tested oil sample was identified. Polymers tested with alkali result in non-Newtonian behavior of the testing solution and display a shear thinning beneficial effect for the buildup water viscosity in EOR. The results show that acidic number of crude oil is a critical parameter that affects the optimal concentration for mixing chemicals and interfacial tension profile. The alkali and surfactant added to crude oil result in a significant reduction of interfacial tension and lead to increase of oil mobilization which is a desired output after ASP injection in EOR process.

Musharova, Darya

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Field-Deployable Real-Time Laser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurement of True Travel Time on the Highway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Real- Time Laser-Based Detection System for Measurement ofTime Laser- Based Prototype Detection System for MeasurementLaser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurement

Cheng, Harry H.; Shaw, Ben; Palen, Joe; Wang, Zhaoqing; Chen, Bo

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect

A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic Elements In Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic Elements in Fly Ash Ann G. Kim 1 1 ORISE Research Fellow, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 KEYWORDS: Coal Utilization By-Products, leaching, pH ABSTRACT In the US, over 100 million tons of coal utilization by-products (CUB) are generated annually. To determine if exposure of these materials to aqueous fluids poses an environmental threat, researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have conducted extensive leaching tests. Five 1 kg samples of 35 PC fly ashes have been leached with acid, neutral and alkaline solutions at an approximate rate of 130 mL/d for 1 to 3 months. The leachates are

272

Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the Deepest Winter Mixed Layer Depths  

SciTech Connect

Modeling the global ocean-atmosphere carbon dioxide system is becoming increasingly important to greenhouse gas policy. These models require initialization with realistic three-dimensional (3-D) oceanic carbon fields. This report presents an approach to establishing these initial conditions from an extensive global database of ocean carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) system measurements and well-developed interpolation methods.

Goyet, C.; Healy, R.; Ryan, J.; Kozyr, A.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

About possibility to measure an electric dipole moment (EDM) of nuclei in the range $10^{-27} ÷10^{-32}$ $e \\cdot cm$ in experiments for search of time-reversal violating generation of magnetic and electric fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility to measure an electric dipole moment (EDM) of nuclei in the range $10^{-27} \\div 10^{-32}$ $e \\cdot cm$ in experiments for search of time-reversal violating generation of magnetic and electric fields is discussed.

Vladimir Baryshevsky

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Model for trace metal exposure in filter-feeding flamingos at alkaline Rift Valley Lake, Kenya  

SciTech Connect

Toxic trace metals have been implicated as a potential cause of recent flamingo kills at Lake Nakuru, Kenya. Chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) have accumulated in the lake sediments as a result of unregulated discharges and because this alkaline lake has no natural outlet. Lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) at Lake Nakuru feed predominantly on the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, and because of their filter-feeding mechanism, they are susceptible to exposure to particle-bound metals. Trace metal adsorption isotherms to lake sediments and S. platensis were obtained under simulated lake conditions, and a mathematical model was developed to predict metal exposure via filter feeding based on predicted trace metal phase distribution. Metal adsorption to suspended solids followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cr > Cu, and isotherms were linear up to 60 {micro}g/L. Adsorption to S. platensis cells followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cu > Cr and fit Langmuir isotherms for Cr, Cu and Zn and a linear isotherm for Pb. Predicted phase distributions indicated that Cr and Pb in Lake Nakuru are predominantly associated with suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn are distributed more evenly between the dissolved phase and particulate phases of both S. platensis and suspended solids. Based on established flamingo feeding rates and particle size selection, predicted Cr and Pb exposure occurs predominantly through ingestion of suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn exposure occurs through ingestion of both suspended solids and S. platensis. For the lake conditions at the time of sampling, predicted ingestion rates based on measured metal concentrations in lake suspended solids were 0.71, 6.2, 0.81, and 13 mg/kg-d for Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn, respectively.

Nelson, Y.M.; DiSante, C.J.; Lion, L.W. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Thampy, R.J.; Raini, J.A. [Worldwide Fund for Nature, Nakuru (Kenya). Lake Nakuru Conservation and Development Project; Motelin, G.K. [Egerton Univ., Njoro (Kenya). Dept. of Animal Health

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Deconvolution of Wide Field-of-View Radiometer Measurements of Earth-Emitted Radiation Part II: Analysis of First Year of Nimbus 6 ERB Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One year of longwave radiation data from July 1975 through June 1976 from the Nimbus 6 satellite Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) experiment is analyzed by representing the longwave radiation field by a spherical harmonic expansion. The data are from ...

T. Dale Bess; Richard N. Green; G. Louis Smith

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Retrieving the Root-Zone Soil Moisture from Surface Soil Moisture or Temperature Estimates: A Feasibility Study Based on Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bulk soil water content must be estimated accurately for short- and medium-term meteorological modeling. A method is proposed to retrieve the total soil moisture content as well as the field capacity from observed surface parameters such as ...

J-C. Calvet; J. Noilhan; P. Bessemoulin

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Development and Testing of Field-Deployable Real-Time Laser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurement of True Travel Time on the Highway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for MeasurementLaser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurementsystems are entirely dependent on time-of-?ight laser measurements

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Isenhour unit - a unique polymer-augmented alkaline flood  

SciTech Connect

The Almy sands in Sublette County, Wyoming have been subjected to various volumetric sweep improvement techniques since September, 1969. This paper describes the first field wide effort to reduce residual oil saturation in the swept area. Although only in its third year of operation, the project is far enough along to conclude the following: (1) It is practical and profitable to employ, at the same time, techniques that will improve sweep and lower residual oil saturation. (2) Selecting a 'Total Oil Recovery' process and starting it early greatly simplifies plant design.(3) EOR process requiring fresh water should be started before breakthru to lower costs and lessen the problems related to lifting, treating and reuse or disposal of produced water. 11 refs.

Sloat, B.; Zlomke, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Surface structural changes of perovskite oxides during oxygen evolution in alkaline electrolyte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perovskite oxides such Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.8O3-6 (BSCF82) are among the most active catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline solution reported to date. In this work it is shown via high resolution ...

May, Kevin J. (Kevin Joseph)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Alkaline resistant phosphate glasses and method of preparation and use thereof  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A substantially alkaline resistant calcium-iron-phosphate (CFP) glass and methods of making and using thereof. In one application, the CFP glass is drawn into a fiber and dispersed in cement to produce glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) articles having the high compressive strength of concrete with the high impact, flexural and tensile strength associated with glass fibers.

Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO); Reis, Signo T. (Rolla, MO); Velez, Mariano (Rolla, MO); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil L, Brazil d Université de Provence, Aix Marseille 1, France e Departamento de Geografia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Três Lagoas, Brazil f Laboratoire de Géomophologie Appliquée, Université de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

282

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

Ahmad, Sajjad

283

Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF2 and BaF2. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 {per_thousand}nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF2, BaF2, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident {gamma}-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs+ relative to Na+, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

Wang, Zhiguo; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF{sub 2} and BaF{sub 2}. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident {gamma}-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs{sup +} relative to Na{sup +}, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

Wang Zhiguo; Gao Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Xie Yulong [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Campbell, Luke W. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

CO adsorption and kinetics on well-characterized Pd films on Pt(111) in alkaline solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electrochemistry of CO on a bare Pt(111) electrode as well as a Pt(111) electrode modified with pseudomorphic thin palladium films has been studied in alkaline solution by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. First Pd films were prepared and well characterized in UHV and subsequently transferred into the electrochemical cell for the registration of the voltammetric profiles. The charge corresponding to the formation of underpotentially deposited hydrogen (H{sub upd}) on these Pt(111)-xPd surfaces was established in sulfuric acid solution as a function of x (0 {le} x {le} 1 Pd monolayer (ML)). All subsequent measurements were then performed on electrochemically deposited palladium films using the above H{sub upd}-charge vs. Pd coverage relationship to evaluate the amount of electrochemically deposited palladium. FTIR spectra for CO adsorbed on one monolayer and a submonolayer coverage are compared to those of the unmodified Pt(111) surface, all surfaces having identical 2D lattice structures. Infrared absorption bands of CO bound on either Pt(111) or Pt(111)-1ML Pd are clearly distinguished. Spectra of CO adsorbed on Pd submonolayers show characteristic features of both CO bound to Pt and to Pd, indicating that on Pt(111)-xPd surfaces there is no coupling between Pt-CO{sub ad} and Pd-CO{sub ad} molecules. The kinetics of CO oxidation on these surfaces is determined either by rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements or by FTIR spectroscopy, monitoring the CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} production. The oxidation of CO{sub ad} on Pt(111) and on Pd modified platinum surfaces starts at the same potential, ca. at 0.2 V. The oxidation rate is, however, considerably lower on the Pt(111)-xPd surfaces than on the Pt(111) surface. The kinetics of CO oxidation appears to be determined by the nature of adsorbed hydroxyl anions (OH{sub ad}), which are more strongly (less active) adsorbed on the highly oxophilic Pd atoms.

Arenz, M.; Stamenkovic, V.; Wandelt, K.; Ross, P.N.; Markovic, N.M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electrocatalytic Measurement Methodology of Oxide Catalysts Using a Thin-Film Rotating Disk Electrode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transition-metal oxides can exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for reactions such as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. It is often difficult to measure and compare the activities of oxide catalysts ...

Suntivich, Jin

287

Petrography of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Petrography of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; PETROGRAPHY; BIOTITE; CALCITE; CLAYS; LIMESTONE; PYRITE; SANDSTONES; SEDIMENTS; SHALES; VOLCANIC ROCKS; ZEOLITES; ALKALINE EARTH METAL COMPOUNDS; CALCIUM CARBONATES; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBONATE ROCKS; CARBONATES; CHALCOGENIDES; IDAHO; IGNEOUS ROCKS; INORGANIC ION EXCHANGERS; ION EXCHANGE MATERIALS; IRON COMPOUNDS; IRON SULFIDES; MICA; MINERALS; NORTH AMERICA; ORES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; PYRITES; ROCKS; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS; SULFIDES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS;

288

Analysis Driven Field Testing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ANALYSIS DRIVEN FIELD TESTING ANALYSIS DRIVEN FIELD TESTING Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 MODELING DRIVEN FIELD TESTING Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 MODELING DRIVEN MEASUREMENTS Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 "Modeling without measuring lacks credibility. Measuring without modeling lacks generality." Ed Hancock

289

A Field Intercomparison Technique to Improve the Relative Accuracy of Longwave Radiation Measurements and an Evaluation of CASES-99 Pyrgeometer Data Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques for improving the relative accuracy of longwave radiation measurements by a set of pyrgeometers [the Eppley Laboratory Precision Infrared Radiometer (Model PIR)] are presented using 10 PIRs from the 1999 Cooperative Atmosphere–Surface ...

S. P. Burns; J. Sun; A. C. Delany; S. R. Semmer; S. P. Oncley; T. W. Horst

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Measurement of two-dimensional concentration fields of a glycol-based tracer aerosol using laser light sheet illumination and microcomputer video image acquisition and processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of a tracer aerosol with a bulk density close to that of air is a convenient way to study the dispersal of pollutants in ambient room air flow. Conventional point measurement techniques do not permit the rapid and ...

Revi, Frank

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

One-Dimensional Soil Moisture Profile Retrieval by Assimilation of Near-Surface Measurements: A Simplified Soil Moisture Model and Field Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Kalman filter assimilation technique is applied to a simplified soil moisture model for retrieval of the soil moisture profile from near-surface soil moisture measurements. First, the simplified soil moisture model is developed, based on an ...

Jeffrey P. Walker; Garry R. Willgoose; Jetse D. Kalma

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Aerosol plume transport and transformation in high spectral resolution lidar measurements and WRF-Flexpart simulations during the MILAGRO Field Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) experiences high loadings of atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic sources, biomass burning and wind-blown dust. This paper uses a combination of measurements and numerical ...

de Foy, B.

293

Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 95. Alkaline Earth Carbonates in Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Ca  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alkaline earth carbonates are an important class of minerals. This article is part of a volume in the IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series that compiles and critically evaluates solubility data of the alkaline earth carbonates in water and in simple aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 1 outlined the procedure adopted in this volume, and presented the beryllium and magnesium carbonates. Part 2, the current paper, compiles and critically evaluates the solubility data of calcium carbonate. The chemical forms included are the anhydrous CaCO{sub 3} types calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, the monohydrate monohydrocalcite (CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot} H{sub 2}O), the hexahydrate ikaite (CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O), and an amorphous form. The data were analyzed with two model variants, and thermodynamic data of each form consistent with each of the models and with the CODATA key values for thermodynamics are presented.

De Visscher, Alex; Vanderdeelen, Jan [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, and Centre for Environmental Engineering Research and Education (CEERE), Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Applied Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Annual report, 1992--1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, the authors present the results of experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, the authors have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil, and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties.

Wasan, D.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Characterization of Actinides in Simulated Alkaline Tank Waste Sludges and Leachates  

SciTech Connect

Removal of waste-limiting components of sludge (Al, Cr, S, P) in underground tanks at Hanford by treatment with concentrated alkali has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. More aggressive treatments of sludges, for example, contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to improve leaching efficiency for Cr. Oxidative alkaline leaching can be expected to have at best a secondary influence on the mobilization of Al. Our earlier explorations of Al leaching from sludge simulants indicated acidic and complexometric leaching can improve Al dissolution. Unfortunately, treatments of sludge samples with oxidative alkaline, acidic or complexing leachates produce conditions under which normally insoluble actinide ions (e.g., Am3+, Pu4+, Np4+) can be mobilized to the solution phase. Few experimental or meaningful theoretical studies of actinide chemistry in strongly alkaline, strongly oxidizing solutions have been completed. Unfortunately, extrapolation of the more abundant acid phase thermodynamic data to these radically different conditions provides limited reliable guidance for predicting actinide speciation in highly salted alkaline solutions. In this project, we are investigating the fundamental chemistry of actinides and important sludge components in sludge simulants and supernatants under representative oxidative leaching conditions. We are examining the potential impact of acidic or complexometric leaching with concurrent secondary separations on Al removal from sludges. Finally, a portion of our research is directed at the control of polyvalent anions (SO4=, CrO4=, PO43-) in waste streams destined for vitrification. Our primary objective is to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop. We expect to identify those components of sludges that are likely to be problematic in the application of oxidative, acidic, and complexometric leaching protocols.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Probing the Kondo lattice model with alkaline-earth-metal atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study transport properties of alkaline-earth-metal atoms governed by the Kondo lattice Hamiltonian plus a harmonic confining potential, and suggest simple dynamical probes of several different regimes of the phase diagram that can be implemented with current experimental techniques. In particular, we show how Kondo physics at strong coupling, at low density, and in the heavy fermion phase is manifest in the dipole oscillations of the conduction band upon displacement of the trap center.

Foss-Feig, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); JILA, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Hermele, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Rey, Ana Maria [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); JILA, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); NIST, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Laboratory development of sludge washing and alkaline leaching processes: Test plan for FY 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy plans to vitrify (as borosilicate glass) the large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes at the Hanford site. To reduce costs, pretreatment processes will be used to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass required for disposal. Several options are being considered for the pretreatment processes: (1) sludge washing with water or dilute hydroxide: designed to remove most of the Na from the sludge, thus significantly reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified; (2) sludge washing plus caustic leaching and/or metathesis (alkaline sludge leaching): designed to dissolve large quantities of certain nonradioactive elements, such as Al, Cr and P, thus reducing the volume of waste even more; (3) sludge washing, sludge dissolution, and separation of radionuclides from the dissolved sludge solutions (advanced processing): designed to remove all radionuclides for concentration into a minimum waste volume. This report describes a test plan for work that will be performed in FY 1994 under the Sludge Washing and Caustic Leaching Studies Task (WBS 0402) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Project. The objectives of the work described here are to determine the effects of sludge washing and alkaline leaching on sludge composition and the physical properties of the washed sludge and to evaluate alkaline leaching methods for their impact on the volume of borosilicate glass required to dispose of certain Hanford tank sludges.

Rapko, B.M.; Lumetta, G.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

High-Strength / High Alkaline Resistant Fe-Phosphate Glass Fibers as Concrete Reinforcement  

SciTech Connect

Calcium-iron-phosphate glasses were developed whose chemical durabilities in alkaline solutions (pH 13) were comparable or superior to those of commercial alkaline-resistant (AR) silica-based glasses. However, the tensile strength of Ca-Fe-phosphate fibers, after being exposed to alkaline environments, including wet Portland cement pastes, is lower than that of current AR silicate fibers. Another series of Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses were developed with excellent chemical durability in strong acidic solutions (H2SO4, HF), indicating potential applications where silica-based fibers degrade very quickly, including E-glass. The new Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses can be melted and processed 300 to 500°C lower than silica-based glasses. This offers the possibility of manufacturing glass fibers with lower energy costs by 40-60% and the potential to reduce manufacturing waste and lower gas emissions. It was found that Ca-Fe-phosphate melts can be continuously pulled into fibers depending on the slope of the viscosity-temperature curve and with viscosity ~100 poise, using multi-hole Pt/Rh bushings.

Mariano Velez

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES  

SciTech Connect

In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

302

Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Presley, Derek J. (Ooltewah, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Molybdenum uptake by forage crops grown on sewage sludge -- Amended soils in the field and greenhouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molybdenum (Mo) is a plant-available element in soils that can adversely affect the health of farm animals. There is a need for more information on its uptake into forage crops from waste materials, such as sewage sludge, applied to agricultural land. Field and greenhouse experiments with several crops grown on long-term sewage sludge-amended soils as well as soils recently amended with dewatered (DW) and alkaline-stabilized (ALK) sludges indicated that Mo supplied from sludge is readily taken up by legumes in particular. Excessive uptake into red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) was seen in a soil that had been heavily amended with sewage sludge 20 yr earlier, where the soil contained about 3 mg Mo/kg soil, three times the background soil concentration. The greenhouse and field studies indicated that Mo can have a long residual availability in sludge-amended soils. The effect of sludge application was to decrease Cu to Mo ratios in legume forages, canola (Brassica napus var. napus) and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] below the recommended limit of 2:1 for ruminant diets, a consequence of high bioavailability of Mo and low uptake of Cu added in sludge. Molybdenum uptake coefficients (UCs) for ALK sludge were higher than for DW sludge, presumably due to the greater solubility of Mo measured in the more alkaline sludges and soils. Based on these UCs, it is tentatively recommended that cumulative Mo loadings on forages grown on nonacid soils should not exceed 1.0 kg/ha from ALK sludge or 4.0 kg/ha from DW sludge.

McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Wavelets and Field Forecast Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current field forecast verification measures are inadequate, primarily because they compress the comparison between two complex spatial field processes into one number. Discrete wavelet transforms (DWTs) applied to analysis and contemporaneous ...

William M. Briggs; Richard A. Levine

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Utilization of by-products from alkaline hydroxide preservation of whole broiler carcasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkaline hydroxides can be used as a preservation method for on-farm storage of broiler mortalities. This method creates two by-products: alkaline preserved whole broiler carcasses, which can be rendered into an Alkaline Poultry By-Product Meal (APBPM) and residual alkaline effluent, which can be used as a soil amendment. In experiment 1 APBPM was added to a broiler diet and evaluated for apparent metabolizable energy (AME). In experiment 2 AME was used to formulate balanced diets with 0 to 5% APBPM. Effects on broiler performance, organ morphology, tibia sheer strength and moisture content were evaluated in both experiments. Experiment 1 determined that the optimum additive concentration for the APBPM was 5%. The AME trials showed no significant difference between the control group and treatment group (5% APBPM) when comparing body weight and feed consumption, however a significant difference was observed when comparing excreta moisture. Experiment 2 evaluated the parameters of feed consumption, feed conversion, and body weight when fed an APBPM. The feed conversion for the 5% treatment in trial 1 was significantly lower compared to control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups. Feed consumption per bird for trial 1 was significantly higher in the control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups compared to the 5% treatment group. The percentage of organ weight was larger in treatment groups compared to control groups indicating an enlargement of organ weight as a percentage of body weight. The residual alkaline effluent was applied to coastal bermudagrass plots in amounts of 0 to 9354 L/ha with four replications per treatment each year for 1999 and 2000. Dry matter yield, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) uptakes were evaluated. In 1999 maximum yields were at the 5612 L/ha rate but there was no yield response to effluent rate in 2000. Effluent rate had only small effects on N and P uptake since all treatments were balanced for these nutrients. The potassium uptakes showed a significant increase as the effluent rate increased. The residual KOH effluent can be applied to Coastal bermudagrasses as a source of K as well as N and P.

Niemeyer, Truitt Preston

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

X-ray diffuse scattering measurements of chemical short-range order and lattice strains in a highly magnetostrictive Fe0.813Ga0.187 alloy in an applied magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth of the magnetostriction coefficient of ferromagnetic Fe1?xGax alloys that occurs at a composition range from 0field, thereby resulting in a large magnetoelastic response. X-ray diffuse scattering measurements sensitive to the atomic short-range ordering and lattice strain were performed on a quenched 18.7 at. % Ga alloy and show no dependence on the application of a magnetic field. This negative result sets limits on the role of nanoscale precipitates in magnetostriction.

Du, Yingzhou; Lograsso, Thomas A.; McQueeney, Robert J.

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

307

Summary technical report on the electrochemical treatment of alkaline nuclear wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the laboratory studies investigating the electrolytic treatment of alkaline solutions carried out under the direction of the Savannah River Technology Center from 1985-1992. Electrolytic treatment has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale to be feasible for the destruction of nitrate and nitrite and the removal of radioactive species such as {sup 99}Tc and {sup 106}Ru from Savannah River Site (SRS) decontaminated salt solution and other alkaline wastes. The reaction rate and current efficiency for the removal of these species are dependent on cell configuration, electrode material, nature of electrode surface, waste composition, current density, and temperature. Nitrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide have been identified as the nitrogen-containing reaction products from the electrochemical reduction of nitrate and nitrite under alkaline conditions. The reaction mechanism for the reduction is very complex. Voltammetric studies indicated that the electrode reactions involve surface phenomena and are not necessarily mass transfer controlled. In an undivided cell, results suggest an electrocatalytic role for oxygen via the generation of the superoxide anion. In general, more efficient reduction of nitrite and nitrate occurs at cathode materials with higher overpotentials for hydrogen evolution. Nitrate and nitrite destruction has also been demonstrated in engineering-scale flow reactors. In flow reactors, the nitrate/nitrite destruction efficiency is improved with an increase in the current density, temperature, and when the cell is operated in a divided cell configuration. Nafion{reg_sign} cation exchange membranes have exhibited good stability and consistent performance as separators in the divided-cell tests. The membranes were also shown to be unaffected by radiation at doses approximating four years of cell operation in treating decontaminated salt solution.

Hobbs, D.T.

1994-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

An alkaline spring system within the Del Puerto ophiolite (California USA): A Mars analog site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mars appears to have experienced little compositional differentiation of primitive lithosphere, and thus much of the surface of Mars is covered by mafic lavas. On Earth, mafic and ultramafic rocks present in ophiolites, oceanic crust and upper mantle that have been obducted onto land, are therefore good analogs for Mars. The characteristic mineralogy, aqueous geochemistry, and microbial communities of cold-water alkaline springs associated with these mafic and ultramafic rocks represent a particularly compelling analog for potential life-bearing systems. Serpentinization, the reaction of water with mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene, yields fluids with unusual chemistry (Mg-OH and Ca-OH waters with pH values up to {approx}12), as well as heat and hydrogen gas that can sustain subsurface, chemosynthetic ecosystems. The recent observation of seeps from pole-facing crater and canyon walls in the higher Martian latitudes supports the hypothesis that even present conditions might allow for a rockhosted chemosynthetic biosphere in near-surface regions of the Martian crust. The generation of methane within a zone of active serpentinization, through either abiogenic or biogenic processes, could account for the presence of methane detected in the Martian atmosphere. For all of these reasons, studies of terrestrial alkaline springs associated with mafic and ultramafic rocks are particularly timely. This study focuses on the alkaline Adobe Springs, emanating from mafic and ultramafic rocks of the California Coast Range, where a community of novel bacteria is associated with the precipitation of Mg-Ca carbonate cements. The carbonates may serve as a biosignature that could be used in the search for evidence of life on Mars.

Blank, J.G.; Green, S.; Blake, D.; Valley, J.; Kita, N.; Treiman, A.; Dobson, P.F.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol image  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments SEMSAMP : Scanning Electron Microscope Sampler...

310

Investigation on application of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis for alkaline waste treatment  

SciTech Connect

The stabilization of neptunium(IV) in alkaline solution by chemical reductants under various conditions was studied. Testing showed that neptunium(V) is slowly reduced to Np(IV) by V(IV) at room temperature in alkaline solutions. Increasing temperature accelerates reduction. Complete reduction of 2 x 10{sup -4} M Np(V) occurs in three hours at 80{degrees}C in 1 M NaOH with 0.02 M VOSO{sub 4-}. Under similar conditions, but in 5 M NaOH, only 15 to 20% of the Np(V) was reduced in 5 hours. In all cases, about 98 % of the initial neptunium was found in the precipitate. Thus V(IV) acts both as a reductant and as a precipitation carrier. Tests showed Np(V) reduction by hydrazine hydrate could be catalyzed by Pd(II). Reduction increased with temperature and catalyst concentration and decreased with hydroxide concentration. Reduction of Np(V) also takes place in 1 M NaOH solutions containing 1 M sodium formate and palladium. Increasing temperature accelerates reduction; with three hours` treatment in 5 M NaOH solution at 90{degrees}C, about 95 % of the initial 2 x 10{sup -4} M neptunium(V) is transformed to Np(IV). Organic complexants and organic acid anions hinder the decontamination of alkaline solutions from neptunium and plutonium by coprecipitation with d-element hydroxides (the Method of Appearing Reagents). It was found that ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetate (HEDTA) are decomposed by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in alkaline solution in the presence of cobalt compounds with heating and by Na2S208 at moderate temperatures. Citrate, glycolate, and oxalate are decomposed by Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} with heating. Oxidant amounts must be increased when NaNO{sub 2} also is present in solution. 8 refs., 25 figs., 16 tabs.

Shilov, V.P.; Bessonov, A.A.; Garnov, A.Y.; Gelis, A.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry] [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Progress in alkaline peroxide dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide targets  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports recent progress on two alkaline peroxide dissolution processes: the dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) targets. These processes are being developed to substitute low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in targets used for production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. Issues that are addressed include (1) dissolution kinetics of silicide targets, (2) {sup 99}Mo lost during aluminum dissolution, (3) modeling of hydrogen peroxide consumption, (4) optimization of the uranium foil dissolution process, and (5) selection of uranium foil barrier materials. Future work associated with these two processes is also briefly discussed.

Chen, L.; Dong, D.; Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Liquefaction process for solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved liquefaction process wherein wall scale and particulate agglomeration during the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates is reduced and/or eliminated by subjecting the solid carbonaceous materials to controlled cyclic cavitation during liquefaction. It is important that the solid carbonaceous material be slurried in a suitable solvent or diluent during liquefaction. The cyclic cavitation may be imparted via pressure cycling, cyclic agitation and the like. When pressure cycling or the like is employed an amplitude equivalent to at least 25 psia is required to effectively remove scale from the liquefaction vessel walls.

Epperly, William R. (Summit, NJ); Deane, Barry C. (East Brunswick, NJ); Brunson, Roy J. (Buffalo Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1 h at 1273 K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300 K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done for most of potential reactions between components in the batteries as well as between them and the surrounding atmosphere and it reasonably agrees the experimental results. The results obtained show the role of alkaline batteries at the acid gases cleaning process, through the neutralization reactions of some of their components. Therefore, LCA of spent AA alkaline batteries at the municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process must consider this contribution.

Almeida, Manuel F. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: mfa@fe.up.pt; Xara, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Electric Field Reversal in Sprite Electric Field Signature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In measurements of the electric field associated with the current of a sprite 450 km from ground-based field sensors, it was observed that the sign of the electric field was positive when positive charge was lowered from the ionosphere. A recent ...

Richard G. Sonnenfeld; William W. Hager

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Magnetic-field-dosimetry system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

316

Residential Transient Magnetic Field Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential populations are exposed, in some measure, to transient magnetic fields. Such fields result from virtually all electric and electronic switching operations that may occur within the residence or external to the residence. This report presents the first phase of a study to better characterize these fields and, ultimately, describe their relationship to utility wiring configurations.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

Marra, J.; Billings, A.

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

318

Weights and Measures Newsletter Archives - Field Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Proving Reports, March 2006. H-013, Mercury thermometers, Get the (Lead) Mercury Out!! March 2006. H-014, Bottom-drain ...

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

319

MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF MODEL SSC DIPOLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High EnergyOffice of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High Energy

Hassenzahl, W.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A new magnetic field integral measurement system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and the Default. The Default copy is read only. Each copy contains, among others, the motor velocities, accelerations, voltage amplification 6 ANLAPSTB-49 and system...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Field power measurements of imaging equipment  

SciTech Connect

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, electricity use by non-PC commercial office equipment is growing at an annual rate of nearly 5 percent (AEO 2003). To help address this growth in consumption, U.S. EPA periodically updates its ENERGY STAR specifications as products and markets change. This report presents background research conducted to help EPA update the ENERGY STAR specification for imaging equipment, which covers printers, fax machines, copiers, scanners, and multifunction devices (MFDs). We first estimated the market impact of the current ENERGY STAR imaging specification, finding over 90 percent of the current market complies with the specification. We then analyzed a sample of typical new imaging products, including 11 faxes, 57 printers and 19 copiers/MFD. For these devices we metered power levels in the most common modes: active/ready/sleep/off, and recorded features that would most likely affect energy consumption. Our metering indicates that for many products and speed bins, current models consume substantially less power than the current specification. We also found that for all product categories, power consumption varied most considerably across technology (i.e. inkjet vs. laser). Although inkjet printers consumed less energy than laser printers in active, ready and sleep-mode, they consumed more power on average while off, mostly due to the use of external power supplies. Based on these findings, we developed strategies for the ENERGY STAR program to achieve additional energy reductions. Finally, we present an assessment of manufacturer's ENERGY STAR labeling practices.

McWhinney, Marla; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard; Roberson, Judy; Nordman, Bruce; Busch, John

2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

322

F 230 -2012 Forestry Field Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been processed first). F230 Estimated Costs for Summer 2012 Resident Non-resident Tuition (minus COF and picking up an Override Form. 2) Take Override form to Forestry 123 and get it processed. 3) IMPORTANT are charged for your NR220 lodging. Prior to arrival at Pingree, you will need to purchase the equipment

323

Field power measurements of imaging equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the spot metering test. Standby and sleep power wasoff reflect spot metering, standby and sleep power reflector receiving hard copy input Standby: the condition in which

McWhinney, Marla; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard; Roberson, Judy; Nordman, Bruce; Busch, John

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Field power measurements of imaging equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

we disaggregate our metering results by print engine andcollected during the spot metering test. Standby and sleepcollected during the spot metering test. Ready and sleep

McWhinney, Marla; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard; Roberson, Judy; Nordman, Bruce; Busch, John

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Field Power Measurements of Imaging Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Busch Date Published 052004 ISBN Number LBNL-54202 Keywords Enduse, Energy End-Use Forecasting, EUF Abstract According to the U.S. Department of Energy, electricity use by non-PC...

326

Extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using an ion-exchange column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selective extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using phenolic resins was studied. The resins were synthesized by alkaline polycondensation of formaldehyde by phenol, resorcinol, catechol, and phloroglucinol. Their ionoselectivities for five alkali metals were evaluated with a solid-liquid extraction, and their ion-exchange capacities were compared. The resin with the best selectivity for cesium was tested with a real solution at different pH values. An on-column extraction is proposed to obtain cesium with high purity.

Dumont, N.; Favre-Reguillon, A.; Dunjic, B.; Lemaire, M. [Institut De Recherches sur la Catalyse et Laboratoire de Catalyse et Synthese Organique, Villeubanne (France)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Experimental investigation of sand consolidation using high-temperature alkaline solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to better understand the sand consolidation process under high-temperature alkaline solution. Wilmington Tar sand samples were successfully consolidated in the laboratory using high-temperature (250-260?C) solution of sodium carbonate (pH 11-12). The sample was placed in a vertical 18 in. long aluminum cylindrical cell with an ID of 1.5 in.. The top half of the cell was thermally insulated while the bottom half was cooled. Hot alkaline solution was injected at 20 ml/min for 3-4 hours at the top of the cell and liquid produced at the bottom of the cell. After each experiment, the cell contents were removed and analyzed to determine if sand consolidation occurred. Both aggregates of sand grains and sectioned and polished epoxy-mounted sand grains were examined and analyzed using an electron microprobe to determine any change in shape, size, or composition of the sand pack and precipitation and growth of secondary phases. To better understand the process, experiments were subsequently conducted using samples of pure quartz, pure feldspar, and a 50:50 (by weight) mixture of quartz and feldspar. In each case, both varied 20-40 mesh and 50-250 mesh grain size samples were used. For the 20-40 mesh cases, zeolites and a mixture of amorphous silica and sodium carbonate were deposited on grain surfaces but were insufficient to cause overall sand consolidation. However, when a finer, poorly sorted (50-250 mesh) 50:50 mixture of feldspar and quartz was used, sand consolidation was obtained in 2.5 hours. At the top, hotter part of the cell, equant and acicular zeolite crystals (sodium aluminum silicates) weakly bound the sand grains. At the bottom and cooler part of the cell, the sand grains were strongly bound by a mixture of amorphous silica and sodium carbonate. Results to-date indicate that both zeolite and silica may be cementing agents, the grain-bonding strength depending on the grain surface area. This investigation is part of an ongoing research. The temperature, injection rate, and pH of the alkaline solution, treating time and "soaking period" are considered important process parameters that need to be further investigated.

Moreno Romero, Fidel Enrique

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Studies at PNNL are directed toward new solvent formulation for the practical sodium pseudohydroxide extraction systems.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Review and assessment of technologies for the separation of strontium from alkaline and acidic media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A literature survey has been conducted to identify and evaluate methods for the separation of strontium from acidic and alkaline media as applied to Hanford tank waste. The most promising methods of solvent extraction, precipitation, and ion exchange are described. The following criteria were used for evaluating the separation methods: Appreciable strontium removal must be demonstrated; Strontium selectivity over bulk components must be demonstrated; The method must show promise for evolving into a practical and fairly simple process; The process should be safe to operate; The method must be robust (i.e., capable of separating strontium from various waste types); Secondary waste generation must be minimized; and The method must show resistance to radiation damage. The methods discussed did not necessarily satisfy all of the above criteria; thus, key areas requiring further development are also given for each method. Less promising solvent extraction, precipitation, and ion exchange methods were also identified; areas for potential development are included in this report.

Orth, R.J.; Kurath, D.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Design and Test of a Carbon-Tolerant Alkaline Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents new results which may constitute a breakthrough in the effort to develop fuel cells truly suitable for use in cars and trucks. For decades, researchers have known that the alkaline fuel cell (AFC) is much cheaper to make, more efficient and more durable than the more popular PEM fuel cell; however, "carbon poisoning" (either from CO2 in air or from contaminants in reformed methanol) causes big problems in the kind of oxygen-hydrogen AFC commonly used in space. This paper reports successful tests of a technique for coating the electrodes with polystyrene which, in conjunction with older common-sense techniques, appears to solve the problem. This kind of design is applicable to cars run on hydrogen fuel, on reformed methanol or even direct methanol. Developing a test methodology was a major part of the work. A foreword by one of the sponsors at NSF discusses the larger importance of this work for energy security and the environment.

Urquidi-Macdonald, M; Grimes, P; Tewari, A; Sambhy, V; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Sen, Ayusman; Grimes, Patrick; Tewari, Ashutosh; Sambhy, Varun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

Dangerous electromagnetic fields?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dangerous electromagnetic fields? Dangerous electromagnetic fields? Name: Tommy T Joseph Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why are electromagnetic fields supposedly dangerous? Replies: I assume you are asking about power line frequency (60 Hz) fields, since they have been in the news lately. No one knows for sure that they are dangerous. There have been a few studies which seem to show an association between how close homes are to power lines, and the incidence of childhood cancer (mostly leukemia) in children living (or who have lived) in those homes. Other similar studies have not found such an association. In all the studies which have found an association, none has actually measured the fields. Studies which actually have measured the fields find no association. There is no known mechanism for 60 Hz fields to cause cancer. Furthermore, the classic "dose-response relationship," that is, the greater the dose, the greater the response, does not seem to work here. Many laboratory studies have found that 60 Hz fields have an effect on organisms under certain conditions, but none of the observed effects can be convincingly related to a hazard. The bottom line is, no one knows for sure. It is important to realize that it is impossible to prove that anything is completely safe. My personal opinion is that, if there is a risk, it must be very small, or it wouldn't be so hard to prove. I can supply some good unbiased references if you are interested.

335

Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

Voyles, JW

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Thermal treatment for recovery of manganese and zinc from zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We separated Zn from Mn in zinc-carbon and alkaline batteries after removal of Hg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost total removal of Hg is achieved at low temperature in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen atmosphere is needed to reduce zinc and to permit its volatilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high grade Zn concentrate was obtained with a high recovery at 1000-1200 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grade of Mn in the residue was enhanced with complete recovery. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is the recovery of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, containing 40.9% of Mn and 30.1% of Zn, after preliminary physical treatment followed by removal of mercury. Separation of the metals has been carried out on the basis of their different boiling points, being 357 Degree-Sign C and 906 Degree-Sign C the boiling point of mercury and zinc and 1564 Degree-Sign C the melting point of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Characterization by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA and X-ray powder diffraction of the mixture has been carried out after comminution sieving and shaking table treatment to remove the anodic collectors and most of chlorides contained in the mixture. The mixture has been roasted at various temperatures and resident times in a flow of air to set the best conditions to remove mercury that were 400 Degree-Sign C and 10 min. After that, the flow of air has been turned into a nitrogen one (inert atmosphere) and the temperatures raised, thus permitting the zinc oxide to be reduced to metallic zinc by the carbon present in the original mixture and recovered after volatilization as a high grade concentrate, while manganese was left in the residue. The recovery and the grade of the two metals, at 1000 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, were 84% and 100% for zinc and 85% and 63% for manganese, respectively. The recovery of zinc increased to 99% with a grade of 97% at 1200 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, while the recovery and grade of manganese were 86% and 87%, respectively, at that temperature. Moreover, the chlorinated compounds that could form by the combustion of the plastics contained in the spent batteries, are destroyed at the temperature required by the process.

Belardi, G. [Institute for Environmental Engineering and Geosciences (CNR) Area della Ricerca CNR, via Salaria km 29,300, Monterotondo, 00016 Rome (Italy); Lavecchia, R.; Medici, F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy); Piga, L., E-mail: luigi.piga@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Reactive transport modelling of the interaction of fission product ground contamination with alkaline and cementitious leachates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fission products Cs-137 and Sr-90 are amongst the most common radionuclides occurring in ground contamination at the UK civil nuclear sites. Such contamination is often associated with alkaline liquids and the mobility of these fission products may be affected by these chemical conditions. Similar geochemical effects may also result from cementitious leachate associated with building foundations and the use of grouts to remediate ground contamination. The behaviour of fission products in these scenarios is a complex interaction of hydrogeological and geochemical processes. A suite of modelling tools have been developed to investigate the behaviour of a radioactive plume containing Cs and Sr. Firstly the effects of sorption due to cementitious groundwater is modelled using PHREEQC. This chemical model is then incorporated into PHAST for the 3-D reactive solute transport modeling. Results are presented for a generic scenario including features and processes that are likely to be relevant to a number of civil UK nuclear sites. Initial results show that modelling can be a very cost-effective means to study the complex hydrogeological and geochemical processes involved. Modelling can help predict the mobility of contaminants in a range of site end point scenarios, and in assessing the consequences of decommissioning activities. (authors)

Kwong, S.; Small, J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd, The British Technology Centre, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

339

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Process for depositing epitaxial alkaline earth oxide onto a substrate and structures prepared with the process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilize molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and/or electron beam evaporation methods and an ultra-high vacuum facility to grow a layup of epitaxial alkaline earth oxide films upon the substrate surface. By selecting metal constituents for the oxides and in the appropriate proportions so that the lattice parameter of each oxide grown closely approximates that of the substrate or base layer upon which oxide is grown, lattice strain at the film/film or film/substrate interface of adjacent films is appreciably reduced or relieved. Moreover, by selecting constituents for the oxides so that the lattice parameters of the materials of adjacent oxide films either increase or decrease in size from one parameter to another parameter, a graded layup of films can be grown (with reduced strain levels therebetween) so that the outer film has a lattice parameter which closely approximates that of, and thus accomodates the epitaxial growth of, a pervoskite chosen to be grown upon the outer film.

McKee, Rodney A. (Kingston, TN); Walker, Frederick J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modeling experimental results of diffusion of alkaline solutions through a compacted bentonite barrier  

SciTech Connect

The interaction between concrete/cement and swelling clay (bentonite) has been modeled in the context of engineered barrier systems for deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The geochemical transformations observed in laboratory diffusion experiments at 60 and 90 {sup o}C between bentonite and different high-pH solutions (K-Na-OH and Ca(OH){sub 2}-saturated) were reconciled with the reactive transport code CrunchFlow. For K-Na-OH solutions (pH = 13.5 at 25 {sup o}C) partial dissolution of montmorillonite and precipitation of Mg-silicates (talc-like), hydrotalcite and brucite at the interface are predicted at 60 {sup o}C, while at 90 {sup o}C the alteration is wider. Alkaline cations diffused beyond the mineralogical alteration zone by means of exchange with Mg{sup 2+} in the interlayer region of montmorillonite. Very slow reactivity and minor alteration of the clay are predicted in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-bentonite system. The model is a reasonable description of the experiments but also demonstrates the difficulties in modeling processes operating at a small scale under a diffusive regime.

Fernandez, Raul, E-mail: raul.fernandez@ietcc.csic.e [Instituto Eduardo Torroja de Ciencias de la Construccion (CSIC), C/Serrano Galvache, 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Cuevas, Jaime [Dpto. Geologia y Geoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Maeder, Urs K. [Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Baltzerstrasse 3, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

EPRI Appliance Measurement Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a measurement survey that characterizes magnetic fields from common electronic appliances, with an emphasis on appliances that have become available since 1985. The purpose of this study was to supplement a survey of appliance magnetic fields by J. R. Gauger, which was published by IEEE in 1985.

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

343

Quantum field theory without divergences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that loop divergences emerging in the Green functions in quantum field theory originate from correspondence of the Green functions to {\\em unmeasurable} (and hence unphysical) quantities. This is because no physical quantity can be measured in a point, but in a region, the size of which is constrained by the resolution of measuring equipment. The incorporation of the resolution into the definition of quantum fields $\\phi(x)\\to\\phi^{(A)}(x)$ and appropriate change of Feynman rules results in finite values of the Green functions. The Euclidean $\\phi^4$-field theory is taken as an example.

Altaisky, M V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Quantum field theory without divergences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that loop divergences emerging in the Green functions in quantum field theory originate from correspondence of the Green functions to {\\em unmeasurable} (and hence unphysical) quantities. This is because no physical quantity can be measured in a point, but in a region, the size of which is constrained by the resolution of measuring equipment. The incorporation of the resolution into the definition of quantum fields $\\phi(x)\\to\\phi^{(A)}(x)$ and appropriate change of Feynman rules results in finite values of the Green functions. The Euclidean $\\phi^4$-field theory is taken as an example.

M. V. Altaisky

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

New Hardware and Software Design of a Field-Deployable Real-Time Laser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurement of True Travel Time on the Highway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time Laser-Based Prototype Detection System for MeasurementLaser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for MeasurementLaser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurement

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is leading an effort to find novel approaches to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial sources. The Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) program is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to encourage development of processes that

347

Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

348

Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultra-low tension. In addition, the novel concept of pH gradient design to optimize flood water conditions will be tested.

Wasan, D.T.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Deltaic sedimentation in saline, alkaline Lake Bogoria, Kenya: Response to environmental change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake Bogoria is a meromictic, saline (90 g/l TDS), alkaline (pH: 10.3) lake with Na-CO[sub 3]-Cl waters, located in a narrow half-graben in the central Kenya Rift. It is fed by hot springs, direct precipitation, and a series of ephemeral streams that discharge into the lake via small deltas and fan-deltas. Examination of the exposed deltas and >50 short cores from the lake floor, have revealed a wide range of deltaic and prodeltaic sediments, including turbidites and subaqueous debris-flow deposits. Studies of 3 long cores and the exposed delta stratigraphy have shown how the style of deltaic sedimentation has responded to environmental changes during the last 30,000 years. During humid periods when lake level is high the lake waters are fresher and less dense. Theoretically, high sediment yield and more constant discharge may promote underflow (hyperpycnal flow), generating low-density turbidity currents. In contrast, during low stages with dense brine, the less dense, inflowing waters carry fine sediment plumes toward the center of the lake where they settle from suspension (hypopycnal flow). Although applicable as a general model, the sediment record shows that reality is more complex. Variations in meromixis and level of the chemocline, together with local and temporal differences in sediment yield and discharge, may permit density flows even when the lake is under a predominant hypopycnal regime. During periods of aridity when sodium carbonate evaporites were forming, exposed delta plains were subject to desiccation with local development of calcrete and zeolitic paleosols.

Renaut, R.W. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Tiercelin, J.J. (Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Domaines Oceaniques)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Mechanism of formation of oil by the hot aqueous alkaline digestion of cellulose  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall mechanism of cellulose converson in hot aqueous alkali appears to be one of degradation through glucose to low molecular weight saccharinic acids, dihydroxybutyric acid, glycolic acid, and carbonyl products such as acetone, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, and similar compounds. Although the products identified in the present report were fairly complex furans, carbocyclic ketones, unsaturated hydrocarbons, and aromatic compounds, nevertheless, in most cases, they could have been formed from simple carbonyl compounds through a series of condensations involving carbanion intermediates. It is conceivable that residual alkali in the oil during acetone extraction could have given rise to diacetone alcohol as an artifact. This is refuted by examination of an aqueous residue which was extracted with diethyl ether and which was never exposed to any acetone: Compounds derived from diacetone alcohol (such as mesityl oxide or 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one) were also identified in the diethyl ether extract of the aqueous phase. Other compounds were identified in the oil acetone extract which could not have been derived from acetone or diacetone alcohol, but which could have been formed from other carbonyl compounds by the same mechanism. Hence, diacetone alcohol is a genuine product of cellulose conversion although apparently not an intermediate in further synthesis of other products. The further reaction of the postulated cyclic intermediates, and the route to formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons of high molecular weight is intended to be the next subject of investigation in the current work. The fundamental difference in the mechanism of cellulose conversion to oil by pyrolysis and by aqueous alkaline digestion predicted by theory is therefore confirmed. Pyrolysis products may be explained generally by carbonium ion and free radical reactions (in fact, cellulose decomposition is acid-catalyzed), while in aqueous alkali, nucleophilic carbanion reactions are favored.

Molten, P.M.; Miller, R.K.; Donovan, J.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Alkaline-side extraction of technetium from tank waste using crown ethers and other extractants  

SciTech Connect

The chemical development of a new crown-ether-based solvent-extraction process for the separation of (Tc) from alkaline tank-waste supernate is ready for counter-current testing. The process addresses a priority need in the proposed cleanup of Hanford and other tank wastes. This need has arisen from concerns due to the volatility of Tc during vitrification, as well as {sup 99}Tc`s long half-life and environmental mobility. The new process offers several key advantages that direct treatability--no adjustment of the waste composition is needed; economical stripping with water; high efficiency--few stages needed; non-RCRA chemicals--no generation of hazardous or mixed wastes; co-extraction of {sup 90}Sr; and optional concentration on a resin. A key concept advanced in this work entails the use of tandem techniques: solvent extraction offers high selectivity, while a subsequent column sorption process on the aqueous stripping solution serves to greatly concentrate the Tc. Optionally, the stripping solution can be evaporated to a small volume. Batch tests of the solvent-extraction and stripping components of the process have been conducted on actual melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) waste as well as simulants of MVST and Hanford waste. The tandem process was demonstrated on MVST waste simulants using the three solvents that were selected the final candidates for the process. The solvents are 0.04 M bis-4,4{prime}(5{prime})[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6 (abbreviated di-t-BuCH18C6) in a 1:1 vol/vol blend of tributyl phosphate and Isopar{reg_sign} M (an isoparaffinic kerosene); 0.02 M di-t-BuCH18C6 in 2:1 vol/vol TBP/Isopar M and pure TBP. The process is now ready for counter-current testing on actual Hanford tank supernates.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Moyer, B.A.; Presley, D.J.; Armstrong, V.S.; Haverlock, T.J.; Counce, R.M.; Sachleben, R.A.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Americium/Lanthanide Separations in Alkaline Solutions for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project goals: Can used nuclear fuel be partitioned by dissolution in alkaline aqueous solution to give a solution of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium and a filterable solid containing nearly all of the lanthanide fission products and certain other fission products? What is the chemistry of Am/Cm/Ln in oxidative carbonate solutions? Can higher oxidation states of Am be stabilized and exploited? Conclusions: Am(VI) is kinetically stable in 0.5-2.0 M carbonate solutions for hours. Aliquat 336 in toluene has been successfully shown to extract U(VI) and Pu(VI) from carbonate solutions. (Stepanov et al 2011). Higher carbonate concentration gives lower D, SF{sub U/Eu} for = 4 in 1 M K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Experiments with Am(VI) were unsuccessful due to reduction by the organics. Multiple sources of reducing organics...more optimization. Reduction experiments of Am(VI) in dodecane/octanol/Aliquat 336 show that after 5 minutes of contact, only 30-40% of the Am(VI) has been reduced. Long enough to perform an extraction. Shorter contact times, lower T, and lower Aliquat 336 concentration still did not result in any significant extraction of Am. Anion exchange experiments using a strong base anion exchanger show uptake of U(VI) with minimal uptake of Nd(III). Experiments with Am(VI) indicate Am sorption with a Kd of 9 (10 minute contact) but sorption mechanism is not yet understood. SF{sub U/Nd} for = 7 and SF{sub U/Eu} for = 19 after 24 hours in 1 M K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

Goff, George S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Long, Kristy Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reilly, Sean D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Runde, Wolfgang H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

353

Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

354

Experimental Techniques for Measuring Temperature and Velocity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Temperature and Velocity Fields to Improve the Use and Validation of Building Heat Transfer Models Title Experimental Techniques for Measuring Temperature and Velocity...

355

Measuring Devices: Liquefied Petroleum Gas Liquid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquefied Petroleum Gas Liquid-Measuring Devices. Intro about it. EPOs, Field Manual, Training Materials & Presentaions, Newsletter Articles, Other ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

Environmental Management Performance Measures, IG-0561 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Environmental Management Performance Measures, IG-0561 Environmental Management...

357

Evaluation of Addition of Alkaline Solutions on Overall Quality and Functionality of Normal and Pale, Soft, and Exudative (PSE) Pork Gels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry surveys indicated that up to 16percent of pork is pale, soft, and exudative (PSE); which has reduced functionality. Recently, the cost of sodium phosphates (SP) has escalated. SPs are used to improve water holding capacity (WHC), increase pH, and retard lipid oxidation. Alkaline non-meat ingredient addition could improve PSE pork functionality and replace SP in pork products. The objective was to examine effects of alkaline solutions on pH, color, WHC, and texture of PSE and normal pork gels. Normal (pH 5.6-5.9) and PSE (pH ? 5.4) loins were obtained and homogenized. Treatment solutions were: no added solution (control); double-distilled deionized water (ddW); 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 pecent(w/v) SP; and 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3M potassium bicarbonate (PB), sodium bicarbonate (SB), potassium carbonate (PC), or sodium carbonate (SC). PSE gels had lighter color, lower pH, WHC, and cook yields, and higher TPA values than normal gels. Control and ddW gels had lower pH, and higher L*, a*, and b* values. As treatment levels increased, gels had higher pH, and lower L*, a*, and b* values. SP gels had lower pH, WHC, cook yields, and higher L*, a*, b*, and TPA values compared to PB, SB, PC, and SC gels. PC and SC gels had higher cook yields than normal control gels and PB and SB gels were intermediate. For both meat types, TPA values improved for PB and SB gels compared to normal control gels, but did not differ from SP gels. As levels of PC and SC increased, gels were softer, less cohesive, chewy, and lower in work 2 than other gels. Cooked PSE gels treated with 0.2 or 0.3M PC or SC were less red and yellow and had cook yields that surpassed normal control and ddW gels. Normal and PSE gels treated with 0.2 or 0.3M PC or SC did not differ in TPA measurements for hardness and work. PSE pork functionality was improved with PC or SC addition to be similar to or higher than normal samples. PC and SC are feasible alternatives to replace SP in pork gel systems without loss of WHC, color, or pH.

Garza, Sonia Yvette

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2003.04.02 - 2003.09.02 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon, water, and energy varies with climate, soil, and land management, in ways 1) that influence the CO2 flux and planetary boundary layer CO2 concentration in ARM CART and 2) that we can model and predict. This activity repeated portable flux system measurements that we performed in spring 2002, by continuing measurements of the spatial heterogeneity of carbon, water, and energy fluxes in fields surrounding the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF).

359

Microbial field pilot study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Field Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Techniques Field Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map surface geology and hydrothermal alteration. Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Bulk and trace element analysis of rocks, minerals, and sediments. Identify and document surface geology and mineralogy. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Locates active faults in the area of interest. Map fault and fracture patterns, kinematic information. Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

362

Electronic field permeameter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For making rapid, non-destructive permeability measurements in the field, a portable minipermeameter of the kind having a manually-operated gas injection tip is provided with a microcomputer system which operates a flow controller to precisely regulate gas flow rate to a test sample, and reads a pressure sensor which senses the pressure across the test sample. The microcomputer system automatically turns on the gas supply at the start of each measurement, senses when a steady-state is reached, collects and records pressure and flow rate data, and shuts off the gas supply immediately after the measurement is completed. Preferably temperature is also sensed to correct for changes in gas viscosity. The microcomputer system may also provide automatic zero-point adjustment, sensor calibration, over-range sensing, and may select controllers, sensors, and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements. Electronic sensors may provide increased accuracy and precision. Preferably one microcomputer is used for sensing instrument control and data collection, and a second microcomputer is used which is dedicated to recording and processing the data, selecting the sensors and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements, and instructing the user how to set-up and operate the minipermeameter. To provide mass data collection and user-friendly operation, the second microcomputer is preferably a lap-type portable microcomputer having a non-volatile or battery-backed CMOS memory.

Chandler, Mark A. (Madison, WI); Goggin, David J. (Austin, TX); Horne, Patrick J. (Austin, TX); Kocurek, Gary G. (Roundrock, TX); Lake, Larry W. (Austin, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Chemically and compositionally modified solid solution disordered multiphase nickel hydroxide positive electrode for alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high capacity, long cycle life positive electrode for use in an alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising: a solid solution nickel hydroxide material having a multiphase structure that comprises at least one polycrystalline .gamma.-phase including a polycrystalline .gamma.-phase unit cell comprising spacedly disposed plates with at least one chemical modifier incorporated around the plates, the plates having a range of stable intersheet distances corresponding to a 2.sup.+ oxidation state and a 3.5.sup.+, or greater, oxidation state; and at least one compositional modifier incorporated into the solid solution nickel hydroxide material to promote the multiphase structure.

Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Corrigan, Dennis (Troy, MI); Venkatesan, Srini (Southfield, MI); Young, Rosa (Troy, MI); Fierro, Christian (Troy, MI); Fetcenko, Michael A. (Rochester Hills, MI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Suppressant: Electric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Suppressant:Electric Fields. Fire Extinguishment of Pool Flames by Means of a DC electric Field.. ...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

365

ARM - Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select below to highlight measurements in specified measurement categories. Aerosols The effect of aerosols is measured by instrument systems and lidars that provide data...

366

Internal split field generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

Thundat; ,Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

Measuring Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Compressed Natural Gas Retail Motor-Fuel Dispensers; Hydrogen Measuring Devices; Liquefied Petroleum Gas Liquid-Measuring Devices; Loading ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

368

ENTO 489 Field Entomology Field Project Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENTO 489 ­ Field Entomology Field Project Plan GENERAL Title: A Taxonomic Survey of Late Summer will be using aerial sweep nets as our only technique to collect the butterflies because this is the best way: · Materials needed to implement the project in the field include: o 2 aerial sweep nets o 2-4 killing jars set

Behmer, Spencer T.

369

Remote field eddy current inspection  

SciTech Connect

The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique uses an internal probe to inspect conducting tubes nondestructively. A coaxial solenoidal exciter, energized with low frequency AC, and detector coils near the inside of the pipe wall are separated by about two pipe diameters to obtain through wall transmission and equal sensitivity to defects on the outside or inside of the pipe wall. Calculation methods are outlined and the voltage plane polar plot signal representation for defect measurement is described. Slit defect interactions in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic tubes are discussed. Defect-induced anomalous fields are interpreted in terms of anomalous source eddy current and missing magnetization defect models. The use of computer animations to represent the time variations of high resolution field measurements and calculations is described.

Atherton, D.L. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Nordholt, Jane E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer is described having a low weight and low power requirement, for use in space. It can be used to analyze the ionized particles in the region of the spacecraft on which it is mounted. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically sysmetric linear electric field.

McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

Magnetotelluric measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ideas of flux quantization and Josephson tunneling are reviewed, and the operation of the dc SQUID as a magnetometer is described. The SQUID currently used for magnetotellurics has a sensitivity of 10/sup -14/ T Hz/sup -1/2/, a dynamic range at 10/sup 7/ in a 1 Hz bandwidth, a frequency response from 0 to 40 kHz, and a slewing rate of 5 x 10/sup -5/T s/sup -1/. Recent improvements in sensitivity are discussed: SQUIDS are rapidly approaching the limit imposed by the uncertainty principle. The essential ideas of magnetotelluric (MT) measurements are outlined, and it is shown how the remote reference method can lead to major reductions in bias errors compared to more conventional schemes. The field techniques of the Berkeley group are described. The practical application of MT requires that amplitude and phase spectra of apparent resistivities be transformed into a geologically useful distribution of subsurface resistivities. In many areas where MT is being applied today, the technique may not provide the information needed because stations are too few and widely spaced, or because we are unable to interpret data influenced by complex 3-D resistivity features. The results of two surveys, one detailed, the other regional, over the Klamath Basin, Oregon, are examined. The detailed survey is able to resolve small (1 km wide) structural features that are missed or add a component of spatial aliasing to the regional data. On the other hand, the regional survey avoids truncation effects that may occur when the survey undersamples an area.

Clarke, J.; Goldstein, N.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Quantum Operations and Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Operations and Measurement M.P Seevinck E-mail: M.P.Seevinck@phys.uu.nl Utrecht field in quantum physics ­ or perhaps better, a new way of doing quantum physics ­ . . . Surprisingly of these developments to the conceptual problems of quantum mechanics. In our view, the new work on quantum information

Seevinck, Michiel

375

Alkaline earth lead and tin compounds Ae2Pb, Ae2Sn, Ae=Ca,Sr,Ba, as thermoelectric materials  

SciTech Connect

We present a detailed theoretical study of three alkaline earth compounds Ca2Pb, Sr2Pb and Ba2Pb, which have undergone little previous study, calculating electronic band structures and Boltzmann transport and bulk moduli using density functional theory. We also study the corresponding tin compounds Ca2 Sn, Sr2 Sn and Ba2 Sn. We find that these are all narrow band gap semiconductors with an electronic structure favorable for thermoelectric performance, with substantial thermopowers for the lead compounds at temperature ranges from 300 to 800 K. For the lead compounds, we further find very low calculated bulk moduli - roughly half of the values for the lead chalcogenides, suggestive of soft phonons and hence low lattice thermal conductivity. All these facts indicate that these materials merit experimental investigation as potential high performance thermoelectrics. We find good potential for thermoelectric performance in the environmentally friendly stannide materials, particularly at high temperature.

Parker, David S [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Efficiency Measures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recommended steam system energy efficiency measures Based on analyses implementation of steam system energy efficiency measures is driven primarily by cost metrics payback period...

378

External split field generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

379

Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole electromagnetic (EM) measurements, using fiberglass-cased boreholes, have proven useful in oil field reservoir characterization and process monitoring (Wilt et al., 1995). It has been presumed that these measurements would be impossible in steel-cased wells due to the very large EM attenuation and phase shifts. Recent laboratory and field studies have indicated that detection of EM signals through steel casing should be possible at low frequencies, and that these data provide a reasonable conductivity image at a useful scale. Thus, we see an increased application of this technique to mature oilfields, and an immediate extension to geothermal industry as well. Along with the field experiments numerical model studies have been carried out for analyzing the effect of steel casing to the EM fields. The model used to be an infinitely long uniform casing embedded in a homogeneous whole space. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the formation signal could be accurately recovered if the casing characteristics were independently known (Becker et al., 1998; Lee el al., 1998). Real steel-cased wells are much more complex than the simple laboratory models used in work to date. The purpose of this study is to develop efficient numerical methods for analyzing EM fields in realistic settings, and to evaluate the potential application of EM technologies to cross-borehole and single-hole environment for reservoir characterization and monitoring.

Lee, Ki Ha; Kim, Hee Joon; Uchida, Toshihiro

2001-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

Pilot Study of Nonresidential Power Frequency Magnetic Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has initiated several research projects to investigate magnetic field levels, their characteristics, and their sources. This report describes nonresidential magnetic field measurement protocols and instrumentation that can be used to identify and measure magnetic field sources in a variety of settings, including schools, offices, and electric utility facilities.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Experience and Limitations of using Manganese Alkaline Primary Cells in a large Operational AUV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shall have sockets and spigots with push-in type integral rubber ring joints. Bends shall be uPVC and all other fittings shall be cast iron, all with similar push-in type joints. Copper pipes Pipes shall measured): 4 203 x 203 x 46Kg/m H-section beams with and including connector plates, etc. m 12 5 M16 x 190

Griffiths, Gwyn

382

Humidity Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Quantities. Humidity Measurements. Rate our Services. Technical ... Special Tests of Humidity (36070S). Tests ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a standard field monitoring protocol for evaluating the installed performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in residential buildings. The report is organized to be consistent with the chronology of field test planning and execution. Research questions are identified first, followed by a discussion of analysis methods, and then the details of measuring the required information are laid out. A field validation of the protocol at a house near the NREL campus is included for reference.

Sparn, B.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.; Wilson, E.; Hancock, E.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Square Butte HVDC modulation system field tests  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe field tests conducted at the Square Butte dc system to validate transfer functions of the digital model for dc current and voltage modulation control design. The field tests and digital model results confirm a dominant interarea mode of oscillation of 0.8 hz. Field tests also established spurious responses in rectifier and inverter frequency measurements which appear to be attributable to transducer distortion.

Grund, C.E. (General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (USA)); Hauer, J.F. (BPA, Portland, OR (US)); Crane, L.P.; Carlson, D.L. (Minnesota Power and Light Co., Duluth, MN (USA)); Wright, S.E. (EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Determining Progression in Glaucoma Using Visual Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standardized visual field assessment, which measures visual function in 76 locations of the central visual area, is an important diagnostic tool in the treatment of the eye disease glaucoma. It helps determine whether the disease is stable or progressing ...

Andrew Turpin; Eibe Frank; Mark Hall; Ian H. Witten; Chris A. Johnson

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Heating Structures of the TRMM Field Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating profiles calculated from sounding networks and other observations during three Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) field campaigns [the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX), TRMM Large-Scale Biosphere–Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (...

Courtney Schumacher; Minghua H. Zhang; Paul E. Ciesielski

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ARM - Field Campaign - Surface spectral albedo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15. Mostly clear-sky. Measurement were made at the following locations a) Milo (grain sorghum) field. b) Bare soil. c) Tall grass. d) Short grass. e) Bare soil. f) Young green...

388

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2006.01.01 - 2006.12.31 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. In an extension of our earlier work on crop systems, we investigated the effects of burning on the cycles of carbon, water, and energy in an example of grazed land of the Southern Great Plains. In collaboration with Dr. Herman Mayeux, of the USDA Grazing

389

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2004.04.15 - 2004.12.15 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. Models predicting fluxes for un-irrigated agriculture were posed with the challenge of characterizing the onset and severity of plant water stress. We conducted a study that quantified the spatial heterogeneity and temporal variations in land

390

ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

size size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Hydrometeor size The size of a hydrometeor, measured directly or derived from other measurements . Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer LDIS : Laser Disdrometer External Instruments CPOL : C-Band Polarimetric Radar Field Campaign Instruments EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters

391

ARM - Measurement - Hygroscopic growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsHygroscopic growth govMeasurementsHygroscopic growth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Hygroscopic growth The rate that aerosol particles grow at relative humidity values less than 100 percent. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System SMPS : Scanning mobility particle sizer TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System

392

ARM - Measurement - Isotope ratio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsIsotope ratio govMeasurementsIsotope ratio ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Isotope ratio Ratio of stable isotope concentrations. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Field Campaign Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Datastreams FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes

393

Characterization of Magnetic Fields from Power Distribution Transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a measurement study that was performed to characterize magnetic fields from power distribution transformers. The purpose of the study was to evaluate magnetic field attenuation rates of various sizes of transformers.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

Optimal Estimation of Hydrographic Station Data and Derived Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimal estimation is applied to contouring and analysis of hydrographic sections. Measured fields, such as temperature and salinity, and derived fields, such as geostrophic velocity, are decomposed into large-scale and small-scale components. ...

Dean Roemmich

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Concerning Measurement of Gravitomagnetism in Electromagnetic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of gravitomagnetic field is of fundamental importance as a test of general relativity. Here we present a new theoretical project for performing such a measurement based on detection of the electric field arising from the interplay between the gravitomagnetic and magnetic fields in the stationary axial-symmetric gravitational field of a slowly rotating massive body. Finally it is shown that precise magnetometers based on superconducting quantum interferometers could not be designed for measurement of the gravitomagnetically induced magnetic field in the cavity of a charged capacitor since they measure the circulation of a vector potential of electromagnetic field, i.e., an invariant quantity including the sum of electric and magnetic fields, and the general-relativistic magnetic part will be totally cancelled by the electric one which is in good agreement with the experimental results.

B. J. Ahmedov; N. I. Rakhmatov

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

397

Measuring circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automatic gain control circuit functions to adjust the magnitude of an input signal supplied to a measuring circuit to a level within the dynamic range of the measuring circuit while a log-ratio circuit adjusts the magnitude of the output signal from the measuring circuit to the level of the input signal and optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio performance of the measuring circuit.

Sun, Shan C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Chaprnka, Anthony G. (Cockeysville, MD)

1977-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

Nanocalorimetry Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Establishing feedback controlled instrumentation should provide for greater accuracy in the thermodynamic measurements. The new control system ...

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Virtual Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... measurements, in some applications. The dollar value of computational predictions will be greatly enhanced. Goals. In the near ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Method of Evaluating Atmospheric Models Using Tracer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a method that uses tracer measurements as the basis for comparing and evaluating wind fields. An important advantage of the method is that the wind fields are evaluated from the tracer measurements without introducing ...

Darko Kora?in; James Frye; Vlad Isakov

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

402

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

403

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Development of electrolysis-cell separator for 125/sup 0/C operation. Advanced alkaline electrolysis cell development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the findings of a seven-month contracted effort. The major technical task involved a 125/sup 0/C operating temperature test of the 20 v/o polybenzimidazole (PBI) - 80 v/o potassium titanate (K/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/) separator in combination with the nickel-molybdenum cathode electrocatalyst system dubbed the C-AN cathode using the ARIES test system which was developed previously. The test of the PBI-K/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/ separator was only partially successful. The anticipated 1.85 (75/sup 0/C) and 1.75 volt per cell (100/sup 0/C) input requirement at 550 ma/cm/sup 2/ were surpassed slightly. The test module operated stably for about 550 hr. Although there were some mechanical difficulties with the ARIES test unit, testing at 125/sup 0/C proceeded from 745 hr on test until the test was terminated at 2318 operating hours to allow diagnostic disassembly. The input voltage degraded to a value of 1.82 volt per cell at 125/sup 0/C which is unacceptable. Diagnostic disassembly showed the PBI portion of the separator was no longer present. PBI had been shown to be stable in 123/sup 0/C, 45 w/o KOH solutions in a 1000-hr test. The attack is suggested to be attributable to a peroxide or perchlorate type oxidizer which would be unique to the electrolysis mode and probably not present in alkaline fuel cell applications. Recommendations for further testing include an evaluation of the chemical compatibility of PBI with alkaline/oxidizer solutions and endurance testing the C-AN cathode with new improved anode structures at 125/sup 0/C using asbestos separators in combination with a silicate saturated KOH electrolyte. Demonstration of the stability of this 1.65 volt per cell (90% voltage efficiency) technology at 500 ma/cm/sup 2/ will document an inexpensive and intelligent hydrogen production process which will satisfy the needs of the United States in the 1990s.

Murray, J N

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Measurement of total ion current from vacuum arc plasma sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field is not to just change the plasma flux distribution but rather to increase the measured (electrical) ion current

Oks, Efim M.; Savkin, Konstantin P.; Yushkov, Georgiu Yu.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.; Anders, A.; Brown, Ian G.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

NIST Measurement Services: cw Laser Power and Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... estimates for the NIST laser energy measurements are ... fields of physical science, engineering, applied mathematics, statistics, biotechnology, and ...

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

408

Undergraduate Research at Jefferson Lab - Light Yield Measurements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emission Characteristics) Field Emission Characteristics Light Yield Measurements of Heavy Photon Search (HPS) Muon Scintillator Hodoscopes Student: Marianne Skolnik School:...

409

Novel refractory alkaline earth silicate sealing glasses for planar solid oxide fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel “refractory” Sr-Ca-Y-B-Si sealing glass (glass-ceramic) was developed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objective was to develop sealing glass with desired thermal properties and minimal interfacial reactions with SOFC components, ceramic electrolyte and metallic interconnect. The current glass was different from conventional sealing glass in that the sealing temperatures were targeted higher (>950 degree C) and hence more refractory. Six glasses were formulated and made by conventional glass-making process. Thermal properties were characterized in the glass state and the sintered (crystallized) state. The effect of formulation on thermal properties was discussed. Candidate glasses were also aged for 1000 to 2000 h at elevated temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements showed minimal change after aging. A candidate glass (YSO-1) was used in sealing ceramic electrolyte to a metallic interconnect from 900 degree C to 1050 degree C in air. The interfacial microstructure was characterized and SrCrO4 was identified near the metal interface. Possible reaction mechanism for the chromate formation was discussed.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Feasibility study of a new zinc-air battery concept using flowing alkaline electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

Proof-of-principle experiments are reported for a new concept in electrically rechargeable zinc-air battery. The zinc electrode is a porous flow-thru type using a copper foam metal substrate with zinc deposition onto the foam metal from concentrated zincate electrolyte (as used in zinc-slurry type batteries). The bifunctional air electrode employs low-cost materials, being fabricated entirely from carbon-based precursors and small amounts of nickel and/or cobalt oxide. Corrosion measurements on the graphite materials in the air electrode indicate sufficient corrosion resistance for 8000 h life on charge. A prototype single cell was constructed having 1.5 Ah capacity producing 1.2 V discharge -2.0 charge at the three hour rate and has produced stable voltages for more than 150 cycles. Based on the 1.5 Ah prototype characteristics, design calculations for a 32 kWh battery project an energy density of about 110 Wh/kg, peak power density of 140 W/kg, electrical efficiency of 60% and an attractive materials cost of less than or equal to$20 per kWh.

Ross, P.N. Jr.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Airborne Spectral Measurements of Ocean Directional Reflectance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) was flown aboard the University of Washington Convair 580 (CV-580) research aircraft during the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) field campaign and obtained measurements ...

Charles K. Gatebe; Michael D. King; Alexei I. Lyapustin; G. Thomas Arnold; Jens Redemann

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

1 String field theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This elementary introduction to string field theory highlights the features and the limitations of this approach to quantum gravity as it is currently understood. String field theory is a formulation of string theory as a field theory in space-time with an infinite number of massive fields. Although existing constructions of string field theory require expanding around a fixed choice of space-time background, the theory is in principle background-independent, in the sense that different backgrounds can be realized as different field configurations in the theory. String field theory is the only string formalism developed so far which, in principle, has the potential to systematically address questions involving multiple asymptotically distinct string backgrounds. Thus, although it is not yet well defined as a quantum theory, string field theory may eventually be helpful for understanding questions related to cosmology in string theory. 1.1

W. Taylor

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

414

Can Wind Lidars Measure Turbulence?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling of the systematic errors in the second-order moments of wind speeds measured by continuous-wave (ZephIR) and pulsed (WindCube) lidars is presented. These lidars use the conical scanning technique to measure the velocity field. The model ...

A. Sathe; J. Mann; J. Gottschall; M. S. Courtney

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Effect of Lignin Removal by Alkaline Peroxide Pretreatment on the Susceptibility of Corn Stover to Purified Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Enzymes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pretreatment of corn stover with alkaline peroxide (AP) at pH 11.5 resulted in reduction of lignin content in the residual solids as a function of increasing batch temperature. Scanning electron microscopy of these materials revealed notably more textured surfaces on the plant cell walls as a result of the delignifying pretreatment. As expected, digestion of the delignified samples with commercial cellulase preparations showed an inverse relationship between the content of lignin present in the residual solids after pretreatment and the extent of both glucan and xylan conversion achievable. Digestions with purified enzymes revealed that decreased lignin content in the pretreated solids did not significantly impact the extent of glucan conversion achievable by cellulases alone. Not until purified xylanolytic activities were included with the cellulases were significant improvements in glucan conversion realized. In addition, an inverse relationship was observed between lignin content after pretreatment and the extent of xylan conversion achievable in a 24-h period with the xylanolytic enzymes in the absence of the cellulases. This observation, coupled with the direct relationship between enzymatic xylan and glucan conversion observed in a number of cases, suggests that the presence of lignins may not directly occlude cellulose present in lignocelluloses but rather impact cellulase action indirectly by its association with xylan.

Selig, M. J.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The role of noncovalent interactions in electrocatalysis : trends in fuel cell reactions on Pt in alkaline solutions.  

SciTech Connect

The classic models of metal electrode-electrolyte interfaces generally focus on either covalent interactions between adsorbates and solid surfaces or on long-range electrolyte-metal electrostatic interactions. Here we demonstrate that these traditional models are insufficient. To understand electrocatalytic trends in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and the oxidation of methanol on platinum surfaces in alkaline electrolytes, non-covalent interactions must be considered. We find that non-covalent interactions between hydrated alkali metal cations M{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub x} and adsorbed OH (OH{sub ad}) species increase in the same order as the hydration energies of the corresponding cations (Li{sup +} >> Na{sup +} > K{sup +} > Cs{sup +}) and also correspond to an increase in the concentration of OH{sub ad}-M{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub x} clusters at the interface. These trends are inversely proportional to the activities of the ORR, the HOR and the oxidation of methanol on platinum (Cs{sup +} > K{sup +} > Na{sup +} >> Li{sup +}), which suggests that the clusters block the platinum active sites for electrocatalytic reactions.

Strmcnik, D.; Kodama, K.; van der Vliet, D.; Greeley, J.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Markovicv, N. M.; Toyota Central R& D Labs

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Far field acceleration  

SciTech Connect

Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

Fernow, R.C.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Aerosol Simulations by LLNL IMPACT and Comparisons with Field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulations by LLNL IMPACT and Comparisons with Field Measurements C. C. Chuang, D. Bergman, J. Dignon, and P. Connell Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California...

419

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification J. Chris Stratton, Iain S. Walker, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5982E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

420

length measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A greased steel surface coming in contact with newspaper, wrapping paper ... on Measurement and Inspection in Industry by Computer Aided Laser ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field measurements alkalinity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Impedance measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... no means of measuring or monitoring the oven's ... Services at ambient conditions outside these limits are ... Service for Voltage Transformers and High ...

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

422

Magnetic field generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

Krienin, Frank (Shoreham, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); McDermott, Robert (Louisville, CO); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz (CH-8006 Zurich, CH)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); McDermott, Robert F. (Monona, WI); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

425

Evaluation of an alkaline-side solvent extraction process for cesium removal from SRS tank waste using laboratory-scale centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkaline-side solvent extraction process for cesium removal from Savannah River Site (SRS) tank waste was evaluated experimentally using a laboratory-scale centrifugal contactor. Single-stage and multistage tests were conducted with this contactor to determine hydraulic performance, stage efficiency, and general operability of the process flowsheet. The results and conclusions of these tests are reported along with those from various supporting tests. Also discussed is the ability to scale-up from laboratory- to plant-scale operation when centrifugal contractors are used to carry out the solvent extraction process. While some problems were encountered, a promising solution for each problem has been identified. Overall, this alkaline-side cesium extraction process appears to be an excellent candidate for removing cesium from SRS tank waste.

Leonard, R. A.; Conner, C.; Liberatore, M. W.; Sedlet, J.; Aase, S. B.; Vandegrift, G. F.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

426

141 PATTERNS OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVI IN THE NUCLEI OF NORMAL AND MALIGNANT CELLS DURING THE PHASES OF GROWTH AND DIFFERENTIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LoCALIZATION of alkaline phosphatase in the nuclei of normal and malignant stratified epithelia of mammalian cervix is still an open question (Alamanni, 1956; Foraker and Denham, 1957; Gross and Danziger, 1957). It was decided that problems should be attacked with a quantitative technique where risk of error is negligibly small. In the present investigation, alkaline phosphatase activity associated with nuclear heterochromatin of normal and malignant stratified epithelia of human cervix was quantitatively assessed during the phases of growth and differentiation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Normal tissues were collected from the cervices of 5 non-pregnant women who had no positive evidence of any infection, neoplasia and detectable hormonal disturbances. Cancerous tissues were obtained from the epidermoid carcinoma cervix of 6 women. Tissues were fixed in ice-cold 80 per cent ethyl alcohol up to 24 hours in a frigidaire as described before from this laboratory (De, et al., 1961). They were

P. De; R. Chatterjee

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

428

Combined Extraction of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Alkaline Media: An Extension of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wastes present at DOE long-term storage sites are usually highly alkaline, and because of this, much of the actinides in these wastes are in the sludge phase. Enough actinide materials still remain in the supernatant liquid that they require separation followed by long-term storage in a geological repository. The removal of these metals from the liquid waste stream would permit their disposal as low-level waste and dramatically reduce the volume of high-level wastes.

Kenneth Raymond

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

429

VDTs: Field levels, epidemiology, and laboratory studies  

SciTech Connect

As the use of video display terminals (VDTs) has expanded, questions have been raised as to whether working at a VDT affects the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. A particular focus for these questions has been the very low frequency (VLF) magnetic field produced by a VDT's horizontal deflection coil. VDTs also produce VLF electric fields, extremely low frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields, and static electric fields, Ten studies of pregnancy outcome in VDT operators have been conducted in six countries, and with one exception, none has concluded that magnetic fields from VDTs may predispose pregnant operators to spontaneous abortion or congenital malformation. The epidemiologic studies conducted thus far do not provide a basis for concluding that VDT work and adverse pregnancy outcome are associated. Studies of fetal resorptions and malformations in rodents exposed to VLF magnetic fields have produced inconsistent findings. Two laboratories in Sweden that studied mice have reported positive results, one laboratory showing field-related malformations (but not resorptions) and the other showing field-related resorptions (but not malformations). Two Canadian laboratories have reported negative results in rats and mice. Studies of avian embryos have also yielded inconsistent results, but lacking a maternal-fetal placental interface, avian embryos are a questionable model for evaluating human reproductive risks. Finally, VLF electric and magnetic fields measured at the operator position are in compliance with field strength standards and guidelines that have been established around the world. 55 refs.

Kavet, R.; Tell, R.A. (Richard Tell Associates, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (USA))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

On the Magnitude of the Electric Field near Thunderstorm-Associated Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric-field measurements made in and near clouds during two airborne field programs are presented. Aircraft equipped with multiple electric-field mills and cloud physics sensors were flown near active convection and into thunderstorm anvil and ...

Francis J. Merceret; Jennifer G. Ward; Douglas M. Mach; Monte G. Bateman; James E. Dye

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

MEASURING PROJECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiautomatic measuring projector particularly adapted for measurement of the coordinates of photographic images of particle tracks as prcduced in a bubble or cloud chamber is presented. A viewing screen aids the operator in selecting a particle track for measurement. After approximate manual alignment, an image scanning system coupled to a servo control provides automatic exact alignment of a track image with a reference point. The apparatus can follow along a track with a continuous motion while recording coordinate data at various selected points along the track. The coordinate data is recorded on punched cards for subsequent computer calculation of particle trajectory, momentum, etc.

Franck, J.V.; Broadhead, P.S.; Skiff, E.W.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

Study of YBCO tape anisotropy as a function of field, field orientation and operating temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting magnets with magnetic fields above 20 T will be needed for a Muon Collider and possible LHC energy upgrade. This field level exceeds the possibilities of traditional Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) such as Nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Al. Presently the use of high field high temperature superconductors (HTS) is the only option available for achieving such field levels. Commercially available YBCO comes in tapes and shows noticeable anisotropy with respect to field orientation, which needs to be accounted for during magnet design. In the present work, critical current test results are presented for YBCO tape manufactured by Bruker. Short sample measurements results are presented up to 14 T, assessing the level of anisotropy as a function of field, field orientation and operating temperature.

Lombardo, v.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Alkaline-Side Extraction of Cesium from Savannah River Tank Waste Using a Calixarene-Crown Ether Extractant  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented supporting the viability of the alkaline-side CSEX process as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removal of cesium from aqueous high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Under funding from the USDOE Efficient Separations and Crosscutting program, a flowsheet was suggested in early June of 1998, and in the following four months, this flowsheet underwent extensive testing, both in batch tests at ORNL and ANL and in two centrifugal-contactor tests at ANL. To carry out these tests, the initial ESP funding was augmented by direct funds from Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation. The flowsheet employed a solvent containing a calixarene-crown hybrid compound called BoBCalixC6 that was invented at ORNL and can now be obtained commercially for government use from IBC Advanced Technologies. This special extractant is so powerful and selective that it can be used at only 0.01 M, compensating for its expense, but a modifier is required for use in an aliphatic diluent, primarily to increase the cesium distribution ratio D{sub Cs} in extraction. The modifier selected is a relatively economical fluorinated alcohol called Cs3, invented at ORNL and so far available. only from ORNL. For the flowsheet, the modifier is used at 0.2 M in the branched aliphatic kerosene Isopar{reg_sign} L. Testing at ORNL and ANL involved simulants of the SRS HLW. After extraction of the Cs from the waste simulant, the solvent is scrubbed with 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} and stripped with a solution comprised of 0.0005 M HNO{sub 3} and 0.0001 M CsNO{sub 3}. The selection of these conditions is justified in this report, both on the basis of experimental data and underlying theory.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Moyer, B.A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Removal of technetium from alkaline nuclear-waste media by a solvent-extraction process using crown ethers  

SciTech Connect

Crown ethers dissolved in suitably modified aliphatic kerosene diluents can be employed to extract technetium as pertechnetate anion (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) with good extraction ratios from realistic simulants of radioactive alkaline nitrate waste. The modifiers utilized are non-halogenated and non-volatile, and the technetium can be removed from the solvent by stripping using water. The crown ethers bis-4,4{prime}(5{prime})[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6 (di-t-BuCH18C6) and dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) provide stronger TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} extraction than dicyclohexano-21-crown-7 and 4-tert-butylcyclohexano 15-crown-5. Whereas DCH18C6 provides somewhat higher TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} extraction ratios than the more lipophilic di-t-BuCH18C6 derivative, the latter was selected for further study owing to its lower distribution to the aqueous phase. Particularly good extraction and stripping results were obtained with di-t-BuCH 18C6 at 0.02 M in a 2:1 vol/vol blend of tributyl phosphate and Isopar{reg_sign} M. Using this solvent, 98.9% of the technetium contained (at 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M) in a Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) Hanford tank waste simulant was removed following two cross-current extraction contacts. Two cross-current stripping contacts with deionized water afforded removal of 99.1% of the technetium from the organic solvent.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Presley, D.J.; Haverlock, T.J.; Moyer, B.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.