National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for field measurements alkalinity

  1. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1993-12-01

    The Tucker sand from Hepler field, Crawford County, Kansas, was characterized using routine and advanced analytical methods. The characterization is part of a chemical flooding pilot test to be conducted in the field, which is classified as a DOE Class I (fluvial-dominated delta) reservoir. Routine and advanced methods of characterization were compared. Traditional wireline logs indicate that the reservoir is vertically compartmentalized on the foot scale. Routine core analysis, X-ray computed tomography (CT), minipermeameter measurement, and petrographic analysis indicate that compartmentalization and lamination extend to the microscale. An idealized model of how the reservoir is probably structured (complex layering with small compartments) is presented. There was good agreement among the several methods used for characterization, and advanced characterization methods adequately explained the coreflood and tracer tests conducted with short core plugs. Tracer and chemical flooding tests were conducted in short core plugs while monitoring with CT to establish flow patterns and to monitor oil saturations in different zones of the core plugs. Channeling of injected fluids occurred in laboratory experiments because, on core plug scale, permeability streaks extended the full length of the core plugs. A graphic example of how channeling in field core plugs can affect oil recovery during chemical injection is presented. The small scale of compartmentalization indicated by plugs of the Tucker sand may actually help improve sweep between wells. The success of field-scale waterflooding and the fluid flow patterns observed in highly heterogeneous outcrop samples are reasons to expect that reservoir flow patterns are different from those observed with short core plugs, and better sweep efficiency may be obtained in the field than has been observed in laboratory floods conducted with short core plugs.

  2. CP(N-1) Quantum Field Theories with Alkaline-Earth Atoms in Optical Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Laflamme; W. Evans; M. Dalmonte; U. Gerber; H. Mejía-Díaz; W. Bietenholz; U. -J. Wiese; P. Zoller

    2015-07-24

    We propose a cold atom implementation to attain the continuum limit of (1+1)-d CP(N-1) quantum field theories. These theories share important features with (3+1)-d QCD, such as asymptotic freedom and $\\theta$ vacua. Moreover, their continuum limit can be accessed via the mechanism of dimensional reduction. In our scheme, the CP(N-1) degrees of freedom emerge at low energies from a ladder system of SU(N) quantum spins, where the N spin states are embodied by the nuclear Zeeman states of alkaline-earth atoms, trapped in an optical lattice. Based on Monte Carlo results, we establish that the continuum limit can be demonstrated by an atomic quantum simulation by employing the feature of asymptotic freedom. We discuss a protocol for the adiabatic state preparation of the ground state of the system, the real-time evolution of a false $\\theta$-vacuum state after a quench, and we propose experiments to unravel the phase diagram at non-zero density.

  3. CP(N-1) Quantum Field Theories with Alkaline-Earth Atoms in Optical Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laflamme, C; Dalmonte, M; Gerber, U; Mejía-Díaz, H; Bietenholz, W; Wiese, U -J; Zoller, P

    2015-01-01

    We propose a cold atom implementation to attain the continuum limit of (1+1)-d CP(N-1) quantum field theories. These theories share important features with (3+1)-d QCD, such as asymptotic freedom and $\\theta$ vacua. Moreover, their continuum limit can be accessed via the mechanism of dimensional reduction. In our scheme, the CP(N-1) degrees of freedom emerge at low energies from a ladder system of SU(N) quantum spins, where the N spin states are embodied by the nuclear Zeeman states of alkaline-earth atoms, trapped in an optical lattice. Based on Monte Carlo results, we establish that the continuum limit can be demonstrated by an atomic quantum simulation by employing the feature of asymptotic freedom. We discuss a protocol for the adiabatic state preparation of the ground state of the system, the real-time evolution of a false $\\theta$-vacuum state after a quench, and we propose experiments to unravel the phase diagram at non-zero density.

  4. Measurement of radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonowich, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    We are literally surrounded by radiofrequency (RFR) and microwave radiation, from both natural and man-made sources. The identification and control of man-made sources of RFR has become a high priority of radiation safety professionals in recent years. For the purposes of this paper, we will consider RFR to cover the frequencies from 3 kHz to 300 MHz, and microwaves from 300 MHz to 300 GHz, and will use the term RFR interchangeably to describe both. Electromagnetic radiation and field below 3 kHz is considered Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and will not be discussed in this paper. Unlike x- and gamma radiation, RFR is non-ionizing. The energy of any RFR photon is insufficient to produce ionizations in matter. The measurement and control of RFR hazards is therefore fundamentally different from ionizing radiation. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the reader with the fundamental issues involved in measuring and safely using RFR fields. 23 refs.

  5. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-04-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  6. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-03-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  7. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report for the period of April--June, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitts, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this study of the West Kiehl is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) quantify the effect of chemical slug volume on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) determine the economics of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) forecast the results of injecting an alkaline--surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. This report will document the numerical simulation waterflood, polymer flood, alkaline-surfactant flood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood predictions from the West Kiehl and Prairie Creek South fields.

  9. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Annual technical report, January 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the most advanced application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. A preliminary analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil of 20% of the original stock tank oil in place will be produced above waterflooding. The cost of the incremental oil will be less than $2.50 per incremental barrel. A statistical analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 200 million barrels. This project (1) evaluates the geological deposition environment of West Kiehl and adjacent Minneluse sand reservoirs; (2) compares the production performance results of the best geologic and reservoir performance analogs and select two fields for future study; (3) compares the two best field analogs to the west Kiehl field using numerical simulation; (4) predict results of applying the enhancement technology on two mature Minneluse waterflood analog units using engineering and numerical simulation; (5) predict waterflood and polymer flood performance of the West Kiehl field using numerical simulation.

  10. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    October 2013) Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) The first edition of this report, released in October...

  11. Measuring Magnetic Fields in the Solar Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Wijn, A G

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery by Hale in the early 1900s that sunspots harbor strong magnetic field, magnetism has become increasingly important in our understanding of processes on the Sun and in the Heliosphere. Many current and planned instruments are capable of diagnosing magnetic field in the solar atmosphere. Photospheric magnetometry is now well-established. However, many challenges remain. For instance, the diagnosis of magnetic field in the chromosphere and corona is difficult, and interpretation of measurements is harder still. As a result only very few measurements have been made so far, yet it is clear that if we are to understand the outer solar atmosphere we must study the magnetic field. I will review the history of solar magnetic field measurements, describe and discuss the three types of magnetometry, and close with an outlook on the future.

  12. Lunar magnetic field measurements with a cubesat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrick-Bethell, Ian

    We have developed a mission concept that uses 3-unit cubesats to perform new measurements of lunar magnetic fields, less than 100 meters above the Moon’s surface. The mission calls for sending the cubesats on impact ...

  13. Alkaline Waterflooding Demonstration Project, Ranger Zone, Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Field, California. Fourth annual report, June 1979-May 1980. Volume 3. Appendices II-XVII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    Volume 3 contains Appendices II through XVII: mixing instructions for sodium orthosilicate; oil displacement studies using THUMS C-331 crude oil and extracted reservoir core material from well B-110; clay mineral analysis of B-827-A cores; sieve analysis of 4 Fo sand samples from B-110-IA and 4 Fo sand samples from B-827-A; core record; delayed secondary caustic consumption tests; long-term alkaline consumption in reservoir sands; demulsification study for THUMS Long Beach Company, Island White; operating plans and instructions for DOE injection demonstration project, alkaline injection; caustic pilot-produced water test graphs; well test irregularities (6/1/79-5/31/80); alkaline flood pump changes (6/1/79-5/31/80); monthly DOE pilot chemical waterflood injection reports (preflush injection, alkaline-salt injection, and alkaline injection without salt); and caustic safety procedures-alkaline chemicals.

  14. Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

    2012-12-21

    Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses were used to better understand porosity and permeability trends in the region and to characterize barriers and define flow units. Diagenetic alterations that impact porosity and permeability include development of quartz overgrowths, sutured quartz grains, dissolution of feldspar grains, formation of clay mineral coatings on grains, and calcite cementation. Many of these alterations are controlled by facies. Mapping efforts identified distinct flow units in the northern part of the field showing that the Pennsylvanian Bridgeport consists of a series of thick incised channel fill sequences. The sandstones are about 75-150 feet thick and typically consist of medium grained and poorly sorted fluvial to distributary channel fill deposits at the base. The sandstones become indistinctly bedded distributary channel deposits in the main part of the reservoir before fining upwards and becoming more tidally influenced near their top. These channel deposits have core permeabilities ranging from 20 md to well over 1000 md. The tidally influenced deposits are more compartmentalized compared to the thicker and more continuous basal fluvial deposits. Fine grained sandstones that are laterally equivalent to the thicker channel type deposits have permeabilities rarely reaching above 250 md. Most of the unrecovered oil in Lawrence Field is contained in Pennsylvanian Age Bridgeport sandstones and Mississippian Age Cypress sandstones. These reservoirs are highly complex and compartmentalized. Detailed reservoir characterization including the development of 3-D geologic and geocellular models of target areas in the field were completed to identify areas with the best potential to recover remaining reserves including unswept and by-passed oil. This project consisted of tasks designed to compile, interpret, and analyze the data required to conduct reservoir characterization for the Bridgeport and Cypress sandstones in pilot areas in anticipation of expanded implementation of ASP flooding in Lawrence Field. Geologic and geocellular modeling needed for reservoir characterization and res

  15. Quantum Measurement of Broadband Nonclassical Light Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Grünwald; D. Vasylyev; J. Häggblad; W. Vogel

    2014-11-14

    Based on the measurement of quantum correlation functions, the quantum statistical properties of spectral measurements are studied for broadband radiation fields. The spectral filtering of light before its detection is compared with the direct detection followed by the spectral analysis of the recorded photocurrents. As an example, the squeezing spectra of the atomic resonance fluorescence are studied for both types of filtering procedures. The conditions for which the detection of the nonclassical signatures of the radiation is possible are analyzed. For the considered example, photocurrent filtering appears to be the superior option to detect nonclassicality, due to the vacuum-noise effects in the optical filtering.

  16. Polarization bispectrum for measuring primordial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke, E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ''G. Galilei'', Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    We examine the potential of polarization bispectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to constrain primordial magnetic fields (PMFs). We compute all possible bispectra between temperature and polarization anisotropies sourced by PMFs and show that they are weakly correlated with well-known local-type and secondary ISW-lensing bispectra. From a Fisher analysis it is found that, owing to E-mode bispectra, in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment the expected uncertainty in the amplitude of magnetized bispectra is 80% improved in comparison with an analysis in terms of temperature auto-bispectrum alone. In the Planck or the proposed PRISM experiment cases, we will be able to measure PMFs with strength 2.6 or 2.2 nG. PMFs also generate bispectra involving B-mode polarization, due to tensor-mode dependence. We also find that the B-mode bispectrum can reduce the uncertainty more drastically and hence PMFs comparable to or less than 1 nG may be measured in a PRISM-like experiment.

  17. CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS THROUGH GYRORESONANCE EMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    . The spiralling motion of electrons in the 200­ 2000 G fields in the solar corona produces sufficient opacity to render the corona optically thick, making it easy to recognize such sources in microwave images from. Keywords: Sun, solar corona, solar magnetic fields, solar radio emission Introduction Since the realization

  18. Field Emission Measurements from Niobium Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. BastaniNejad, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, S. Covert, J. Hansknecht, C. Hernandez-Garcia, R. Mammei, M. Poelker

    2011-03-01

    Increasing the operating voltage of a DC high voltage photogun serves to minimize space charge induced emittance growth and thereby preserve electron beam brightness, however, field emission from the photogun cathode electrode can pose significant problems: constant low level field emission degrades vacuum via electron stimulated desorption which in turn reduces photocathode yield through chemical poisoning and/or ion bombardment and high levels of field emission can damage the ceramic insulator. Niobium electrodes (single crystal, large grain and fine grain) were characterized using a DC high voltage field emission test stand at maximum voltage -225kV and electric field gradient > 10MV/m. Niobium electrodes appear to be superior to diamond-paste polished stainless steel electrodes.

  19. Alkalinity tolerance of peach rootstocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Yan

    1992-01-01

    be substituted for chlorophyll analyses in the alkalinity tolerance evaluation in sorghum, soybeans and citrus (DeCianzio et al. , 1979; Mckenzie et al. , 1984; Sudahono, 1991). Active Fe, a form of Fe effective in chlorophyll formation, is proportional... 1992 ABSTRACT Alkalinity Tolerance of Peach Rootstocks. (May 1992) Yan Shi, B. S. , Fujian Agricultural College Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. David H. Byrne Peaches suffer from Fe chlorosis when grown in alkaline soils. A range of alkalinity...

  20. Magnetic field measurements via visible spectroscopy on the Z machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, M. R., E-mail: mrgomez@sandia.gov; Hansen, S. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Carlson, A. L.; Lamppa, D. C.; Rochau, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Schroen, D. G. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Sandia's Z Machine uses its high current to magnetically implode targets relevant to inertial confinement fusion. Since target performance is highly dependent on the applied drive field, measuring magnetic field at the target is essential for accurate simulations. Recently, the magnetic field at the target was measured through splitting of the sodium 3s-3p doublet at 5890 and 5896 Å. Spectroscopic dopants were applied to the exterior of the target, and spectral lines were observed in absorption. Magnetic fields in excess of 200 T were measured, corresponding to drive currents of approximately 5 MA early in the pulse.

  1. Molecular-scale measurements of electric fields at electrochemical interfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, Carl C.; Farrow, Roger L.

    2011-01-01

    Spatially resolved measurements of electric fields at electrochemical interfaces would be a critical step toward further understanding and modeling the detailed structure of electric double layers. The goal of this project was to perform proof-of-principle experiments to demonstrate the use of field-sensitive dyes for optical measurements of fields in electrochemical systems. A confocal microscope was developed that provides sensitive detection of the lifetime and high resolution spectra of excited fluorescence for dyes tethered to electrically conductive surfaces. Excited state lifetimes for the dyes were measured and found to be relatively unquenched when linked to indium tin oxide, but strongly quenched on gold surfaces. However, our fluorescence detection is sufficiently sensitive to measure spectra of submonolayer dye coatings even when the fluorescence was strongly quenched. Further work to create dye labeled interfaces on flat, uniform and durable substrates is necessary to make electric field measurements at interfaces using field sensitive dyes.

  2. Magic wavelengths in the alkaline earth ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B K

    2015-01-01

    We present magic wavelengths for the $nS$ - $nP_{1/2,3/2}$ and $nS$ - $mD_{3/2,5/2}$ transitions, with the respective ground and first excited $D$ states principal quantum numbers $n$ and $m$, in the Mg$^+$, Ca$^+$, Sr$^+$ and Ba$^+$ alkaline earth ions for linearly polarized lights by plotting dynamic polarizatbilities of the $nS$, $nP_{1/2,3/2}$ and $mD_{3/2,5/2}$ states of the ions. These dynamic polarizabilities are evaluated by employing a relativistic all-order perturbative method and their accuracies are ratified by comparing their static values with the available high precision experimental or other theoretical results. Moreover, some of the magic wavelengths identified by us in Ca$^+$ concurs with the recent measurements reported in [{\\bf Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 223001 (2015)}]. Knowledge of these magic wavelengths are propitious to carry out many proposed high precision measurements trapping the above ions in the electric fields with the corresponding frequencies.

  3. Measuring Oscillatory Velocity Fields Due to Swimming Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guasto, Jeffrey S; Gollub, J P

    2010-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video, we present the first time-resolved measurements of the oscillatory velocity field induced by swimming unicellular microorganisms. Confinement of the green alga C. reinhardtii in stabilized thin liquid films allows simultaneous tracking of cells and tracer particles. The measured velocity field reveals complex time-dependent flow structures, and scales inversely with distance. The instantaneous mechanical power generated by the cells is measured from the velocity fields and peaks at 15 fW. The dissipation per cycle is more than four times what steady swimming would require.

  4. Measuring Helical FCG Voltage with an Electric Field Antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, A D; Anderson, R A; Javedani, J B; Reisman, D B; Goerz, D A; Ferriera, A J; Speer, R D

    2011-08-01

    A method of measuring the voltage produced by a helical explosive flux compression generator using a remote electric field antenna is described in detail. The diagnostic has been successfully implemented on several experiments. Measured data from the diagnostic compare favorably with voltages predicted using the code CAGEN, validating our predictive modeling tools. The measured data is important to understanding generator performance, and is measured with a low-risk, minimally intrusive approach.

  5. VEHICLE EMISSIONS AND TRAFFIC MEASURES: EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    VEHICLE EMISSIONS AND TRAFFIC MEASURES: EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF FIELD OBSERVATIONS AT SIGNALIZED between vehicle emissions and traffic control measures is an important step toward reducing the potential roadway design and traffic control, have the ability to reduce vehicle emissions. However, current vehicle

  6. Field quality measurements of a 2-Tesla transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velev, G.V.; Foster, W.; Kashikhin, V.; Mazur, P.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Wake, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    A prototype 2-Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet for future hadron colliders was designed, built and tested at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, combined-function gradient-dipole magnet has a vertical pole aperture of 20 mm. To measure the magnetic field quality in such a small magnet aperture, a specialized rotating coil of 15.2 mm diameter, 0.69 m long was fabricated. Using this probe, a program of magnetic field quality measurements was successfully performed. Results of the measurements are presented and discussed.

  7. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ki Ha (Lafayette, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A simple and compact method and apparatus for detecting high frequency electric fields, particularly in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 100 MHz, uses a compact toroidal antenna. For typical geophysical applications the sensor will be used to detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from about 1 MHz, in particular in the frequency range between 1 to 100 MHz, to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Time-varying magnetic fields associated with time-varying electric fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroidal coil. The electric field at the center of (and perpendicular to the plane of) the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroidal coil one can easily and accurately determine the electric field.

  8. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Kaushik, Sumanth (Cambridge, MA)

    1999-01-01

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations.

  9. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stallard, B.R.; Kaushik, S.

    1999-05-18

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below is disclosed. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations. 8 figs.

  10. Post measurement bipartite entanglement entropy in conformal field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Rajabpour

    2015-08-06

    We derive exact formulas for bipartite von Neumann entanglement entropy after partial projective local measurement in $1+1$ dimensional conformal field theories with periodic and open boundary conditions. After defining the set up we will check numerically the validity of our results in the case of Klein-Gordon field theory (coupled harmonic oscillators) and spin-$1/2$ XX chain in a magnetic field. The agreement between analytical results and the numerical calculations is very good. We also find a lower bound for localizable entanglement in coupled harmonic oscillators.

  11. Estimating of pulsed electric fields using optical measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, Timothy McGuire; Chantler, Gary R.

    2013-09-01

    We performed optical electric field measurements ion nanosecond time scales using the electrooptic crystal beta barium borate (BBO). Tests were based on a preliminary bench top design intended to be a proofofprinciple stepping stone towards a modulardesign optical Efield diagnostic that has no metal in the interrogated environment. The long term goal is to field a modular version of the diagnostic in experiments on large scale xray source facilities, or similarly harsh environments.

  12. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-07-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

  13. Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13

    A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

  14. Measurement of Gravitomagnetic and Acceleration Fields Around Rotating Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tajmar; F. Plesescu; B. Seifert; K. Marhold

    2006-10-17

    It is well known that a rotating superconductor produces a magnetic field proportional to its angular velocity. The authors conjectured earlier, that in addition to this so-called London moment, also a large gravitomagnetic field should appear to explain an apparent mass increase of Niobium Cooper-pairs. A similar field is predicted from Einstein's general relativity theory and the presently observed amount of dark energy in the universe. An experimental facility was designed and built to measure small acceleration fields as well as gravitomagnetic fields in the vicinity of a fast rotating and accelerating superconductor in order to detect this so-called gravitomagnetic London moment. This paper summarizes the efforts and results that have been obtained so far. Measurements with Niobium superconductors indeed show first signs which appear to be within a factor of 2 of our theoretical prediction. Possible error sources as well as the experimental difficulties are reviewed and discussed. If the gravitomagnetic London moment indeed exists, acceleration fields could be produced in a laboratory environment.

  15. Development of conductometric biosensors based on alkaline phosphatases for the water quality control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berezhetskyy, A

    2008-01-01

    Researches are focused on the elaboration of enzymatic microconductometric device for heavy metal ions detection in water solutions. The manuscript includes a general introduction, the first chapter contains bibliographic review, the second chapter described the fundamentals of conductometric transducers, the third chapter examining the possibility to create and to optimize conductometric biosensor based on bovine alkaline phosphatase for heavy metals ions detection, the fourth chapter devoted to creation and optimization of conductometric biosensor based on alkaline phosphatase active microalgae and sol gel technology, the last chapter described application of the proposed algal biosensor for measurements of heavy metal ions toxicity of waste water, general conclusions stating the progresses achieved in the field of environmental monitoring

  16. Utilizing Nitrogen Vacancy Centers to measure oscillating magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Zaman Chaudhry

    2014-04-11

    We show how nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers can be used to determine the amplitude, phase and frequency of unknown weak monochromatic and multichromatic oscillating magnetic fields using only the periodic dynamical decoupling (PDD) and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequences. The effect of decoherence on the measurement of the magnetic field parameters is explicitly analyzed, and we take into account the fact that different pulse sequences suppress decoherence to different extents. Since the sensitivity increases with increasing sensing time while it decreases due to decoherence, we use the Fisher information matrix in order to optimize the number of pulses that should be used.

  17. Measuring the Earth's gravity field with cold atom interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Carraz; Christian Siemes; Luca Massotti; Roger Haagmans; Pierluigi Silvestrin

    2015-06-12

    The scope of the paper is to propose different concepts for future space gravity missions using Cold Atom Interferometers (CAI) for measuring the diagonal elements of the gravity gradient tensor, the spacecraft angular velocity and the spacecraft acceleration. The aim is to achieve better performance than previous space gravity missions due to a very low white noise spectral behaviour of the CAI instrument and a very high common mode rejection, with the ultimate goals of determining the fine structures of the gravity field with higher accuracy than GOCE and detecting time-variable signals in the gravity field.

  18. Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

  19. Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Flow Field Measurement Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, H.; Dentz, J.; Doty, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

  20. Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Field Measurement Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Hugh; Dentz, Jordan; Doty, Chris

    2013-07-01

    The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

  1. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the author describes an innovative method of measuring high-frequency electric fields using a toroid. For typical geophysical applications the new sensor will detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from 1.0 MHz. This window, in particular the lower frequency range between 1.0 to 100 MHz, has not been used for existing electromagnetic or radar systems to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) can be used successfully in this depth range if the ground is resistive but most soils are, in fact, conductive (0.01 to 1.0 S/m) rendering GPR inefficient. Other factors controlling the resolution of GPR system for small objects is the spatial averaging inherent in the electric dipole antenna and the scattering caused by soil inhomogeneities of dimensions comparable to the wavelength (and antenna size). For maximum resolution it is desirable to use the highest frequencies but the scattering is large and target identification is poor. Time-varying magnetic fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroid. The electric field at the center of the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroid one can easily and accurately determine the electric field. The new sensor will greatly simplify the cumbersome procedure involved with GPR measurements with its center frequency less than 100 MHz. The overall size of the toroidal sensor can be as small as a few inches. It is this size advantage that will not only allow easy fabrication and deployment of multi-component devices either on the surface or in a borehole, but it will render greatly improved resolution over conventional systems.

  2. The IMCA: A field instrument for uranium enrichment measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, G.H.; Koskelo, M.; Moeslinger, M.; Mayer, R.L. II; McGinnis, B.R.; Wishard, B.

    1996-12-31

    The IMCA (Inspection Multi-Channel Analyzer) is a portable gamma-ray spectrometer designed to measure the enrichment of uranium either in a laboratory or in the field. The IMCA consists of a Canberra InSpector Multi-Channel Analyzer, sodium iodide or a planar germanium detector, and special application software. The system possesses a high degree of automation. The IMCA uses the uranium enrichment meter principle, and is designed to meet the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) requirements for the verification of enriched uranium materials. The IMCA is available with MGA plutonium isotopic analysis software or MGAU uranium analysis software as well. In this paper, the authors present a detailed description of the hardware and software of the IMCA system, as well as results from preliminary measurements testing compliance of IMCA with IAEA requirements using uranium standards and UF6 cylinders. Measurements performed on UF6 cylinders in the field under variable environmental conditions (temperatures ranging from 0 to 35 C) have shown that good results can be achieved. The enrichment of UF6 contained in the cylinder is determined by using calibration constants generated from an instrument calibration, using traceable uranium oxide standards, performed in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. The IMCA software is designed to make the necessary matrix and container corrections to ensure that accurate results are achieved in the field.

  3. Definition: A measurement of hydrogen ion concentration (H+) in liquids and other substances. The amount of H+ can determine whether the substance is acidic or basic (alkaline).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    Definition: A measurement of hydrogen ion concentration (H+) in liquids and other substances contains both H+ (hydrogen) and OH- (hydroxyl) ions. Pure distilled water has an equal number of hydrogen and hydroxyl ions.making the water neutral (pH of 7) More hydrogen than hydroxyl ions results in a acidic

  4. Real-time measurement of radon activity and mixed radiation fields characterization with silicon pixel detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severino, Clizia Tecla; Silari, Marco

    Real-time measurement of radon activity and mixed radiation fields characterization with silicon pixel detector

  5. A Geometric Formulation of Higgs Effective Field Theory: Measuring the Curvature of Scalar Field Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Alonso; Elizabeth E. Jenkins; Aneesh V. Manohar

    2015-11-02

    A geometric formulation of Higgs Effective Field Theory (HEFT) is presented. Experimental observables are given in terms of geometric invariants of the scalar sigma model sector such as the curvature of the scalar field manifold $\\mathcal M$. We show how the curvature can be measured experimentally via Higgs cross-sections, $W_L$ scattering, and the $S$ parameter. The one-loop action of HEFT is given in terms of geometric invariants of $\\mathcal M$. The distinction between the Standard Model (SM) and HEFT is whether $\\mathcal M$ is flat or curved, not whether the scalars transform linearly or non-linearly under the electroweak group.

  6. Laboratory measurements on reservoir rocks from The Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boitnott, G.N.

    1995-01-26

    A suite of laboratory measurements have been conducted on Geysers metagraywacke and metashale recovered from a drilled depth of 2599 to 2602 meters in NEGU-17. The tests have been designed to constrain the mechanical and water-storage properties of the matrix material. Various measurements have been made at a variety of pressures and at varying degrees of saturation. Both compressional and shear velocities exhibit relatively little change with effective confining pressure. In all of the samples, water saturation causes an increase in the compressional velocity. In some samples, saturation results in a moderate decrease in shear velocity greater in magnitude than would be expected based on the slight increase in bulk density. It is found that the effect of saturation on the velocities can be quantitatively modeled through a modification of Biot-Gassmann theory to include weakening of the shear modulus with saturation. The decrease is attributed to chemo-mechanical weakening caused by the presence of water. The degree of frame weakening of the shear modulus is variable between samples, and appears correlated with petrographic features of the cores. Two related models are presented through which we can study the importance of saturation effects on field-scale velocity variations. The model results indicate that the saturation effects within the matrix are significant and may contribute to previously observed field anomalies. The results help to define ways in which we may be able to separate the effects of variations in rock properties, caused by phenomena such as degree of fracturing, from similar effects caused by variations in matrix saturation. The need for both compressional and shear velocity data in order to interpret field anomalies is illustrated through comparisons of model results with the field observations.

  7. System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Blue Springs, MO)

    2006-08-15

    A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

  8. Probe measurements of the three-dimensional magnetic field structure in a rotating magnetic field sustained field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velas, K. M. [William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Box 352250, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 (United States)] [William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Box 352250, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 (United States); Milroy, R. D. [Plasma Science and Innovation-Center, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Box 352250, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Innovation-Center, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Box 352250, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    A translatable three-axis probe was constructed and installed on the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) experiment. With ninety windings, the probe can simultaneously measure B{sub r}, B{sub ?}, and B{sub z} at 30 radial positions, and can be placed at any desired axial position within the field reversed configuration (FRC) confinement chamber. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Measurements were made for odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMF) antennas and even-parity RMF. The steady state data from applying a 10?kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Comparisons will be made to the 3D magnetic structure predicted by NIMROD simulations, with parameters adjusted to match that of the TCSU experiments. The probe provides sufficient data to utilize a Maxwell stress tensor approach to directly measure the torque applied to the FRC's electrons, which combined with a resistive torque model, yields an estimate of the average FRC resistivity.

  9. Warm Magnetic Field Measurements of LARP HQ Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caspi, S; Cheng, D; Deitderich, D; Felice, H; Ferracin, P; Hafalia, R; Joseph, J; Lizarazo, J; Martchevskii, M; Nash, C; Sabbi, G L; Vu, C; Schmalzle, J; Ambrosio, G; Bossert, R; Chlachidze, G; DiMarco, J; Kashikhin, V

    2011-03-28

    The US-LHC Accelerator Research Program is developing and testing a high-gradient quadrupole (HQ) magnet, aiming at demonstrating the feasibility of Nb{sub 3}Sn technologies for the LHC luminosity upgrade. The 1 m long HQ magnet has a 120 mm bore with a conductor-limited gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a peak field of 15 T. HQ includes accelerator features such as alignment and field quality. Here we present the magnetic measurement results obtained at LBNL with a constant current of 30 A. A 100 mm long circuit-board rotating coil developed by FNAL was used and the induced voltage and flux increment were acquired. The measured b{sub 6} ranges from 0.3 to 0.5 units in the magnet straight section at a reference radius of 21.55 mm. The data reduced from the numerical integration of the raw voltage agree with those from the fast digital integrators.

  10. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  11. Debye size microprobes for electric field measurements in laboratory plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pribyl, P.; Gekelman, W.; Nakamoto, M.; Lawrence, E.; Chiang, F.; Stillman, J.; Judy, J.; Katz, N.; Kintner, P.; Niknejadi, P. [Department of Physics Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, MIT, Cambridge, Massachussetts (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cal Poly, Pomona, California 91768 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the development of a host of tiny machines and sensors over the past decade. Plasma physics is in great need of small detectors for several reasons. First of all, very small detectors do not disturb a plasma, and secondly some detectors can only work because they are very small. We report on the first of a series of small (sub-Debye length) probes for laboratory plasmas undertaken at the basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA. The goal of the work is to develop robust and sensitive diagnostic probes that can survive in a plasma. The probes must have electronics packages in close proximity. We report on the construction and testing of probes that measure the electric field.

  12. Calculation methods and detection techniques for electric and magnetic fields from power lines with measurement verification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamishev, Alexander V

    1994-01-01

    An accurate determination and characterization of electric and magnetic fields produced by power lines is a complex task. Different models must be used for far fields and for near fields. This study is centered on computation and measurement aspects...

  13. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

  14. Magnetic-field sensing coil embedded in ceramic for measuring ambient magnetic field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Hironori

    2004-02-10

    A magnetic pick-up coil for measuring magnetic field with high specific sensitivity, optionally with an electrostatic shield (24), having coupling elements (22) with high winding packing ratio, oriented in multiple directions, and embedded in ceramic material for structural support and electrical insulation. Elements of the coil are constructed from green ceramic sheets (200) and metallic ink deposited on surfaces and in via holes of the ceramic sheets. The ceramic sheets and the metallic ink are co-fired to create a monolithic hard ceramic body (20) with metallized traces embedded in, and placed on exterior surfaces of, the hard ceramic body. The compact and rugged coil can be used in a variety of environments, including hostile conditions involving ultra-high vacuum, high temperatures, nuclear and optical radiation, chemical reactions, and physically demanding surroundings, occurring either individually or in combinations.

  15. Quantitative estimates of magnetic field reconnection properties from electric and magnetic field measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Quantitative estimates of magnetic field reconnection properties from electric and magnetic field there are positive electric field components tangential to the magnetopause and a magnetic field component normal to it. Because these three components are the smallest of the six electric and magnetic fields

  16. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-pol

  17. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  18. Electron Heat Transport Measured in a Stochastic Magnetic Field T. M. Biewer,* C. B. Forest,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biewer, Theodore

    Electron Heat Transport Measured in a Stochastic Magnetic Field T. M. Biewer,* C. B. Forest, J. K where magnetic islands overlap and field lines are stochastic. The measurements show that (1 are small, the magnetic field lines break into chains of magnetic islands at mode-rational sur- faces where

  19. Lightning-Driven Electric and Magnetic Fields Measured in the Stratosphere: Implications for Sprites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    Lightning-Driven Electric and Magnetic Fields Measured in the Stratosphere: Implications-Driven Electric and Magnetic Fields Measured in the Stratosphere: Implications for Sprites Jeremy Norman Thomas et al., 2004b], in which the lightning-driven electric and magnetic field changes were rare, while

  20. Development of alkaline zinc/ferricyanide battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollandsworth, R.P.; Adams, G.B.; Webber, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    The zinc/ferro-ferricyanide battery system is intended for utility load leveling and solar photovoltaic/wind applications with advantages of high cyclic efficiency, high cell voltage, near-ambient temperature operation, flowing alkaline electrolyte, low toxicity, potentially long cycle life and low projected capital costs. The system demonstrates excellent electrochemical performance. Cell voltages are 1.88 V OCV and 1.61 V discharge at 35 mA/cm/sup 2/ or 57 mW/cm/sup 2/ in 2N NaOH at 40/sup 0/C (Nafion N-125 separator). Cell polarization losses are almost entirely resistive, and, within the separator. Over 800 4-h cycles have been demonstrated in cell of 60-cm/sup 2/ nominal area (70 ma.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity) with mean energy efficiency of 76.6 +- 2.1%. Similarly, a 60-cm/sup 2/ cell has demonstrated over 220, 11 to 17 hour cycles (255 +- 48 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity) with a mean energy efficiency of 75.3+-5.1%. Solar acceptability has been demonstrated with random cycling without zinc strip cycles and with typical switching times of less than 5 ms for switching from load to insolation or vice versa. The self-discharge rate has been measured at 1.6%/day. Criteria for separator selection have been established and compatibility with alkaline ferricyanide has been found to be the factor determining membrane life with resistance and electrolyte transference rate, as secondary factors.

  1. LiveLab: Measuring Wireless Networks and Smartphone Users in the Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    1 LiveLab: Measuring Wireless Networks and Smartphone Users in the Field Clayton Shepard*, Ahmad and wireless networks with a reprogrammable in- device logger designed for long-term user studies. We discuss to measure smartphone users in the field and to measure wireless networks with smartphone users. The key

  2. Internal field, density & temperature measurements in MTF plasmas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temperature measurements in MTF plasmas using Pulsed Polarimetry final report Authors: Smith, Roger J. Publication Date: 2014-08-11 OSTI Identifier: 1149491 Report Number(s): 001...

  3. Measurements of electric and magnetic fields in the Waianae, Hawaii area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantiply, E.D.

    1992-07-01

    During November 27--30, 1990, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a measurement survey of electric and magnetic field levels along the southwest coast of Oahu, Hawaii. These measurements were requested by the State of Hawaii to determine the levels of radiofrequency (RF) electric and magnetic fields near Naval radio transmitters at Lualualei. The objective was to determine maximum fields in residential areas. This report documents the measurement results. Also, a few measurements were made of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields at 60 hertz, the frequency used for electrical power.

  4. Large-Scale Hybrid Dynamic Simulation Employing Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Guttromson, Ross T.; Hauer, John F.

    2004-06-30

    Simulation and measurements are two primary ways for power engineers to gain understanding of system behaviors and thus accomplish tasks in system planning and operation. Many well-developed simulation tools are available in today's market. On the other hand, large amount of measured data can be obtained from traditional SCADA systems and currently fast growing phasor networks. However, simulation and measurement are still two separate worlds. There is a need to combine the advantages of simulation and measurements. In view of this, this paper proposes the concept of hybrid dynamic simulation which opens up traditional simulation by providing entries for measurements. A method is presented to implement hybrid simulation with PSLF/PSDS. Test studies show the validity of the proposed hybrid simulation method. Applications of such hybrid simulation include system event playback, model validation, and software validation.

  5. Field comparison of the point velocity probe with other groundwater velocity measurement methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labaky, W.; Devlin, John F.; Gillham, R. W.

    2009-03-14

    Field testing of a new tool for measuring groundwater velocities at the centimeter scale, the point velocity probe (PVP), was undertaken at Canadian Forces Base, Borden, Ontario, Canada. The measurements were performed in a sheet pile...

  6. Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

    1982-09-01

    An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

  7. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  8. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  9. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  10. LiveLab: Measuring Wireless Networks and Smartphone Users in the Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    LiveLab: Measuring Wireless Networks and Smartphone Users in the Field Clayton Shepard*, Ahmad and wireless networks with a reprogrammable in- device logger designed for long-term user studies. We discuss of smartphone usage and measurement of wireless networks x In-field programmability of the logger so

  11. Stellar magnetic field measurements Zeeman-Doppler imaging and magnetic-flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cool stars and solar-like stars Instrumentation The most successful spectrographs field measurements of the Herbig Ae stars HD 101412 (left panel) and HD 150193 (right panel) (FORS 2). Left panel: Phase diagram and residuals for the longitudinal magnetic field measurements of the Cephei

  12. Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image of Mathematics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, 4 Elekta Oy, Helsinki, Finland Abstract Ultra-low. (2013) Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image

  13. The measurement and analysis of the magnetic field of a synchrotron light source magnet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graf, Udo Werner

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis a unique system is used to measure the magnetic field of a superconducting synchrotron light source magnet. The magnet measured is a superferric dipole C-magnet designed to produce a magnetic field up to 3 Tesla in magnitude. Its...

  14. Toward magnetic field dissipation during the 23 July 2002 solar flare measured with Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zharkova, Valentina V.

    Toward magnetic field dissipation during the 23 July 2002 solar flare measured with Solar. Benkhalil (2005), Toward magnetic field dissipation during the 23 July 2002 solar flare measured with Solar] It is widely accepted that the source of primary energy release in solar flares is associated with magnetic

  15. Field measurements and analyses of electrokinetic seismoelectric signals generated in sedimentary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Brent

    these aquifers and aquitards amenable to seismoelectric investigation. The results of vertical profiling to confirm that the co-seismic fields predicted by a quasi-static model are consistent with field measurements. The amplitudes of the co-seismic field are influenced by the resistivity and porosity

  16. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-04-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

  17. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, Stephen R. (Berthoud, CO); Adney, William S. (Golden, CO); Vinzant, Todd B. (Golden, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO)

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  18. Exploring the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars: II. New magnetic field measurements in cluster and field stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Ilyin, I; Kharchenko, N V; Oskinova, L M; Langer, N; Gonzalez, J F; Kholtygin, A F; Briquet, M

    2013-01-01

    Theories on the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars remain poorly developed, because the properties of their magnetic field as function of stellar parameters could not yet be investigated. To investigate whether magnetic fields in massive stars are ubiquitous or appear only in stars with a specific spectral classification, certain ages, or in a special environment, we acquired 67 new spectropolarimetric observations for 30 massive stars. Among the observed sample, roughly one third of the stars are probable members of clusters at different ages, whereas the remaining stars are field stars not known to belong to any cluster or association. Spectropolarimetric observations were obtained during four different nights using the low-resolution spectropolarimetric mode of FORS2 (FOcal Reducer low dispersion Spectrograph) mounted on the 8-m Antu telescope of the VLT. Furthermore, we present a number of follow-up observations carried out with the high-resolution spectropolarimeters SOFIN mounted at the Nordic O...

  19. Idaho field experiment 1981. Volume 2: measurement data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Start, G E; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Cate, J H; Hukari, N F; Dickson, C R

    1984-04-01

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeastern Idaho over the upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24km square. Also, a single total integrated sample of about 30 hours duration was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72km square (using 6km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were collected. Volume II lists the data in tabular form or cites the special supplemental reports by other participating contractors. While the primary user file and the data archive are maintained on 9 track/1600 cpi magnetic tapes, listings of the individual values are provided for the user who either cannot utilize the tapes or wishes to preview the data. The accuracies and quality of these data are described.

  20. A baculovirus alkaline nuclease knockout construct produces fragmented DNA and aberrant capsids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okano, Kazuhiro [Department of Microbiology, Nash Hall Room 220, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3804 (United States); Vanarsdall, Adam L. [Department of Microbiology, Nash Hall Room 220, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3804 (United States); Rohrmann, George F. [Department of Microbiology, Nash Hall Room 220, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3804 (United States)]. E-mail: rohrmanng@orst.edu

    2007-03-01

    DNA replication of bacmid-derived constructs of the Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was analyzed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) in combination with digestion at a unique Eco81I restriction enzyme site. Three constructs were characterized: a parental bacmid, a bacmid deleted for the alkaline nuclease gene, and a bacmid from which the gp64 gene had been deleted. The latter was employed as a control for comparison with the alkaline nuclease knockout because neither yields infectious virus and their replication is limited to the initially transfected cells. The major difference between DNA replicated by the different constructs was the presence in the alkaline nuclease knockout of high concentrations of relatively small, subgenome length DNA in preparations not treated with Eco81I. Furthermore, upon Eco81I digestion, the alkaline nuclease knockout bacmid also yielded substantially more subgenome size DNA than the other constructs. Electron microscopic examination of cells transfected with the alkaline nuclease knockout indicated that, in addition to a limited number of normal-appearing electron-dense nucleocapsids, numerous aberrant capsid-like structures were observed indicating a defect in nucleocapsid maturation or in a DNA processing step that is necessary for encapsidation. Because of the documented role of the baculovirus alkaline nuclease and its homologs from other viruses in homologous recombination, these data suggest that DNA recombination may play a major role in the production of baculovirus genomes.

  1. EMF Rapid Program Engineering Projects, Project 1, Development of Recommendations for Guidelines for Field Source Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The goal of this project is to develop a protocol for measuring the electric and magnetic fields around sources. Data from these measurements may help direct future biological effects research by better defining the complexity of magnetic and electric fields to which humanity is exposed, as well asprovide the basis for rigorous field exposure analysis and risk assessment once the relationship between field exposure and biological response. is better understood. The data base also should have sufficient spatial and temporal characteristics to guide electric and magnetic field management. The goal of Task A is to construct a set of characteristics that would be ideal to have for guiding and interpreting biological studies and for focusing any future effort at field management. This ideal set will then be quantified and reduced according to the availability (or possible development of) instrumentation to measure the desired characteristics. Factors that also will be used to define pragmatic data sets will be the cost of collecting the data, the cost of developing an adequate data base, and the needed precision in measuring specific characteristics. A field, electric or magnetic, will always be ,some function of time and space. The first step in this section of the protocol development will be to determine what span of time and what portion of space are required to quantify the electric and magnetic fields around sources such as appliances and electrical apparatus. Constraints on time will be set by examining measurement limitations and biological data requirements.

  2. Experimental Measurement of the Flow Field of Heavy Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Browand; Charles Radovich

    2005-05-31

    Flat flaps that enclose the trailer base on the sides and top are known to reduce truck drag and reduce fuel consumption. Such flapped-truck geometries have been studied in laboratory wind tunnels and in field tests. A recent review of wind tunnel data for a variety of truck geometries and flow Reynolds numbers show roughly similar values of peak drag reduction, but differ in the determination of the optimum flap angle. Optimum angles lie in the range 12 degrees-20 degrees, and may be sensitive to Reynolds number and truck geometry. The present field test is undertaken to provide additional estimates of the magnitude of the savings to be expected on a typical truck for five flap angles 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 degrees. The flaps are constructed from a fiberglass-epoxy-matrix material and are one-quarter of the base width in length (about 61 cm, or 2 feet). They are attached along the rear door hinge lines on either side of the trailer, so that no gap appears at the joint between the flap and the side of the trailer The flap angle is adjusted by means of two aluminum supports. The present test is performed on the NASA Crows Landing Flight Facility at the northern end of the San Joaquin valley in California. The main runway is approximately 2400 meters in length, and is aligned approximately in a north-south direction The test procedure is to make a series of runs starting at either end of the runway. All runs are initiated under computer control to accelerate the truck to a target speed of 60 mph (96 6 km/hr), to proceed at the target speed for a fixed distance, and to decelerate at the far end of the runway. During a run, the broadcast fuel rate, the engine rpm, forward speed, elapsed time--as well as several other parameters (10 in all)--are digitized at a rate of 100 digitizations per second. Various flapped-conditions are interspersed with the ''no flaps'' control, and are sequenced in a different order on different days. Approximately 310 runs are accumulated over the 5-day test period, May 17-21, 2004. The runway slopes rather uniformly upward from north-to-south. Over the distance of 2424 meters between our two ''start'' markers at either end of the runway, the net change in elevation is a little over ten meters. Test results clearly show the greater fuel consumption required to lift the truck against gravity in the southbound direction For this reason, it is important that the tests be averaged over a round trip circuit--that is, a run in both directions over the identical portion of the roadway. Northbound-southbound averages require an overlap segment of the runway (near the middle of the runway) where the truck--starting from either end--has achieved its target speed. For the target truck speed of 60 mph, this overlap region is approximately 700 meters in length. Typically a run and the return run are accomplished within a time interval of 6 minutes. Analysis of the data show fuel consumption savings at all flap angle settings tested, when compared to the ''no flaps'' condition. The most beneficial flap angle appears to be 13 degrees, for which the fuel consumption is 0.3778 {+-} 0.0025 liters/km compared to the ''no flaps'' control of 0.3941 {+-} 0.0034 liters/km. The error bounds expressed above mark the 99% confidence interval in the mean values given. That is, additional estimates of the mean fuel consumption would be expected to lie within the bounds given, approximately 99% of the time. The fuel consumption saving is--to reasonable accuracy--about 1.63 liters/100 kilometers. These savings represent the increment associated only with the change in drag due to the presence or absence of flaps. The result will hold for any truck of similar size and shape and engine performance regardless of the loading of the truck or the rolling resistance. The economy achieved by use of base flaps can be compared to the economy resulting from driving two trucks in a tandem configuration. In December 2003, such fuel consumption tests were performed at the same Crows Landing testsite. In the tests, two identical trucks are ope

  3. Measuring the effects of online advertising on human behavior using natural and field experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Randall A. (Randall Aaron)

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the effects of online advertising on human behavior: clicks, new-account sign-ups, and retail sales. Five chapters cover natural and field experiments used to measure these effects for both display ...

  4. Measurement of the drift field in the ARGONTUBE LAr TPC with 266~nm pulsed laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ereditato; D. Goeldi; S. Janos; I. Kreslo; M. Luethi; C. Rudolf von Rohr; M. Schenk; T. Strauss; M. S. Weber; M. Zeller

    2014-10-30

    ARGONTUBE is a liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr TPC) with a drift field generated in-situ by a Greinacher voltage multiplier circuit. We present results on the measurement of the drift-field distribution inside ARGONTUBE using straight ionization tracks generated by an intense UV laser beam. Our analysis is based on a simplified model of the charging of a multi-stage Greinacher circuit to describe the voltages on the field cage rings.

  5. A COMPARISON OF LABORATORY AND FIELD-TEST MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;A COMPARISON OF LABORATORY AND FIELD-TEST MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS William P a heat pump water heater (HPWH). After developing the HPWH, a field-test plan was implemented whereby 20 estimates were that a heat pump water heater (HPWH) could save from 50 to 70% of the energy used

  6. Electric field measurement in microwave discharge ion thruster with electro-optic probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ise, Toshiyuki; Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki [The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Togo, Hiroyoshi [Microsystem Integration Laboratories, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone, Morinosato, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Kuninaka, Hitoshi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    In order to understand the internal phenomena in a microwave discharge ion thruster, it is important to measure the distribution of the microwave electric field inside the discharge chamber, which is directly related to the plasma production. In this study, we proposed a novel method of measuring a microwave electric field with an electro-optic (EO) probe based on the Pockels effect. The probe, including a cooling system, contains no metal and can be accessed in the discharge chamber with less disruption to the microwave distribution. This method enables measurement of the electric field profile under ion beam acceleration. We first verified the measurement with the EO probe by a comparison with a finite-difference time domain numerical simulation of the microwave electric field in atmosphere. Second, we showed that the deviations of the reflected microwave power and the beam current were less than 8% due to inserting the EO probe into the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. Finally, we successfully demonstrated the measurement of the electric-field profile in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. These measurements show that the electric field distribution in the thruster dramatically changes in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration as the propellant mass flow rate increases. These results indicate that this new method using an EO probe can provide a useful guide for improving the propulsion of microwave discharge ion thrusters.

  7. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  8. Evaluation of measurement reproducibility using the standard-sites data, 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, C.A.

    1996-02-01

    The US Department of Energy conducted the 1994 Fernald (Ohio) field characterization demonstration project to evaluate the performance of a group of both industry-standard and proposed alternative technologies in describing the nature and extent of uranium contamination in surficial soils. Detector stability and measurement reproducibility under actual operating conditions encountered in the field is critical to establishing the credibility of the proposed alternative characterization methods. Comparability of measured uranium activities to those reported by conventional, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-certified laboratory methods is also required. The eleven (11) technologies demonstrated included (1) EPA-standard soil sampling and laboratory mass-spectroscopy analyses, and currently-accepted field-screening techniques using (2) sodium-iodide scintillometers, (3) FIDLER low-energy scintillometers, and (4) a field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Proposed advanced characterization techniques included (5) alpha-track detectors, (6) a high-energy beta scintillometer, (7) electret ionization chambers, (8) and (9) a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer in two different configurations, (10) a field-adapted laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) technique, and (11) a long-range alpha detector. Measurement reproducibility and the accuracy of each method were tested by acquiring numerous replicate measurements of total uranium activity at each of two ``standard sites`` located within the main field demonstration area. Meteorological variables including temperature, relative humidity. and 24-hour rainfall quantities were also recorded in conjunction with the standard-sites measurements.

  9. Measurement of Untruncated Nuclear Spin Interactions via Zero- to Ultra-Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John W. Blanchard; Tobias F. Sjolander; Jonathan P. King; Micah P. Ledbetter; Emma H. Levine; Vikram S. Bajaj; Dmitry Budker; Alexander Pines

    2015-07-09

    Zero- to ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the coupling averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial alignment, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero- to ultra-low-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-$^{13}$C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This represents the first investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin $J$-coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole coupling Hamiltonian that are invisible in conventional high-field NMR. This technique expands the capabilities of zero- to ultra-low-field NMR and may have applications in precision measurement of subtle physical interactions, chemical analysis, and characterization of local mesoscale structure in materials.

  10. Distribution of Carbon Impurity Sources Between Low and High Field Side Measured via Zeeman-Spectroscopy in JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of Carbon Impurity Sources Between Low and High Field Side Measured via Zeeman-Spectroscopy in JET

  11. The Effect of the Accuracy of Toroidal Field Measurements on Spatial Consistency of Kinetic Profiles at JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Effect of the Accuracy of Toroidal Field Measurements on Spatial Consistency of Kinetic Profiles at JET

  12. Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ash, lime spoil, C&D waste, Solvay Process waste · CaO hydrolyzes and liberates OH- in solution Ca(OH)2 Ca2+ + 2OH- · NaOH-derived alkalinity at some sites: Bayer Process sources Alkaline leachates

  13. Study on multiphase flow and mixing in semidry flue gas desulfurization with a multifluid alkaline spray generator using particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Y.G.; Wang, D.F.; Zhang, M.C. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2009-06-15

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique was used to measure the velocity fields of gas-droplet-solid multiphase flow in the experimental setup of a novel semidry flue gas desulfurization process with a multifluid alkaline spray generator. The flow structure, mixing characteristic, and interphase interaction of gas-droplet-solid multiphase flow were investigated both in the confined alkaline spray generator and in the duct bent pipe section. The results show that sorbent particles in the confined alkaline spray generator are entrained into the spray core zone by a high-speed spray jet and most of the sorbent particles can be effectively humidified by spray water fine droplets to form aqueous lime slurry droplets. Moreover, a minimum amount of air stream in the generator is necessary to achieve higher collision humidification efficiency between sorbent particles and spray water droplets and to prevent the possible deposition of fine droplets on the wall. The appropriate penetration length of the slurry droplets from the generator can make uniform mixing between the formed slurry droplets and main air stream in the duct bent pipe section, which is beneficial to improving sulfur dioxide removal efficiency and to preventing the deposition of droplets on the wall.

  14. Measurements of field decay and snapback effect on Tevatron dipole and quadrupole magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velev, G.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Annala, G.; Bauer, P.; Carcagno, R.; DiMarco, J.; Glass, H.; Hanft, R.; Kephart, R.; Lamm, M.; Martens, M.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Since the beginning of 2002 an intensive measurement program has been performed at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility (MTF) to understand dynamic effects in Tevatron magnets. Based on the results of this program a new correction algorithm was proposed to compensate for the decay of the sextupole field during the dwell at injection and for the subsequent field ''snapback'' during the first few seconds of the energy ramp. Beam studies showed that the new correction algorithm works better than the original one, and improves the Tevatron efficiency by at least 3%. The beam studies also indicated insufficient correction during the first 6s of the injection plateau where an unexpected discrepancy of 0.15 sextupole units of extra drift was observed. This paper reports on the most recent measurements of the Tevatron dipoles field at the beginning of the injection plateau. Results on the field decay and snapback in the Tevatron quadrupoles are also presented.

  15. High Field Magnetization measurements of uranium dioxide single crystals (P08358- E003-PF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gofryk, K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harrison, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Jaime, M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab)

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary high field magnetic measurements of UO2 are consistent with a complex nature of the magnetic ordering in this material, compatible with the previously proposed non-collinear 3-k magnetic structure. Further extensive magnetic studies on well-oriented (<100 > and <111>) UO2 crystals are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states at high fields.

  16. Full-field velocity measurements of single and two phase flows using digital pulsed laser velocimetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canaan, Robert Ernst

    1990-01-01

    to reliably measure and quantify both component velocities of two phase systems would directly contribute toward the goal of understanding such fundamental two phase flow characteristics as void fraction and its effects, flow and heat transfer regime...-field non-intrusive analysis of two phase flow regimes which are of great concern in the field of nuclear engineering. Modeling of two phase flow systems presents a particularly challenging problem in which there is much room for continuing improvement...

  17. Measurements accounting for the impediment of ion spin-up in rotating magnetic field driven field reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deards, C. L. [Lockheed Martin, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale, California 93599 (United States); Hoffman, A. L.; Steinhauer, L. C. [Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 14700 NE 95th Street, Suite 100, Redmond, Washington 98052 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Improved vacuum hygiene, wall conditioning, and reduced recycling in the rotating magnetic field (RMF) driven translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade (TCSU) field reversed configuration experiment have made possible a more accurate assessment of the forces affecting ion spin-up. This issue is critical in plasmas sustained by RMFs, such as TCSU since ion spin-up can substantially reduce or cancel the RMF current drive effect. Several diagnostics are brought to bear, including a 3-axis translatable magnetic probe allowing the first experimental measurement of the end shorting effect. These results show that the ion rotation is determined by a balance between electron-ion friction, the end shorting effect, and ion drag against neutrals.

  18. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  19. Identification of an elasticity-tensor random field at mesoscopic scale using experimental measurements at mesoscopic and macroscopic scales for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of the random field at meso-scale (1) using image field measurements at macro- and meso-scales, (2) introducing- and meso-scales for a given sample submitted to a given load. The experimental displacement (strain) field is measured on the whole domain (1x1 cm) at the macro-scale while, at the meso-scale, the displacement (strain

  20. FULL FIELD STRESS MEASUREMENT FOR IN SITU STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF AIRFRAME COMPONENTS AND REPAIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    FULL FIELD STRESS MEASUREMENT FOR IN SITU STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF AIRFRAME COMPONENTS to structural health monitoring however is problematic. The reasons are manifold but a key one is that strain detector to furnish a basis for in situ structural health monitoring. It first covers some preliminaries

  1. ORNL/TM-2011/419 Field Measurements at River and Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    National Laboratory 3 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, University of Washington 4 IIHRORNL/TM-2011/419 Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy

  2. Lessons from two field tests on pipeline damage detection using acceleration measurement (Invited Paper)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Lessons from two field tests on pipeline damage detection using acceleration measurement (Invited, Irvine, CA USA 92697-2700 ABSTRACT Early detection of pipeline damages has been highlighted in water supply industry. Water pressure change in pipeline due to a sudden rupture causes pipe to vibrate

  3. Recommendations for Guidelines for Environment-Specific Magnetic-Field Measurements, Rapid Program Engineering Project #2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.; IIT Research Institute; Magnetic Measurements; Survey Research Center, University of California; T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The purpose of this project was to document widely applicable methods for characterizing the magnetic fields in a given environment, recognizing the many sources co-existing within that space. The guidelines are designed to allow the reader to follow an efficient process to (1) plan the goals and requirements of a magnetic-field study, (2) develop a study structure and protocol, and (3) document and carry out the plan. These guidelines take the reader first through the process of developing a basic study strategy, then through planning and performing the data collection. Last, the critical factors of data management, analysis reporting, and quality assurance are discussed. The guidelines are structured to allow the researcher to develop a protocol that responds to specific site and project needs. The Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) is based on exposure to magnetic fields and the potential health effects. Therefore, the most important focus for these magnetic-field measurement guidelines is relevance to exposure. The assumed objective of an environment-specific measurement is to characterize the environment (given a set of occupants and magnetic-field sources) so that information about the exposure of the occupants may be inferred. Ideally, the researcher seeks to obtain complete or "perfect" information about these magnetic fields, so that personal exposure might also be modeled perfectly. However, complete data collection is not feasible. In fact, it has been made more difficult as the research field has moved to expand the list of field parameters measured, increasing the cost and complexity of performing a measurement and analyzing the data. The guidelines address this issue by guiding the user to design a measurement protocol that will gather the most exposure-relevant information based on the locations of people in relation to the sources. We suggest that the "microenvironment" become the base unit of area in a study, with boundaries defined by the occupant's activity patterns and the field variation from the sources affecting the area. Such a stratification allows the researcher to determine which microenvironment are of most interest, and to methodically focus the areas, in order to gather the most relevant set of data.

  4. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  5. Quiet Sun internetwork magnetic fields from the inversion of Hinode measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Orozco Suarez; L. R. Bellot Rubio; J. C. del Toro Iniesta; S. Tsuneta; B. W. Lites; K. Ichimoto; Y. Katsukawa; S. Nagata; T. Shimizu; R. A. Shine; Y. Suematsu; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2007-10-07

    We analyze Fe I 630 nm observations of the quiet Sun at disk center taken with the spectropolarimeter of the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite. A significant fraction of the scanned area, including granules, turns out to be covered by magnetic fields. We derive field strength and inclination probability density functions from a Milne-Eddington inversion of the observed Stokes profiles. They show that the internetwork consists of very inclined, hG fields. As expected, network areas exhibit a predominance of kG field concentrations. The high spatial resolution of Hinode's spectropolarimetric measurements brings to an agreement the results obtained from the analysis of visible and near-infrared lines.

  6. Field testing of a probe to measure fouling in an industrial flue gas stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohal, M.S.

    1990-11-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology sponsors work in the area of measuring and mitigating fouling in heat exchangers. This report describes the design and fabrication of a gas-side fouling measuring device, and its testing in an industrial environment. The report gives details of the probe fabrication, material used, controllers, other instrumentation required for various measurements, and computer system needed for recording the data. The calibration constants for measuring the heat flux with the heat fluxmeter were determined. The report also describes the field test location, the tests performed, the data collected, and the data analysis. The conclusions of the tests performed were summarized. Although fouling deposits on the probe were minimal, the tests proved that the probe is capable of measuring the fouling in a harsh industrial environment. 17 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, Gabriel (Omer, IL); Hicho, George (Derwood, MD); Swartzendruber, Lydon (New Carrollton, MD)

    1997-01-01

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment.

  8. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, G.; Hicho, G.; Swartzendruber, L.

    1997-04-08

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment. 7 figs.

  9. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differentia

  10. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

  11. Note: Spectral motional Stark effect diagnostic for measurement of magnetic fields below 0.3 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lizunov, A.; Donin, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Savkin, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    The paper reports on development of the spectral motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic in the midplane of the gas dynamic trap (GDT) linear system for magnetic confinement of anisotropic hot-ion plasma. The axially symmetric GDT vacuum magnetic field has a minimum value in the midplane, which varies from 0.2 to 0.35 T in different regimes of operation. Buildup of 15 keV ion population generates a diamagnetic reduction of magnetic field in the plasma core of up to 30% in the maximum density region, as measured by the existing eight-line MSE diagnostic. Commissioning of the midplane MSE provided first direct measurements of diamagnetic modifications in the minimum magnetic field GDT section, a necessary complement to the understanding of equilibrium and self-organization of high-? plasmas in GDT. Making use of the stable short-pulse diagnostic beam and calibration of the apparent spectral width of beam emission lines allow for the measurement of the plasma magnetic field of 0.29 ± 0.007 T with the integration time of 200 ?s.

  12. Summary of Field Measurement on UF6 Cylinders Using Electro-Mechanically Cooled Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, Brent R; Smith, Steven E; Solodov, Alexander A; Whitaker, J Michael; Morgan, James B; MayerII, Richard L.; Montgomery, J. Brent

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the enrichment of solid state UF6 stored within large metal cylinders is a task commonly performed by plant operators and inspectors. The measurement technologies typically used range from low-resolution, high-efficiency sodium iodide detectors to high-resolution, moderate-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The technology used and methods deployed are dependent upon the material being measured, environmental conditions, time constraints, and measurement-precision requirements. Operators and inspectors typically use specially designed, HPGe detectors that are cooled with liquid nitrogen in situations where high-resolution measurements are required. However, the requirement for periodically refilling the system with liquid nitrogen makes remote usage cumbersome and slow. The task of cooling the detector reduces the available time for the inspector to perform other safeguards activities while on site. If the inspector has to reduce the count time for each selected cylinder to ensure that all preselected cylinders are measured during the inspection, the resulting measurement uncertainties may be increased, making it more difficult to detect and verify potential discrepancies in the operator's declarations. However, recent advances in electromechanically cooled HPGe detectors may provide the inspector with an improved verification tool by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen. This report provides a summary of test results for field measurements performed using electromechanically cooled HPGe detectors on depleted, natural, and low-enriched uranium cylinders. The results of the study provide valuable information to inspectors and operators regarding the capabilities and limitations of electromechanically cooled systems based on true field-measurement conditions.

  13. Idaho Field Experiment 1981. Volume 1. Experimental design and measurement systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Start, G E; Cate, J H; Dickson, C R; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R

    1983-10-01

    The Idaho Field Experiment is reported in three volumes and supplemented by special contractor reports. Volume I describes the design and goals of the measurement program and the measurement systems utilized during the field program. The measurement systems layouts are described as well. The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in South East Idaho over the Upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were measured between July 15 and 30, 1981. Eight-hour releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made from 46 m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24 km square. Also, a single total integrated sample, of about 30 hours duration, was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72 km (using 6 km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plumes were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High-altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were also collected. 10 references, 14 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Alan G. Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ?10{sup 4} T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (?10{sup ?10}m{sup 3}) at high plasma densities (?10{sup 28}m{sup ?3}) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  15. Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Shuang; Sullivan, Maurice O.; Hui, Rongqing

    2012-11-01

    lidar system based on the measurement of complex optical field is demonstrated for the first time. An electro-optic in- phase/quadrature (I/Q) modulator is used in the lidar transmitter to realize carrier-suppressed complex optical field modulation...-modulated continuous-wave lidar using I/Q modulator for simplified heterodyne detection,” Opt. Lett. 37(11), 2022–2024 (2012). 11. Y. Zhang, M. O’Sullivan, and R. Hui, “Digital subcarrier multiplexing for flexible spectral allocation in optical transport network...

  16. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Field Test Best Practices, BEopt, and the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is the transcript of the Building America webinar, Field Test Best Practices, BEopt, and the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, held on March 18, 2015.

  17. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

    field field-type-text field-field-page-name">
  18. Measurement of accelerator neutron radiation field spectrum by Extended Range Neutron Multisphere Spectrometers and unfolding program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Guanjia; Ma, Zhongjian; Guo, Siming; Yan, Mingyang; Shi, Haoyu; Xu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    This paper described a measurement of accelerator neutron radiation field at a transport beam line of Beijing-TBF. The experiment place was be selected around a Faraday Cup with a graphite target impacted by electron beam at 2.5GeV. First of all, we simulated the neutron radiation experiment by FLUKA. Secondly, we chose six appropriate ERNMS according to their neutron fluence response function to measure the neutron count rate. Then the U_M_G package program was be utilized to unfolding experiment data. Finally, we drew a comparison between the unfolding with the simulation spectrum and made an analysis about the result.

  19. MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF HD2, A HIgh Nb3Sn DIPOLE MAGNET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R. R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lietzke, A. F.; Lizarazo, J.; McInturff, A. D.; Sabbi, G. L.; Sasaki, K.

    2009-05-04

    The Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has designed and tested HD2, a 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator-type dipole based on a simple block-type coil geometry with flared ends. HD2 represents a step toward the development of cost-effective accelerator quality magnets operating in the range of 13-15 T. The design was optimized to minimize geometric harmonics and to address iron saturation and conductor magnetization effects. Field quality was measured during recent cold tests. The measured harmonics are presented and compared to the design values.

  20. Measurements of the Ion Species of Cathodic Arc Plasma in an Axial Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oks, Efim; Anders, Andre

    2010-10-19

    Metal and gas ion species and their charge state distributions were measured for pulsed copper cathodic arcs in argon background gas in the presence of an axial magnetic field. It was found that changing the cathode position relative to anode and ion extraction system as well as increasing the gas pressure did not much affect the arc burning voltage and the related power dissipation. However, the burning voltage and power dissipation greatly increased as the magnetic field strength was increased. The fraction of metal ions and the mean ion charge state were reduced as the discharge length was increased. The observations can be explained by the combination of charge exchange collisions and electron impact ionization. They confirm that previously published data on characteristic material-dependent charge state distributions (e.g., Anders and Yushkov, J. Appl. Phys., Vol. 91, pp. 4824-4832, 2002) are not universal but valid for high vacuum conditions and the specifics of the applied magnetic fields.

  1. Field measurements of ammonia volatilization from surface applications of nitrogen fertilizers to a calcareous soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, W. L

    1977-01-01

    , according to Mortland (1958), ". . . the conflicting nature of the data on losses of ammonia from soils. . . does not necessarily represent in- consistency but arises from the multitude of variables affecting ammonia sorption. Variations in techniques...FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF AMMONIA VOLATILIZATION FROM SURFACE APPLICATIONS OF NITROGEN FERTILIZERS TO A CALCAREOUS SOIL A Thesis by WILLIAM LEONARD HARGROVE, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment...

  2. Novel Refractory Materials for High-Temperature, High-Alkaline...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications Can be used in high-temperature, high-alkaline furnaces and process vessels found in aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, and steel industries....

  3. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD FROM FARADAY ROTATION MEASURES OF DIFFUSE POLARIZED EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, S. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; McConnell, D.; Gaensler, B. M.; Haverkorn, M.; Beck, R.; Wolleben, M.; Stanimirovic, S.; Dickey, J. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2012-11-01

    We present a study of the magnetic field of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), carried out using diffuse polarized synchrotron emission data at 1.4 GHz acquired at the Parkes Radio Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The observed diffuse polarized emission is likely to originate above the LMC disk on the near side of the galaxy. Consistent negative rotation measures (RMs) derived from the diffuse emission indicate that the line-of-sight magnetic field in the LMC's near-side halo is directed coherently away from us. In combination with RMs of extragalactic sources that lie behind the galaxy, we show that the LMC's large-scale magnetic field is likely to be of quadrupolar geometry, consistent with the prediction of dynamo theory. On smaller scales, we identify two brightly polarized filaments southeast of the LMC, associated with neutral hydrogen arms. The filaments' magnetic field potentially aligns with the direction toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We suggest that tidal interactions between the SMC and the LMC in the past 10{sup 9} years are likely to have shaped the magnetic field in these filaments.

  4. Piezoelectric and optical setup to measure an electrical field: Application to the longitudinal near-field generated by a tapered coax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Euphrasie, Sébastien; Cretin, Bernard; Lengaigne, Glawdys; 10.1063/1.2901543

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new setup to measure an electrical field in one direction. This setup is made of a piezoelectric sintered lead zinconate titanate film and an optical interferometric probe. We used this setup to investigate how the shape of the extremity of a coaxial cable influences the longitudinal electrical near-field generated by it. For this application, we designed our setup to have a spatial resolution of 100 um in the direction of the electrical field. Simulations and experiments are presented.

  5. A configurable component-based software system for magnetic field measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogiec, J.M.; DiMarco, J.; Kotelnikov, S.; Trombly-Freytag, K.; Walbridge, D.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    A new software system to test accelerator magnets has been developed at Fermilab. The magnetic measurement technique involved employs a single stretched wire to measure alignment parameters and magnetic field strength. The software for the system is built on top of a flexible component-based framework, which allows for easy reconfiguration and runtime modification. Various user interface, data acquisition, analysis, and data persistence components can be configured to form different measurement systems that are tailored to specific requirements (e.g., involving magnet type or test stand). The system can also be configured with various measurement sequences or tests, each of them controlled by a dedicated script. It is capable of working interactively as well as executing a preselected sequence of tests. Each test can be parameterized to fit the specific magnet type or test stand requirements. The system has been designed with portability in mind and is capable of working on various platforms, such as Linux, Solaris, and Windows. It can be configured to use a local data acquisition subsystem or a remote data acquisition computer, such as a VME processor running VxWorks. All hardware-oriented components have been developed with a simulation option that allows for running and testing measurements in the absence of data acquisition hardware.

  6. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2000-12-01

    A test program is being sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPRI, FirstEnergy, and TVA to investigate furnace injection of alkaline sorbents as a means of reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in the flue gas from coal-fired boilers. This test program is being conducted at the FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP), although later testing will be conducted at a TVA plant. A sorbent injection test was conducted the week of April 18, 2000. The test was the first of several short-term (one- to two-week duration) tests to investigate the effectiveness of various alkaline sorbents for sulfuric acid control and the effects of these sorbents on boiler equipment performance. This first short-term test investigated the effect of injecting dry dolomite powder (CaCO{sub 3} {center_dot} MgCO{sub 3}), a mineral similar to limestone, into the furnace of Unit 2. During the test program, various analytical techniques were used to assess the effects of sorbent injection. These primarily included sampling with the controlled condensation system (CCS) for determining flue gas SO{sub 3} content and an acid dew-point (ADP) meter for determining the sulfuric acid dew point (and, indirectly, the concentration of sulfuric acid) of the flue gas. EPA Reference Method 26a was used for determining hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrofluoric acid (HF), as well and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and fluorine (F{sub 2}) concentrations in the flue gas. Fly ash resistivity was measured using a Southern Research Institute (SRI) point-to-plane resistivity probe, and unburned carbon in fly ash was determined by loss on ignition (LOI). Coal samples were also collected and analyzed for a variety of parameters. Finally, visual observations were made of boiler furnace and convective pass surfaces prior to and during sorbent injection.

  7. Tailoring electrode hydrophobicity to improve anode performance in alkaline media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    t s Backing layers may be permeable to catalyst solvent. 20 wt% PTFE optimal for alkaline anode. High the optimal PTFE loading was 20 wt% in alkaline media. We investigated PTFE and Fumion binders, determining of PTFE in the cathode backing layer [12]. Fairweather et al. determined that PTFE wet- proofing at less

  8. Measurement of the Internal Magnetic Field of Plasmas using an Alpha Particle Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.J. Zweben; D.S. Darrow; P.W. Ross; J.L. Lowrance; G. Renda

    2004-05-13

    The internal magnetic fields of plasmas can be measured under certain conditions from the integrated v x B deflection of MeV alpha particles emitted by a small radioactive source. This alpha source and large-area alpha particle detector would be located inside the vacuum vessel but outside the plasma. Alphas with a typical energy of 5.5 MeV (241Am) can reach the center of almost all laboratory plasmas and magnetic fusion devices, so this method can potentially determine the q(r) profile of tokamaks or STs. Orbit calculations, background evaluations, and conceptual designs for such a vxB (or ''AVB'') detector are described.

  9. Magnetic field measurements of a superconducting undulator for a Harmonic Generation FEL experiment at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, L.; Ingold, G.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Krinsky, S.; Yu, L.H.; Sampson, W.; Robins, K.

    1993-07-01

    An 18mm period, 0.54 Tesla, 8mm gap superconducting undulator with both horizontal and vertical focusing has been built and tested. This magnet, which is fabricated in 25 cm length sections, is being tested for use in the radiator section (total magnet length of 1.5 m) of the Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser experiment at the National Synchrotron Light Source - Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab., in collaboration with Grumman Corp. The measurement system is outlined, sources and estimates of errors are described, and some magnetic field data are presented and discussed.

  10. The deflection of light induced by the Sun's gravitational field and measured with geodetic VLBI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Titov; A. Girdiuk

    2015-11-02

    The Sun's gravitational field deflects the apparent positions of close objects in accordance with the formulae of general relativity. Optical astrometry is used to test the prediction, but only with the stars close to the Sun and only during total Solar eclipses. Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is capable of measuring the deflection of the light from distant radio sources anytime and across the whole sky. We show that the effect of light deflection is equivalent to the gravitational delay calculated during the reduction of VLBI data. All reference radio sources display an annual circular motion with the magnitude proportional to their ecliptic latitude. In particular, radio sources near the ecliptic pole draw an annual circle with magnitude of 4 mas. This effect could be easily measured with the current precision of the geodetic VLBI data.

  11. Measurement of the three-dimensional tip region flow field in an axial compressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauter, R.C. )

    1993-07-01

    A two-color, five-beam LDV system has been configured to make simultaneous three-component velocity measurements of the flow field in a two-stage axial compressor model. The system has been used to make time-resolved measurements both between compressor blade rows and within the rotating blade passages in an axial compressor. The data show the nature and behavior of the complex, three-dimensional flow phenomena present in the tip region of a compressor as the convect downstream. In particular, the nature of the tip leakage vortex is apparent, being manifested by high blockage as well as the expected vortical motion. The data indicate that the radial flows associated with the tip leakage vortex begin to decrease while within the rotor passage, and that they temporarily increase aft of the passage.

  12. Dynamic density field measurements of an explosively driven ????? phase transition in iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, L. M.; Gray, G. T.; Warthen, B. J.

    2014-07-28

    We provide a unique set of observations of the behavior of the ??? phase transition under a complex axially symmetric loading path created by sweeping a detonation wave along the end surface of a cylindrical sample. The primary data sets are the measured mass density distributions acquired at 5 independent times during the sweep of the detonation along the surface. Shocked regions and boundaries are measured, as well as regions and boundaries of elevated density (presumed to be the ??phase iron). The formation and dynamics of these regions were captured and are available for comparisons to material descriptions. We also applied 16 Photon Doppler Velocimetry probes to capture the free surface velocity along a discrete set of radially distributed points in order to compare and correlate the density measurements with previous shock wave studies. The velocimetry data are in nearly exact agreement with previous shock wave studies of the ??? phase transition, the density distributions, while generally in agreement with expectations evolved from the shock wave studies, show that the epsilon phase is generated in regions of high shear stress but at hydrostatic stresses below the typically quoted 13?GPa value. The density field measurements are particularly useful for observing the effects of the forward and reverse transformation kinetics, as well as the reverse transformation hysteresis.

  13. Accessing interior magnetic field vector components in neutron electric dipole moment experiments via exterior measurements, I. Boundary-value techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Plaster

    2013-09-22

    We propose a new concept for determining the interior magnetic field vector components in neutron electric dipole moment experiments. If a closed three-dimensional boundary surface surrounding the fiducial volume of an experiment can be defined such that its interior encloses no currents or sources of magnetization, each of the interior vector field components and the magnetic scalar potential will satisfy a Laplace equation. Therefore, if either the vector field components or the normal derivative of the scalar potential can be measured on the surface of this boundary, thus defining a Dirichlet or Neumann boundary-value problem, respectively, the interior vector field components or the scalar potential (and, thus, the field components via the gradient of the potential) can be uniquely determined via solution of the Laplace equation. We discuss the applicability of this technique to the determination of the interior magnetic field components during the operating phase of neutron electric dipole moment experiments when it is not, in general, feasible to perform direct in situ measurements of the interior field components. We also study the specifications that a vector field probe must satisfy in order to determine the interior vector field components to a certain precision. The technique we propose here may also be applicable to experiments requiring monitoring of the vector magnetic field components within some closed boundary surface, such as searches for neutron-antineutron oscillations along a flight path or measurements in storage rings of the muon anomalous magnetic moment $g-2$ and the proton electric dipole moment.

  14. Statistics of Met-Ocean Conditions Between West and Central Gulf of Mexico Based on Field Measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Lin

    2012-07-16

    Statistics of met-ocean conditions including wind, current and wave at the location between west and central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) are derived based on about three year of field measurements. Two-parameter Weibull distribution has been employed...

  15. Measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations during the MCMA-2006 field campaign – Part 2: Model comparison and radical budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dusanter, S.

    Measurements of hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals were made during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) field campaign as part of the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) ...

  16. MEMS-based contact stress field measurements at a rough elastomeric layer: local test of Amontons' friction law in static

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    MEMS-based contact stress field measurements at a rough elastomeric layer: local test of Amontons/Universit´e Paris 6, Paris, France Abstract. We present the results of recent friction experiments in which a MEMS

  17. Measurement of a false electric dipole moment signal from $^{199}$Hg atoms exposed to an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Afach; C. A. Baker; G. Ban; G. Bison; K. Bodek; Z. Chowdhuri; M. Daum; M. Fertl; B. Franke; P. Geltenbort; K. Green; M. G. D. van der Grinten; Z. Grujic; P. G. Harris; W. Heil; V. Hélaine; R. Henneck; M. Horras; P. Iaydjiev; S. N. Ivanov; M. Kasprzak; Y. Kermaïdic; K. Kirch; P. Knowles; H. -C. Koch; S. Komposch; A. Kozela; J. Krempel; B. Lauss; T. Lefort; Y. Lemière; A. Mtchedlishvili; O. Naviliat-Cuncic; J. M. Pendlebury; F. M. Piegsa; G. Pignol; P. N. Prashant; G. Quéméner; D. Rebreyend; D. Ries; S. Roccia; P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; N. Severijns; A. Weis; E. Wursten; G. Wyszynski; J. Zejma; J. Zenner; G. Zsigmond

    2015-08-03

    We report on the measurement of a Larmor frequency shift proportional to the electric-field strength for $^{199}{\\rm Hg}$ atoms contained in a volume permeated with aligned magnetic and electric fields. This shift arises from the interplay between the inevitable magnetic field gradients and the motional magnetic field. The proportionality to electric-field strength makes it apparently similar to an electric dipole moment (EDM) signal, although unlike an EDM this effect is P- and T-conserving. We have used a neutron magnetic resonance EDM spectrometer, featuring a mercury co-magnetometer and an array of external cesium magnetometers, to measure the shift as a function of the applied magnetic field gradient. Our results are in good agreement with theoretical expectations.

  18. Alternative measurements of the fermion g-factor in the field of a traveling circularly polarized electromagnetic wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Gisin

    2015-08-20

    The field of a traveling circularly polarized electromagnetic wave and a constant magnetic field localizes fermions perpendicularly to propagation of the wave in the cross section of the order of the wavelength. Unusual exact solutions of the Dirac equation correspond to this localization. Except to routine use of thin fermion beams it can be suitable for alternative measurements of the g - factor. Details and peculiarities of the solutions in application to the measurements are considered in the paper.

  19. Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shearer, J.A.; Turner, C.B.; Johnson, I.

    1980-03-13

    A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

  20. Precision measurements on lithium atoms in an electric field compared with R-matrix and other Stark theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delande, Dominique

    the classical saddle point to test various theories and to obtain a precise calibration of the electric fieldPrecision measurements on lithium atoms in an electric field compared with R-matrix and other Stark theories G. D. Stevens, C.-H. Iu, T. Bergeman, and H. J. Metcalf Physics Department, State University

  1. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1994-01-01

    According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

  2. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-lin W. (Augusta, GA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

  3. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, C.L.W.

    1995-07-25

    A process is described for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO{sub 2}, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. 4 figs.

  4. Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-08-09

    The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

  5. Oxidation of methanol on single crystal platinum electrodes in alkaline solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripkovic, A.V.; Marinkovic, N.; Adzic, R.R.

    1995-10-01

    Methanol oxidation has been studied on three low-index single crystal Pt electrodes and four stepped surfaces, vicinal to the (111) and (100) orientations in alkaline solutions. Considering the onset of the reaction, it appears that the activity decreases in the sequence Pt(100), Pt(110) and Pt(111). This can also be inferred from the quasi-steady-state measurements. The current peaks, observed at different potentials, show the highest activity of Pt(111). The steps cause increase of the surface activity, but are prone to a fast poisoning. The reaction involves a formation of a small amount of CO on Pt(100) but a negligible amount on Pt(111). This was inferred from the in situ FTIR measurements. Two different reaction mechanisms were identified for the Pt(111) and Pt(100). The data clearly show that a large difference of the activity of Pt for methanol oxidation in acid and alkaline solutions originates in a smaller or negligible poisoning effects in alkaline solutions.

  6. Mass-resolved retarding field energy analyzer and its measurement of ion energy distribution in helicon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zexian, Cao

    Mass-resolved retarding field energy analyzer and its measurement of ion energy distribution) are measured at rf power of 1000 W. The results show that the fairly broad energy distributions of different analyzer; Ion energy distribution; Helicon plasma 1. Introduction It is well recognized that ion

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Manacapuru, Brazil for the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON) Field Campaign

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Amazon rain forest in Brazil is the largest broadleaf forest in the world, covering 7 million square kilometers of the Amazon Basin in South America. It represents over half of the planet’s remaining rain forests, and comprises the most biodiverse tract of tropical rain forest on the planet. Due to the sheer size of the Amazon rain forest, the area has a strong impact on the climate in the Southern Hemisphere. To understand the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rain forest, the Green Ocean Amazon, or GOAMAZON, field campaign is a two-year scientific collaboration among U.S. and Brazilian research organizations. They are conducting a variety of different experiments with dozens of measurement tools, using both ground and aerial instrumentation, including the ARM Aerial Facility's G-1 aircraft. For more information on the holistic view of the campaign, see the Department of Energy’s GOAMAZON website. As a critical component of GOAMAZON, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will obtain measurements near Manacapuru, south of Manaus, Brazil, from January to December 2014. The city of Manaus, with a population of 3 million, uses high-sulfur oil as their primary source of electricity. The AMF site is situated to measure the atmospheric extremes of a pristine atmosphere and the nearby cities’ pollution plume, as it regularly intersects with the site. Along with other instrument systems located at the Manacapuru site, this deployment will enable scientists to study how aerosol and cloud life cycles are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity.

  8. Solvent Extraction of Tc and Cs from Alkaline Nitrate Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Haverlock, T J.; Sachleben, R A.; Leonard, R A.; Conner, C; Lumetta, Gregg J. ); M. Cox, M. Hidalgo, and M. Valiente

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes progress at three collaborating U.S. national laboratories on the extraction of the fission products 99Tc and 137Cs from alkaline high-level wastes. Efficient economical processes for Tc and Cs extraction (SRTALK and alkaline-side CSEX, respectively) have been developed, and testing has progressed through batch tests on actual wastes and continuous counter-current centrifugal-contactor tests on simulants.

  9. Solvent Extraction of Tc and Cs from Alkaline Nitrate Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnesen, P.V.; Conner, C.; Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Leonard, R.A.; Lumetta, G.J.; Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.

    1999-07-11

    This paper summarizes progress at three collaborating US national laboratories on the extraction of the fission products {sup 99}Tc and {sup 137}Cs from alkaline high-level wastes (HLW). Efficient, economical processes for Tc and Cs extraction (SRTALK and alkaline-side CSEX, respectively) have been developed, and testing has progressed through batch tests on actual wastes and continuous countercurrent centrifugal-contactor tests on simulants.

  10. Self-propelled in-tube shuttle and control system for automated measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H. ); Pidcoe, S.V. . Space Systems Div.); Zink, R.A. )

    1990-03-01

    A magnetic field alignment gauge is used to measure the field angle as a function of axial position in each of the magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Present measurements are made by manually pushing the through the magnet bore tube and stopping at intervals to record field measurements. Gauge location is controlled through graduation marks and alignment pins on the push rods. Field measurements are recorded on a logging multimeter with tape output. Described is a computerized control system being developed to replace the manual procedure for field alignment measurements. The automated system employs a pneumatic walking device to move the measurement gauge through the bore tube. Movement of the device, called the Self-Propelled In-Tube Shuttle (SPITS), is accomplished through an integral, gas driven, double-acting cylinder. The motion of the SPITS is transferred to the bore tube by means of a pair of controlled, retractable support feet. Control of the SPITS is accomplished through an RS-422 interface from an IBM-compatible computer to a series of solenoid-actuated air valves. Direction of SPITS travel is determined by the air-valve sequence, and is managed through the control software. Precise axial position of the gauge within the magnet is returned to the control system through an optically-encoded digital position transducer attached to the shuttle. Discussed is the performance of the transport device and control system during preliminary testing of the first prototype shuttle. 1 ref., 7 figs.

  11. A NEW CONCEPT IN AN ELECTRICALLY RECHARGEABLE ZINC-AIR ALKALINE BATTERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    flow-thru porous zinc electrode with recirculating supersaturated zincate solution. An alkaline zinc battery

  12. Method and apparatus for steady-state magnetic measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woolley, R.D.

    1998-09-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the steady-state measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma, where the tokamak is configured with respect to a cylindrical coordinate system having z, phi (toroidal), and r axes. The method is based on combining the two magnetic field principles of induction and torque. The apparatus includes a rotor assembly having a pair of inductive magnetic field pickup coils which are concentrically mounted, orthogonally oriented in the r and z directions, and coupled to remotely located electronics which include electronic integrators for determining magnetic field changes. The rotor assembly includes an axle oriented in the toroidal direction, with the axle mounted on pivot support brackets which in turn are mounted on a baseplate. First and second springs are located between the baseplate and the rotor assembly restricting rotation of the rotor assembly about its axle, the second spring providing a constant tensile preload in the first spring. A strain gauge is mounted on the first spring, and electronic means to continually monitor strain gauge resistance variations is provided. Electronic means for providing a known current pulse waveform to be periodically injected into each coil to create a time-varying torque on the rotor assembly in the toroidal direction causes mechanical strain variations proportional to the torque in the mounting means and springs so that strain gauge measurement of the variation provides periodic magnetic field measurements independent of the magnetic field measured by the electronic integrators. 6 figs.

  13. Method and apparatus for steady-state magnetic measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woolley, Robert D. (Hillsborough, NJ)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the steady-state measurement of poloidal magnetic field near a tokamak plasma, where the tokamak is configured with respect to a cylindrical coordinate system having z, phi (toroidal), and r axes. The method is based on combining the two magnetic field principles of induction and torque. The apparatus includes a rotor assembly having a pair of inductive magnetic field pickup coils which are concentrically mounted, orthogonally oriented in the r and z directions, and coupled to remotely located electronics which include electronic integrators for determining magnetic field changes. The rotor assembly includes an axle oriented in the toroidal direction, with the axle mounted on pivot support brackets which in turn are mounted on a baseplate. First and second springs are located between the baseplate and the rotor assembly restricting rotation of the rotor assembly about its axle, the second spring providing a constant tensile preload in the first spring. A strain gauge is mounted on the first spring, and electronic means to continually monitor strain gauge resistance variations is provided. Electronic means for providing a known current pulse waveform to be periodically injected into each coil to create a time-varying torque on the rotor assembly in the toroidal direction causes mechanical strain variations proportional to the torque in the mounting means and springs so that strain gauge measurement of the variation provides periodic magnetic field measurements independent of the magnetic field measured by the electronic integrators.

  14. Highly Stable, Anion Conductive, Comb-Shaped Copolymers for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, NW; Leng, YJ; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2013-07-10

    To produce an anion-conductive and durable polymer electrolyte for alkaline fuel cell applications, a series of quaternized poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide)s containing long alkyl side chains pendant to the nitrogen-centered cation were synthesized using a Menshutkin reaction to form comb-shaped structures. The pendant alkyl chains were responsible for the development of highly conductive ionic domains, as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The comb-shaped polymers having one alkyl side chain showed higher hydroxide conductivities than those with benzyltrimethyl ammonium moieties or structures with more than one alkyl side chain per cationic site. The highest conductivity was observed for comb-shaped polymers with benzyldimethylhexadecyl ammonium cations. The chemical stabilities of the comb-shaped membranes were evaluated under severe, accelerated-aging conditions, and degradation was observed by measuring IEC and ion conductivity changes during aging. The comb-shaped membranes retained their high ion conductivity in 1 M NaOH at 80 degrees C for 2000 h. These cationic polymers were employed as ionomers in catalyst layers for alkaline fuel cells. The results indicated that the C-16 alkyl side chain ionomer had a slightly better initial performance, despite its low IEC value, but very poor durability in the fuel cell. In contrast, 90% of the initial performance was retained for the alkaline fuel cell with electrodes containing the C-6 side chain after 60 h of fuel cell operation.

  15. Measuring the rotation period distribution of field M-dwarfs with Kepler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuillan, Amy; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2013-01-01

    We have analysed 10 months of public data from the Kepler space mission to measure rotation periods of main-sequence stars with masses between 0.3 and 0.55 M_sun. To derive the rotational period we introduce the autocorrelation function and show that it is robust against phase and amplitude modulation and residual instrumental systematics. Of the 2483 stars examined, we detected rotation periods in 1570 (63.2%), representing an increase of a factor ~ 30 in the number of rotation period determination for field M-dwarfs. The periods range from 0.37-69.7 days, with amplitudes ranging from 1.0-140.8 mmags. The rotation period distribution is clearly bimodal, with peaks at ~ 19 and ~ 33 days, hinting at two distinct waves of star formation, a hypothesis that is supported by the fact that slower rotators tend to have larger proper motions. The two peaks of the rotation period distribution form two distinct sequences in period-temperature space, with the period decreasing with increasing temperature, reminiscent of ...

  16. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael (Brooktondale, NY) [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  17. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi

    2011-09-01

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

  18. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis. Task 2 summary report. Model for alkaline water electrolysis systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaffe, M.R.; Murray, J.N.

    1980-04-01

    Task 2 involved the establishment of an engineering and economic model for the evaluation of various options in water electrolysis. The mode, verification of the specific coding and four case studies are described. The model was tested by evaluation of a nearly commercial technology, i.e., an 80-kW alkaline electrolyte system, operating at 60/sup 0/C, which delivers approximately 255 SLM, hydrogen for applications such as electrical generation cooling or semiconductor manufacturing. The calculated cost of hydrogen from this installed non-optimized case system with an initial cost to the customer of $87,000 was $6.99/Kg H/sub 2/ ($1.67/100 SCF) on a 20-yr levelized basis using 2.5 cents/kWh power costs. This compares favorably to a levelized average merchant hydrogen cost value of $9.11/Kg H/sub 2/ ($2.17/100 SCF) calculated using the same program.

  19. Arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pidcoe, Stephen V. (Bonita, CA); Zink, Roger A. (Desoto, TX); Boroski, William N. (Aurora, IL); McCaw, William R. (Burr Ridge, IL)

    1993-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube of a magnet such as is used with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The arrangement includes a magnetic field alignment gauge that is carried through the magnet bore tube by a positioning shuttle in predetermined increments. The positioning shuttle includes an extensible body assembly which is actuated by an internal piston arrangement. A pair of spaced inflatable cuffs are carried by the body assembly and are selectively actuated in cooperation with pressurizing of the piston to selectively drive the positioning shuttle in an axial direction. Control of the shuttle is provided by programmed electronic computer means located exteriorly of the bore tube and which controls valves provided pressurized fluid to the inflatable cuss and the piston arrangement.

  20. 3D Residual Stress Field in Arteries: Novel Inverse Method Based on Optical Full-field Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badel, Pierre; Avril, Stéphane; 10.1111/str.12008

    2013-01-01

    Arterial tissue consists of multiple structurally important constituents that have individual material properties and associated stress-free configurations that evolve over time. This gives rise to residual stresses contributing to the homoeostatic state of stress in vivo as well as adaptations to perturbed loads, disease or injury. The existence of residual stresses in an intact but load-free excised arterial segment suggests compressive and tensile stresses, respectively, in the inner and outer walls. Accordingly, an artery ring springs open into a sector after a radial cut. The measurement of the opening angle is commonly used to deduce the residual stresses, which are the stresses required to close back the ring. The opening angle method provides an average estimate of circumferential residual stresses but it gives no information on local distributions through the thickness and along the axial direction. To address this lack, a new method is proposed in this article to derive maps of residual stresses usi...

  1. Magnetotransport measurements of current induced effective fields in Ta/CoFeB/MgO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Chaoliang; Yamanouchi, Michihiko Ikeda, Shoji; Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 ; Sato, Hideo; Fukami, Shunsuke; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo; Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577; WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577

    2013-12-23

    We evaluate current-induced effective magnetic fields in perpendicularly magnetized Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures from the external magnetic field angle dependence of the Hall resistance. We confirm the presence of two components of effective fields. The dependence of their magnitudes on Ta thickness implies that both components are related to the spin current in Ta layer generated by the spin Hall effect.

  2. Temperature-Dependent Polarization in Field-Effect Transport and Photovoltaic Measurements of Methylammonium Lead Iodide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Solar Cells. Energy & Environmental Science Almora, O. ;Electric Field. Energy & Environmental Science 2015, 8, 995-Efficiency. Energy & Environmental Science 2015, 8, 1602-

  3. Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator S-3120, United States 1. Introduction Knowledge of soil water content is critical to agricultural, hydrological-rays from H will be a function of the soils' water-content. To the best of our knowledge

  4. Automated spectro-goniometer: A spherical robot for the field measurement of the directional reflectance of snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    reflectance of snow Thomas H. Paintera) Institute for Computational Earth System Science, University the spectral hemispherical-directional reflectance factor HDRF of snow in the field across the wavelength range 0.4 2.5 m. Few measurements of snow's HDRF exist in the literature, in part caused by a lack

  5. VLF wave activity in the solar wind and the photoelectron effect in electric field measurements: Ulysses observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    solar wind streams, Ulysses observed nearly continuous electric wave activity with peak power belowVLF wave activity in the solar wind and the photoelectron effect in electric field measurements present observations of very low frequency (VLF) waves (0.2 to 448 Hz) made by Ulysses during the solar

  6. Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite for wind retrieval over the Great Lakes on a daily basis. We use data acquired by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT (QSCAT) satellite launched in June 1999 to derive wind speeds and directions over

  7. Direct, spectroscopic measurement of electric fields in a plasma-RF antenna interaction region in Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klepper, C Christopher; Hillis, Donald Lee; Isler, Ralph C; Hillairet, J.; Martin, E. H.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Martin, V.; Panayotis, Stephanie; Pegourie, B.; Harris, Jeffrey H

    2013-01-01

    Balmer-series spectral line profiles of deuterium emission near a lower-hybrid (3.7 GHz) wave, high power (1-4 MW) launcher were measured with high-spectral resolution in the Tore Supra tokamak and fitted to an atomic physics model which includes both Zeeman and dynamic Stark effects. The magnetic field is static and the electric field is assumed to be monochromatic at 3.7 GHz. The determined strength and direction of the high-frequency electric field is found to be in good agreement with the results of a simulation that computes the propagation of these lower hybrid waves into the plasma in the region around the launch antenna and specifically in the region of estimated peak emission contributing to the measurement. This agreement indicates feasibility for the use of dynamic Stark effect spectroscopy to study interaction at the plasma antenna interactions in a fusion plasma environment. (C) 2013 Elsevier B. V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heat inactivation of alkaline phosphatase in human milk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odumodu, Chinyelu Uzoamaka

    1979-01-01

    of bovine mii. k than in similar portions of human milk. The activity of the enzyme was, in general, three times more in colostrum than in normal human milk. A definite alkaline phosphatase acti. vity with stages of lactation wa- indeterminate because.... LIST OF FIGURES. I NTR ODD'CTI ON. vill 1X The Study and Its Purposes. The Objectives. . LITERATURE REVIEW 1 3 Distribution of the Enzyme in Various Milk Portions. Variation of Alkaline Phosphatase in Relation to 'the Progress of Lactation...

  9. Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

  10. Small, high frequency probe for internal magnetic field measurements in high temperature plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    temperature 50 eV , high density ( 1020 m 3 ) plasmas such as the field-reversed configuration FRC , it has eV , high density ( 1020 m 3 ) plasmas such as the field-reversed configuration FRC , it has be exposed to the plasma. An estimate of the limiting probe size for the FRC can be obtained from

  11. Exposure assessment of Electromagnetic Fields from Wireless Computer Networks (Wi-Fi); Phase 1 Laboratory Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Exposure assessment of Electromagnetic Fields from Wireless Computer Networks (Wi-Fi); Phase 1 networks, the most popular Wi-Fi devices used in the schools were identified. The regulatory standards bisecting the screen and keyboard. The maximum electric field strength recorded at 1 m varied from 719 mVm-1

  12. Temperature measurement of axisymmetric flames under the influence of magnetic field using Talbot interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Shilpi, E-mail: sipi.agarwal@gmail.com, E-mail: manojklakra@gmail.com, E-mail: cshakher@iddc.iitd.ac.in; Kumar, Manoj, E-mail: sipi.agarwal@gmail.com, E-mail: manojklakra@gmail.com, E-mail: cshakher@iddc.iitd.ac.in; Shakher, Chandra, E-mail: sipi.agarwal@gmail.com, E-mail: manojklakra@gmail.com, E-mail: cshakher@iddc.iitd.ac.in [Instrument Design Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, HauzKhas, New Delhi - 110016 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Combustion process control is related with ecological improvement and the problem of energy efficiency; hence it has a wide interest at both economical and scientific levels. Application of a magnetic field is one of the most promising methods of combustion control. The presence of magnetic field induces the changes in flame behavior. The effect of uniform magnetic field developed by permanent magnet is studied by Talbot interferometry using circular gratings. Experimental results show a small decrease in flame temperature and increase in flame dimensions.

  13. The effect of E{sub r} on MSE measurements of q, a new technique for measuring E{sub r}, and a test of the neoclassical electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarnstorff, M.C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H.

    1996-10-01

    Previous analysis of motional-Stark Effect (MSE) data to measure the q-profile ignored contributions from the plasma electric field. The MSE measurements are shown to be sensitive to the electric field and require significant corrections for plasmas with large rotation velocities or pressure gradients. MSE measurements from rotating plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) confirm the significance of these corrections and verify their magnitude. Several attractive configurations are considered for future MSE-based diagnostics for measuring the plasma radial electric field. MSE data from TFTR is analyzed to determine the change in the radial electric field between two plasmas. The measured electric field quantitatively agrees with the predictions of neoclassical theory. These results confirm the utility of a MSE electric field measurement.

  14. Irradiators for measuring the biological effects of low dose-rate ionizing radiation fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Matthew Allen

    2011-01-01

    Biological response to ionizing radiation differs with radiation field. Particle type, energy spectrum, and dose-rate all affect biological response per unit dose. This thesis describes methods of spectral analysis, ...

  15. Equilibrium and stability studies of plasmas confined in a dipole magnetic field using magnetic measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karim, Ishtak

    2007-01-01

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is the first experiment of its kind to use a levitated current ring to confine a plasma in a dipole magnetic field. Unlike most other confinement devices, plasma compressibility ...

  16. Measurements of the Ion Species of Cathodic Arc Plasma in an Axial Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oks, Efim

    2011-01-01

    distributions of a vacuum arc plasma," Rev. Sci. Instrum. ,by filtered cathodic arc plasma," physica status solidi (a),in high current vacuum arc plasma in a magnetic field," IEEE

  17. Measuring and shimming the magnetic field of a 4 Tesla MRI magnet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyriazis, Georgios

    1993-01-01

    The Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Laboratory (BMRL) of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) has ordered from the Texas Accelerator Center (TAC) a superconducting, self-shielded, solenoidal magnet with a maximum field of 4 Tesla...

  18. Method of measuring the dc electric field and other tokamak parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Princeton, NJ); Kirtz, Arnold H. (Princeton Junction, NJ)

    1992-01-01

    A method including externally imposing an impulsive momentum-space flux to perturb hot tokamak electrons thereby producing a transient synchrotron radiation signal, in frequency-time space, and the inference, using very fast algorithms, of plasma parameters including the effective ion charge state Z.sub.eff, the direction of the magnetic field, and the position and width in velocity space of the impulsive momentum-space flux, and, in particular, the dc toroidal electric field.

  19. Field measurements of frost penetration into a landfill cover that uses a paper sludge barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moo-Young, H.K.; LaPlante, C.; Zimmie, T.F.; Quiroz, J.

    1999-07-01

    Frost penetration is a major environmental concern in landfill design. Freezing and thawing cycles may deteriorate the permeability of the liner or cap. In this study, the depth of frost penetration into a landfill cover that uses paper sludge as the impermeable barrier (the Hubbardston landfill in Massachusetts) was measured using a frost measurement system. A thermistor probe measured the temperature at various depths. Although temperature measurements are important, soil resistivity measurements are required to accurately predict the freezing level, since soil resistivity increases greatly upon freezing. A conductivity probe measured the half-bridge voltage between conductivity rings and a ground rod. Data were collected in data loggers. The data collected from 1992--1996 showed that the frost level did not penetrate the paper sludge capping layer. Heavy snow cover throughout the winters decreased the depth of frost penetration by insulating the landfill. The high water content in the sludge also contributed to the lack of freezing.

  20. Effect of alkalinity in irrigation water on selected greenhouse crops 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdez Aguilar, Luis Alonso

    2005-11-01

    Effect of Alkalinity in Irrigation Water on Selected Greenhouse Crops. (August 2004) Luis Alonso Valdez Aguilar, B.S., Universidad Aut??noma de Nuevo Le??n, Mexico; M.S., Universidad Aut??noma Chapingo, Mexico Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. David...

  1. Rechargeable alkaline zinc/ferricyanide hybrid redox battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, G.B.; Hollandsworth, R.P.; Littauer, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    The zinc/ferricyanide battery system is described for utility load leveling and solar photovoltaic/wind applications, with advantages of high cell voltage, near-ambient temperature operation, flowing alkaline electrolyte, low-cost reactant storage, low toxicity, potentially long cycle life and low projected capital costs. 13 refs.

  2. Cactus and Alkalinity By Elton Roberts Ripon, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    their water directly from rain. These plants normally grow on a minimum of soil in rocky areas. Many appear dissolving in the rain water. It is this water that the cacti prefer. We have seen that dropping the p in general. The occurrence of highly alkaline water seems to be quite prevalent. For this reason we would

  3. Temperature-Dependent Polarization in Field-Effect Transport and Photovoltaic Measurements of Methylammonium Lead Iodide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Two-­?Layer Organic Photovoltaic Cell. Appl Phys Lett 1986,Sensitizers for Photovoltaic Cells. J Am Chem Soc 2009, 131,transistor, capacitor and photovoltaic cell measurements all

  4. Magnetic field structures of galaxies derived from analysis of Faraday rotation measures, and perspectives for the SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodion Stepanov; Tigran G. Arshakian; Rainer Beck; Peter Frick; Marita Krause

    2008-01-21

    The forthcoming new-generation radio telescope SKA (Square Kilometre Array) and its precursors will provide a rapidly growing number of polarized radio sources. Our analysis aims on what can be learned from these sources concerning the structure and evolution of magnetic fields of external galaxies. Recognition of magnetic structures is possible from Faraday rotation measures (${\\rm RM}$) towards background sources behind galaxies. We construct models for the ionized gas and magnetic field patterns of different azimuthal symmetry (axisymmetric, bisymmetric and quadrisymmetric spiral, and superpositions) plus a halo magnetic field. $\\RM$ fluctuations with a Kolmogorov spectrum due to turbulent fields and/or fluctuations in ionized gas density are superimposed. Assuming extrapolated number density counts of polarized sources, we generate a sample of $\\RM$ values within the solid angle of the galaxy. Applying various templates, we derive the minimum number of background sources and the minimum quality of the observations. For a large number of sources, reconstruction of the field structure without precognition becomes possible. Any large-scale regular component of the magnetic field can be clearly recognized from $\\RM$ data with help of the $\\chi^2$ criterium. Under favourite conditions, about a few dozens of polarized sources are sufficient for a reliable result.

  5. Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01

    Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance and longer lifetime for alkaline membrane fuel cells.

  6. Gravitationally enhanced depolarization of ultracold neutrons in magnetic field gradients, and implications for neutron electric dipole moment measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. G. Harris; J. M. Pendlebury; N. E. Devenish

    2013-06-05

    Trapped ultracold neutrons (UCN) have for many years been the mainstay of experiments to search for the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron, a critical parameter in constraining scenarios of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Because their energies are so low, UCN preferentially populate the lower region of their physical enclosure, and do not sample uniformly the ambient magnetic field throughout the storage volume. This leads to a substantial increase in the rate of depolarization, as well as to shifts in the measured frequency of the stored neutrons. Consequences for EDM measurements are discussed.

  7. Measurement of Rb 5P3/2 scalar and tensor polarizabilities in a 1064 nm light field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yun-Jhih; Raithel, Georg

    2015-01-01

    We employ doubly-resonant two-photon excitation into the 74S Rydberg state to spectroscopically measure the dynamic scalar polarizability, alpha 0, and tensor polarizability, alpha 2, of rubidium 5P3/2. To reach the necessary high intensities, we employ a cavity-generated 1064 nm optical-lattice light field, allowing us to obtain intensities near 2x10^11 W/m^2. In the evaluation of the data we use a self-referencing method that renders the polarizability measurement largely free from the intensity calibration of the laser light field. We obtain experimental values alpha 0 =-1149 (pm 2.5 percent) and alpha 2 = 563 (pm 4.2 percent), in atomic units. Methods and results are supported by simulations.

  8. High-performance alkaline ionomer for alkaline exchange membrane fuel cells L. Zeng, T.S. Zhao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay used as the base polymer to synthesize the alkaline ionomer over the past decades [5,6]. Typically), responding to the number of the conductive groups in the polymer. An increase in the IEC, however, will lead

  9. Measurement of the strength of magnetic fields by means of liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borton, Martha Clara

    1915-01-01

    ­ vestigators, with the exception of A.P. Wills, had been limited to the use of exploring coils for such work. Prom its galvanometer throw when the coil is put into or taken out of the field, its effective area, and the galvanometer constant, the field... strength can be determined as follows: where R is the resistance in ohms, k is the galvanometer constant, #tis the galvanometer throw and A is the effective area. Quincke (3) used an exploring coil, calibrating the galvanometer from comparison...

  10. Field line equipotentiality and ion neutral collision frequencies in the dynamo region deduced from Saint-Santin ion drift measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taieb, C.; Blanc, M.

    1981-08-01

    We analyze three-dimensional ion drift data from the Saint-Santin incoherent scatter facility to test experimentally the theoretical description of ion transport in the ionospheric dynamo layer, and to deduce electric fields and ion neutral collision frequencies from the observed drifts. Using a geometrical representation of the ion momentum equation, we show that at middle latitudes, because horizontal neutral wind influences ion motions both parallel and orthogonal to the field lines in the ionospheric dynamo layer, the information contained in a three-dimensional ion drift measurement is redundant, thus permitting to check the standard theoretical description of ionospheric electrodynamics in two ways. First, assuming a model ion-neutral collision frequency profile, one can deduce the north-south perpendicular component of the electric field function of height in the E region from Saint-Santin drift data. We find that its altitude variations remain within the experimental uncertainty of the method, in agreement with the theoretical assumption of equipotential field lines. Second, assuming that the electric field is constant in altitude, one can determine the ion collision ratio, or ratio of the ion collision frequency to the ion gyrofrequency, from a comparison of E and F region drift measurements. Daily median values of the ion collision frequencies, thus obtained for each of the three seasons, are found to compare reasonably well with ion collision frequencies derived from the Jacchia neutral atmosphere model for the case of the equinox sample, but determinations for the other seasons are contaminated by a high level of measurement noise.

  11. Design of A Conduction-cooled 4T Superconducting Racetrack for Multi-field Coupling Measurement System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuquan; Wu, Wei; Guan, Mingzhi; Wu, Beimin; Mei, Enming; Xin, Canjie

    2015-01-01

    A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet producing a transverse field of 4 Tesla has been designed for the new generation multi-field coupling measurement system, which was used to study the mechanical behavior of superconducting samples at cryogenic temperature and intense magnetic fields. Considering experimental costs and coordinating with system of strain measurements by contactless signals (nonlinear CCD optics system), the racetrack type for the coil winding was chosen in our design, and a compact cryostat with a two-stage GM cryocooler was designed and manufactured for the superconducting magnet. The magnet was composed of a pair of flat racetrack coils wound by NbTi/Cu superconducting composite wires, a copper and stainless steel combinational form and two Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy superconducting current leads. All the coils were connected in series and can be powered with a single power supply. The maximum central magnetic field is 4 T. In order to support the high stress and uniform thermal distribution in t...

  12. Field Instruments for Real Time In-Situ Crude Oil Concentration Measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, C. B.; Bonner, J. S.; Page, C. A.; Arrambide, G.; Sterling Jr., M. C.; Ojo, T.

    2003-01-01

    The Texas Water Resources Institute awarded a Mill Scholarship to M.C. Sterling, Jr in 2002. This project describes five sensors for rapid monitoring of crude oil concentrations in an aquatic system. These measurements are critical for monitoring...

  13. Lift, drag and flow-field measurements around a small ornithopter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakumar, B J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez - Alarcon, Ramiro [NMSU; Shu, Fangjun [NMSU

    2011-01-12

    The aerodynamics of a flight-worthy, radio controlled ornithopter is investigated using a combination of Particle-Image Velocimetry (PIV), load cell measurements, and high-speed photography of smoke visualizations. The lift and thrust forces of the ornithopter are measured at various flow speeds, flapping frequencies and angles of attack to characterize the flight performance. These direct force measurements are then compared with forces estimated using control volume analysis on PIV data. High-speed photography of smoke streaks is used to visualize the evolution of leading edge vortices, and to qualitatively infer the effect of wing deformation on the net downwash. Vortical structures in the wake are compared to previous studies on root flapping, and direct measurements of flapping efficiency are used to argue that the current ornithopter operates sub-optimally in converting the input energy into propulsive work.

  14. Output Field-Quadrature Measurements and Squeezing in Ultrastrong Cavity-QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Stassi; Salvatore Savasta; Luigi Garziano; Bernardo Spagnolo; Franco Nori

    2015-09-30

    We study the squeezing of output quadratures of an electro-magnetic field escaping from a resonator coupled to a general quantum system with arbitrary interaction strengths. The generalized theoretical analysis of output squeezing proposed here is valid for all the interaction regimes of cavity-quantum electrodynamics: from the weak to the strong, ultrastrong, and deep coupling regimes. For coupling rates comparable or larger then the cavity resonance frequency, the standard input-output theory for optical cavities fails to calculate the correct output field-quadratures and predicts a non-negligible amount of output squeezing, even if the system is in its ground state. Here we show that, for arbitrary interactions and cavity-embedded quantum systems, no squeezing can be found in the output-field quadratures if the system is in its ground state. We also apply the proposed theoretical approach to study the output squeezing produced by: (i) an artificial two-level atom embedded in a coherently-excited cavity; and (ii) a cascade-type three-level system interacting with a cavity field mode. In the latter case the output squeezing arises from the virtual photons of the atom-cavity dressed states. This work extends the possibility of predicting and analyzing continuous-variable optical quantum-state tomography when optical resonators interact very strongly with other quantum systems.

  15. Experimental Measurements of Stretching Fields in Fluid Mixing Greg A. Voth1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollub, Jerry P.

    points of Poincar´e maps. Contours of a passive impurity field are found at each instant to be oriented for understanding mixing [2­5]. However, the building blocks of this theory, i.e. the fixed points and invariant authors have noted the way a passive scalar pat- tern is aligned with calculated unstable manifolds

  16. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Measurements and Modeling of the Flow Field in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzman, Jerry M.

    fuel and air mass flow rates are found to be very similar except in the near field region of the jet, reductions in NOx emissions from land-based, gas turbine combustors have been achieved mainly through lean developed to address these issues. The unique design of this combustor allows it to burn gaseous or liquid

  17. Lightning-driven electric fields measured in the lower ionosphere: Implications for transient luminous events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    conductivity enhancement, or it might be evidence of flaws in the electromagnetic pulse mechanism for elves-electrostatic field (QSF) model for sprites and halos and the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) model for elves. In the QSF been successfully accomplished, since it is typically too low in altitude for rockets and satellites

  18. Use of Remote Technology in the Surface Water Environmental Monitoring Program at SRS Reducing Measurements in the Field - 13336

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, T.; Terry, B.; Meyer, A.; Hall, J.; Allen, P.; Hughey, D.; Hartley, T.

    2013-07-01

    There are a wide range of sensor and remote technology applications available for use in environmental monitoring programs. Each application has its own set of limitations and can be challenging when attempting to utilize it under diverse environmental field conditions. The Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Program has implemented several remote sensing and surface water flow technologies that have increased the quality of the data while reducing the number of field measurements. Implementation of this technology reduced the field time for personnel that commute across the Savannah River Site (SRS) over a span of 310 square miles. The wireless surface water flow technology allows for immediate notification of changing field conditions or equipment failure thus reducing data-loss or erroneous field data and improving data-quality. This wireless flow technology uses the stage-to-flow methodology coupled with implementation of a robust highly accurate Acoustic Doppler Profiler system for measuring discharge under various field conditions. Savings for implementation of the wireless flow application and Flowlink{sup R} technology equates to approximately 1175 hours annually for the radiological liquid effluent and surveillance programs. The SonTek River Suveyor and Flowtracker technologies are utilized for calibration of the wireless flow monitoring devices in the site streams and validation of effluent flows at the SRS. Implementation of similar wireless devices is also planned in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm-water Monitoring Program. SRS personnel have been developing a unique flow actuator device. This device activates an ISCO{sup TM} automated sampler under flowing conditions at storm-water outfall locations across the site. This technology is unique in that it was designed to be used under field conditions with rapid changes in flow and sedimentation where traditional actuators have been unsuccessful in tripping the automated sampler. In addition, automated rain gauges will be tied into this technology for immediate notification of rain at storm-water locations further enhancing the automation of environmental data collection. These technological improvements at SRS have led to data-quality improvements while reducing the field technician time in the field and costs for maintaining the traditional environmental monitoring applications. (authors)

  19. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, R.; Anand, V. Ganesan, K.; Tabrizi, P.; Torres, R.; Grant, B.; Catina, D.; Ryan, D.; Borman, C.; Krueckl, C.

    2014-02-15

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175?°C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases (referred to as “live oils”) are shown. This is the first time low-field NMR measurements have been performed at such high temperatures and pressures on live crude oil samples. We discuss the details of the apparatus design, tuning, calibration, and operation. NMR data acquired at multiple temperatures and pressures on a live oil sample are discussed.

  20. High-field de Haas{endash}van Alphen measurements in Pd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vuillemin, J.J. [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Harrison, N. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Goodrich, R.G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The de Haas{endash}van Alphen (dHvA) effect in 99.999{percent} pure palladium has been observed in pulsed fields up to 60 T directed along [100]. We report a dHvA frequency of 73.5 kT with a cyclotron effective mass=12.5m{sub 0}. Such a frequency is not reported previously but is predicted by band theory for the open hole sheet of the Fermi surface. We also observe strong harmonic content near 50 T for the electron sheet and this is interpreted in terms of a field-dependent {ital g} factor. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. POISON SPIDER FIELD CHEMICAL FLOOD PROJECT, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Arnell; Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi

    2004-11-01

    A reservoir engineering and geologic study concluded that approximate 7,852,000 bbls of target oil exits in Poison Spider. Field pore volume, OOIP, and initial oil saturation are defined. Potential injection water has a total dissolved solids content of 1,275 mg/L with no measurable divalent cations. If the Lakota water consistently has no measurable cations, the injection water does not require softening to dissolve alkali. Produced water total dissolved solids were 2,835 mg/L and less than 20 mg/L hardness as the sum of divalent cations. Produced water requires softening to dissolve chemicals. Softened produced water was used to dissolve chemicals in these evaluations. Crude oil API gravity varies across the field from 19.7 to 22.2 degrees with a dead oil viscosity of 95 to 280 cp at 75 F. Interfacial tension reductions of up to 21,025 fold (0.001 dyne/cm) were developed with fifteen alkaline-surfactant combinations at some alkali concentration. An additional three alkaline-surfactant combinations reduced the interfacial tension greater than 5,000 fold. NaOH generally produced the lowest interfacial tension values. Interfacial tension values of less than 0.021 dyne/cm were maintained when the solutions were diluted with produced water to about 60%. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} when mixed with surfactants did not reduce interfacial tension values to levels at which incremental oil can be expected. NaOH without surfactant interfacial tension reduction is at a level where some additional oil might be recovered. Most of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions producing ultra low interfacial tension gave type II- phase behavior. Only two solutions produced type III phase behavior. Produced water dilution resulted in maintenance of phase type for a number of solutions at produced water dilutions exceeding 80% dilution. The average loss of phase type occurred at 80% dilution. Linear corefloods were performed to determine relative permeability end points, chemical-rock compatibility, polymer injectivity, dynamic chemical retention by rock, and recommended injected polymer concentration. Average initial oil saturation was 0.796 Vp. Produced water injection recovered 53% OOIP leaving an average residual oil saturation of 0.375 Vp. Poison Spider rock was strongly water-wet with a mobility ratio for produced water displacing the 280 cp crude oil of 8.6. Core was not sensitive to either alkali or surfactant injection. Injectivity increased 60 to 80% with alkali plus surfactant injection. Low and medium molecular weight polyacrylamide polymers (Flopaam 3330S and Flopaam 3430S) dissolved in either an alkaline-surfactant solution or softened produced water injected and flowed through Poison Spider rock. Recommended injected polyacrylamide concentration is 2,100 mg/L for both polymers for a unit mobility ratio. Radial corefloods were performed to evaluate oil recovery efficiency of different chemical solutions. Waterflood oil recovery averaged 46.4 OOIP and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery averaged an additional 18.1% OIP for a total of 64.6% OOIP. Oil cut change due to injection of a 1.5 wt% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} plus 0.05 wt% Petrostep B-100 plus 0.05 wt% Stepantan AS1216 plus 2100 mg/L Flopaam 3430S was from 2% to a peak of 23.5%. Additional study might determine the impact on oil recovery of a lower polymer concentration. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood field implementation outline report was written.

  2. Time-separated oscillatory fields for high-precision mass measurements on short-lived Al and Ca nuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. George; G. Audi; B. Blank; K. Blaum; M. Breitenfeldt; U. Hager; F. Herfurth; A. Herlert; A. Kellerbauer; H. -J. Kluge; M. Kretzschmar; D. Lunney; R. Savreux; S. Schwarz; L. Schweikhard; C. Yazidjian

    2008-01-17

    High-precision Penning trap mass measurements on the stable nuclide 27Al as well as on the short-lived radionuclides 26Al and 38,39Ca have been performed by use of radiofrequency excitation with time-separated oscillatory fields, i.e. Ramsey's method, as recently introduced for the excitation of the ion motion in a Penning trap, was applied. A comparison with the conventional method of a single continuous excitation demonstrates its advantage of up to ten times shorter measurements. The new mass values of 26,27Al clarify conflicting data in this specific mass region. In addition, the resulting mass values of the superallowed beta-emitter 38Ca as well as of the groundstate of the beta-emitter 26Al m confirm previous measurements and corresponding theoretical corrections of the ft-values.

  3. Electric-field gradients at the Zr sites in Zr3Fe: Measured using perturbed-angular-correlation spectroscopy and calculated using band theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Electric-field gradients at the Zr sites in Zr3Fe: Measured using perturbed-angular-correlation spectroscopy and calculated using band theory Arthur T. Motta, Stephen E. Cumblidge, and Gary L. Catchen; published 13 December 2001 We have measured the electric-field-gradient EFG parameters VZZ

  4. Measurement and verification protocols -- Facts and fiction, news from the field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiller, S.R.; Kromer, J.S.

    1998-07-01

    This paper provides descriptions of the 1997 International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP), the 1996 Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Measurement Verification Guidelines, and the draft ASHRAE 13-P Measurement of Energy and Demand Savings Guideline. These protocols and guidelines are establishing a framework for measurement and verification (M and V) activities throughout the world. The M and V protocols are also being used by the energy performance contracting industry as an educational tool and as the starting point for program specific M and V guidelines. Beyond descriptions of the documents the paper covers how the documents are being sued and the perspective of various user groups--such as government entities, utilities, private companies, and energy services companies. The protocols were designed around four main M and V options to allow flexibility in their application to different types of projects. However, this intentional flexibility has caused confusion among some users who are now required to select the appropriate option, method, level or rigor, and accuracy for their projects. Eventually though, as the protocols are more widely used and more documentation is available on M and V costs and accuracy the industry will become more comfortable selecting the best option and applying the M and V protocols in a more consistent manner for different types of projects and programs.

  5. Development of alkaline zinc/ferricyanide battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollandsworth, R.P.; Adams, G.B.; Webber

    1983-08-01

    The zinc/ferro-ferricyanide battery system is intended for utility load leveling and solar photovoltaic/wind applications with advantages of high cyclic efficiency, high cell voltage, random cycling without zinc strip cycles and with switching times of less than 5 ms from load to insolation or vice versa. Self-discharge has been measured at 1.6%/day. The system demonstrates excellent electrochemical performance. Cell voltages are 1.88 V OCV and 1.61 V discharge at 35 mA/cm/sup 2/ or 57 mW/cm/sup 2/ in 2N NaOH at 40/sup 0/C (Nafion N-125 separator). Cell polarization losses are almost entirely resistive and within the separator. Over 800 4-hr cycles have been demonstrated in cell of 60-cm/sup 2/ nominal area (70 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity) with mean energy efficiency of 76.6 + or - 2.1 percent). Similarly, a 60-cm/sup 2/ cell has demonstrated over 220, 11 to 17 hour cycles (255 + or - 48 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity) with a mean energy efficiency of 75.3 + or - 5.1 percent.

  6. Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernard, Patrick (Massy, FR); Baudry, Michelle (Le Pontaroux, FR)

    2000-12-05

    A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

  7. Measurements of ionospheric electric field convection by the long-line technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDougall, J.W.

    1981-06-01

    Ionospheric E x B convections are measured by a new technique that uses satellite scintillations. The measurements are for and ionospheric region centred on 39/sup 0/N, 82/sup 0/W geographic or 53/sup 0/ invarient latitude. Results are presented for spring equinox 1980. The quiet condition eastward convection drift is approximately V/sub i/E = -12+43 cos(2..pi../24)(t-13.4). During disturbed conditions at nighttime the westward convection becomes large and highly variable. The northward perpendicular E x B convection is approximately V/sub i/N = -5+13 cos (2..pi../12)(t-10.5)+6 cos (2..pi../24) (t-11.5) m/s during quiet conditions. During disturbed conditions the semidiurnal component of the northward convection increases by about a factor of 3 and becomes larger than the diurnal.

  8. Measurement of magnetic field produced by the interaction of ultra-short, ultra-intense fs laser pulse with matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamponi, F.; Luebcke, A.; Uschmann, I.; Foerster, E.; Sauerbrey, R. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz, 1 07743 Jena (Germany); Kroupp, E.; Stambulchik, E.; Maron, Y. [Weizmann Institute of Science Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Fisher, D. [Soreq, NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel)

    2006-04-07

    We report on the preliminary results of a first experiment where the Zeeman effect in the X-ray range was exploited to monitor the quasi static magnetic field, created by the interaction of an ultra-short (80 fs) ultra-intense fs laser pulse with solid matter.The involved laser intensities ranged between 1018 and 5{center_dot}1019 W/cm2. The target was a 25 {mu}m thick Ti foil. We monitored the X-ray emissions of the K{alpha}1 and K{alpha}2 lines by means of a spectrometer with 0.3 eV energy resolution and 20 {mu}m spatial resolution. The spectrometer was composed by a toroidally bent GaAs crystal and a Si plane crystal in dispersionless setup at 45 deg., working as polarizer, to distinguish contribution to the line broadening coming from other mechanisms.We observe an increasing broadening of the linewidth in dependence of the intensity but no differences between polarized and non-polarized spectra, probably because of a too low spatial resolution. A linewidth increase was measured to be 30%. We are working to determine the role of mechanisms other than the Zeeman effect in the measurements. Possible mechanisms causing line broadening, i.e. Stark effect, satellite lines, are discussed.If the Zeeman effect was the main cause for the measured line broadening, a magnetic field of 5000 tesla would be expected.

  9. Development of three-wavelength CCD image pyrometer used for the temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Zhi; Bai, Haicheng [State Key Laboratory of Synthetical Automation for Process Industries, School of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Synthetical Automation for Process Industries, School of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2014-02-15

    This paper develops an imaging based three-color pyrometer for the monitoring of temperature distribution in a continuous casting billet. A novel optical device, together with an embedded electronic system, is designed to sequentially collect a dark image and three thermal images with specified wavelengths on a same monochromatic charge-coupled-device (CCD). The three thermal images provide the basis for the determination of target temperature, while the dark image is used to online eliminate the dark noise of CCD with a differential method. This image pyrometer is not only independent of target emissivity but also overcomes the dissimilarity of measuring accuracy between the micro-sensors of CCD resulted from the non-uniformity of pixels’ intensity response and the vignetting of optical system. Furthermore, a precise two-color temperature field measuring model on the CCD pyrometer is established, based on which a self-adaptive light-integration mechanism is presented. Compared with the traditional fixed light-integration method, the measuring range of the pyrometer is greatly extended and its sensitivity in low temperature segment is improved. The test results in a steel factory demonstrate that the pyrometer is capable of meeting the requirement of surface temperature measurements about casting billets. Reliability and accuracy of measurement results are also discussed herein.

  10. Investigations Into the Nature of Alkaline Soluble, Non-Pertechnetate Technetium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Edwards, Matthew K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Peterson, James M.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.

    2013-11-14

    This report summarizes work accomplished in fiscal year (FY) 2013, exploring the chemistry of a low-valence technetium(I) species, [Tc(CO)3(H2O)3]+, a compound of interest due to its implication in the speciation of alkaline-soluble technetium in several Hanford tank waste supernatants. Various aspects of FY 2013’s work were sponsored both by Washington River Protection Solutions and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection; because of this commonality, both sponsors’ work is summarized in this report. There were three tasks in this FY 2013 study. The first task involved examining the speciation of [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ in alkaline solution by 99Tc nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The second task involved the purchase and installation of a microcalorimeter suitable to study the binding affinity of [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ with various inorganic and organic compounds relevant to Hanford tank wastes, although the actual measure of such binding affinities is scheduled to occur in future FYs. The third task involved examining the chemical reactivity of [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ as relevant to the development of a [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ spectroelectrochemical sensor based on fluorescence spectroscopy.

  11. A small unperturbing probe for the measurement and mapping of electric fields at extremely low frequencies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrekenhamer, Abraham

    1975-01-01

    ) Substituting from (1. 4) into (1. 5) [4: p. 45] yields p V VU= ?? C (1. 6a) or (1. 6b) This is known as Poisson's equation. For the special case of charge- free space p = 0 and VV=0 (1 7) Eq. (1. 7) is known as Laplace's equation, a second order...) dt = q (t) = ks E (t) dS (1. 19) D For the cubical geometry: 11 f i (t)dt = ks E dS z z Z face (1. 20) Let E denote the average electric field over the z face. Then z f 2 i (t)dt = kE sJ dS ~skE a z z z Z face (1. 21) where a is the cube...

  12. Cloning Hubble Deep Fields I: A Model-Independent Measurement of Galaxy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rychard J. Bouwens; Tom Broadhurst; Joseph Silk

    1998-10-29

    We present a model-independent method of quantifying galaxy evolution in high-resolution images, which we apply to the Hubble Deep Field (HDF). Our procedure is to k-correct all pixels belonging to the images of a complete set of bright galaxies and then to replicate each galaxy image to higher redshift by the product of its space density, 1/V_{max}, and the cosmological volume. The set of bright galaxies is itself selected from the HDF, because presently the HDF provides the highest quality UV images of a redshift-complete sample of galaxies (31 galaxies with I24) are much smaller, more numerous, and less regular than our ``no-evolution'' extrapolation, for any interesting geometry. A higher proportion of HDF galaxies ``dropout'' in both U and B, indicating that some galaxies were brighter at higher redshifts than our ``cloned'' z\\sim0.5 population.

  13. Reversing the weak measurement of an arbitrary field with finite photon number 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Qingqing; Al-Amri, M.; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

    2009-01-01

    ?, can still be reversed probabilistically. If the photon de- tector registered k ?m?n?k? clicks during time t, the com- ponent ?n? will change into e??a? ?a?ta?k?n? = e???n?k?t n ! /?n ? k?!?n ? k? , ?11? where we have ignored the prefactor e???t1... efficiency of the reversing operation ?10?. In a recent experiment ?11?, based on a proposal by Korotkov and Jordan ?12?, the rever- sal of a weak measurement on a superconducting phase qubit was performed. A general procedure for N-dimensional sys- tem...

  14. Cropland Field Monitoring: MMV Page 1 Montana Cropland Enrolled Farm Fields Carbon Sequestration Field Sampling, Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification: Application of Visible-Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (VNIR) and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Spangler; Ross Bricklemyer; David Brown

    2012-03-15

    There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laboratory based soil characterization typically requires significant soil processing, which is time and resource intensive. This severely limits application for large-region soil characterization. Thus, development of rapid and accurate methods for characterizing soils are needed to map soil properties for precision agriculture applications, improve regional and global soil carbon (C) stock and flux estimates and efficiently map sub-surface metal contamination, among others. The greatest gains for efficient soil characterization will come from collecting soil data in situ, thus minimizing soil sample transportation, processing, and lab-based measurement costs. Visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VisNIR) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are two complementary, yet fundamentally different spectroscopic techniques that have the potential to meet this need. These sensors have the potential to be mounted on a soil penetrometer and deployed for rapid soil profile characterization at field and landscape scales. Details of sensor interaction, efficient data management, and appropriate statistical analysis techniques for model calibrations are first needed. In situ or on-the-go VisNIR spectroscopy has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive tool for intensively mapping soil texture and organic carbon (SOC). While lab-based VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for estimating various soil properties, few experiments have compared the predictive accuracy of on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Eight north central Montana wheat fields were intensively interrogated using on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Lab-based spectral data consistently provided more accurate predictions than on-the-go data. However, neither in situ nor lab-based spectroscopy yielded even semi-quantitative SOC predictions. There was little SOC variability to explain across the eight fields, and on-the-go VisNIR was not able to capture the subtle SOC variability in these Montana soils. With more variation in soil clay content compared to SOC, both lab and on-the-go VisNIR showed better explanatory power. There are several potential explanations for poor on-the-go predictive accuracy: soil heterogeneity, field moisture, consistent sample presentation, and a difference between the spatial support of on-the-go measurements and soil samples collected for laboratory analyses. Though the current configuration of a commercially available on-the-go VisNIR system allows for rapid field scanning, on-the-go soil processing (i.e. drying, crushing, and sieving) could improve soil carbon predictions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging elemental analysis technology with the potential to provide rapid, accurate and precise analysis of soil constituents, such as carbon, in situ across landscapes. The research team evaluated the accuracy of LIBS for measuring soil profile carbon in field-moist, intact soil cores simulating conditions that might be encountered by a probe-mounted LIBS instrument measuring soil profile carbon in situ. Over the course of three experiments, more than120 intact soil cores from eight north central Montana wheat fields and the Washington State University (WSU) Cook Agronomy Farm near Pullman, WA were interrogated with LIBS for rapid total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), and SOC determination. Partial least squares regression models were derived and independently validated at field- and regional scales. Researchers obtained the best LIBS validation predictions for IC followed by TC and SOC. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is fundamentally an elemental analysis technique, yet LIBS PLS2 models appeared to discriminate IC from TC. Regression coefficients from initial models suggested a reliance upon stoichiometric relationships between carbon (247.8 nm) and other elements

  15. Measurement of Coherent Emission and Linear Polarization of Photons by Electrons in the Strong Fields of Aligned Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NA59 Collaboration; A. Apyan; R. O. Avakian; B. Badelek; S. Ballestrero; C. Biino; I. Birol; P. Cenci; S. H. Connell; S. Eichblatt; T. Fonseca; A. Freund; B. Gorini; R. Groess; K. Ispirian; T. J. Ketel; Yu. V. Kononets; A. Lopez; A. Mangiarotti; B. van Rens; J. P. F. Sellschop; M. Shieh; P. Sona; V. Strakhovenko; E. Uggerhoj; U. I. Uggerhoj; G. Unel; M. Velasco; Z. Z. Vilakazi; O. Wessely

    2004-06-24

    We present new results regarding the features of high energy photon emission by an electron beam of 178 GeV penetrating a 1.5 cm thick single Si crystal aligned at the Strings-Of-Strings (SOS) orientation. This concerns a special case of coherent bremsstrahlung where the electron interacts with the strong fields of successive atomic strings in a plane and for which the largest enhancement of the highest energy photons is expected. The polarization of the resulting photon beam was measured by the asymmetry of electron-positron pair production in an aligned diamond crystal analyzer. By the selection of a single pair the energy and the polarization of individual photons could be measured in an the environment of multiple photons produced in the radiator crystal. Photons in the high energy region show less than 20% linear polarization at the 90% confidence level.

  16. Measuring Galaxy Disk Mass with the SparsePak Integral Field Unit on WIYN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Verheijen; Matthew Bershady; David Andersen

    2002-01-21

    We present first results from commissioning data of the SparsePak Integral Field Unit on the WIYN telescope. SparsePak is a bundle of 82 fibers, each 5 arcsec in diameter and arranged in a sparsely filled, 76x77 arcsec hexagonal grid. NGC 3982, a nearly face-on, blue and very high surface brightness galaxy, was mapped in three spectral regions; around 5130A (MgI), 6680A (H-alpha) and 8660A (CaII-triplet) with FWHM spectral resolutions of 24, 16 and 37 km/s respectively. At 3.5 disk scale lengths, the spectra of 18 fibers were averaged after deprojection of the rotation curve. Stellar velocity dispersions were determined in the CaII region by convolving the spectrum of a K0.5-III template star with a Gaussian of varying FWHM and finding the best match to the azimuthally avaraged galaxy spectra. A radial mass surface density profile has been derived for a variety of scale heights assuming an isothermal vertical density profile. At two disk scale lengths, the mass surface density of N3982 is ~3 times higher than that of the Milky Way in the solar neighborhood. Surprisingly, the stellar rotation curve of this compact and high surface brightness galaxy is substantially sub-maximum.

  17. Cloning Hubble Deep Fields: A Model-Independent Measurement of Galaxy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rychard J. Bouwens; Tom Broadhurst; Joseph Silk

    1998-10-26

    We present a model-independent method of quantifying galaxy evolution in high- resolution images, which we apply to the Hubble Deep Field (HDF). Our procedure is to k-correct the pixels belonging to the images of a complete set of bright galaxies and then to replicate each galaxy image to higher redshift by the product of its space density, 1/V_{max}, and the cosmological volume. The set of bright galaxies is itself selected from the HDF because presently the HDF provides the highest quality UV images of a redshift-complete sample of galaxies (31 galaxies with I24) are much smaller, more numerous, and less regular than our ``no-evolution'' extrapolation, for any relevant geometry. A higher proportion of HDF galaxies ``dropout'' in both U and B, indicating that some galaxies were brighter at higher redshifts than our ``cloned'' z\\sim0.5 population. By simple image transformations we demonstrate that bolometric luminosity evolution generates galaxies which are too large and the contribution of any evolving dwarf population is uninterestingly small. A plausible fit is provided by `mass-conserving' density-evolution, consistent with hierarchical growth of small-scale structure. Finally, we show the potential for improvement using the Advanced Camera, with its superior UV and optical performance.

  18. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors: Automated measurement development for full field digital mammography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, E. E.; Sellers, T. A.; Lu, B.; Heine, J. J.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors are used for standardized mammographic reporting and are assessed visually. This reporting is clinically relevant because breast composition can impact mammographic sensitivity and is a breast cancer risk factor. New techniques are presented and evaluated for generating automated BI-RADS breast composition descriptors using both raw and calibrated full field digital mammography (FFDM) image data.Methods: A matched case-control dataset with FFDM images was used to develop three automated measures for the BI-RADS breast composition descriptors. Histograms of each calibrated mammogram in the percent glandular (pg) representation were processed to create the new BR{sub pg} measure. Two previously validated measures of breast density derived from calibrated and raw mammograms were converted to the new BR{sub vc} and BR{sub vr} measures, respectively. These three measures were compared with the radiologist-reported BI-RADS compositions assessments from the patient records. The authors used two optimization strategies with differential evolution to create these measures: method-1 used breast cancer status; and method-2 matched the reported BI-RADS descriptors. Weighted kappa (?) analysis was used to assess the agreement between the new measures and the reported measures. Each measure's association with breast cancer was evaluated with odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for body mass index, breast area, and menopausal status. ORs were estimated as per unit increase with 95% confidence intervals.Results: The three BI-RADS measures generated by method-1 had ? between 0.25–0.34. These measures were significantly associated with breast cancer status in the adjusted models: (a) OR = 1.87 (1.34, 2.59) for BR{sub pg}; (b) OR = 1.93 (1.36, 2.74) for BR{sub vc}; and (c) OR = 1.37 (1.05, 1.80) for BR{sub vr}. The measures generated by method-2 had ? between 0.42–0.45. Two of these measures were significantly associated with breast cancer status in the adjusted models: (a) OR = 1.95 (1.24, 3.09) for BR{sub pg}; (b) OR = 1.42 (0.87, 2.32) for BR{sub vc}; and (c) OR = 2.13 (1.22, 3.72) for BR{sub vr}. The radiologist-reported measures from the patient records showed a similar association, OR = 1.49 (0.99, 2.24), although only borderline statistically significant.Conclusions: A general framework was developed and validated for converting calibrated mammograms and continuous measures of breast density to fully automated approximations for the BI-RADS breast composition descriptors. The techniques are general and suitable for a broad range of clinical and research applications.

  19. Feasibility of Using Measurements of Internal Components ofTankless Water Heaters for Field Monitoring of Energy and Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Jim; Biermayer, Peter

    2008-04-17

    The objective of this study was to determine if it was feasible to collect information regarding energy use and hot water delivery from tankless gas water heaters using the sensors and controls built into the water heaters. This could then be used to determine the water heater efficiency ? the ratio of energy out (hot water delivered) to energy in (energy in the gas) in actual residential installations. The goal was to be as unobtrusive as possible, and to avoid invalidating warranties or exposing researchers to liability issues. If feasible this approach would reduce the costs of instrumentation.This paper describes the limited field and laboratory investigations to determine if using the sensors and controls built into tankless water heaters is feasible for field monitoring.It was more complicated to use the existing gas flow, water and temperature sensors than was anticipated. To get the signals from the existing sensors and controls is difficult and may involve making changes that would invalidate manufacturer warrantees. The procedures and methods for using signals from the existing gas valves, water flow meters and temperature sensors will vary by model. To be able to monitor different models and brands would require detailed information about each model and brand.Based on these findings, we believe that for field monitoring projects it would be easier, quicker and safer to connect external meters to measure the same parameters rather than using the sensors and controls built into tankless water heaters.

  20. Development of neutron measurement in high gamma field using new nuclear emulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawarabayashi, J.; Ishihara, K.; Takagi, K.; Tomita, H.; Iguchi, T.; Naka, T.; Morishima, K.; Maeda, S.

    2011-07-01

    To precisely measure the neutron emissions from a spent fuel assembly of a fast breeder reactor, we formed nuclear emulsions based on a non-sensitized Oscillation Project with Emulsion tracking Apparatus (OPERA) film with AgBr grain sizes of 60, 90, and 160 nm. The efficiency for {sup 252}Cf neutron detection of the new emulsion was calculated to be 0.7 x 10{sup -4}, which corresponded to an energy range from 0.3 to 2 MeV and was consistent with a preliminary estimate based on experimental results. The sensitivity of the new emulsion was also experimentally estimated by irradiating with 565 keV and 14 MeV neutrons. The emulsion with an AgBr grain size of 60 nm had the lowest sensitivity among the above three emulsions but was still sensitive enough to detect protons. Furthermore, the experimental data suggested that there was a threshold linear energy transfer of 15 keV/{mu}m for the new emulsion, below which no silver clusters developed. Further development of nuclear emulsion with an AgBr grain size of a few tens of nanometers will be the next stage of the present study. (authors)

  1. Measurements of stress fields near a grain boundary: Exploring blocked arrays of dislocations in 3D

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Y.; Collins, D. M.; Tarleton, E.; Hofmann, F.; Tischler, J.; Liu, W.; Xu, R.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Britton, T. B.

    2015-06-24

    The interaction between dislocation pile-ups and grain boundaries gives rise to heterogeneous stress distributions when a structural metal is subjected to mechanical loading. Such stress heterogeneity leads to preferential sites for damage nucleation and therefore is intrinsically linked to the strength and ductility of polycrystalline metals. To date the majority of conclusions have been drawn from 2D experimental investigations at the sample surface, allowing only incomplete observations. Our purpose here is to significantly advance the understanding of such problems by providing quantitative measurements of the effects of dislocation pile up and grain boundary interactions in 3D. This is accomplished throughmore »the application of differential aperture X-ray Laue micro-diffraction (DAXM) and high angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) techniques. Our analysis demonstrates a similar strain characterization capability between DAXM and HR-EBSD and the variation of stress intensity in 3D reveals that different parts of the same grain boundary may have different strengths in resisting slip transfer, likely due to the local grain boundary curvature.« less

  2. 2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pivovar, B.

    2012-02-01

    A workshop addressing the current state-of-the-art in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs) was held May 8-9, 2011, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop was the second of its kind, with the first being held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2011 workshop and associated workshop report were created to assess the current state of AMFC technology (taking into account recent advances), investigate the performance potential of AMFC systems across all possible power ranges and applications, and identify the key research needs for commercial competitiveness in a variety of areas.

  3. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-04-29

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period October 1, 2001 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub X} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. This is the fifth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During the previous (fourth) period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (at both Gavin and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub X} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the previous semi-annual technical progress report (April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001). During the current reporting period, additional balance of plant impact information was determined for one of the two tests. These additional balance-of-plant results are presented and discussed in this report. There was no other technical progress to report, because all planned testing as part of this project has been completed.

  4. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2001-11-06

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. Balance of plant impacts, primarily on the ESP particulate control device, were also determined during both tests. These results are presented and discussed in this report.

  5. 2006 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014 -EnergyEnergySenior Chapter2Energy 06 Alkaline

  6. Comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements made by PTR-MS, DOAS and GC-FID during the MCMA 2003 Field Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jobson, B. T.

    A comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements is reported for the CENICA supersite in the district of Iztapalapa during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field experiment in April 2003 (MCMA 2003). Data from three ...

  7. Hit from both sides: tracking industrial and volcanic plumes in Mexico City with surface measurements and OMI SO2 retrievals during the MILAGRO field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Foy, B.

    Large sulfur dioxide plumes were measured in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO field campaign. This paper seeks to identify the sources of these plumes and the meteorological processes that affect ...

  8. The black hole mass of NGC 4151. II. Stellar dynamical measurement from near-infrared integral field spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onken, Christopher A.; Ferrarese, Laura [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Valluri, Monica; Brown, Jonathan S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); McGregor, Peter J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bentz, Misty C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Office 610, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Vestergaard, Marianne [Dark Cosmology Centre, The Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Instituto de Física, CP 15051, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil); Riffel, Rogemar A., E-mail: christopher.onken@anu.edu.au, E-mail: mvalluri@umich.edu [Departamento de Física, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2014-08-10

    We present a revised measurement of the mass of the central black hole (M{sub BH} ) in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. The new stellar dynamical mass measurement is derived by applying an axisymmetric orbit-superposition code to near-infrared integral field data obtained using adaptive optics with the Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS). When our models attempt to fit both the NIFS kinematics and additional low spatial resolution kinematics, our results depend sensitively on how ?{sup 2} is computed—probably a consequence of complex bar kinematics that manifest immediately outside the nuclear region. The most robust results are obtained when only the high spatial resolution kinematic constraints in the nuclear region are included in the fit. Our best estimates for the black hole mass and H-band mass-to-light ratio are M{sub BH} ? 3.76 ± 1.15 × 10{sup 7} M{sub ?} (1? error) and Y{sub H} ? 0.34 ± 0.03 M{sub ?}/L{sub ?} (3? error), respectively (the quoted errors reflect the model uncertainties). Our black hole mass measurement is consistent with estimates from both reverberation mapping (3.57{sub ?0.37}{sup +0.45}×10{sup 7} M{sub ?}) and gas kinematics (3.0{sub ?2.2}{sup +0.75}×10{sup 7} M{sub ?}; 1? errors), and our best-fit mass-to-light ratio is consistent with the photometric estimate of Y{sub H} = 0.4 ± 0.2 M{sub ?}/L{sub ?}. The NIFS kinematics give a central bulge velocity dispersion ?{sub c} = 116 ± 3 km s{sup –1}, bringing this object slightly closer to the M{sub BH}-? relation for quiescent galaxies. Although NGC 4151 is one of only a few Seyfert 1 galaxies in which it is possible to obtain a direct dynamical black hole mass measurement—and thus, an independent calibration of the reverberation mapping mass scale—the complex bar kinematics makes it less than ideally suited for this purpose.

  9. Development of wireless communication system in real-time internal radiation dose measurement system using magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Fumihiro; Shinohe, Kohta; Takura, Tetsuya [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aoba, Aramaki aza, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Matsuki, Hidetoshi [Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aoba, Aramaki aza, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Yamada, Syogo [Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, 1-1 Seiryou-cyo, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Sato, Tadakuni [NEC Tokin Corp., 6-7-1 Koriyama, Taihaku-ku, Sendai 982-8510 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    In radiation therapy, excessive radiation occurs because the actual delivered dose to the tumor is unknown. To overcome this problem, we need a system in which the delivered dose is measured inside the body, and the dose data are transmitted from the inside to the outside of the body. In this study, a wireless communication system, using magnetic fields was studied, and an internal circuit for obtaining radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was examined. As a result, a communication distance of 200 mm was obtained. An internal circuit was developed, and a signal transmission experiment was performed using the wireless communication system. As a result, the radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was transmitted over a communication distance of 200 mm, and the delivered dose was determined from the received signal.

  10. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2000-12-01

    This document summarizes progress on the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2000 through September 30, 2000. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid will also be determined, as will the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NOX selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), First Energy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. This is the second reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, the first of four short-term sorbent injection tests were conducted at the First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant. This test determined the effectiveness of dolomite injection through out-of-service burners as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from this unit. The tests showed that dolomite injection could achieve up to 95% sulfuric acid removal. Balance of plant impacts on furnace slagging and fouling, air heater fouling, ash loss-on-ignition, and the flue gas desulfurization system were also determined. These results are presented and discussed in this report.

  11. Determination of Correction Factors for Small Field Based on Measurement and Numerical Calculation using Cylindrical Ionization Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Kwangwoo; Park, Sungho; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Bak, Jino

    2015-01-01

    We studied the investigation of volume averaging effect for air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers to determine correction factors in small photon field for the given chamber. As a method, we measured output factors using several cylindrical ionization chambers and calculated with mathematical method similar to deconvolution in which we modeled non-constant and inhomogeneous exposure function in the cavity of chamber. The parameters in exposure function and correction factors were determined by solving a system of equations we developed with measurement data and geometry of the given chamber. Correction factors (CFs) we had found are very similar to that from Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. For example, CFs in this study were computed as 1.116 for PTW31010, and 1.0225 for PTW31016, while CFs from MC were reported as approximately between 1.17 and 1.20 for PTW31010, and between 1.02 and 1.06 for PTW31016 in of 6MV photon beam . Furthermore, the result from the method of deconvolution combined with MC for cham...

  12. New topics in coherent anti-stokes raman scattering gas-phase diagnostics : femtosecond rotational CARS and electric-field measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lempert, Walter R.; Barnat, Edward V.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Serrano, Justin Raymond

    2010-07-01

    We discuss two recent diagnostic-development efforts in our laboratory: femtosecond pure-rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for thermometry and species detection in nitrogen and air, and nanosecond vibrational CARS measurements of electric fields in air. Transient pure-rotational fs-CARS data show the evolution of the rotational Raman polarization in nitrogen and air over the first 20 ps after impulsive pump/Stokes excitation. The Raman-resonant signal strength at long time delays is large, and we additionally observe large time separation between the fs-CARS signatures of nitrogen and oxygen, so that the pure-rotational approach to fs-CARS has promise for simultaneous species and temperature measurements with suppressed nonresonant background. Nanosecond vibrational CARS of nitrogen for electric-field measurements is also demonstrated. In the presence of an electric field, a dipole is induced in the otherwise nonpolar nitrogen molecule, which can be probed with the introduction of strong collinear pump and Stokes fields, resulting in CARS signal radiation in the infrared. The electric-field diagnostic is demonstrated in air, where the strength of the coherent infrared emission and sensitivity our field measurements is quantified, and the scaling of the infrared signal with field strength is verified.

  13. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Gilman, Jessica; Warneke, Carsten; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Hosseini, SeyedEhsan; Miller, J. Wayne; Cocker, David R.; Jung, H.; Weise, David

    2013-01-07

    Vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected from five locations in the southeastern and southwestern U.S. and burned in a series of 77 fires at the U.S. Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. An additional 152 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. As phase II of this study, we conducted airborne and ground-based sampling of the emissions from real prescribed fires mostly in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These extensive field measurements of emission factors (EF) for temperate biomass burning are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for “smoldering compounds” emitted by burning the semi-arid SW fuels should likely be increased by about a factor of 2.7 to better represent field fires. Based on the lab/field comparison, we present a table with emission factors for 365 pyrogenic species (including unidentified species) for 4 broad fuel types: pine understory, semi-arid shrublands, evergreen canopy, and duff. To our knowledge this is the most complete measurement of biomass burning emissions to date and it should enable improved representation of smoke in atmospheric models. The results provide important insights into the nature of smoke. For example, ~35% (range from 16-71%) of the mass of gas-phase NMOC species was attributed to the species that we could not identify. These unidentified species are likely not represented in most models, but some provision should be made for the fact that they will react in the atmosphere. In addition, the total mass of gas-phase NMOC divided by the mass of co-emitted PM2.5 averaged ~2.6 for the main fire types with a range from ~1.8-8.8. About 36-63% of the NMOC were likely semivolatile or of intermediate volatility. Thus, the gas-phase NMOC represent a large reservoir of potential precursors for secondary formation of organic aerosol. For the one fire in organic soil (Alaskan duff) about 28% of the emitted carbon was present as gas-phase NMOC in contrast to the other fuels for which NMOC accounted for only ~1-3% of emitted carbon. 71% of the mass of NMOC emitted by the smoldering duff was un-identified. The duff results highlight the need to learn more about the emissions from smoldering organic soils. The ?NMOC/“NOx-as-NO” ratio was consistently about ten for the main fire types when accounting for all NMOC, indicating strongly NOx-limited O3 production conditions. Finally, the fuel consumption per unit area was measured on 6 of the 14 prescribed fires and averaged 7.08 ± 2.09 (1?) Mg ha-1.

  14. Alkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    optimization is needed for the commercialization of alkaline membrane fuel cell (AMFC) technologiesAlkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a , Lizhu Wang b membrane fuel cell (AMFC) in-situ cross-linking ionomer net water transport coefficient A B S T R A C

  15. Preparation of Solid Alkaline Fuel Cell Binders Based on Fluorinated Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Preparation of Solid Alkaline Fuel Cell Binders Based on Fluorinated Poly to be used in a Solid Alkaline Fuel Cell (SAFC) needs to (i) be insoluble in both aqueous solutions,10% > 320 °C). When used in a fuel cell as a binder in the membrane-electrodes assembly (MEA

  16. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  17. Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montes-Hernandez, German

    Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions Romain Available online 8 March 2012 Keywords: A1. Mineral replacement rate A1. Serpentinization A1. TG analyses B1. Alkaline medium B2. Chrysotile nanotubes a b s t r a c t Olivine mineral replacement by serpentine is one

  18. ForPeerReview Biogeochemical reduction processes in a hyper-alkaline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    of industrial7 processes, e.g., lime production waste, steelworks slags, coal combustion residues, Solvay8ForPeerReview Only Biogeochemical reduction processes in a hyper-alkaline affected leachate soil processes in a hyper-alkaline affected leachate soil profile1 2 Ian T. Burke1* , Robert J.G. Mortimer1

  19. Alkaline Microfluidic Hydrogen-Oxygen Fuel Cell as a Cathode Characterization Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Alkaline Microfluidic Hydrogen-Oxygen Fuel Cell as a Cathode Characterization Platform Fikile R on an alkaline microfluidic fuel cell for catalyst and electrode characterization. Its constantly refreshing investigated and the dual effects of enhanced oxygen reduction reaction activity and improved ionic

  20. Solid-State Water Electrolysis with an Alkaline Membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, YJ; Chen, G; Mendoza, AJ; Tighe, TB; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2012-06-06

    We report high-performance, durable alkaline membrane water electrolysis in a solid-state cell. An anion exchange membrane (AEM) and catalyst layer ionomer for hydroxide ion conduction were used without the addition of liquid electrolyte. At 50 degrees C, an AEM electrolysis cell using iridium oxide as the anode catalyst and Pt black as the cathode catalyst exhibited a current density of 399 mA/cm(2) at 1.80 V. We found that the durability of the AEM-based electrolysis cell could be improved by incorporating a highly durable ionomer in the catalyst layer and optimizing the water feed configuration. We demonstrated an AEM-based electrolysis cell with a lifetime of > 535 h. These first-time results of water electrolysis in a solid-state membrane cell are promising for low-cost, scalable hydrogen production.

  1. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-06-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the seventh reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO3 removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the previous report (April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002). During the current period, there was no technical progress to report, because all planned testing as part of this project has been completed. The project period of performance was extended to allow the conduct of testing of another SO{sub 3} control technology, the sodium bisulfite injection process. However, these additional tests have not yet been conducted.

  2. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the report for the time period April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. During the current period, process economic estimates were developed, comparing the costs of the furnace magnesium hydroxide slurry injection process tested as part of this project to a number of other candidate SO{sub 3}/sulfuric acid control technologies for coal-fired power plants. The results of this economic evaluation are included in this progress report.

  3. Constraining models of the large scale Galactic magnetic field with WMAP5 polarization data and extragalactic rotation measure sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Waelkens, Andre H.; Enßlin, Torsten A., E-mail: rj486@nyu.edu, E-mail: gf25@nyu.edu, E-mail: waelkens@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE, E-mail: ensslin@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE [Max-Planck-Institute für Astrophysik, Karl Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    We introduce a method to quantify the quality-of-fit between data and observables depending on the large scale Galactic magnetic field. We combine WMAP5 polarized synchrotron data and rotation measures of extragalactic sources in a joint analysis to obtain best fit parameters and confidence levels for GMF models common in the literature. None of the existing models provide a good fit in both the disk and halo regions, and in many instances best-fit parameters are quite different than the original values. We note that probing a very large parameter space is necessary to avoid false likelihood maxima. The thermal and relativistic electron densities are critical for determining the GMF from the observables but they are not well constrained. We show that some characteristics of the electron densities can already be constrained using our method and with future data it may be possible to carry out a self-consistent analysis in which models of the GMF and electron densities are simultaneously optimized.

  4. Measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations during the MCMA-2006 field campaign - Part 2: Model comparison and radical budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    speciation vs. C2-benzene Styrene Measured Sum xylenesethylbenzene, ben- zaldehyde, styrene) were measured by aToluene, C2-benzene, styrene, isoprene, monoterpenes, DMS,

  5. Measurements of the Radiated Fields and Conducted Current Leakage from the Pulsed Power Systems in the National Ignition Facility at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R A; Clancy, T J; Fulkerson, S; Petersen, D; Pendelton, D; Hulsey, S; Ullery, G; Tuck, J; Polk, M; Kamm, R; Newton, M; Moore, W B; Arnold, P; Ollis, C; Hinz, A; Robb, C; Fornes, J; Watson, J

    2003-07-31

    An important pulsed power system consideration is that they inherently generate fields and currents that can cause interference in other subsystems and diagnostics. Good pulsed power design, grounding and isolation practices can help mitigate these unwanted signals. During the laser commissioning shots for the NIF Early Light milestone at LLNL, measurements were made of the radiated field and conducted currents caused by the Power Conditioning System (PCS) modules with flash lamp load and the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) driver. The measurements were made in the capacitor bay, laser bay, control room and target bay. The field measurements were made with B-dot and E-dot probes with bandwidth of about 100MHz. The current measurements were made with a clamp on probe with a bandwidth of about 20 MHz. The results of these measurements show fields and currents in the NIF Facility well below that required for interference with other subsystems. Currents on the target chamber from the pulsed power systems are well below the background noise currents.

  6. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snadra L. Fox; X. Xie; K. D. Schaller; E. P. Robertson; G. A. Bala

    2003-10-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones. Current technology relies on the use of cross-linking agents to initiate gelation. The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium sp. ATCC no. 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability. Permeability modification was investigated by injecting solubilized biopolymer into Berea sandstone cores and defining the contribution of pH, salt, temperature, and Schuricht crude oil on biopolymer gelation. The biopolymer was soluble in KOH at a pH greater than 11.4 and gelled when the pH dropped below 10.8. The Berea sandstone core buffered the biopolymer solution, decreasing the pH sufficiently to form a gel, which subsequently decreased the permeability. The effluent pH of the control cores injected with 0.01 {und M} KOH (pH 12.0) and 0.10{und M} KOH (pH 13.0) decreased to 10.6 and 12.7, respectively. The permeability of the sandstone core injected with biopolymer was decreased to greater than 95% of the original permeability at 25 C in the presence of 2% NaCl, and Schuricht crude oil; however, the permeability increased when the temperature of the core was increased to 60 C. Residual resistance factors as high as 792 were seen in Berea cores treated with biopolymer. The buffering capacity of sandstone has been demonstrated to reduce the pH of a biopolymer solution sufficiently to cause the polymer to form a stable in-situ gel. This finding could potentially lead to alternate technology for permeability modification, thus extending the life of a reservoir and preventing premature abandonment.

  7. Bachelor thesis: "Validation of an engineering model of the near wake wind field of wind turbines based on nacelle based lidar measurements"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    , in an early stage of wind farm layout optimisation and wind turbine loading calculation in wind farms by Ainslie[1], This is widely used in the industry for wind farming purposes. Scope During this project analysis are performed of near wake measurements of a 5 MW wind turbine at the offshore test field alpha

  8. SPIE Symposium on Smart Structures & Materials 2/96 paper No. 2717-66 Measured Terfenol-D material properties under varied applied magnetic field levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatau, Alison B.

    -D material properties under varied applied magnetic field levels Marcelo J. Dapino, Frederick T. Calkins An experimental approach is used to identify Terfenol-D material properties under magnetic bias and mechanical, and on the theory of vector impedance and admittance analysis. The material properties being investigated, measured

  9. Quantum-state measurement of two-mode entangled field-state in a high-Q cavity RID C-6638-2008 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khosa, A. H.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2005-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the measurement of a two-mode entangled field-state in a high-Q cavity. The scheme utilizes the momentum distribution spectrum in the Raman-Nath regime of a three-level atom in V configuration. Due to the two modes...

  10. Contamination and purification of alkaline gas treating solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCullough, J.G. [Proton Technology Ltd., Hawthorne, NY (United States); Nielsen, R.B. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Alkanolamine and potassium carbonate solutions in gas treating units removing carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, or both are contaminated by impurities in the feed gases and makeup water and by the products of the degradation and oxidation of amines occurring in the units themselves. Feed gas impurities include oxygen, carbonyl sulfide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, brine, solid particles, heavy hydrocarbons, sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid, organic acids, and pipeline corrosion inhibitors. Impure makeup water contains sulfate, chloride, alkali metal, and alkaline earth ions (hardness). Reactions causing contamination in the units include oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate and thiosulfate, oxidation of amines to formic acid and other products, and degradation of amines by carbon dioxide. The resulting heat-stable salts and polymers reduce the gas absorbing capacity of alkanolamine solutions and increase their corrosiveness. Similar problems occur in potassium carbonate solutions, except that degradation products of amine activators are too dilute to be harmful. Contaminants are removed by inlet gas separation, charcoal and mechanical filtration, neutralization of heat-stable salts, reclaiming at both atmospheric and reduced pressure, upstream washing of the feed gas, electrodialysis, use of antioxidants, ion exchange, and blowdown and dumping of the solution.

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INSTRUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT, VOL. 58, NO. 1, JANUARY 2009 129 Very-Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motai, Yuichi

    and difficult to detect under normal conditions. These naturally occurring VLF electromagnetic events) analog recorder output. Index Terms--Biological effects, electromagnetic field (EMF), gaussmeter, very field (EMF) radiation [1], [2] is a continuing con- cern of scientists and engineers. Our environment

  12. Measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations during the MCMA-2006 field campaign - Part 2: Model comparison and radical budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of O 3 (Teledyne 400E) and NO x (Thermo Environmental) were performed using commercial monitors based on UV

  13. Measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations during the MCMA-2006 field campaign - Part 2: Model comparison and radical budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    acetonitrile, ethylacetate Measured Propane, i-butane,n-butane, 2,2-dimethylbutane, ethyne Canister speciation vs.

  14. Experimental investigation of sand consolidation using high-temperature alkaline solution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Romero, Fidel Enrique

    2000-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to better understand the sand consolidation process under high-temperature alkaline solution. Wilmington Tar sand samples were successfully consolidated in the laboratory using high-temperature (250-260?C...

  15. Hot alkaline treatment to stimulate and consolidate the heavy oil Bachaquero-01 sand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valera Villarroel, Cesar Amabilis

    2005-02-17

    An experimental study was conducted to verify experimentally whether sand consolidation by high-temperature alkaline treatment was possible in the heavy oil Bachaquero-01 reservoir. The experiments were conducted using sand samples from a core taken...

  16. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP Unit 3, and the second was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant test provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. A final task in the project was to compare projected costs for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries to estimated costs for other potential sulfuric acid control technologies. Estimates were developed for reagent and utility costs, and capital costs, for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries and seven other sulfuric acid control technologies. The estimates were based on retrofit application to a model coal-fired plant.

  17. Kerr electro-optic measurements for electric field and space charge distributions using similar and dissimilar electrode pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowocin, John Kendall

    2013-01-01

    The electrical breakdown strength of insulating materials is a major limiting factor of reliability in electric power, medical devices, and other high electric field applications. Electrical breakdown strength increase ...

  18. Measurements of 222Rn, 220Rn, and CO Emissions in Natural CO2 Fields in Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, John; Sims, Kenneth

    2014-09-30

    An integrated field-laboratory program evaluated the use of radon and CO2 flux measurements to constrain source and timescale of CO2 fluxes in environments proximate to CO2 storage reservoirs. By understanding the type and depth of the gas source, the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir can be assessed and monitored. The concept is based on correlations of radon and CO2 fluxes observed in volcanic systems. This fundamental research is designed to advance the science of Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) and to address the Carbon Storage Program goal of developing and validating technologies to ensure 99 percent storage performance. Graduate and undergraduate students conducted the research under the guidance of the Principal Investigators; in doing so they were provided with training opportunities in skills required for implementing and deploying CCS technologies. Although a final method or “tool” was not developed, significant progress was made. The field program identified issues with measuring radon in environments rich in CO2. Laboratory experiments determined a correction factor to apply to radon measurements made in CO2-bearing environments. The field program also identified issues with radon and CO2-flux measurements in soil gases at a natural CO2 analog. A systematic survey of radon and CO2 flux in soil gases at the LaBarge CO2 Field in Southwest Wyoming indicates that measurements of 222Rn (radon), 220Rn (thoron), and CO2 flux may not be a robust method for monitoring the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir. The field program was also not able to correlate radon and CO2 flux in the CO2-charged springs of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system. However, this part of the program helped to motivate the aforementioned laboratory experiments that determined correction factors for measuring radon in CO2-rich environments. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; she is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Measurement of radon in springs has improved significantly since the field program first began; however, in situ measurement of 222Rn and particularly 220Rn in springs is problematic. Future refinements include simultaneous salinity measurements and systematic corrections, or adjustments to the partition coefficient as needed for more accurate radon concentration determination. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; he is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Both graduate students are poised to begin work in a CCS technology area. Laboratory experiments evaluated important process-level fundamentals that effect measurements of radon and CO2. Laboratory tests established that fine-grained source minerals yield higher radon emissivity compared to coarser-sized source minerals; subtleties in the dataset suggest that grain size alone is not fully representative of all the processes controlling the ability of radon to escape its mineral host. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn increases linearly with temperature due to reaction of rocks with water, consistent with faster diffusion and enhanced mineral dissolution at higher temperatures. The presence of CO2 changes the relative importance of the factors that control release of radon. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn in CO2-bearing experiments is greater at all temperatures compared to the experiments without CO2, but emissivity does not increase as a simple function of temperature. Governing processes may include a balance between enhanced dissolution versus carbonate mineral formation in CO2-rich waters.

  19. Measurement of haplotypic variation in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae within a single field by rep-PCR and RFLP analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vera Cruz, C.M.; Leach, J.E.; Ardales, E.Y.; Talag, J.

    1996-12-01

    The haplotypic variation of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in a farmer;s field that had endemic bacterial blight in the Philippines was evaluated at a single time. The genomic structure of the field population was analyzed by repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction with oligonucleotide primers corresponding to interspersed repeated sequences in prokaryotic genomes and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) with the insertion sequence IS1113. The techniques and specific probes and primers were selected because they grouped consistently into the same lineages a set of 30 selected X. oryzae pv. oryzae strains that represented the four distinct RFLP lineages found in the Philippines did. Strains (155) were systematically collected from a field planted to rice cv. Sinandomeng, which is susceptible to the indigenous pathogen population. Two of the four Philippine lineages, B and C, which included race 2 and races 3 and 9, respectively, were detected in the field. Lineage C was the predominant population (74.8%). The haplotypic diversities of 10 of the 25 blocks were significantly greater than the total haplotypic diversity of the collection in the entire field; however, between individual blocks the haplotypic diversities were not significantly different. Haplo-types from both lineages were distributed randomly across the field. Analysis of genetic diversity at the microgeographic scale provided insights into the finer scale of variation of X. oryzae pv. oryzae, which are useful in designing experiments to study effects of host resistance on the population structure of the bacterial blight pathogen. 46 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Apparatus and procedure to characterize the surface quality of conductors by measuring the rate of cathode emission as a function of surface electric field strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mestayer, Mac; Christo, Steve; Taylor, Mark

    2014-10-21

    A device and method for characterizing quality of a conducting surface. The device including a gaseous ionizing chamber having centrally located inside the chamber a conducting sample to be tested to which a negative potential is applied, a plurality of anode or "sense" wires spaced regularly about the central test wire, a plurality of "field wires" at a negative potential are spaced regularly around the sense, and a plurality of "guard wires" at a positive potential are spaced regularly around the field wires in the chamber. The method utilizing the device to measure emission currents from the conductor.

  1. Measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations during the MCMA-2006 field campaign - Part 2: Model comparison and radical budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Pilling, M. J. : Urban atmospheric chemistry during the PUMAmechanism for regional atmospheric chemistry modeling, J.3.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Measurements

  2. Measurement of the internal stress and electric field in a resonating piezoelectric transformer for high-voltage applications using the electro-optic and photoelastic effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanGordon, James A.; Kovaleski, Scott D., E-mail: kovaleskis@missouri.edu; Norgard, Peter; Gall, Brady B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [High Power Electrodynamics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [High Power Electrodynamics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The high output voltages from piezoelectric transformers are currently being used to accelerate charged particle beams for x-ray and neutron production. Traditional methods of characterizing piezoelectric transformers (PTs) using electrical probes can decrease the voltage transformation ratio of the device due to the introduction of load impedances on the order of hundreds of kiloohms to hundreds of megaohms. Consequently, an optical diagnostic was developed that used the photoelastic and electro-optic effects present in piezoelectric materials that are transparent to a given optical wavelength to determine the internal stress and electric field. The combined effects of the piezoelectric, photoelastic, and electro-optic effects result in a time-dependent change the refractive indices of the material and produce an artificially induced, time-dependent birefringence in the piezoelectric material. This induced time-dependent birefringence results in a change in the relative phase difference between the ordinary and extraordinary wave components of a helium-neon laser beam. The change in phase difference between the wave components was measured using a set of linear polarizers. The measured change in phase difference was used to calculate the stress and electric field based on the nonlinear optical properties, the piezoelectric constitutive equations, and the boundary conditions of the PT. Maximum stresses of approximately 10 MPa and electric fields of as high as 6 kV/cm were measured with the optical diagnostic. Measured results were compared to results from both a simple one-dimensional (1D) model of the piezoelectric transformer and a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model. Measured stresses and electric fields along the length of an operating length-extensional PT for two different electrical loads were within at least 50 % of 3D finite element simulated results. Additionally, the 3D finite element results were more accurate than the results from the 1D model for a wider range of electrical load impedances under test.

  3. Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks in Lab and Field: Physical, Chemical, and Biological Effects of Fluids (Detecting a Biosurfactant Additive in a Field Irrigation Experiment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spetzler, Hartmut

    2006-05-01

    We have been exploring a new technology that is based on using low-frequency seismic attenuation data to monitor changes in fluid saturation conditions in two-fluid phase porous materials. The seismic attenuation mechanism is related to the loss of energy due to the hysteresis of resistance to meniscus movement (changes in surface tension, wettability) when a pore containing two fluids is stressed at very low frequencies (< 10 Hz). This technology has potential applications to monitoring changes in (1) leakage at buried waste sites, (2) contaminant remediation, and (3) flooding during enhanced petroleum recovery. We have concluded a three year field study at the Maricopa Agricultural Center site of the University of Arizona. Three sets of instruments were installed along an East-West line perpendicular to the 50m by 50m inigation site. Each set of instruments consisted of one three component seismometer and one tiltmeter. Microseisms and solid Earth-tides served as strain sources. The former have a power peak at a period of about 6 seconds and the tides have about two cycles per day. Installation of instruments commenced in late summer of 2002. The instruments operated nearly continuously until April 2005. During the fall of 2003 the site was irrigated with water and one year later with water containing 150 ppm of a biosurfactant additive. This biodegradable additive served to mimic a class of contaminants that change the surface tension of the inigation fluid. Tilt data clearly show tidal tilts superimposed on local tilts due to agricultural irrigation and field work. When the observed signals were correlated with site specific theoretical tilt signals we saw no anomalies for the water irrigation in 2003, but large anomalies on two stations for the surfactant irrigation in 2004. Occasional failures of seismometers as well as data acquisition systems contributed to less than continuous coverage. These data are noisier than the tilt data, but do also show possible anomalies for the irrigation with the surfactant. The quantity of data is large and deserves careful analysis. Detailed analyses of the two data sets are ongoing.

  4. Space-charge compensation measurements in electron cyclotron resonance ion source low energy beam transport lines with a retarding field analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winklehner, D.; Leitner, D., E-mail: leitnerd@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, D.; Machicoane, G.; Tobos, L. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    In this paper we describe the first systematic measurement of beam neutralization (space charge compensation) in the ECR low energy transport line with a retarding field analyzer, which can be used to measure the potential of the beam. Expected trends for the space charge compensation levels such as increase with residual gas pressure, beam current, and beam density could be observed. However, the overall levels of neutralization are consistently low (<60%). The results and the processes involved for neutralizing ion beams are discussed for conditions typical for ECR injector beam lines. The results are compared to a simple theoretical beam plasma model as well as simulations.

  5. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uematsu, Y.; Iwawaki, T.; Habara, H., E-mail: habara@eei.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ivancic, S.; Theobald, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Lei, A. L. [Shanghai Institute of Laser Plasma, 201800 Shanghai (China)

    2014-11-15

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ? 10{sup 11} V/m and B ? 10{sup 8} G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma.

  6. Geologic and climatic controls on the formation of the Permian coal measures in the Sohagpur coal field, Madhya Pradesh, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milici, R.C.; Warwick, P.D.; Mukhopadhyah, A.; Adhikari, S.; Roy, S.P.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    1999-07-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of India (GSI) are concluding a cooperative study of the coking coal deposits in the Sohagpur coal field in central India. Because of the importance of coal in India's economy, the Coal Wing of the Geological Survey of India has studied the area intensely since the early 1980's. This report summarizes the overall stratigraphic, tectonic, and sedimentologic framework of the Sohagpur coal field area, and the interpretations of the geologic and climatic environments required for the accumulation of the thick Gondwana coal deposits, both coking and non-coking.

  7. Measurement of magnetic turbulence structure and nonlinear mode coupling of tearing fluctuations in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assadi, S.

    1994-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of current-driven modes are studied in the MST reversed field pinch. Measured low frequency (f < 35 kHz) magnetic fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 35 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized and externally resonant. Discrete dynamo events, ``sawtooth oscillations,`` have been observed in the experimental RFP plasmas. This phenomenon causes the plasma to become unstable to m = 1 tearing modes. The modes that may be important in different phases of these oscillations are identified. These results then assist in nonlinear studies and also help to interpret the spectral broadening of the measured data during a discrete dynamo event. Three-wave nonlinear coupling of spectral Fourier modes is measured in the MST by applying bispectral analysis to magnetic fluctuations measured at the plasma edge at 64 toroidal locations and 16 poloidal locations, permitting observation of coupling over 8 poloidal and 32 toroidal modes. Comparison to bispectra predicted by resistive MHD computation indicates reasonably good agreement. However, during the crash phase of the sawtooth oscillation the nonlinear coupling is strongly enhanced, concomitant with a broadened k-spectrum. During the sawtooth formation the plasma is undergoing a pure diffusive process. The dynamo only occurs during the sawtooth crash. High frequency activity prior to a sawtooth crash is caused by nonlinear frequency (small-scale) mode coupling. Growth rate and coupling coefficients of toroidal mode spectra are calculated by statistical modeling. Temporal evolution of edge toroidal mode spectra has been predicted by transfer function analysis. The driving sources of electrostatic fields are different than for the magnetic fields. The characteristics of tearing modes can be altered by external field errors and addition of impurities to the plasma.

  8. Cross-Calibrating Sunspot Magnetic Field Strength Measurements from the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Dunn Solar Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Fraser T; Penn, Matthew J; Tritschler, Alexandra; Pillet, Valentin Martinez; Livingston, William C

    2015-01-01

    In this article we describe a recent effort to cross-calibrate data from an infrared detector at the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Facility InfraRed Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A synoptic observation program at the McMath-Pierce has measured umbral magnetic field strengths since 1998, and this data set has recently been compared with umbral magnetic field observations from SOHO MDI and SDO HMI. To further improve on the data from McMath-Pierce, we compared the data with measurements taken at the Dunn Solar Telescope with far greater spectral resolution than has been possible with space instrumentation. To minimise potential disruption to the study, concurrent umbral measurements were made so that the relationship between the two datasets can be most accurately characterised. We find that there is a strong agreement between the umbral magnetic field strengths recorded by each instrument, and we reduced the FIRS data in two different ways to successfully test this correlation ...

  9. Direct measurement of the characteristic three-body electron attachment time in the atmospheric air in direct current electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shutov, A. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Zvorykin, V. D.

    2013-07-15

    We report the results of theoretical and experimental study of the characteristic time for three-body attachment of electrons produced by 100 fs UV laser pulse in the atmosphere air in the external DC electric field ranged from 0.2 to 10 kV/cm.

  10. A portable extensional rheometer for measuring the viscoelasticity of pitcher plant and other sticky liquids in the field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett, Catherine; Ardron, Alia; Bauer, Ulrike; Chapman, Gary; Chaudan, Elodie; Hallmark, Bart; Pratt, Lee; Torres-Perez, Maria Dolores; Wilson, D. Ian

    2015-03-07

    to enable in situ studies of biological fluids in the field. The design of the device (named Seymour) is based on a conventional capillary break-up extensional rheometer (the Cambridge Trimaster). It works by rapidly stretching a small fluid sample between...

  11. Measuring features of the fluence at the far field of a CO/sub 2/ pulsed laser: an issue study with suggestions on how to do it

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, E.G. Jr.; Phelan, R.J. Jr.; Boyle, D.R.

    1980-04-01

    This study examines the problems for measuring the energy density incident on targets where the energy is from a pulse of high energy at CO2 wavelengths and where the targets are located at the far field. The analysis considers two targets--first, a ground-based target for testing and calibration of the measurement systems and second, a drone towed behind an airplane from which the energy distribution information is telemetered to the ground station. Although certain design limits are assumed, the results are general and therefore specific data about the laser sources is not supplied. This study traces each stage of the measurement system from the reception of the incident laser pulse on the drone to the pulse-coded transmission of the sampled data to a ground-based computer.

  12. Microscale investigation of the corrosion performances of low-carbon and stainless steels in highly alkaline concretes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion Behaviour of New Stainless Steels Reinforcing BarsSpecification for Stainless Steel Bars and Shapes. ” ASTMFilms of Different Stainless Steels Developed on Alkaline

  13. Breast radiotherapy in the prone position primarily reduces the maximum out-of-field measured dose to the ipsilateral lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    breast, lung dose, secondary cancer, low dose measurements, breast cancer I. INTRODUCTION Radiation position, using 50 Gy prescription dose intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3D-CRT plans radiotherapy is of potentially considerable significance. The dose-response relation for radiation-induced lung

  14. Spin-lattice coupling in uranium dioxide probed by magnetostriction measurements at high magnetic fields (P08358-E001-PF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gofryk, K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jaime, M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab)

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary magnetostriction measurements have already shown a strong interplay of lattice dynamic and magnetism in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states, and give unambiguous evidence of strong spin- phonon coupling in uranium dioxide. Further studies are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in magnetic and paramagnetic states and details of the spin-phonon coupling.

  15. Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2011-07-01

    In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

  16. Removal of dissolved actinides from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krot, Nikolai N. (Chelomiya St., 2, Apartment 15, Moscow, RU); Charushnikova, Iraida A. (Svoboda St., Bldg. 7A, Apartment 15, Moscow, RU)

    1997-01-01

    A method of reducing the concentration of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline radwastes containing plutonium and neptunium values along with other transuranic values produced during the course of plutonium production. The OH.sup.- concentration of the alkaline radwaste is adjusted to between about 0.1M and about 4M. [UO.sub.2 (O.sub.2).sub.3 ].sup.4- ion is added to the radwastes in the presence of catalytic amounts of Cu.sup.+2, Co.sup.+2 or Fe.sup.+2 with heating to a temperature in excess of about 60.degree. C. or 85.degree. C., depending on the catalyst, to coprecipitate plutonium and neptunium from the radwaste. Thereafter, the coprecipitate is separated from the alkaline radwaste.

  17. Developing and Testing an Alkaline-Side Solvent Extraction Process for Technetium Separation from Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Ralph A.; Conner, Cliff; Liberatore, Matthew W.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Presley, Derek J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Lumetta, Gregg J. )

    1998-11-01

    Engineering development and testing of the SRTALK solvent extraction process are discussed in this paper. This process provides a way to carry out alkaline-side removal and recovery of technetium in the form of pertechnetate anion from nuclear waste tanks within the DOE complex. The SRTALK extractant consists of a crown ether, bis-4,4'(5')[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6, in a modifier, tributyl phosphate, and a diluent, Isopar-L. The SRTALK flowsheet given here separates technetium form the waste and concentrates it by a factor of ten to minimize the load on downstream evaporator for the technetium effluent. In this work, we initially generated and correlated the technetium extraction data, measured the dispersion number for various processing conditions, and determined hydraulic performance in a single-stage 2-cm centrifugal contactor. Then we used extraction-factor analysis, single-stage contactor tests, and stage-to-stage process calculations to develop a SRTALK flowsheet . Key features of the flowsheet are (1) a low organic-to-aqueous (O/A) flow ratio in the extraction section and a high O/A flow ratio in the strip section to concentrate the technetium and (2) the use of a scrub section to reduce the salt load in the concentrated technetium effluent. Finally, the SRTALK process was evaluated in a multistage test using a synthetic tank waste. This test was very successful. Initial batch tests with actual waste from the Hanford nuclear waste tanks show the same technetium extractability as determined with the synthetic waste feed. Therefore, technetium removal from actual tank wastes should also work well using the SRTALK process.

  18. Measurement of the second-order Zeeman effect on the sodium clock transition in the weak-magnetic-field region using the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Numazaki, Kazuya; Imai, Hiromitsu; Morinaga, Atsuo [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda-shi, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    The second-order Zeeman effect of the sodium clock transition in a weak magnetic field of less than 50 {mu}T was measured as the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase by two-photon stimulated Raman atom interferometry. The ac Stark effect of the Raman pulse was canceled out by adopting an appropriate intensity ratio of two photons in the Raman pulse. The Ramsey fringes for the pulse separation of 7 ms were obtained with a phase uncertainty of {pi}/200 rad. The nondispersive feature of the scalar Aharonov-Bohm phase was clearly demonstrated through 18 fringes with constant amplitude. The Breit-Rabi formula of the sodium clock transition was verified to be {Delta}{nu}=(0.222{+-}0.003)x10{sup 12}xB{sup 1.998{+-}0.004} in a magnetic field of less than 50 {mu}T.

  19. Complete recovery of Eu from BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ alkaline fusion and its mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    and efficient process for recycling waste phosphors has been developed. The alkaline fusion process is used in BMA disintegration in the alkaline fusion process. X-ray diffraction analysis provides details recovery of rare earths from waste phosphors developed by Solvay-Rhodia operated in France in Saint Fons

  20. Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas1 emissions into the atmosphere2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    dioxide sequestration process. The overall carbonation reaction includes the following steps: (1)23 CaCarbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas1 emissions change.20 This study investigates experimentally the aqueous carbonation mechanisms of an alkaline paper

  1. Electrocatalytic Measurement Methodology of Oxide Catalysts Using a Thin-Film Rotating Disk Electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suntivich, Jin

    Transition-metal oxides can exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for reactions such as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. It is often difficult to measure and compare the activities of oxide catalysts ...

  2. Heat stable alkaline phosphatase from thermophiles. Final report, March-October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combie, J.D.; Runnion, K.N.; Williamson, M.L.

    1994-07-01

    Alkaline phosphatase has been the most widely used enzyme for colorimetric immunoassays. The current potential for this enzyme lies in biosensors, fieldable assay kits, biotechnology applications, degradation of certain nerve agents and pesticides and detoxification of heavy metal waste streams. While the commercial source of this enzyme is predominantly from mammalian tissues, expanded commercial application is restricted by the enzyme's instability at elevated temperatures. Although alkaline phosphatases are ubiquitous in nature, two isolates out of 44 alkaline phosphatase producing isolates occurring in habitats at 50 deg C and above have been isolated possessing extremely stable enzymes. One enzyme retained 98% of original activity following boiling for 1 hr. The secretion of the enzyme by the organism is an added benefit promoting efficient and economical production capability. Procedures for the screening, isolation, and optimal growth and fermentation of organisms acquired from geothermal sources located in Yellowstone National Park, WY are described. Purification was most effectively achieved using size exclusion chromatography where 101% of the activity and 33% of the crude mother liquor protein were recovered. Although the presence of manganese in the assay buffer was observed to significantly elevate the enzyme's catalytic activity, a precipitate incompatibility with calcium chloride, a requirement for high temperature stability, prohibits its use. Bacteria, Fermentation, Alkaline phosphatase, Biosensors, Biotechnology, Heat stable enzymes, Biochemistry, Bioremediation, Thermophilic microorganisms.

  3. Alkaline resistant phosphate glasses and method of preparation and use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO); Reis, Signo T. (Rolla, MO); Velez, Mariano (Rolla, MO); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

    2010-01-26

    A substantially alkaline resistant calcium-iron-phosphate (CFP) glass and methods of making and using thereof. In one application, the CFP glass is drawn into a fiber and dispersed in cement to produce glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) articles having the high compressive strength of concrete with the high impact, flexural and tensile strength associated with glass fibers.

  4. Noncovalent interaction or chemical bonding between alkaline earth cations and benzene? A quantum chemistry study using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Joel L.

    Noncovalent interaction or chemical bonding between alkaline earth cations and benzene? A quantum earth metal ion±benzene complexes were performed using the density-functional theory (DFT) B3LYP and ab of the al- kaline earth metal ions to benzene may be attributed to s±p and p±p interactions, which are signi

  5. GENETIC OPTIMIZATION FOR ALKALINE pH OF A CYANIDE DIHYDRATASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS STUTZERI 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez Mendoza, Alvaro

    2011-08-08

    is the cyanide dihydratase (CynDstut) found in Pseudomonas stutzeri AK61. The enzyme operates optimally around pH 7-8, but most polluted waters have much higher alkaline pH. The aim of this research project is to construct genetic mutants for this enzyme...

  6. Surface structural changes of perovskite oxides during oxygen evolution in alkaline electrolyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Kevin J. (Kevin Joseph)

    2013-01-01

    Perovskite oxides such Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.8O3-6 (BSCF82) are among the most active catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline solution reported to date. In this work it is shown via high resolution ...

  7. Separating natural and bomb-produced radiocarbon in the ocean: The potential alkalinity method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the atmosphere to the ocean on a similar time scale and that they penetrate into the ocean in a similar mannerSeparating natural and bomb-produced radiocarbon in the ocean: The potential alkalinity method M. Key Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA

  8. Analysis of Pt/C electrode performance in a flowing-electrolyte alkaline fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Analysis of Pt/C electrode performance in a flowing- electrolyte alkaline fuel cell Fikile R cell Electrode characterization X-ray micro-computed tomography Microfluidic fuel cell Carbonates a b a microfluidic H2/O2 fuel cell as an analytical platform. Both anodes and cathodes were investigated

  9. Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil L, Brazil d Université de Provence, Aix Marseille 1, France e Departamento de Geografia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Três Lagoas, Brazil f Laboratoire de Géomophologie Appliquée, Université de

  10. MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

  11. Results of stretched wire field integral measurements on the mini-undulator magnet -- comparison of results obtained from circular and translational motion of the integrating wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, L.

    1998-05-01

    Measurements of the multipole content of the Mini-Undulator magnet have been made with two different integrating wire techniques. Both measurements used 43 strand Litz wire stretched along the length of the magnet within the magnet gap. In the first technique, the wire motion was purely translational, while in the second technique the wire was moved along a circular path. The induced voltage in the Litz wire was input into a Walker integrator, and the integrator output was analyzed as a function of wire position for determination of the multipole content of the magnetic field. The mini-undulator magnet is a 10 period, 80 mm per period hybrid insertion device. For all the data contained herein the magnet gap was set at 49 mm. In the mini-undulator magnet, the iron poles are 18mm x 32mm x 86 mm, and the Samarium Cobalt permanent magnet blocks are 22mm x 21mm x 110mm. For this magnet, which is a shortened prototype for the NSLS Soft X-Ray Undulator Magnet, the undulator parameter K = 0.934 B (Tesla){lambda}(cm), and B(tesla) = 0.534/sinh({pi}Gap/{lambda}). At a gap of 49 mm, the magnetic field is 1590 Gauss.

  12. Measurement of the high-field Q-drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; alex gurevich

    2007-06-01

    The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio > 200) niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop”) of the cavity quality factor Q0(Bp) as the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100 – 140 ?C) “in-situ” baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 K and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm2) grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere and baking in air up to 180 °C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20 – 30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not re-appear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120 °C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180 °C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180 °C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a post-purification treatment at 1250 °C. A statistic of the position of the “hot-spots” on the cavity surface showed that grain-boundaries are not the preferred location. An interesting correlation was found between the Q-drop onset, the quench field and the low-field energy gap, which supports the hypothesis of thermo-magnetic instability governing the Q-drop and the baking effect.

  13. Field-measured performance of four full-scale cylindrical stratified chilled-water thermal storage tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musser, A.; Bahnfleth, W.P.

    1999-07-01

    Results are presented for controlled flow rate tests in four full-scale cylindrical chilled-water storage tanks. The tanks range in volume from 1.15 to 5.18 million gallons (4.35 to 19.61 million liters) and have water depths of 40 to 65 ft (12.2 to 19.8 m). Water is introduced into and withdrawn from two of these tanks using radial parallel plate diffusers, while the remaining two tanks utilize octagonal slotted pipe diffuser designs. Thermal performance is quantified for full cycles in terms of Figure of Merit, for single charge and discharge processes as half-cycle Figure of Merit, and for incomplete charge and discharge processes as Lost Capacity. Results show that the thermal performance of all four tanks is excellent, with less than 4% of theoretical cooling capacity lost to inlet mixing and other degradation mechanisms for flow rates less than or equal to design. Based on these results, the appropriateness of current design guidance is discussed. Operational issues that affect implementation of controlled flow rate full-scale tests are also identified, and measurement issues are addressed.

  14. CO adsorption and kinetics on well-characterized Pd films on Pt(111) in alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenz, M.; Stamenkovic, V.; Wandelt, K.; Ross, P.N.; Markovic, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemistry of CO on a bare Pt(111) electrode as well as a Pt(111) electrode modified with pseudomorphic thin palladium films has been studied in alkaline solution by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. First Pd films were prepared and well characterized in UHV and subsequently transferred into the electrochemical cell for the registration of the voltammetric profiles. The charge corresponding to the formation of underpotentially deposited hydrogen (H{sub upd}) on these Pt(111)-xPd surfaces was established in sulfuric acid solution as a function of x (0 {le} x {le} 1 Pd monolayer (ML)). All subsequent measurements were then performed on electrochemically deposited palladium films using the above H{sub upd}-charge vs. Pd coverage relationship to evaluate the amount of electrochemically deposited palladium. FTIR spectra for CO adsorbed on one monolayer and a submonolayer coverage are compared to those of the unmodified Pt(111) surface, all surfaces having identical 2D lattice structures. Infrared absorption bands of CO bound on either Pt(111) or Pt(111)-1ML Pd are clearly distinguished. Spectra of CO adsorbed on Pd submonolayers show characteristic features of both CO bound to Pt and to Pd, indicating that on Pt(111)-xPd surfaces there is no coupling between Pt-CO{sub ad} and Pd-CO{sub ad} molecules. The kinetics of CO oxidation on these surfaces is determined either by rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements or by FTIR spectroscopy, monitoring the CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} production. The oxidation of CO{sub ad} on Pt(111) and on Pd modified platinum surfaces starts at the same potential, ca. at 0.2 V. The oxidation rate is, however, considerably lower on the Pt(111)-xPd surfaces than on the Pt(111) surface. The kinetics of CO oxidation appears to be determined by the nature of adsorbed hydroxyl anions (OH{sub ad}), which are more strongly (less active) adsorbed on the highly oxophilic Pd atoms.

  15. Mechanism of CO Oxidation on Pt(111) in Alkaline Media J. S. Spendelow, J. D. Goodpaster, P. J. A. Kenis, and A. Wieckowski*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    of the mechanism of CO oxidation on Pt surfaces would be useful in optimizing Pt-based catalysts for fuel cell fuel cells (DMFCs) and reformate- fed hydrogen fuel cells.1-11 Alkaline electrolytes have been shown carbonation in alkaline media complicates the use of alkaline electrolytes for fuel cells.16 Fuel cells

  16. RESULTS OF STRETCHED WIRE FIELD INTEGRAL MEASUREMENTS ON THE MINI-UNDULATOR MAGNET-COMPARISON OF RESULTS OBTAINED FROM CIRCULAR AND TRANSLATIONAL MOTION OF THE INTEGRATING WIRE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SOLOMON, L.

    1998-05-01

    Measurements of the multipole content of the Mini-Undulator magnet have been made with two different integrating wire techniques. Both measurements used 43 strand Litz wire stretched along the length of the magnet within the magnet gap. In the first technique, the wire motion was purely translational, while in the second technique the wire was moved along a circular path. The induced voltage in the Litz wire was input into a Walker integrator, and the integrator output was analyzed as a function of wire position for determination of the multipole content of the magnetic field. The mini-undulator magnet is a 10 period, 80 mm per period hybrid insertion device. For all the data contained herein the magnet gap was set at 49 mm. In the mini-undulator magnet, the iron poles are 18mm x 32mm x 86mm, and the Samarium Cobalt permanent magnet blocks are 22mm x 21mm x 110mm. For this magnet, which is a shortened prototype for the NSLS Soft X-Ray Undulator Magnet, the undulator parameter K = 0.934 B(Tesla){lambda}(cm), and B(tesla) = 0.534/sinh({pi}Gap/{lambda}). At a gap of 49 mm, the magnetic field is 1590 Gauss. The 43 strand Litz wire is supported on motorized x-y stages at both ends of the magnet, which are controlled by stepping motors through a Labview program. One leg of the wire loop is within the magnet gap, and the other leg is in an essentially field free region. Only the leg of the wire loop within the magnet gap is moved during data acquisition. The Litz wire is tensioned with 11.5 pounds, and is wrapped with a supporting tape which is itself tensioned with 18 pounds through a spring and turnbuckle arrangement. With this setup the sag in the wire over the 72 inch span is less than 0.003 inches, as measured with survey instruments. Photographs of the setup are shown.

  17. Magnetic behavior of LaMn{sub 2}(Si{sub (1?x)}Ge{sub x}){sub 2} compounds characterized by magnetic hyperfine field measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosch-Santos, B., E-mail: brianna@usp.br; Carbonari, A. W.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Saxena, R. N. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, University of São Paulo, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-05-07

    The temperature dependence of the magnetic hyperfine field (B{sub hf}) at Mn atom sites was measured in LaMn{sub 2}(Si{sub (1?x)}Ge{sub x}){sub 2}, with 0???x???1, compounds with perturbed ??? angular correlation spectroscopy using {sup 111}In({sup 111}Cd) as probe nuclei in the temperature range from 20?K to 480?K. The results show a transition from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic ordering for all studied compounds when Ge gradually replaces Si and allowed an accurate determination of the Néel temperature (T{sub N}) for each compound. It was observed that T{sub N} decreases when Ge concentration increases. Conversely, the Curie temperature increases with increase of Ge concentration. This remarkable change in the behavior of the transition temperatures is discussed in terms of the Mn-Mn distance and ascribed to a change in the exchange constant J{sub ex}.

  18. Sodium Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions via Crystalline Urea-Functionalized Capsules: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Crystallization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custelcean, Radu; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V; Rajbanshi, Arbin; Wan, Shun; Moyer, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallization of sodium sulfate with a tripodal tris-urea receptor (L1) from aqueous alkaline solutions have been measured in the 15 55 C temperature range, with the goal of identifying the optimal conditions for efficient and quick sulfate removal from nuclear wastes. The use of radiolabeled Na235SO4 provided a practical way to monitor the sulfate concentration in solution by liquid scintillation counting. Our results are consistent with a two-step crystallization mechanism, involving relatively quick dissolution of crystalline L1 followed by the rate-limiting crystallization of the Na2SO4(L1)2(H2O)4 capsules. We found that temperature exerted relatively little influence over the equilibrium sulfate concentration, which ranged between 0.004 and 0.011 M. This corresponds to 77 91% removal of sulfate from a solution containing 0.0475 M initial sulfate concentration, as found in a typical Hanford waste tank. The apparent pseudo-first-order rate constant for sulfate removal increased 20-fold from 15 to 55 C, corresponding to an activation energy of 14.1 kcal/mol. At the highest measured temperature of 55 C, 63% and 75% of sulfate was removed from solution within 8 h and 24 h, respectively.

  19. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-31

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  20. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  1. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  2. Advances in the growth of alkaline-earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Beck, P; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystal-growth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2008-11-20

    In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

  4. Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Presley, Derek J. (Ooltewah, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

  5. DEVELOPMENT AND SELECTION OF IONIC LIQUID ELECTROLYTES FOR HYDROXIDE CONDUCTING POLYBENZIMIDAZOLE MEMBRANES IN ALKALINE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, E.

    2012-05-01

    Alkaline fuel cell (AFC) operation is currently limited to specialty applications such as low temperatures and pure H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} due to the corrosive nature of the electrolyte and formation of carbonates. AFCs are the cheapest and potentially most efficient (approaching 70%) fuel cells. The fact that non-Pt catalysts can be used, makes them an ideal low cost alternative for power production. The anode and cathode are separated by and solid electrolyte or alkaline porous media saturated with KOH. However, CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere or fuel feed severely poisons the electrolyte by forming insoluble carbonates. The corrosivity of KOH (electrolyte) limits operating temperatures to no more than 80?C. This chapter examines the development of ionic liquids electrolytes that are less corrosive, have higher operating temperatures, do not chemically bond to CO{sub 2}, and enable alternative fuels. Work is detailed on the IL selection and characterization as well as casting methods within the polybenzimidazole based solid membrane. This approach is novel as it targets the root of the problem (the electrolyte) unlike other current work in alkaline fuel cells which focus on making the fuel cell components more durable.

  6. Correlating the hydrogen evolution reaction activity in alkaline electrolytes with the hydrogen binding energy on monometallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, WC; Myint, M; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2013-05-01

    The slow reaction kinetics of the hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) on platinum in alkaline electrolytes hinders the development of alkaline electrolysers, solar hydrogen cells and alkaline fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of the exchange current density of the HER/HOR in alkaline media is critical for the search and design of highly active electrocatalysts. By studying the HER on a series of monometallic surfaces, we demonstrate that the HER exchange current density in alkaline solutions can be correlated with the calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) on the metal surfaces via a volcano type of relationship. The HER activity varies by several orders of magnitude from Pt at the peak of the plot to W and Au located on the bottom of each side of the plot, similar to the observation in acids. Such a correlation suggests that the HBE can be used as a descriptor for identifying electrocatalysts for HER/HOR in alkaline media, and that the HER exchange current density can be tuned by modifying the surface chemical properties.

  7. The relationship between coefficient of restitution and state of charge of zinc alkaline primary LR6 batteries [Bouncing alkaline batteries: A basic solution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bhadra, S.; Hertzberg, B. J.; Croft, M.; Gallaway, J. W.; Van Tassell, B. J.; Chamoun, M.; Erdonmez, C.; Zhong, Z.; Steingart, D. A.

    2015-03-13

    The coefficient of restitution of alkaline batteries had been shown to increase as a function of depth of discharge. In this work, using non-destructive mechanical testing, the change in coefficient of restitution is compared to in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction data to determine the cause of the macroscopic change in coefficient of restitution. The increase in coefficient of restitution correlates to the formation of a percolation pathway of ZnO within the anode of the cell, and that the coefficient of restitution saturates at a value of 0.63 ± .05 at 50% state if charge when the anode has densified intomore »porous ZnO solid. Of note is the sensitivity of coefficient of restitution to the amount of ZnO formation that rivals the sensitivity on in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction spectroscopy.« less

  8. Simulating Black Carbon and Dust and their Radiative Forcing in Seasonal Snow: A Case Study over North China with Field Campaign Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chun; Hu, Zhiyuan; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Maoyi; Jin, Jiming; Flanner, M. G.; Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Yan, Huiping; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, D. G.

    2014-10-30

    A state-of-the-art regional model, WRF-Chem, is coupled with the SNICAR model that includes the sophisticated representation of snow metamorphism processes available for climate study. The coupled model is used to simulate the black carbon (BC) and dust concentrations and their radiative forcing in seasonal snow over North China in January-February of 2010, with extensive field measurements used to evaluate the model performance. In general, the model simulated spatial variability of BC and dust mass concentrations in the top snow layer (hereafter BCS and DSTS, respectively) are quantitatively or qualitatively consistent with observations. The model generally moderately underestimates BCS in the clean regions but significantly overestimates BCS in some polluted regions. Most model results fall into the uncertainty ranges of observations. The simulated BCS and DSTS are highest with >5000 ng g-1 and up to 5 mg g-1, respectively, over the source regions and reduce to <50 ng g-1 and <1 ?g g-1, respectively, in the remote regions. BCS and DSTS introduce similar magnitude of radiative warming (~10 W m-2) in snowpack, which is comparable to the magnitude of surface radiative cooling due to BC and dust in the atmosphere. This study represents the first effort in using a regional modeling framework to simulate BC and dust and their direct radiative forcing in snow. Although a variety of observational datasets have been used to attribute model biases, some uncertainties in the results remain, which highlights the need for more observations, particularly concurrent measurements of atmospheric and snow aerosols and the deposition fluxes of aerosols, in future campaigns.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii for the Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) Field Campaign (an AMF2 Deployment)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    From October 2012 through September 2013, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed on the container ship Spirit, operated by Horizon Lines, for the Marine ARM GPCI* Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign. During approximately 20 round trips between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, AMF2 obtained continuous on-board measurements of cloud and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; surface meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric profiles from weather balloons launched every six hours. During two two-week intensive observational periods in January and July 2013, additional instruments were deployed and balloon soundings were be increased to every three hours. These additional data provided a more detailed characterization of the state of the atmosphere and its daily cycle during two distinctly different seasons. The primary objective of MAGIC was to improve the representation of the stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition in climate models. AMF2 data documented the small-scale physical processes associated with turbulence, convection, and radiation in a variety of marine cloud types.

  10. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-10-20

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low-emitting and “conventional” materials as installed in newly constructed residential homes using both (1) highly controlled, short-term active samples to precisely characterize the building-related chemical emissions and building contents and (2) a week-long passive sample designed to capture the impact of occupant behavior and related activities on measured IAQ contaminant levels indoors. The combination of detailed short-term measurements with the home under controlled/consistent conditions during pre- and post-occupancy and the week-long passive sampling data provide the opportunity to begin to separate the different emission sources and help isolate and quantify variability in the monitored homes. Between April and August 2014, the research team performed pre-occupancy and post-occupancy sampling in one conventional home and two homes built with low-emitting materials that were generally consistent with EPA’s Indoor airPLUS guidelines. However, for a number of reasons, the full experimental plan was not implemented. The project was intended to continue for up to three years to asses long-term changes in IAQ but the project was limited to one calendar year. As a result, several of the primary research questions related to seasonal impacts and the long-term trends in IAQ could not be addressed. In addition, there were several unexpected issues related to recruiting, availability of home types, and difficulty coordinating with builders/realtors/homeowners. Several field monitoring issues also came up that provide “lessons learned” that led to improvements to the original monitoring plan. The project produced a good experimental plan that is expected to be be useful for future efforts collecting data to support answering these same or similar research questions.

  11. Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Harvey; Michael Gula

    1998-12-07

    Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

  12. Cellulose nanocrystal-based composite electrolyte with superior dimensional stability for alkaline fuel cell membranes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Yuan; Artmentrout, Aaron A.; Li, Juchuan; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Nanda, Jagjit; Ozcan, Soydan

    2015-05-13

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-based composite films were prepared as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and silica gel hybrid was used to bind the CNCs to form a robust composite film. The mass ratio (i.e., 1 : 1, 1 : 2) of PVA and silica gel was tuned to control the hydrophobicity of the resulting films. Composite films with a range of CNC content (i.e., 20 to 60%) were prepared to demonstrate the impact of CNC on the performance of these materials as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Different from previously reported cross-linked polymermore »films, CNC-based composite films with 40% hydrophobic binder (i.e., PVA : silica gel=1 : 2) exhibited simultaneous low water swelling (e.g., ~5%) and high water uptake (e.g., ~80%) due to the hydrophilicity and extraordinary dimensional stability of CNC. It also showed a conductivity of 0.044 and 0.065 S/cm at 20 and 60 oC, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the film with 60% CNC and 40% binder is characterized by the lowest hydroxide conductivity-normalized swelling ratio. Decreased CNC content (i.e., 40 and 20%) resulted in comparable hydroxide conductivity but a greater swelling ratio. These results demonstrate the advantage of CNC as a key component for a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells over conventional polymers, suggesting the great potential of CNCs in improving the dimensional stability while maintaining the conductivity of existing anion exchange membranes.« less

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Rao, Linfeng

    2005-06-01

    Removal of waste-limiting components of sludge (Al, Cr, S, P) in underground tanks at Hanford by treatment with concentrated alkali has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. More aggressive treatments of sludges, for example, contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to improve leaching efficiency for Cr. Oxidative alkaline leaching can be expected to have at best a secondary influence on the mobilization of Al. Our earlier explorations of Al leaching from sludge simulants indicated acidic and complexometric leaching can improve Al dissolution.

  14. Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions by Selective Crystallization of Alkali Metal Coordination Capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajbanshi, Arbin; Moyer, Bruce A; Custelcean, Radu

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembly of a tris(urea) anion receptor with Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} yields crystalline capsules held together by coordinating Na{sup +} or K{sup +} cations and hydrogen-bonding water bridges, with the sulfate anions encapsulated inside urea-lined cavities. The sodium-based capsules can be selectively crystallized in excellent yield from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions ({approx}6 M Na{sup +}, pH 14), thereby providing for the first time a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  15. Isotope fractionation in surface ionization ion source of alkaline-earth iodides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, T.; Kanzaki, C.; Nomura, M.; Fujii, Y.

    2012-02-15

    The relationship between the isotope fractionation of alkaline-earth elements in the surface ionization ion source and the evaporation filament current, i.e., filament temperature, was studied. It was confirmed that the isotope fractionation depends on the evaporation filament temperature; the isotope fractionation in the case of higher temperature of filament becomes larger. The ionization and evaporation process in the surface ionization ion source was discussed, and it was concluded that the isotope fractionation is suppressed by setting at the lower temperature of evaporation filament because the dissociations are inhibited on the evaporation filament.

  16. Field Guide Field Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    and demand in the U.S., with only part of the demand being met by U.S. production. Canola oil has achieved1 1 June 2011 A-1280 Canola Production Field Guide Canola Production Field Guide 2 2 Edited.....................................101 · Contributors to Canola Production Field Guide........102 · Resource Contact Information

  17. Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

    1998-09-01

    The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

  18. Current distributions and dissolution mechanisms during localized corrosion of steels in alkaline environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Ryan, M.P.; Virtanen, S.; Schmuki, P.

    1997-12-31

    In situ corrosion investigations of iron were carried out in alkaline environments to determine the stages of corrosion that may be encountered with steels in concrete. The electrochemical and chemical processes taking place on Fe have been studied using x-ray absorption, current density mapping of the iron surface and artificial pits. The x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy was used to observe the conversion of Fe to oxide in hydroxide solutions. The oxide formed was electrochemically active and changes in valence states between 2+ and 3+ were observed during electrochemical cycling between the passive state and hydrogen evolution. The oxide continued to thicken during the cycling with very little dissolution or any conversion back to the metallic state. Current density mapping in chloride/hydroxide solution showed that corrosion took place in highly localized areas confined by the formation of a corrosion product shell. The activity within the shell decayed on removing a supporting cathodic area limiting but reactivated on its replacement. Artificial pits were used to study the anodic processes taking place within the region confined by the corrosion product shell. The local pH and anodic behavior were similar to that observed in neutral or slightly acid bulk solutions. The dissolution within the artificial pits in alkaline bulk solutions was found to be sensitive to the presence of small-quantities of nitrite.

  19. J. Phys. Chem. 1994,98, 4899-4905 4899 Electrostatic Field Measurements and Band Flattening during Electron-Transfer Processes at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The interfacial SHG at a fundamental wavelength of 584 nm is dominated by the electric field-induced second Electron-Transfer Processes at Single-CrystalTi02 Electrodes by Electric Field-Induced Optical Second Harmonic Generation Juliette M. Lantz and Robert M. Corn' Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.; Billings, A.

    2009-06-24

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, James C.; Billings, Amanda Y.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Vienna, John D.

    2010-02-26

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

  2. Dependence of Berry's phase on the sign of the g factor for conical rotation of a magnetic field, measured without any dynamical phase shift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morinaga, Atsuo; Toriyama, Koichi; Narui, Hirotaka; Aoki, Takatoshi; Imai, Hiromitsu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda-shi, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Berry's phase for a whole turn in a conical rotation of the magnetic field with a semiangle {theta} has been clearly manifested free from the dynamical phase shift using the magnetic-field-insensitive two-photon transitions between sodium-ground hyperfine states having different signs of the g factors. The solid angles for states with a positive g factor and with a negative g factor are verified to be 2{pi}(1-cos{theta}) and -2{pi}(1+cos{theta}), respectively, for a right-handed rotation of a magnetic field and a semiangle of 0{<=}{theta}{<=}{pi}/2.

  3. Syntheses and characterization of energetic compounds constructed from alkaline earth metal cations (Sr and Ba) and 1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia Zhengqiang; Chen Sanping; Wei Qing; Qiao Chengfang

    2011-07-15

    Two new energetic compounds, [M(BTE)(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub n} (M=Sr(1), Ba(2)) [H{sub 2}BTE=1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane], have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that they are isomorphous and exhibit 2D (4,4) net framework, generated by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs linked up by two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE, and the resulting 2D structure is interconnected by hydrogen-bond and strong face to face {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between two tetrazole rings to lead to a 3D supramolecular architecture. DSC measurements show that they have significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties, thermogravimetric analyses, and flame colors of the as-prepared compounds are also investigated in this paper. - Graphical abstract: Two novel 2D isomorphous alkaline earth metal complexes were assembled by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE ligands, and the catalytic performances toward thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate and photoluminescent properties of them were investigated. Highlights: > Two novel alkaline earth energetic coordination polymers have been prepared.{yields} Both structures are layered based on 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two distinct H{sub 2}BTE coordination modes.{yields} The dehydrated products of the compounds possess good thermostability and significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of AP.

  4. Methanol Dehydrogenation and Oxidation on Pt(111) in Alkaline Jacob S. Spendelow, Jason D. Goodpaster, Paul J. A. Kenis, and Andrzej Wieckowski*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Methanol Dehydrogenation and Oxidation on Pt(111) in Alkaline Solutions Jacob S. Spendelow, Jason D, and oxidation of methanol on Pt(111) in alkaline solutions has been examined from a fundamental mechanistic.COhasbeenconfirmedasthemainpoisoningspecies,affectingtherateofmethanoldehydrogenation primarily through repulsive interactions with methanol dehydrogenation intermediates. At direct methanol

  5. Phase behavior and oil recovery investigations using mixed and alkaline-enhanced surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; French, T.R.; Noll, L.A.; Munden, S.A.

    1992-03-01

    The results of an evaluation of different mixed surfactant and alkaline-enhanced surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery are described. Several mixed surfactant systems have been studies to evaluate their oil recovery potential as well as improved adaptability to different ranges of salinity, divalent ion concentrations, and temperature. Several combinations of screening methods were used to help identify potential chemical formulations and determine conditions where particular chemical systems can be applied. The effects of different parameters on the behavior of the overall surfactant system were also studied. Several commercially available surfactants were tested as primary components in the mixtures used in the study. These surfactants were formulated with different secondary as well as tertiary components, including ethoxylated and non-ethoxylated sulfonates and sulfates. Improved salinity and hardness tolerance was achieved for some of these chemical systems. The salinity tolerance of these systems were found to be dependent on the molecular weight, surfactant type, and concentration of the surfactant components.

  6. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-24

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  7. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  8. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Studies at PNNL are directed toward new solvent formulation for the practical sodium pseudohydroxide extraction systems.

  9. Geometric frequency shift for electric dipole searches with trapped spin-1/2 particles in general fields and measurement cells of arbitrary shape with smooth or rough walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Steyerl; C. Kaufman; G. Müller; R. Golub

    2015-05-13

    The important role of geometric phases in searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron, using Ramsey separated oscillatory field nuclear magnetic resonance, was first investigated by Pendlebury $\\textit{et al.}$ [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{70}$, 032102 (2004)]. Their analysis was based on the Bloch equations. In subsequent work using the spin density matrix Lamoreaux and Golub [Phys. Rev. A $\\mathbf{71}$, 032104 (2005)] showed the usual relation between the frequency shifts and the correlation functions of the fields seen by trapped particles in general fields (Redfield theory). More recently we presented a solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation for spin-$1/2$ particles in circular cylindrical traps with smooth walls and exposed to arbitrary fields [Steyerl $\\textit{et al.}$, Phys.Rev. A $\\mathbf{89}$, 052129 (2014)]. Here we extend this work to show how the Redfield theory follows directly from the Schr\\"odinger equation solution and include wall roughness, cylindrical trap geometry with arbitrary cross section, and field perturbations that do not, in the frame of the moving particles, average to zero in time and which, therefore, do not satisfy the prerequisites of the statistical approach based on the spin-density matrix. We show by direct, detailed, calculation the agreement of the results from the Schr\\"odinger equation with the Redfield theory for the cases of a rectangular cell with specular walls and of a circular cell with diffuse reflecting walls.

  10. Competition between Metal-Amido and Metal-Imido Chemistries in the Alkaline Earth Series: An Experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    produced by the reaction of ammonia or ND3 and barium vapor in the presence of a dc discharge. Transitions, they represent successive steps in reduction of nitrogen to ammonia. Aside from these relationships, metal- amido and alkaline earth metal-amido and -imido species have recently been proposed as materials for storage

  11. Charge carriers in alkaline direct oxidation fuel cells Liang An, T. S. Zhao,* Yinshi Li and Qixing Wu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Charge carriers in alkaline direct oxidation fuel cells Liang An, T. S. Zhao,* Yinshi Li and Qixing than Na+ ions. In a fuel cell system, charge carriers represent positively or negatively charged ions single-ion fuel cells is obvious; e.g. H+ ion is the charge carrier in proton exchange membrane fuel

  12. Simultaneous precipitation of magnesite and lizardite from1 hydrothermal alteration of olivine under high-carbonate alkalinity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    under high-carbonate alkalinity2 3 Romain Lafaya, b , German Montes-Hernandeza, *, Emilie Janotsb experiments in order to investigate the simultaneous25 serpentinization and carbonation of olivine-situ and in-situ mineral sequestration of27 CO2). For this case, specific experimental conditions were

  13. An alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with a cation exchange membrane Liang An and T. S. Zhao*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    An alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with a cation exchange membrane Liang An and T. S. Zhao the performance of anion exchange membrane (AEM) direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) is that state-of-the-art AEMs exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells (AEM- DEFCs) have received ever-increasing attention, mainly

  14. Chromate Reduction in Highly Alkaline Groundwater by Zerovalent Iron: Implications for Its Use in a Permeable Reactive Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    chromite ore processing residue (COPR). This study compares Cr(VI) removal from COPR leachate and chromate leachate. The reaction is first order with respect to both [Cr(VI)] and the iron surface area, but iron form in COPR leachate. Leachate from highly alkaline COPR contains Ca, Si, and Al that precipitate

  15. UONPR No. 1, Elk Hills, 26R Reservoir, Elk Hills oil and gas field, Kern County, California: Management Review: Surface operations and measurements of production and injection volumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Evans, Carey and Crozier was given the task to conduct a Management Review of the Surface Operations of the 26R Reservoir in UONPR No. 1, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California. The MER strategy for this reservoir is to maintain pressure, and toward this end, gas injection volumes are scheduled to amount to 110% of calculated withdrawals. In spite of this, however, reservoir pressure continues to decline. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine if, and to what extent, field operating practices and accounting procedures may be contributing to this dilemma and to make appropriate recommendations pertaining to correcting any deficiencies which may have been found.

  16. Measurement of two-dimensional concentration fields of a glycol-based tracer aerosol using laser light sheet illumination and microcomputer video image acquisition and processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revi, Frank

    1992-01-01

    The use of a tracer aerosol with a bulk density close to that of air is a convenient way to study the dispersal of pollutants in ambient room air flow. Conventional point measurement techniques do not permit the rapid and ...

  17. Development of Portable Beta Spectrometer for Sr-90 Activity Measurements in Field Conditions and Its Application in Rehabilitation Activities at RRC Kurchatov Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potapov, V.N.; Volkovich, A.G.; Ivanov, O.P.; Stepanov, V.E.; Smirnov, S.V.; Volkov, V.G. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, 1 Kurchatov Square, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    A new method to measure the Sr-90 ground specific activity in situ was developed. It is based on the count-rates determination in selected energy ranges of two registered apparatus spectra: total {beta} + {gamma} spectrum and {gamma} spectrum. A numerical simulation of the detector performance defined these energy ranges used for calculation of activity. For implementation of the proposed method a portable instrument was developed and manufactured. Parameters of the instrument are the following: the range of measurement for a specific activity mode - (60 - 3.0x10{sup 6}) Bq/kg; the range for total activity countable mode (0.5 - 2.0x10{sup 4}) Bq; minimum measurable specific activity Sr-90 for samples containing natural radionuclides - 60 Bq/kg, minimum measurable activity for samples not containing NRN - 0.5 Bq. (authors)

  18. Aerosol plume transport and transformation in high spectral resolution lidar measurements and WRF-Flexpart simulations during the MILAGRO Field Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Foy, B.

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) experiences high loadings of atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic sources, biomass burning and wind-blown dust. This paper uses a combination of measurements and numerical ...

  19. A Combined Near-field Scanning Microwave Microscope and Transport Measurement System for Characterizing Dissipation in Conducting and High-Tc Superconducting Films at Variable Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dizon, Jonathan Reyes

    2009-04-28

    , on the other hand, focused early efforts on using their coaxial resonator-type probe to image a sample?s ferroelectric domains by measuring the variations in the dielectric constant [Gao 1998]. Periodic ferroelectric domain structures in crystals have found..., on the other hand, focused early efforts on using their coaxial resonator-type probe to image a sample?s ferroelectric domains by measuring the variations in the dielectric constant [Gao 1998]. Periodic ferroelectric domain structures in crystals have found...

  20. A new method of measuring the poloidal magnetic and radial electric fields in a tokamak using a laser-accelerated ion-beam trace probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, X. Y.; Chen, Y. H.; Lin, C.; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Labaratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Both the poloidal magnetic field (B{sub p}) and radial electric field (E{sub r}) are significant in magnetic confinement devices. In this paper, a new method was proposed to diagnose both B{sub p} and E{sub r} at the same time, which was named Laser-accelerated Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP). This method based on the laser-accelerated ion beam, which has three properties: large energy spread, short pulse lengths, and multiple charge states. LITP can provide the 1D profiles, or 2D images of both B{sub p} and E{sub r}. In this paper, we present the basic principle and some preliminary theoretical results.

  1. The MSXX Force Field for the Barium Sulfate-Water Interface Yun Hee Jang,, Xiao Yan Chang, Mario Blanco, Sungu Hwang,, Yongchun Tang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    The MSXX Force Field for the Barium Sulfate-Water Interface Yun Hee Jang,, Xiao Yan Chang, Mario, 2001; In Final Form: April 3, 2002 A new force field (MSXX FF) was developed for barium sulfate (BaSO4, highly insoluble alkaline earth metal sulfates [barite (BaSO4), celestite (SrSO4), and anhydrite (CaSO4

  2. Field measurements of trace gases emitted by prescribed fires in southeastern U.S. pine forests using an open-path FTIR system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Mendoza, Albert; Johnson, Timothy J.; Cameron, Melanie; Griffith, David WT; Paton-Walsh, C.; Weise, David; Reardon, James; Yokelson, Robert J.

    2014-01-08

    We report trace-gas emission factors from three pine-understory prescribed fires in South Carolina, U.S. measured during the fall of 2011. The fires were an attempt to simulate high-intensity burns and the fuels included mature pine stands not frequently subjected to prescribed fire that were lit following a sustained period of drought. In this work we focus on the emission factor measurements made using a fixed open-path gas analyzer Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) system. We compare these emission factors with those measured using a roving, point sampling, land-based FTIR and an airborne FTIR that were deployed on the same fires. We also compare to emission factors measured by a similar open-path FTIR system deployed on savanna fires in Africa. The data suggest that the method in which the smoke is sampled can strongly influence the relative abundance of the emissions that are observed. The airborne FTIR probed the bulk of the emissions, which were lofted in the convection column and the downwind chemistry while the roving ground-based point sampling FTIR measured the contribution of individual residual smoldering combustion fuel elements scattered throughout the burn site. The open-path FTIR provided a fixed path-integrated sample of emissions produced directly upwind mixed with emissions that were redirected by wind gusts, or right after ignition and before the adjacent plume achieved significant vertical development. It typically probed two distinct combustion regimes, “flaming-like” (immediately after adjacent ignition) and “smoldering-like”, denoted “early” and “late”, respectively. The calculated emission factors from open-path measurements were closer to the airborne than to the point measurements, but this could vary depending on the calculation method or from fire to fire given the changing MCE and dynamics over the duration of a typical burn. The emission factors for species whose emissions are not highly fuel dependent (e.g. CH4 and CH3OH) from all three systems can be plotted versus modified combustion efficiency and fit to a single consistent trend suggesting that differences between the systems for these species may be mainly due to the unique mix of flaming and smoldering that each system sampled. For other more fuel dependent species, the different fuels sampled also likely contributed to platform differences in emission factors. The path-integrated sample of the ground-level smoke layer adjacent to the fire provided by the open-path measurements is important for estimating fire-line exposure to smoke for wildland fire personnel. We provide a table of estimated fire-line exposures for numerous known air toxics based on synthesizing results from several studies. Our data suggest that peak exposures are more likely to challenge permissible exposure limits for wildland fire personnel than shift-average exposures.

  3. Understanding the Factors Affecting the Formation of Carbonyl Iron Electrodes in Rechargeable Alkaline Iron Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Yang, B; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2012-01-01

    Rechargeable iron-based alkaline batteries such as iron - air and nickel - iron batteries are attractive for large-scale electrical energy storage because iron is inexpensive, globally-abundant and environmentally-friendly. Further, the iron electrode is known for its robustness to repeated charge/discharge cycling. During manufacturing these batteries are charged and discharged 20 to 50 times during which the discharge capacity of the iron electrode increases gradually and attains a stable value. This process of achieving stable capacity is called formation. In this study we have focused our efforts on understanding the effect of electrode design on formation. We have investigated the role of wetting agent, pore-former additive, and sulfide additive on the formation of carbonyl iron electrodes. The wetting agent increased the rate of formation while the pore-former additive increased the final capacity. Sodium sulfide added to the electrolyte worked as a de-passivation agent and increased the final discharge capacity. We have proposed a phenomenological model for the formation process that predicts the rate of formation and final discharge capacity given the design parameters for the electrode. The understanding gained here will be useful in reducing the time lost in formation and in maximizing the utilization of the iron electrode. (C) 2012 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.021301jes] All rights reserved.

  4. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  5. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2005-09-26

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  6. Assessment of commercially available ion exchange materials for cesium removal from highly alkaline wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, K.P.; Kim, A.Y.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Approximately 61 million gallons of nuclear waste generated in plutonium production, radionuclide removal campaigns, and research and development activities is stored on the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Although the pretreatment process and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include removal of cesium from the aqueous streams. In many cases, after cesium is removed, the dissolved salt cakes and supernates can be disposed of as LLW. Ion exchange has been a leading candidate for this separation. Ion exchange systems have the advantage of simplicity of equipment and operation and provide many theoretical stages in a small space. The organic ion exchange material Duolite{trademark} CS-100 has been selected as the baseline exchanger for conceptual design of the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). Use of CS-100 was chosen because it is considered a conservative, technologically feasible approach. During FY 96, final resin down-selection will occur for IPM Title 1 design. Alternate ion exchange materials for cesium exchange will be considered at that time. The purpose of this report is to conduct a search for commercially available ion exchange materials which could potentially replace CS-100. This report will provide where possible a comparison of these resin in their ability to remove low concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions. Materials which show promise can be studied further, while less encouraging resins can be eliminated from consideration.

  7. Modeling experimental results of diffusion of alkaline solutions through a compacted bentonite barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Raul; Cuevas, Jaime; Maeder, Urs K.

    2010-08-15

    The interaction between concrete/cement and swelling clay (bentonite) has been modeled in the context of engineered barrier systems for deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The geochemical transformations observed in laboratory diffusion experiments at 60 and 90 {sup o}C between bentonite and different high-pH solutions (K-Na-OH and Ca(OH){sub 2}-saturated) were reconciled with the reactive transport code CrunchFlow. For K-Na-OH solutions (pH = 13.5 at 25 {sup o}C) partial dissolution of montmorillonite and precipitation of Mg-silicates (talc-like), hydrotalcite and brucite at the interface are predicted at 60 {sup o}C, while at 90 {sup o}C the alteration is wider. Alkaline cations diffused beyond the mineralogical alteration zone by means of exchange with Mg{sup 2+} in the interlayer region of montmorillonite. Very slow reactivity and minor alteration of the clay are predicted in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-bentonite system. The model is a reasonable description of the experiments but also demonstrates the difficulties in modeling processes operating at a small scale under a diffusive regime.

  8. Methods of use of calcium hexa aluminate refractory linings and/or chemical barriers in high alkali or alkaline environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGowan, Kenneth A; Cullen, Robert M; Keiser, James R; Hemrick, James G; Meisner, Roberta A

    2013-10-22

    A method for improving the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of a liner in contact with at least one of an alkali and/or alkaline environments is provided. The method comprises lining a surface that is subject to wear by an alkali environment and/or an alkaline environment with a refractory composition comprising a refractory aggregate consisting essentially of a calcium hexa aluminate clinker having the formula CA.sub.6, wherein C is equal to calcium oxide, wherein A is equal to aluminum oxide, and wherein the hexa aluminate clinker has from zero to less than about fifty weight percent C.sub.12A.sub.7, and wherein greater than 98 weight percent of the calcium hexa aluminate clinker having a particle size ranging from -20 microns to +3 millimeters, for forming a liner of the surface. This method improves the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of the liner.

  9. The etching process of boron nitride by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides under high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, W., E-mail: guowei1982cry@163.com [College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); National Key Lab of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Ma, H.A.; Jia, X. [National Key Lab of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Appropriate etch processes of hBN and cBN under HPHT are proposed. • The degree of the crystallization of hBN was decreased. • A special cBN growth mechanism with a triangular unit is proposed. • Plate-shape cBN crystals with large ratio of length to thickness were obtained. • A strategy provides useful guidance for controlling the cBN morphology. - Abstract: Some new etching processes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) under high pressure and high temperature in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth fluorides have been discussed. It is found that hBN is etched distinctly by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the morphology of hBN is significantly changed from plate-shape to spherical-shape. Based on the “graphitization index” values of hBN, the degree of the crystallization of hBN under high pressure and high temperature decreases in the sequence of LiF > CaF{sub 2} > MgF{sub 2}. This facilitates the formation of high-quality cBN single crystals. Different etch steps, pits, and islands are observed on cBN surface, showing the strong etching by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the tendency of layer-by-layer growth. A special layer growth mechanism of cBN with a triangular unit has been found. Furthermore, the morphologies of cBN crystals are apparently affected by a preferential surface etching of LiF, CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2}. Respectively, the plate-shape and tetrahedral cBN crystals can be obtained in the presence of different alkali and alkaline earth fluorides.

  10. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  11. ReproducedfromJournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Phosphorus Speciation in Manure-Amended Alkaline Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    JournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Phosphorus Speciation in Manure-Amended Alkaline Soils Jeremy C. Hansen, Barbara J. Cade-Menun, and Daniel G or mononucleotides, allowing it toThe manure from stockpiles is applied to soils in solid form, while lagoon manure is applied as a liquid. Soil amendment with manure form relatively stable complexes in soil that are pro

  12. Kinetics of hydrolysis and oxidation of carbon disulfide by hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium and application to carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewuyi, Y.G.; Carmichael, G.R.

    1987-02-01

    Kinetic studies of the oxidation of carbon disulfide by hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium were made spectrophotometrically. The reaction of CS/sub 2/ with OH/sup -/ ion was found to be rate controlling and proceeded by the formation of a dithiocarbonate complex. The major reaction product was sulfate with sulfur occurring as colloidal suspensions only at pH values less than 8. The formation of sulfate increased exponentially with time and was also found to be dependent on the rate of hydrolysis of CS/sub 2/. In addition, the production of sulfate showed large induction periods, suggesting either a complex mechanism or formation by secondary reactions. The results obtained for carbon disulfide were extended to carbonyl sulfide (OCS) oxidation in alkaline solutions. The removal of OCS (acid gas) from mixtures of gases by alkaline liquid absorbents (e.g. NaOH) and oxidation of subsequent solutions to sulfate is an important industrial practice. 42 references, 14 figures, 2 tables.

  13. The use of wireline pressure measurements to refine reservoir description, Main Body B waterflood, Elk Hills oil field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, M. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Love, C. (Scientific Software Intercomp, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Fishburn, M. (Dept. of Energy, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Humphrey, M. (Chevron, USA, San Ramon, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01

    The Main Body B, one of five large Stevens sand reservoirs at Elk Hills, occupies the eastern half of the 31S anticline. Early in the production history of this reservoir, the Elk Hills unit initiated peripheral water injection to maintain reservoir pressure. Water injection has proceeded at a rate approximately equal to the voidage created by oil and gas production and has moved water upstructure creating an oil bank. Bechtel Petroleum Operations Inc., the current unit operator, drills five to ten new wells each year to fully exploit this oil bank. In 1985, the unit added wireline pressure measurements to the open-hole logging programs of these infill wells for the purpose of evaluating the net effect of injection into and production from the Main Body B reservoir. A typical well provides the opportunity to obtain 8-10 pressures from the Main Body B. To date, the Unit has measured wireline pressures in more than two dozen wells. The wireline measurements have shown a broader than expected range of formation pressures (1,600 {plus minus} psi to 4,200 {plus minus} psi). The pressures show that this is a layered reservoir with little vertical pressure communication between some of the layers. In some parts of the reservoir, wireline pressures indicate horizontal continuity of the layers between wells and in other areas pressure differences between adjacent wells may indicate faults or cementation barriers. Permeabilities calculated from the sampling drawdown are the same order of magnitude as brine permeabilities obtained from core and show that higher-pressured layers of the reservoir have lower permeability. These observations fundamentally alter performance evaluation of the Main Body B waterflood.

  14. Measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willis, W.L.

    1980-10-01

    The discussion will be restricted to measurements of voltage and current. Also, although the measurements themselves should be as quantitative as possible, the discussion is rather nonquantitative. Emphasis is on types of instruments, how they may be used, and the inherent advantages and limitations of a given technique. A great deal of information can be obtained from good, clean voltage and current data. Power and impedance are obviously inherent if the proper time relationships are preserved. Often an associated, difficult-to-determine, physical event can be evaluated from the V-I data, such as a time-varying load characteristic, or the time of light emission, etc. The lack of active high voltage devices, such as 50-kV operational amplifiers, restricts measurement devices to passive elements, primarily R and C. There are a few more exotic techniques that are still passive in nature. There are several well-developed techniques for voltage measurements. These include: spark gaps; electrostatic meters; capacitive dividers; mixed RC dividers; and the electro-optic effect. Current is measured by either direct measurement of charge flow or by measuring the resulting magnetic field.

  15. Charge exchange neutral particle measurements with natural diamond detector under the deuterium-deuterium neutron field on JT-60U tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, M.; Kusama, Y.; Takechi, M.; Nishitani, T.; Morioka, A.; Sasao, M.; Isobe, M.; Krasilnikov, A.; Kaschuck, Yu. A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-0193 (Japan); Tohoku University, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gihu 509-5292 (Japan); Troitsk Institute of Innovating and Fusion Research (TRINITI) Troitsk, Moscow Region 142092 (Russian Federation)

    2004-10-01

    A natural diamond detector (NDD) has been installed on the JT-60U tokamak to measure the flux and the energy distribution of charge exchange (CX) fast neutral particles. A NDD has many important advantages to be used as a CX neutral particle analyzer, for example very compact size, high energy resolution, and high radiation hardness etc., while the neutrons and {gamma} rays are a large noise source in the deuterium plasma. The shield was set up around the NDD to reduce those noises. Time-resolved energy distribution of CX neutral particles corresponding to injected beam energy have been successfully obtained under high intensity neutron yield Y{sub n}>10{sup 15} n/s. Further enhanced neutral particle fluxes during sawtooth oscillation and Alfven eigenmodes were observed with the NDD. The performance of the NDD as CX neutral particle spectrometer under high intensity neutron yield was demonstrated for the first time on JT-60U in this work.

  16. Large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers for pH measurement at the Nernstian limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fakih, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.fakih@mail.mcgill.ca; Sabri, Shadi; Szkopek, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.szkopek@mcgill.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Mahvash, Farzaneh [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada); Nannini, Matthieu [McGill Nanotools Microfab, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Siaj, Mohamed [Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2014-08-25

    We have fabricated and characterized large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers and demonstrated pH sensitivities approaching the Nernstian limit. Low temperature atomic layer deposition was used to deposit tantalum pentoxide atop large area graphene ISFETs. The charge neutrality point of graphene, inferred from quantum capacitance or channel conductance, was used to monitor surface potential in the presence of an electrolyte with varying pH. Bare graphene ISFETs exhibit negligible response, while graphene ISFETs with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers show increased sensitivity reaching up to 55?mV/pH over pH 3 through pH 8. Applying the Bergveld model, which accounts for site binding and a Guoy-Chapman-Stern picture of the surface-electrolyte interface, the increased pH sensitivity can be attributed to an increased buffer capacity reaching up to 10{sup 14} sites/cm{sup 2}. ISFET response was found to be stable to better than 0.05 pH units over the course of two weeks.

  17. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2004-06-30

    In this project, now completing its third year of its second renewal period, a collaborative project involving Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of North Texas has been addressing outstanding questions regarding the separation of the bulk sodium constituents of alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit of this research is a major reduction in the volume of radioactive tank waste, obviating the building of expensive new tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. As a general approach, principles of ion recognition are being explored toward discovery and basic understanding of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium salts from waste-like matrices. Questions being addressed pertain to applicable extraction equilibria and how extraction properties relate to extractant structure. Progress has included the elucidation of the promising concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction (PHE), demonstration of crown-ether synergized PHE, demonstration of combined sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate separation, and synthesis of novel ditopic receptors for ditopic PHE. In future efforts (pending renewal), a thermochemical study of PHE relating extractant acidity to extraction strength is proposed, and this study will be extended to systems containing crown ethers, including proton-ionizable ones. A series of crown ethers will be synthesized for this purpose and to investigate the extraction of bulk sodium salts (e.g., nitrate, nitrite, and sulfate), possibly in combination with sodium hydroxide. Simple proof-of-principle tests with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent designs that have desirable properties. In view of the upcoming milestone of completion of the second renewal period, this report will, in addition to providing a summary of the past year's progress, summarize all of the work completed since the start of this project.

  18. Constraints on non-Standard Model Higgs boson interactions in an effective field theory using differential cross sections measured in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The strength and tensor structure of the Higgs boson's interactions are investigated within an effective field theory framework, which allows new CP-even and CP-odd interactions that can lead to changes in the kinematic properties of the Higgs boson and associated jet spectra. The parameters of the effective field theory are probed using a fit to five differential cross sections previously measured by the ATLAS experiment in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. In order to perform a simultaneous fit to the five distributions, the statistical correlations between them are determined by re-analysing the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ candidate events in the proton-proton collision data. No significant deviations from the Standard Model are observed and limits on the effective field theory parameters are derived. The statistical correlations are made publicly available to allow for future analysis of theories with non-Standard Model int...

  19. In-situ measurement of ethanol tolerance in an operating fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    In-situ measurement of ethanol tolerance in an operating fuel cell Matt S. Naughton a , Claire E online xxx Keywords: Alkaline fuel cell Gas diffusion electrodes Ag cathode Electrode characterization for direct ethanol fuel cells and as a source for on-demand production of hydrogen in portable applications

  20. Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan Diaz-Loya, E.; Allouche, Erez N.; Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R.; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

  1. Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, María V.; Falco, Lorena R.; Peluso, Miguel A.; Sambeth, Jorge E.; Thomas, Horacio J.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

  2. Development of Effective Solvent Modifiers for the Solvent Extraction of Cesium from Alkaline High-Level Tank Waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnesen, Peter V.; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Lumetta, Gregg J. )

    2003-01-01

    A series of novel alkylphenoxy fluorinated alcohols were prepared and investigated for their effectiveness as modifiers in solvents containing calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 for extracting cesium from alkaline nitrate media. A modifier that contained a terminal 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethoxy group was found to decompose following long-term exposure to warm alkaline solutions. However, replacement of the tetrafluoroethoxy group with a 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy group led to a series of modifiers that possessed the alkaline stability required for a solvent extraction process. Within this series of modifiers, the structure of the alkyl substituent (tert-octyl, tert-butyl, tert-amyl, and sec-butyl) of the alkylphenoxy moiety was found to have a profound impact on the phase behavior of the solvent in liquid-liquid contacting experiments, and hence on the overall suitability of the modifier for a solvent extraction process. The sec-butyl derivative[1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol] (Cs-7SB) was found to possess the best overall balance of properties with respect to third phase and coalescence behavior, cleanup following degradation, resistance to solids formation, and cesium distribution behavior. Accordingly, this modifier was selected for use as a component of the solvent employed in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for removing cesium from high level nuclear waste (HLW) at the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE) Savannah River Site. In batch equilibrium experiments, this solvent has also been successfully shown to extract cesium from both simulated and actual solutions generated from caustic leaching of HLW tank sludge stored in tank B-110 at the DOE?s Hanford Site.

  3. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring SinglegovField CampaignsMidlatitudegovMeasurementsCloud

  4. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  5. Combined Utilization of Cation Exchanger and Neutral Receptor to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2004-03-29

    In this report, novel approaches to the selective liquid-liquid extraction separation of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from high-level alkaline tank waste will be discussed. Sodium hydroxide can be successfully separated from alkaline tank-waste supernatants by weakly acidic lipophilic hydroxy compounds via a cation-exchange mechanism referred to as pseudo hydroxide extraction. In a multi-cycle process, as sodium hydroxide in the aqueous phase becomes depleted, it is helpful to have a neutral sodium receptor in the extraction system to exploit the high nitrate concentration in the waste solution to promote sodium removal by an ion-pair extraction process. Simultaneous utilization of an ionizable organic hydroxy compound and a neutral extractant (crown ether) in an organic phase results in the synergistic enhancement of ion exchange and improved separation selectivity due to the receptor's strong and selective sodium binding. Moreover, combination of the hydroxy compound and the crown ether provides for mutually increased solubility, even in a non-polar organic solvent. Accordingly, application of Isopar{reg_sign} L, a kerosene-like alkane solvent, becomes feasible. This investigation involves examination of such dual-mechanism extraction phases for sodium extraction from simulated and actual salt cake waste solutions. Sodium salts can be regenerated upon the contact of the loaded extraction phases with water. Finally, conditions of potential extraction/strip cycling will be discussed.

  6. Enhancing the Performance of the Rechargeable Iron Electrode in Alkaline Batteries with Bismuth Oxide and Iron Sulfide Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-09-07

    Iron-based alkaline rechargeable batteries have the potential of meeting the needs of large-scale electrical energy storage because of their low-cost, robustness and eco-friendliness. However, the widespread commercial deployment of iron-based batteries has been limited by the low charging efficiency and the poor discharge rate capability of the iron electrode. In this study, we have demonstrated iron electrodes containing bismuth oxide and iron sulfide with a charging efficiency of 92% and capable of being discharged at the 3C rate. Such a high value of charging efficiency combined with the ability to discharge at high rates is being reported for the first time. The bismuth oxide additive led to the in situ formation of elemental bismuth and a consequent increase in the overpotential for the hydrogen evolution reaction leading to an increase in the charging efficiency. We observed that the sulfide ions added to the electrolyte and iron sulfide added to the electrode mitigated-electrode passivation and allowed for continuous discharge at high rates. At the 3C discharge rate, a utilization of 0.2 Ah/g was achieved. The performance level of the rechargeable iron electrode demonstrated here is attractive for designing economically-viable large-scale energy storage systems based on alkaline nickel-iron and iron-air batteries. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacillus cereus Phosphopentomutase Is an Alkaline Phosphatase Family Member That Exhibits an Altered Entry Point into the Catalytic Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panosian, Timothy D.; Nannemann, David P.; Watkins, Guy R.; Phelan, Vanessa V.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, Tina M.

    2011-09-15

    Bacterial phosphopentomutases (PPMs) are alkaline phosphatase superfamily members that interconvert {alpha}-D-ribose 5-phosphate (ribose 5-phosphate) and {alpha}-D-ribose 1-phosphate (ribose 1-phosphate). We investigated the reaction mechanism of Bacillus cereus PPM using a combination of structural and biochemical studies. Four high resolution crystal structures of B. cereus PPM revealed the active site architecture, identified binding sites for the substrate ribose 5-phosphate and the activator {alpha}-D-glucose 1,6-bisphosphate (glucose 1,6-bisphosphate), and demonstrated that glucose 1,6-bisphosphate increased phosphorylation of the active site residue Thr-85. The phosphorylation of Thr-85 was confirmed by Western and mass spectroscopic analyses. Biochemical assays identified Mn{sup 2+}-dependent enzyme turnover and demonstrated that glucose 1,6-bisphosphate treatment increases enzyme activity. These results suggest that protein phosphorylation activates the enzyme, which supports an intermolecular transferase mechanism. We confirmed intermolecular phosphoryl transfer using an isotope relay assay in which PPM reactions containing mixtures of ribose 5-[{sup 18}O{sub 3}]phosphate and [U-{sup 13}C{sub 5}]ribose 5-phosphate were analyzed by mass spectrometry. This intermolecular phosphoryl transfer is seemingly counter to what is anticipated from phosphomutases employing a general alkaline phosphatase reaction mechanism, which are reported to catalyze intramolecular phosphoryl transfer. However, the two mechanisms may be reconciled if substrate encounters the enzyme at a different point in the catalytic cycle.

  8. Conceptual Model of Uranium in the Vadose Zone for Acidic and Alkaline Wastes Discharged at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    Historically, uranium was disposed in waste solutions of varying waste chemistry at the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The character of how uranium was distributed in the vadose zone during disposal, how it has continued to migrate through the vadose zone, and the magnitude of potential impacts on groundwater are strongly influenced by geochemical reactions in the vadose zone. These geochemical reactions can be significantly influenced by the disposed-waste chemistry near the disposal location. This report provides conceptual models and supporting information to describe uranium fate and transport in the vadose zone for both acidic and alkaline wastes discharged at a substantial number of waste sites in the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The conceptual models include consideration of how co-disposed acidic or alkaline fluids influence uranium mobility in terms of induced dissolution/precipitation reactions and changes in uranium sorption with a focus on the conditions near the disposal site. This information, when combined with the extensive information describing uranium fate and transport at near background pH conditions, enables focused characterization to support effective fate and transport estimates for uranium in the subsurface.

  9. F 230 -2012 Forestry Field Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or pencil sharpener Engineer's scale Circular protractor (Sterling #535) Notebooks for lecture notes

  10. The relationship between coefficient of restitution and state of charge of zinc alkaline primary LR6 batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhadra, S; Hertzberg, BJ; Hsieh, AG; Croft, M; Gallaway, JW; Van Tassell, BJ; Chamoun, M; Erdonmez, C; Zhong, Z; Sholklapper, T; Steingart, DA

    2015-01-01

    The coefficient of restitution of alkaline batteries has been shown to increase as a function of depth of discharge. In this work, using non-destructive mechanical testing, the change in coefficient of restitution is compared to in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction data to determine the cause of the macroscopic change in coefficient of restitution. The increase in coefficient of restitution correlates to the formation of a percolation pathway of ZnO within the anode of the cell, and the coefficient of restitution levels off at a value of 0.66 +/- 0.02 at 50% state of charge when the anode has densified into porous ZnO solid. Of note is the sensitivity of coefficient of restitution to the amount of ZnO formation that rivals the sensitivity of in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction.

  11. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  12. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr., E-mail: ncn@inano.au.dk [Center for Insoluble Protein Structures (inSPIN), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Khaneja, Navin [Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C?) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C?-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  13. High-K alkali basalts of the Western Snake River Plain: Abrupt transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkaline plume-derived basalts, Western Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervais, John W.

    High-K alkali basalts of the Western Snake River Plain: Abrupt transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkaline plume-derived basalts, Western Snake River Plain, Idaho John W. Shervais a, , Scott K. Vetter b Snake River Plain SRP Yellowstone plume hotspots Basaltic volcanism in the western Snake River Plain

  14. A Carbon-Supported Copper Complex of 3,5-Diamino-1,2,4-triazole as a Cathode Catalyst for Alkaline Fuel Cell Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Fuel Cell Applications Fikile R. Brushett, Matthew S. Thorum, Nicholas S. Lioutas, Matthew S. Naughton-tri/C) is investigated as a cathode material using an alkaline microfluidic H2/O2 fuel cell. The absolute Cu be realized by optimizing catalyst and electrode preparation procedures. Fuel cell-based systems hold promise

  15. Plasmid DNA minipreps (alkaline lysis method) 1. Centrifuge 1 mL of overnight bacterial culture in eppi tube for 2 min at 10,000 x g

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Norman

    Plasmid DNA minipreps (alkaline lysis method) 1. Centrifuge 1 mL of overnight bacterial culture. Incubate on ice 5 min (or longer). 7. Centrifuge for 10 min at 16,000 x g at 4°C. 8. Transfer supernatant to new eppi tube; add equal volume PCI; mix by vortex. 9. Centrifuge for 5 min at 16,000 x g at room

  16. Pyrite Flotation With Xanthate Under Alkaline Conditions --Application to Environmental Desulfurisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    -metal sulfide minerals and coal. It is generally considered as a barren mineral and concentrated in the mineH 11 with lime. Results presented in this paper include surface infrared analyses and pulp chemistry measurements which have showed that aeration had a dual effect on pyrite flotation. It induced pyrite surface

  17. THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  18. Tachyonic field interacting with Scalar (Phantom) Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2009-01-29

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  19. Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

  20. Estimating Motor Efficiency in the Field

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    testing procedures as described in Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Standard 112-2004 (Test Method B). Field measurements for determining motor efficiency...

  1. Structures and stabilities of alkaline earth metal peroxides XO2 (X=Ca, Be, Mg) studied by a genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xin [Ames Laboratory; Nguyen, Manh Cuong [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Ho, Kai-Ming [Ames Laboratory

    2013-09-17

    The structures and stabilities of alkaline earth metal peroxides XO2 (X = Ca, Be, Mg) were studied using an adaptive genetic algorithm (GA) for global structure optimization in combination with first-principles calculations. From the adaptive GA search, we obtained an orthorhombic structure for CaO2 with 12 atoms in the unit cell, which is energetically more favorable than the previously proposed structures. Reaction energy of the decomposition CaO2 ? CaO + 1/2O2 determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculation shows that this orthorhombic calcium peroxide structure is thermodynamically stable. The simulated X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern using our predicted structure is in excellent agreement with experimental data. We also show that crystal phase BeO2 is unlikely to exist under normal conditions. MgO2 has a cubic pyrite structure, but it is not stable against decomposition: MgO2 ? MgO + 1/2O2.

  2. The Electromagnetic Field as a Synchrony Gauge Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert D. Bock

    2015-09-24

    Building on our previous work, we investigate the identification of the electromagnetic field as a local gauge field of a restricted group of synchrony transformations. We begin by arguing that the inability to measure the one-way speed of light independent of a synchronization scheme necessitates that physical laws must be reformulated without distant simultaneity. As a result, we are forced to introduce a new operational definition of time which leads to a fundamental space-time invariance principle that is related to a subset of the synchrony group. We identify the gauge field associated with this new invariance principle with the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the electromagnetic field acquires a space-time interpretation, as suggested in our previous work. In addition, we investigate the static, spherically symmetric solution of the resulting field equations. Also, we discuss implications of the present work for understanding the tension between classical and quantum theory.

  3. The Electromagnetic Field as a Synchrony Gauge Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bock, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Building on our previous work, we investigate the identification of the electromagnetic field as a local gauge field of a restricted group of synchrony transformations. We begin by arguing that the inability to measure the one-way speed of light independent of a synchronization scheme necessitates that physical laws must be reformulated without distant simultaneity. As a result, we are forced to introduce a new operational definition of time which leads to a fundamental space-time invariance principle that is related to a subset of the synchrony group. We identify the gauge field associated with this new invariance principle with the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the electromagnetic field acquires a space-time interpretation, as suggested in our previous work. In addition, we investigate the static, spherically symmetric solution of the resulting field equations. Also, we discuss implications of the present work for understanding the tension between classical and quantum theory.

  4. Development of a portable neutron coincidence counter for field measurements of nuclear materials using the advanced multiplicity capabilities of MCNPX 2.5.F and the neutron coincidence point model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Angela Lynn

    2009-05-15

    given material. In an effort to identify unknown nuclear samples in field inspections, the Portable Neutron Coincidence Counter (PNCC) has been developed. This detector makes use of the coincident neutrons being emitted from a bulk sample. An in...

  5. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Glen E. Gronniger

    2007-10-02

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 13.2, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1. FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/Standards/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized. The Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major fields of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; (3) Electrical (DC, AC, RF/Microwave); and (4) Optical and Radiation. Metrology Engineering provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement in the fields listed above. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. Evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys.

  6. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) | SciTechSubmittedEcologist for a Day Field Guide Program

  7. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

    2001-06-01

    Disposal of high-level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

  8. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

    2000-06-01

    Disposal of high- level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid- liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

  9. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Haverlock, Tamara J.

    2002-03-30

    This research has focused on new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to separation of major sodium salts from alkaline tank waste. It was the overall goal to provide the scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of liquid-liquid extraction chemistry for bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated. Sodium hydroxide represented the initial test case and primary focus. It is a primary component of the waste1 and has the most value for recycle. A full explanation of the relevance of this research to USDOE Environmental Management needs will be given in the Relevance, Impact, and Technology Transfer section below. It should be noted that this effort was predicated on the need for sodium removal primarily from low-activity waste, whereas evolving needs have shifted attention to volume reduction of the high-activity waste. The results of the research to date apply to both applications, though treatment of high-activity wastes raises new questions that will be addressed in the renewal period. Toward understanding the extractive chemistry of sodium hydroxide and other sodium salts, it was the intent to identify candidate extractants and determine their applicable basic properties regarding selectivity, efficiency, speciation, and structure. A hierarchical strategy was to be employed in which the type of liquid-liquid-extraction system varied in sophistication from simple, single-component solvents to solvents containing designer host molecules. As an aid in directing this investigation toward addressing the fundamental questions having the most value, a conceptualization of an ideal process was advanced. Accordingly, achieving adequate selectivity for sodium hydroxide represented a primary goal, but this result is worthwhile for waste applications only if certain conditions are met.

  10. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of major sodium salts from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites. Disposal of high level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Since the residual bulk chemicals must still undergo expensive treatment and disposal after most of the hazardous radionuclides have been removed, large cost savings will result from processes that reduce the overall waste volume. It is proposed that major cost savings can be expected if sodium hydroxide needed for sludge washing can be obtained from the waste itself, thus avoiding the addition of yet another bulk chemical to the waste and still further increase of the waste volume and disposal cost. Secondary priority is given to separating potassium an d abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

  11. Electronic field permeameter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Mark A. (Madison, WI); Goggin, David J. (Austin, TX); Horne, Patrick J. (Austin, TX); Kocurek, Gary G. (Roundrock, TX); Lake, Larry W. (Austin, TX)

    1989-01-01

    For making rapid, non-destructive permeability measurements in the field, a portable minipermeameter of the kind having a manually-operated gas injection tip is provided with a microcomputer system which operates a flow controller to precisely regulate gas flow rate to a test sample, and reads a pressure sensor which senses the pressure across the test sample. The microcomputer system automatically turns on the gas supply at the start of each measurement, senses when a steady-state is reached, collects and records pressure and flow rate data, and shuts off the gas supply immediately after the measurement is completed. Preferably temperature is also sensed to correct for changes in gas viscosity. The microcomputer system may also provide automatic zero-point adjustment, sensor calibration, over-range sensing, and may select controllers, sensors, and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements. Electronic sensors may provide increased accuracy and precision. Preferably one microcomputer is used for sensing instrument control and data collection, and a second microcomputer is used which is dedicated to recording and processing the data, selecting the sensors and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements, and instructing the user how to set-up and operate the minipermeameter. To provide mass data collection and user-friendly operation, the second microcomputer is preferably a lap-type portable microcomputer having a non-volatile or battery-backed CMOS memory.

  12. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    Danish Atomic Energy Commission, Research Establishment, Ris^, Denmark, published by the International Atomic Energy Agency,

  13. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    1962. "Diatremes and Uranium Deposits in the Hopi Buttes,H. , 1970. "Low-Grade Uranium Deposits in Agpaitic NephelineL. Torkild, 1974B. "The Uranium Deposit at Kvanefjeld, The

  14. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    Minerals," Danish Atomic Energy Commission, ResearchFront Range," U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Trace ElementMinerals," Danish Atomic Energy Commission, Risoe, Research

  15. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    1977. "Geology of Brazil's Uranium and Thorium Occurrences,"A tantalo-niobate of uranium, near pyrochlore. Isometric,niobate and tantalate of uranium, with ferrous iron and rare

  16. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    ComissSo Nacional de Energia Nuclear, and visits to fieldthe Comissao Hacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN). Until a few

  17. Alkaline Membrane Electrolysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research at NRELDepartmentJune 2, 2015AlignedRPTnnnn Membrane-Based

  18. Rechargeable alkaline zinc/ferricyanide battery, Phase III. Final report, 26 October 1981-18 September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, G.B.; Hollandsworth, R.P.; Webber, B.D.

    1983-02-01

    Project effort was concentrated primarily on technical advancement of the alkaline zinc/ferricyanide battery to meet goals of scale-up and demonstration of solid-reactant storage with 1000-cm/sup 2/ full-scale cells; development of a conceptual engineering design for a 50-kW solar-photovoltaic storage system; demonstration of solar acceptance random cycling; and determination of cycle life of cells operating at 70- and 200-mA.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity. These goals were met in the design, fabrication, and cyclic testing of a 1000-cm/sup 2/ cell having a flow aspect ratio of 2:1. After some design optimization, energy efficiency in 2N NaOH at 43/sup 0/C is 74 to 78 percent. Testing has been in conjunction with a crystallizer/reservoir designed with a capacity of 300 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ that delivers solids-free electrolyte to the cell. A conceptual engineering design for a 50-kW solar storage-battery system has been formulated with mass and thermal balances computed. Single-cell (60-cm/sup 2/) cycle life tests are in progress at 35 mA/cm/sup 2/ with 2N NaOH electrolyte with Nafion N-125 separator at 40/sup 0/C. Over 800 cycles at 70 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity with mean energy efficiency of 76.6 +- 2.1 percent have been logged. Mean voltaic and coulombic efficiencies are 83.3 +- 1.8 percent and 92.0 +- 1.8 percent, respectively. Single-cell (60-cm/sup 2/) cycle life tests run under similar conditions at 249 +- 45 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ have logged over 220 cycles with mean energy efficiency of 75.3 +- 5.1 percent. Mean voltaic and coulombic efficiencies are 84.7 +- 2.0 and 89.0 +- 6.0, respectively.

  19. Reflectometer Measurement for the Levitated Dipole Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reflectometer Measurement for the Levitated Dipole Experiment The Levitated Dipole Experiment geometries Magnetic shear makes analysis more difficult (not a problem in LDX) Bandwidth competition propagation perpendicular to the magnetic field Solving: 1. Measure peak density in LDX The innermost

  20. Eighth International Magnetic Measurement Workshop (IMMW-8) presentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-09-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on magnetic field measurements conducted at the superconducting super collider and other accelerators.

  1. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  2. Paint coatings: Controlled field and chamber experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edney, E.O.

    1989-04-01

    To determine the impact of pollution levels on the weathering rates of coatings, laboratory chamber experiments and controlled field exposures at North Carolina and Ohio sites were conducted in such a manner to separate the contributions due to dry deposition, wet deposition, precipitation pH, etc. The results of these studies confirm that acidic gases such as SO/sub 2/ and HNO/sub 3/, as well as acids within rain, promote the dissolution of alkaline components including CaCO/sub 3/, ZnO, and Al flake from paint films. It is unclear from these studies whether the removal of these components reduces the service life or protective properties of the paint film. Other researchers within the Coatings Effects Program are conducting subsequent analyses to determine micro-damage of these paints. The uptake of acidic gases to painted surfaces is a complex process that depends on several factors. The deposition rate of SO/sub 2/ to a wet, painted surface may be controlled by the level of oxidants such as H/sub 2/O/sub 2/.

  3. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  4. "Optical" Spin Rotation Phenomenon and Spin Filtering of Antiproton (Proton, Deuteron) Beams in a Pseudomagnetic Field of a Polarized Target: the Possibility of Measuring the Real Part of the Coherent Zero-angle Scattering Amplitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky

    2011-01-17

    It is shown that in the experiments dedicated for producing of polarized beams of antiprotons during their passage through a polarized gas target placed in a storage ring it is possible to measure not only spin-dependent total cross-sections of antiproton scattering by the proton (deuteron), but also the spin-dependent real part of the coherent zero-angle scattering amplitude in the process of production of a polarized beam of antiprotons.

  5. Internal split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat; Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  6. Mapping the magnetic field vector in a fountain clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertsvolf, Marina; Marmet, Louis [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    We show how the mapping of the magnetic field vector components can be achieved in a fountain clock by measuring the Larmor transition frequency in atoms that are used as a spatial probe. We control two vector components of the magnetic field and apply audio frequency magnetic pulses to localize and measure the field vector through Zeeman spectroscopy.

  7. Electric fields and quantum wormholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalit Engelhardt; Ben Freivogel; Nabil Iqbal

    2015-05-24

    Electric fields can thread a classical Einstein-Rosen bridge. Maldacena and Susskind have recently suggested that in a theory of dynamical gravity the entanglement of ordinary perturbative quanta should be viewed as creating a quantum version of an Einstein-Rosen bridge between the particles, or a "quantum wormhole". We demonstrate within low-energy effective field theory that there is a precise sense in which electric fields can also thread such quantum wormholes. We define a non-perturbative "wormhole susceptibility" that measures the ease of passing an electric field through any sort of wormhole. The susceptibility of a quantum wormhole is suppressed by powers of the U(1) gauge coupling relative to that for a classical wormhole but can be made numerically equal with a sufficiently large amount of entangled matter.

  8. High field magnetotransport and point contact Andreev reflection measurements on CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br—Degenerate magnetic semiconductor single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, K. Coey, J. M. D.; Stamenov, P.; Alaria, J.

    2014-05-07

    Single crystals of the metallically degenerate fully magnetic semiconductors CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br have been prepared by the Chemical Vapour Transport method, using either Se or Br as transport agents. The high-quality, millimetre-sized, octahedrally faceted, needle- and platelet-shaped crystals are characterised by means of high field magnetotransport (?{sub 0}H? 14?T) and Point Contact Andreev Reflection. The relatively high spin polarisation observed |P|>0.56, together with the relatively low minority carrier effective mass of 0.25 m{sub e}, and long scattering time  10{sup ?13}?s, could poise these materials for integration in low- and close-to-room temperature minority injection bipolar heterojunction transistor demonstrations.

  9. Relation between photospheric flow fields and the magnetic field distribution on the solar surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, G.W.; Title, A.M.; Topka, K.P.; Tarbell, T.D.; Shine, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Using the technique of local correlation tracking on a 28 minute time sequence of white-light images of solar granulation, the horizontal flow field on the solar surface is measured. The time series was obtained by the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 (Space Shuttle flight 51-F) and is free from atmospheric blurring and distortion. The SOUP flow fields have been compared with carefully aligned magnetograms taken over a nine hour period at the Big Bear Solar Observatory before, during, and after the SOUP images. The flow field and the magnetic field agree in considerable detail: vectors which define the flow of the white-light intensity pattern (granulation) point toward magnetic field regions, magnetic fields surround flow cells, and magnetic features move along the flow arrows. The projected locations of free particles (corks) in the measured flow field congregate at the same locations where the magnetic field is observed. 31 references.

  10. Field tests of timber railroad bridge piles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donovan, Kendra Ann

    2005-02-17

    generated model and previous test data. Field testing involved consent from a railroad company to install load cells and string potentiometers on an in-situ timber bridge. While simultaneously taking load and deflection measurements for bridges under...

  11. Controllable adhesion using field-activated fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewoldt, Randy H.

    We demonstrate that field-responsive magnetorheological fluids can be used for variable-strength controllable adhesion. The adhesive performance is measured experimentally in tensile tests (a.k.a. probe-tack experiments) ...

  12. Report on Non-Contact DC Electric Field Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Bond, T; Meyer, G

    2009-06-16

    This document reports on methods used to measure DC electrostatic fields in the range of 100 to 4000 V/m using a non-contact method. The project for which this report is written requires this capability. Non-contact measurements of DC fields is complicated by the effect of the accumulation of random space-charges near the sensors which interfere with the measurement of the field-of-interest and consequently, many forms of field measurements are either limited to AC measurements or use oscillating devices to create pseudo-AC fields. The intent of this document is to report on methods discussed in the literature for non-contact measurement of DC fields. Electric field meters report either the electric field expressed in volts per distance or the voltage measured with respect to a ground reference. Common commercial applications for measuring static (DC) electric fields include measurement of surface charge on materials near electronic equipment to prevent arcing which can destroy sensitive electronic components, measurement of the potential for lightning to strike buildings or other exposed assets, measurement of the electric fields under power lines to investigate potential health risks from exposure to EM fields and measurement of fields emanating from the brain for brain diagnostic purposes. Companies that make electric field sensors include Trek (Medina, NY), MKS Instruments, Boltek, Campbell Systems, Mission Instruments, Monroe Electronics, AlphaLab, Inc. and others. In addition to commercial vendors, there are research activities continuing in the MEMS and optical arenas to make compact devices using the principles applied to the larger commercial sensors.

  13. Seasonal variability of water mass distribution in the southeastern Beaufort Sea determined by total alkalinity and d18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ]. Satellite and field observations have revealed a steadily decreasing minimum ice cover in the Arctic Ocean, greater light penetration and an increase in nutrients brought to the euphotic zone by vertical mixing] and the biological CO2 pump. Hence, under these conditions, the Arctic Ocean will play a more active role

  14. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Muir, J.F.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1985-06-19

    The present invention relates to an empirical electrical method for remote sensing of steam quality utilizing flow-through grids which allow measurement of the electrical properties of a flowing two-phase mixture. The measurement of steam quality in the oil field is important to the efficient application of steam assisted recovery of oil. Because of the increased energy content in higher quality steam it is important to maintain the highest possible steam quality at the injection sandface. The effectiveness of a steaming operation without a measure of steam quality downhole close to the point of injection would be difficult to determine. Therefore, a need exists for the remote sensing of steam quality.

  15. Oil fields and Hilbert schemes Lorenzo Robbiano, Genova (Italy)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    Oil fields and Hilbert schemes Lorenzo Robbiano, Genova (Italy) In the realm of polynomial algebra measures of physical quantities in an oil field, see http://staff.fim.uni-passau.de/algebraic-oil

  16. Controllable adhesion using field-activated fluids Randy H. Ewoldt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Controllable adhesion using field-activated fluids Randy H. Ewoldt Institute for Mathematics for variable- strength controllable adhesion. The adhesive performance is measured experimentally in tensile magnet. Increasing the magnetic field strength induces higher peak adhesive forces. We hypothesize

  17. Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    "B. Sparn, L. Earle, D. Christensen, J. Maguire, and E. Wilson, C.E. Hancock

    2013-02-01

    This document provides a standard field monitoring protocol for evaluating the installed performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in residential buildings. The report is organized to be consistent with the chronology of field test planning and execution. Research questions are identified first, followed by a discussion of analysis methods, and then the details of measuring the required information are laid out. A field validation of the protocol at a house near the NREL campus is included for reference.

  18. Software Productivity Measurement Using Multiple Size Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    Software Productivity Measurement Using Multiple Size Measures Software Productivity MeasurementContents Introduction Background Related work Motivation Productivity measurement - Measurement model - Productivity measure construction - Productivity analysis Conclusion Discussion #12;Software Engineering Lab, KAIST 3

  19. Measuring Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING CLOUD1 H( 7Measurements ofMeasurement

  20. Exceptional enhancement of H{sub 2} production in alkaline environment over plasmonic Au/TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Xianguang; Liu, Guigao; Yu, Qing; Wang, Tao; Chang, Kun; Li, Peng; Liu, Lequan E-mail: Lequan.Liu@tju.edu.cn; Ye, Jinhua E-mail: Lequan.Liu@tju.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    A reaction environment modulation strategy was employed to promote the H{sub 2} production over plasmonic Au/semiconductor composites. It is shown that the fast consumption of the holes in plasmonic Au nanoparticles by methanol in alkaline reaction environment remarkably increases H{sub 2} generation rate under visible light. The photocatalytic reaction is mainly driven by the interband transition of plasmonic Au nanoparticles, and the apparent quantum efficiency of plasmon-assisted H{sub 2} production at pH 14 reaches 6% at 420 nm. The reaction environment control provides a simple and effective way for the highly efficient solar fuel production from biomass reforming through plasmonic photocatalysis in future.

  1. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali and alkaline-earth ions and inert gas atoms with a graphene layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Sahoo, B K

    2015-01-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients ($C_3$s) of the alkali ions (Li$^+$, Na$^+$, K$^+$ and Rb$^+$), the alkaline-earth ions (Ca$^+$, Sr$^+$, Ba$^+$ and Ra$^+$) and the inert gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar and Kr) with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of Dirac model. For these calculations, we have evaluated the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are, finally, given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at the room temperature.

  2. Field-induced magnetostructural transition in Gd5ge4 studied by pulsed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouyang, Z.W.; Nojiri, H.; Yoshii, S.; Rao, G.H.; Wang, Y.C.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner Jr., K.A.

    2008-05-22

    The field-induced magnetostructural transformation in Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} was examined by magnetization measurements in pulsed magnetic fields. The low-temperature irreversibility of the transition can be destroyed by the magnetocaloric effect, and depending on the heat exchange between the sample and its surroundings, the irreversibility (or kinetic arrest) can also be retained. Measurements by using various magnetic-field sweep rates were conducted to examine the dynamic response of the system in the transition region. The critical fields for the magnetostructural transition below 20 K are field sweep rate dependent--the larger the field sweep rate, the higher the critical field. However, this rate dependence is readily suppressed with increasing temperature.

  3. External split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  4. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR Free-Field Environment (ACRR-FF-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity free-field reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  5. Neutron Interferometry constrains dark energy chameleon fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Lemmel; Ph. Brax; A. N. Ivanov; T. Jenke; G. Pignol; M. Pitschmann; T. Potocar; M. Wellenzohn; M. Zawisky; H. Abele

    2015-02-20

    We present phase shift measurements for neutron matter waves in vacuum and in low pressure Helium using a method originally developed for neutron scattering length measurements in neutron interferometry. We search for phase shifts associated with a coupling to scalar fields. We set stringent limits for a scalar chameleon field, a prominent quintessence dark energy candidate. We find that the coupling constant $\\beta$ is less than 1.9 $\\times10^7$~for $n=1$ at 95\\% confidence level, where $n$ is an input parameter of the self--interaction of the chameleon field $\\varphi$ inversely proportional to $\\varphi^n$.

  6. Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul William

    2015-05-22

    A two-part field study was conducted in Smith Ranch-Highland in-situ recovery (ISR) near Douglas, Wyoming, to evaluate the restorative capacity of the aquifer downgradient (i.e., hydrologically downstream) of a Uranium ISR mining site with respect to the transport of uranium and other potential contaminants in groundwater after mining has ceased. The study was partially conducted by checking the Uranium content and the alkalinity of separate wells, some wells had been restored and others had not. A map and in-depth procedures of the study are included.

  7. Gravitational repulsion in the Schwarzschild field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGruder, C.H. III

    1982-06-15

    To the distant observer, who uses measuring instruments not affected by gravity, gravitational repulsion can occur anywhere in the Schwarzschild field. It depends on the relationship between the transverse and radial Schwarzschild velocities. On the other hand, local observers, whose measuring instruments are affected by gravity, can not detect a positive value for the acceleration of gravity.

  8. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  9. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  10. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  11. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  12. ARM - Measurement -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring SinglegovField CampaignsMidlatitude Continental

  13. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring SinglegovField CampaignsMidlatitude

  14. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring SinglegovField CampaignsMidlatitude

  15. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring SinglegovField CampaignsMidlatitude

  16. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring SinglegovField

  17. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring SinglegovField

  18. Shell Measures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 Unlimited Release4:SeymourSheddingSheldon Glashow

  19. Measurement of \

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A A; Bazarko, A O; Brice, S J; Brown, B C; Bugel, L; Cao, J; Coney, L; Conrad, J M; Cox, D C; Curioni, A; Djurcic, Z; Finley, D A; Fleming, B T; Ford, R; Garcia, F G; Garvey, G T; Gonzales, J; Grange, J; Green, C; Green, J A; Hart, T L; Hawker, E; Imlay, R; Johnson, R A; Karagiorgi, G; Kasper, P; Katori, T; Kobilarcik, T; Kourbanis, I; Koutsoliotas, S; Laird, E M; Linden, S K; Link, J M; Liu, Y; Louis, W C; Mahn, K B M; Marsh, W; Mauger, C; McGary, V T; McGregor, G; Metcalf, W; Meyers, P D; Mills, F; Mills, G B; Monroe, J; Moore, C D; Mousseau, J; Nelson, R H; Nienaber, P; Nowak, J A; Osmanov, B; Ouedraogo, S; Patterson, R B; Pavlovic, Z; Perevalov, D; Polly, C C; Prebys, E; Raaf, J L; Ray, H; Roe, B P; Russell, A D; Sandberg, V; Schirato, R; Schmitz, D; Shaevitz, M H; Shoemaker, F C; Smith, D; Soderberg, M; Sorel, M; Spentzouris, P; Spitz, J; Stancu, I; Stefanski, R J; Sung, M; Tanaka, H A; Tayloe, R; Tzanov, M; Van de Water, R G; Wascko, M O; White, D H; Wilking, M J; Yang, H J; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2009-01-01

    MiniBooNE reports the first absolute cross sections for neutral current single \\pi^0 production on CH_2 induced by neutrino and antineutrino interactions measured from the largest sets of NC \\pi^0 events collected to date. The principal result consists of differential cross sections measured as functions of \\pi^0 momentum and \\pi^0 angle averaged over the neutrino flux at MiniBooNE. We find total cross sections of (4.76+/-0.05_{stat}+/-0.40_{sys})*10^{-40} cm^2/nucleon at a mean energy of =808 MeV and (1.48+/-0.05_{stat}+/-0.14_{sys})*10^{-40} cm^2/nucleon at a mean energy of =664 MeV for \

  20. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment's final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  1. Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A sensor for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

  2. Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, W.F.

    1980-02-26

    A sensor is described for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device that comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

  3. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARMtotalgovMeasurementsVisibility

  4. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach HomepolarizationMeasurements Related Links RACORO Home AAF

  5. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach HomepolarizationMeasurements Related Links RACORO Home

  6. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach HomepolarizationMeasurements Related Links RACORO

  7. ARM - Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonforsupernovae2GatheringARMHistory and StatusgovMeasurements

  8. Measurement and modeling of hyperfine parameters in ferroic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonçalves, João Nuno; Correia, J G

    This thesis presents the results of perturbed angular correlation (PAC) experiments , an experimental technique which measures the hyperfine interaction at probes (radioactive ions implanted in the materials to study), from which one infers local information on an atomic scale. Furthermore, abinitio calculations using density functional theory electronic obtain results that directly complement the experiments, and are also used for theoretical research. These methods were applied in two families of materials. The manganites, with the possible existence of magnetic, charge, orbital and ferroelectric orders, are of fundamental and technological interest. The experimental results are obtained in the alkaline-earth manganites (Ca, Ba, Sr), with special interest due to the structural variety of possible polymorphs. With probes of Cd and In the stability of the probe and its location in a wide temperature range is established and a comparison with calculations allows the physical interpretation of the results. Cal...

  9. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); McDermott, Robert F. (Monona, WI); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  10. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  11. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  12. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA); McDermott, Robert (Louisville, CO); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz (CH-8006 Zurich, CH)

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  13. Field Emission and Nanostructure of Carbon Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkulov, V.I.; Lowndes, D.H.; Baylor, L.R.

    1999-11-29

    The results of field emission measurements of various forms of carbon films are reported. It is shown that the films nanostructure is a crucial factor determining the field emission properties. In particular, smooth, pulsed-laser deposited amorphous carbon films with both high and low sp3 contents are poor field emitters. This is similar to the results obtained for smooth nanocrystalline, sp2-bonded carbon films. In contrast, carbon films prepared by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HE-CVD) exhibit very good field emission properties, including low emission turn-on fields, high emission site density, and excellent durability. HF-CVD carbon films were found to be predominantly sp2-bonded. However, surface morphology studies show that these films are thoroughly nanostructured, which is believed to be responsible for their promising field emission properties.

  14. Probing ISM Magnetic Fields With SNRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roland Kothes Jo-Anne Brown

    2008-12-17

    As supernova remnants expand, their shock waves are freezing in and compressing the magnetic field lines they encounter; consequently we can use supernova remnants as magnifying glasses for their ambient magnetic fields. We will describe a simple model to determine emission, polarization, and rotation measure characteristics of adiabatically expanding supernova remnants and how we can exploit this model to gain information about the large scale magnetic field in our Galaxy. We will give two examples: The SNR DA530, which is located high above the Galactic plane, reveals information about the magnetic field in the halo of our Galaxy. The SNR G182.4+4.3 is located close to the anti-centre of our Galaxy and reveals the most probable direction where the large-scale magnetic field is perpendicular to the line of sight. This may help to decide on the large-scale magnetic field configuration of our Galaxy.

  15. Alternatives to Nitric Acid Stripping in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process for Cesium Removal from Alkaline High-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Haverlock, Tamara; Bazelaire, Eve; Bonnesen, Peter V; Ditto, Mary E; Moyer, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    Effective alternatives to nitric acid stripping in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent have been demonstrated in this work. The CSSX solvent employs calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-18-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) as the cesium extractant in a modified alkane diluent for decontamination of alkaline high-level wastes. Results reported in this paper support the idea that replacement of the nitrate anion by a much more hydrophilic anion like borate can substantially lower cesium distribution ratios on stripping. Without any other change in the CSSX flowsheet, however, the use of a boric acid stripping solution in place of the 1 mM nitric acid solution used in the CSSX process marginally, though perhaps still usefully, improves stripping. The less-than-expected improvement was explained by the carryover of nitrate from scrubbing into stripping. Accordingly, more effective stripping is obtained after a scrub of the solvent with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide. Functional alternatives to boric acid include sodium bicarbonate or cesium hydroxide as strip solutions. Profound stripping improvement is achieved when trioctylamine, one of the components of the CSSX solvent, is replaced with a commercial guanidine reagent (LIX 79). The more basic guanidine affords greater latitude in selection of aqueous conditions in that it protonates even at mildly alkaline pH values. Under process-relevant conditions, cesium distributions on stripping are decreased on the order of 100-fold compared with current CSSX performance. The extraction properties of the solvent were preserved unchanged over three successive extract-scrub-strip cycles. From the point of view of compatibility with downstream processing, boric acid represents an attractive stripping agent, as it is also a potentially ideal feed for borosilicate vitrification of the separated 137Cs product stream. Possibilities for use of these results toward a dramatically better next-generation CSSX process, possibly one employing the more soluble cesium extractant calix[4]arene-bis(2 ethylhexylbenzo-18-crown-6) (BEHBCalixC6) are discussed.

  16. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  17. Photonic electrode-less passive electric field sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kingsley, S.A.; Sriram, S. [SRICO Inc., Powell, OH (United States); Boyd, J.T. [and others

    1994-12-31

    A novel Mach-Zehnder interferometric wideband electric field sensing device utilizing the electro-optic effect is reported. Reverse poling of one arm of the interferometer allows for a response to common-mode electric fields. Because the lithium niobate sensor uses no metallic electrodes, there is only minimal disturbance to the field being measured.

  18. The History of Near-field Optics1 Lukas Novotny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novotny, Lukas

    The History of Near-field Optics1 Lukas Novotny The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester of near-field optics. The roots trace back to the letters exchanged between Edward Hutchinson Synge of scanning probe microscopy and by the first optical near-field measurements by Dieter W. Pohl and co

  19. Measuring droplet impact with piezoelectric film 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basahi, Jalal M. Al-Badry M.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a measurement system for determining droplet impact in the field with piezoelectric film. The piezoelectric film generates an output signal when it is deformed. The signals ...

  20. Quality of work – concept and measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlm, Svenn-Åge; Nesheim, Torstein; Olsen, Karen M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review some of the most essential literature on the concept and measurement of quality of work. We show that different academic fields have conceptualized quality of work in distinct ways however there has ...

  1. Rapid Field Measurement of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Based on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    as well. National Energy Technology Laboratory - In-house Research USDOE FE Office of Clean Coal (FE-20) United States 2012-01-01 English Conference Medium: ED OSTI ID: 1061497,...

  2. ALPHA SPECTROSCOPIC TECHNIQUES FOR FIELD MEASUREMENT OF RADON DAUGHTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazaroff, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    ventilation with heat recovery for controlling radonand radon-daughter concentrations in residences, Lawrencealpha energy concentration of radon decay products, Lawrence

  3. Dispersion extraction with near-field measurements in periodic waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , R. D. Meade, and J. N. Winn, Photonic Crystals: Molding the Flow of Light (Princeton University. Joannopoulos, "Guided and defect modes in periodic dielectric wave-guides," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 12, 1267

  4. Debye size microprobes for electric field measurements in laboratory plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Troy

    July 2006 Microelectromechanical systems MEMS have led to the development of a host of tiny machines can only be constructed with microelec- tromechanical system MEMS techniques, will make their mark

  5. Rapid Field Measurement of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Based on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for pages...

  6. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bsub pol diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based...

  7. Aerosol Simulations by LLNL IMPACT and Comparisons with Field Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NA LY S IDOEAerosol

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - MPL Measurements, Norwegian Young sea ICE cruise

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design togovCampaignsMASRAD: Pt. Reyes Stratus Cloud and Drizzle StudygovCampaignsMPL

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Measuring Clouds at SGP with Stereo Photogrammetry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design togovCampaignsMASRAD: Pt. Reyes Stratus CloudAtmospheric Opticalthe

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - Radon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing (RAMIX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design togovCampaignsMASRAD: Pt.CampaignSTations2008) govCampaignsRadon

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - Radon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing (RAMIX)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design togovCampaignsMASRAD: Pt.CampaignSTations2008)

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Semi-Continuous OCEC Particulate Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design togovCampaignsMASRAD:govCampaignsReplicator Sonde CampaignBlack

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENA ContactsProductsSACR26, 2015 [FacilityJanuary10,24,

  14. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Field Measurements |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7, 2015Verizon and VerizonCells:|ofRequestRequest

  15. Internal field, density & temperature measurements in MTF plasmas using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy of aerosols in high-temperature applications.cells: The

  16. Internal field, density & temperature measurements in MTF plasmas using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy of aerosols in high-temperature applications.cells: ThePulsed

  17. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for|Connect Non-Largecomparisons(Patent)polarimetry

  18. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14,Energy 9, 2013Federal TaxMAYDonThorium, and

  19. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14,Energy 9, 2013Federal TaxMAYDonThorium, andThorium,

  20. Inflating with large effective fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, C.P. [PH-TH Division, CERN, CH-1211, Genève 23 (Switzerland); Cicoli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Quevedo, F. [Abdus Salam ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Williams, M., E-mail: cburgess@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: mcicoli@ictp.it, E-mail: f.quevedo@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: mwilliams@perimeterinsititute.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton ON (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    We re-examine large scalar fields within effective field theory, in particular focussing on the issues raised by their use in inflationary models (as suggested by BICEP2 to obtain primordial tensor modes). We argue that when the large-field and low-energy regimes coincide the scalar dynamics is most effectively described in terms of an asymptotic large-field expansion whose form can be dictated by approximate symmetries, which also help control the size of quantum corrections. We discuss several possible symmetries that can achieve this, including pseudo-Goldstone inflatons characterized by a coset G/H (based on abelian and non-abelian, compact and non-compact symmetries), as well as symmetries that are intrinsically higher dimensional. Besides the usual trigonometric potentials of Natural Inflation we also find in this way simple large-field power laws (like V ? ?{sup 2}) and exponential potentials, V(?) = ?{sub k}V{sub x}e{sup ?k?/M}. Both of these can describe the data well and give slow-roll inflation for large fields without the need for a precise balancing of terms in the potential. The exponential potentials achieve large r through the limit |?| || ? and so predict r ? (8/3)(1-n{sub s}); consequently n{sub s} ? 0.96 gives r ? 0.11 but not much larger (and so could be ruled out as measurements on r and n{sub s} improve). We examine the naturalness issues for these models and give simple examples where symmetries protect these forms, using both pseudo-Goldstone inflatons (with non-abelian non-compact shift symmetries following familiar techniques from chiral perturbation theory) and extra-dimensional models.

  1. Assessor Training Measurement Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Measurement Uncertainty #12;Assessor Training 2009: Measurement Uncertainty Training 2009: Measurement Uncertainty 3 Measurement Uncertainty ·Calibration and testing labs performing Training 2009: Measurement Uncertainty 4 Measurement Uncertainty ·When the nature of the test precludes

  2. Solvent extraction of technetium from alkaline waste media using bis-4,4{prime}(5{prime})[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnesen, P.V.; Presley, D.J.; Moyer, B.A.

    1995-07-01

    The crown ether bis-4,4`(5`)[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6 can be utilized in a solvent-extraction process for the removal of technetium as pertechnetate ion, TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from solutions simulating highly radioactive alkaline defense wastes (``tank wastes``) stored at several sites in the United States. The process employs non-halogenated and non-volatile diluents and modifiers and includes an efficient stripping procedure using only water. More than 95% of the pertechnetate present at 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M in Melton Valley (Oak Ridge, TN) and Hanford (Washington) tank-waste simulants was removed following two cross-current extraction contacts using 0.02 M bis-4,4`(5`)[(tertbutyl)cyclohexano]- 18-crown-6 in 2:1 vol/vol TBP/Isopar{reg_sign} M diluent at 25 C. Similarly, for both simulants, more than 98% of the pertechnetate contained in the solvent was back-extracted following two cross-current stripping contacts using deionized water.

  3. FTIR study of the photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene over UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} nanoballs synthesized by hydrothermal treatment in alkaline solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Zhengru [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Xinyong, E-mail: xyli@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Qidong; Qu, Zhenping; Hou, Yang; Zhao, Ling [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Shaomin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Chen, Guohua [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)] [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-12-15

    In this study, photocatalysts of TiO{sub 2} nanoballs were obtained via a hydrothermal treating of commercial P25 in alkaline solution, and then characterized with SEM, XRD, BET and surface photovoltage spectroscopy techniques. The UV-assisted photodegradation of gaseous benzene over P25 and the prepared TiO{sub 2} nanoballs was monitored by an in situ infrared technique. The results demonstrated that the prepared TiO{sub 2} nanoballs in anatase form were more active than commercial P25 in photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous benzene. The promoted activity of the hydrothermal-treated TiO{sub 2} is attributed to the increasing specific surface area and larger band gap induced by the reduced crystallite size. The spectra of FTIR indicated that weakly adsorbed phenol was formed as the reaction progress. Hydroxyl groups on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanoballs are able to react with photo-produced phenol, which is then retained on the catalyst surface leading to the progressive deactivation of the catalyst in the gas-solid system.

  4. Measuring Vacuum Polarization with Josephson Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penin, Alexander A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada) and Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-05

    We argue that the vacuum polarization by the virtual electron-positron pairs can be measured by studying a Josephson junction in a strong magnetic field. The vacuum polarization results in a weak dependence of the Josephson constant on the magnetic field strength which is within the reach of the existing experimental techniques.

  5. Strong Field, Noncommutative QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Ilderton; Joakim Lundin; Mattias Marklund

    2010-05-26

    We review the effects of strong background fields in noncommutative QED. Beginning with the noncommutative Maxwell and Dirac equations, we describe how combined noncommutative and strong field effects modify the propagation of fermions and photons. We extend these studies beyond the case of constant backgrounds by giving a new and revealing interpretation of the photon dispersion relation. Considering scattering in background fields, we then show that the noncommutative photon is primarily responsible for generating deviations from strong field QED results. Finally, we propose a new method for constructing gauge invariant variables in noncommutative QED, and use it to analyse the physics of our null background fields.

  6. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Binping P; Reece, Charles E; Kelley, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  7. Cathodic protection of storage field well casings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J.

    1986-01-01

    Downhole logging of gas storage field wells to determine cathodic protection (CP) levels is expensive and requires removing the well from service. A technique allowing the prediction of downhole CP levels by modeling combined with limiting field measurements would provide the industry with a cost-effective means of implementing and monitoring casing protection. A computer model has been developed for a cathodically protected well casing.

  8. Size distribution and structure of Barchan dune fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orencio Durán; Veit Schwämmle; Pedro G. Lind; Hans J. Herrmann

    2011-05-19

    Barchans are isolated mobile dunes often organized in large dune fields. Dune fields seem to present a characteristic dune size and spacing, which suggests a cooperative behavior based on dune interaction. In Duran et al. (2009), we propose that the redistribution of sand by collisions between dunes is a key element for the stability and size selection of barchan dune fields. This approach was based on a mean-field model ignoring the spatial distribution of dune fields. Here, we present a simplified dune field model that includes the spatial evolution of individual dunes as well as their interaction through sand exchange and binary collisions. As a result, the dune field evolves towards a steady state that depends on the boundary conditions. Comparing our results with measurements of Moroccan dune fields, we find that the simulated fields have the same dune size distribution as in real fields but fail to reproduce their homogeneity along the wind direction.

  9. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zihua Weng

    2011-03-31

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in the interplanetary space between the sun and the earth.

  10. Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich; Espy, Michelle A.; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Kraus, Jr., Robert Henry

    2013-03-05

    Method comprising obtaining an NMR measurement from a sample wherein an ultra-low field NMR system probes the sample and produces the NMR measurement and wherein a sampling temperature, prepolarizing field, and measurement field are known; detecting the NMR measurement by means of inductive coils; analyzing the NMR measurement to obtain at least one measurement feature wherein the measurement feature comprises T1, T2, T1.rho., or the frequency dependence thereof; and, searching for the at least one measurement feature within a database comprising NMR reference data for at least one material to determine if the sample comprises a material of interest.

  11. Wide Area Wind Field Monitoring Status & Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Marchant; Jed Simmons

    2011-09-30

    Volume-scanning elastic has been investigated as a means to derive 3D dynamic wind fields for characterization and monitoring of wind energy sites. An eye-safe volume-scanning lidar system was adapted for volume imaging of aerosol concentrations out to a range of 300m. Reformatting of the lidar data as dynamic volume images was successfully demonstrated. A practical method for deriving 3D wind fields from dynamic volume imagery was identified and demonstrated. However, the natural phenomenology was found to provide insufficient aerosol features for reliable wind sensing. The results of this study may be applicable to wind field measurement using injected aerosol tracers.

  12. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  13. An analytical method to calculate equivalent fields to irregular symmetric and asymmetric photon fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Mohamad J.; Chegeni, Nahid; Zabihzadeh, Mansoor; Hamzian, Nima

    2014-04-01

    Equivalent field is frequently used for central axis depth-dose calculations of rectangular- and irregular-shaped photon beams. As most of the proposed models to calculate the equivalent square field are dosimetry based, a simple physical-based method to calculate the equivalent square field size was used as the basis of this study. The table of the sides of the equivalent square or rectangular fields was constructed and then compared with the well-known tables by BJR and Venselaar, et al. with the average relative error percentage of 2.5 ± 2.5% and 1.5 ± 1.5%, respectively. To evaluate the accuracy of this method, the percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured for some special irregular symmetric and asymmetric treatment fields and their equivalent squares for Siemens Primus Plus linear accelerator for both energies, 6 and 18 MV. The mean relative differences of PDDs measurement for these fields and their equivalent square was approximately 1% or less. As a result, this method can be employed to calculate equivalent field not only for rectangular fields but also for any irregular symmetric or asymmetric field.

  14. Continuous profiling of magnetotelluric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdin, C.T.

    1991-05-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method of mapping ground electrical conductivity is traditionally based on measurement of the surface impedance at widely spaced stations to infer models of the subsurface through a suitable pseudo 1-D inverse or with linearized least-squares inversion for 2- or 3-D geoelectric media. It is well known that small near-surface inhomogeneities can produce spatial discontinuities in the measured electric fields over a wide frequency range and may consequently bias the impedance on a very local scale. Inadequate station spacing effectively aliases the electric field measurements and results in distortions that cannot be removed in subsequent processing or modelling. In order to fully exploit the benefits of magnetotellurics in complex geological environments, closely spaced measurements must be used routinely. This thesis entertains an analysis of MT data taken along continuous profiles and is a first step that will allow more encompassing 2-D sampling techniques to become viable in the years to come. The developments presented here are to a large extent motivated by the physical insight gained from low-contrast solutions to the forward MT problem. These solutions describe the relationship between a perturbation in the electrical conductivity of the subsurface and the ensuing perturbation of the MT response as the output of a linear system. Albeit strictly accurate in a limited subset of practical exploration problems, the linearized solutions allow one to pursue a model independent study of the response characteristics of MT data. In fact, these solutions yield simple expressions for 1-,2-, and 3-D resistivity models which are here examined in progressive sequence.

  15. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis? It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment`s final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis? A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  16. Tank waste remediation system compensatory measure removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLIKEN, N.J.

    1999-05-18

    In support of Fiscal Year 1998 Performance Agreement TWR1.4.3, ''Replace Compensatory Measures,'' the Tank Waste Remediation System is documenting the completion of field modifications supporting the removal of the temporary exemptions from the approved Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs), HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006. These temporary exemptions or compensatory measures expire September 30, 1998.

  17. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  18. The Ness field: An integrated field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasek, R.M.; Kean, K.R.; Richards, M.L. (Mobil North Sea Ltd., London (England))

    1990-05-01

    The Ness oil field, located in UK Block 9/13, was discovered in May 1986 by well 9/13b-28A. The field comprises a high-quality Middle Jurassic reservoir with an average 148-ft oil column trapped in a west-dipping, fault-bounded closure. The oil is substantially undersaturated. The field was brought on production as a subsea satellite development tied back to the Beryl B Platform. Oil was first delivered on August 11, 1987, just over a year from discovery. Initial producing rates from the 9/13B-28A well averaged about 10,000 BOPD. Since this well, another producer and water injector have been completed. Based on the frequent and accurate pressure data available from permanent downhole gauges installed in all three wells of the Ness field, material balance was used to calculate initial oil in place. These calculations gave an oil in place value consistent with recent calculations of 87 {times} 166 STB after less than 3% of the oil-in-place had been produced, compared with 55 {times} 106 STB initially mapped. Pressure monitoring enabled reservoir drive mechanisms to be tracked and a high offtake rate to be maintained by balancing water injection with withdrawals. A reevaluation of the mapped structure was prompted by a revision of the geological model following the 9/13b-38/38Z appraisal wells, together with the discrepancy between the oil in place from mapping and material balance. The seismic data was reinterpreted using the additional well control, and the field remapped. This resulted in a revised volume of 129 {times} 106 STB. Additional insight into the differentiation between oil and water volumes in this low compressibility system and a resolution of the differences between material balance and volumetrics were obtained through a black-oil simulation.

  19. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  20. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.