Sample records for field discovery year

  1. Discovery of magnetic fields in CPNs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Jordan; K. Werner; S. J. O'Toole

    2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time we have directly detected magnetic fields in central stars of planetary nebulae by means of spectro-polarimetry with FORS1 at the VLT. In all four objects of our sample we found kilogauss magnetic fields, in NGC 1360 and LSS1362 with very high significance, while in Abell36 and EGB5 the existence of a magnetic field is probable but with less certainty. This discovery supports the hypothesis that the non-spherical symmetry of most planetary nebulae is caused by magnetic fields in AGB stars. Our high discovery rate demands mechanisms to prevent full conservation of magnetic flux during the transition to white dwarfs.

  2. PHENIX: Beyond 15 years of discovery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morrison, D.; Nagle, J. L.

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX experiment at BNL’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was designed to uncover properties of the quark–gluon plasma (QGP) via rare penetrating probes. Over the past 15 years, the collaboration has delivered on its promised measurements, often with exciting results beyond those originally foreseen. That the QGP behaves as a nearly perfect fluid and that non-photonic electrons are substantially suppressed has led to the use of heavy quarks as probes of the medium. The PHENIX silicon vertex detectors are opening a new arena for QGP studies, and the MPC-EX, a novel forward calorimeter with silicon readout, accesses low-x physicsmore »via direct photons with unprecedented precision. PHENIX has proposed sPHENIX, a major upgrade using the recently acquired BaBar solenoid and full calorimetric coverage and high rate capabilities. sPHENIX will reconstruct jets and extend observables to higher transverse momentum, where comparisons to results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) heavy-ion program will provide the most insightful. Following the RHIC program, the nuclear physics community has identified an electron ion collider (EIC) as crucial to the next generation of QCD investigations. The BaBar magnet and sPHENIX calorimetry will be an excellent foundation for a new collaborative pursuit of discovery.« less

  3. Discovery of magnetic fields in hot subdwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. O'Toole; S. Jordan; S. Friedrich; U. Heber

    2004-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present initial results of a project to measure mean longitudinal magnetic fields in a group of sdB/OB/O stars. The project was inspired by the discovery of three super-metal-rich sdOB stars, each having metals (e.g. Ti, V) enhanced by factors of 10^3 to 10^5. Similar behaviour is observed in chemically peculiar A stars, where strong magnetic fields are responsible for the enrichment. With this in mind, we obtained circularly polarised spectra of two of the super-metal-rich sdOBs, two "normal" sdBs and two sdOs using FORS1 on the ESO/VLT. By examining circular polarisation in the hydrogen Balmer lines and in helium lines, we have detected magnetic fields with strengths of 1-2 kG in most of our targets. This suggests that such fields are relatively common in hot subdwarfs.

  4. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

  5. Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercialFeet) New Field Discoveries

  6. Discovery of magnetic fields in hot subdwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. O'Toole; S. Jordan; S. Friedrich; U. Heber

    2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present polarisation measurements of sdB and sdO stars using FORS1 on the VLT. The observations were made as part of a project to determine whether magnetic fields in two super-metal-rich stars can explain their extreme abundance peculiarities. Field strengths of up to ~1.5 kG have been measured at varying levels of significance in each of our six targets, however no clear evidence was found between apparently normal subdwarfs and the metal-rich objects. The origin of the magnetic fields is unknown. We also discuss the implications of our measurements for magnetic flux conservation in late stages of stellar evolution.

  7. Natural Gas Liquids New Field Discoveries

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,960 3,958,315storage35 26 32 16

  8. SophomoreYearChecklist Meet with your Discovery A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    on selecting courses that learning style. Meet with the Discovery academic advisor, located in the CIW Library advantage of study abroad programs or the National Student Exchange at http://oip.binghamton.edu or http and take an active role in them. #12;

  9. U.S. Shale Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0 Year-1(Billion-Field Discoveries

  10. For publication 20th November WOMAN WHO FEEDS POISON TO PLANTS WINS `DISCOVERY OF THE YEAR'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    For publication 20th November WOMAN WHO FEEDS POISON TO PLANTS WINS `DISCOVERY OF THE YEAR, in effect, absorbed the poison from the surrounding area. By simply planting the fern in polluted soil

  11. New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYearFeet) New Field Discoveries

  12. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

  13. Binary and recycled pulsars: 30 years after observational discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G S Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Binary radio pulsars, first discovered by Hulse and Taylor in 1974 [1], are a unique tool for experimentally testing general relativity (GR), whose validity has been confirmed with a precision unavailable in laboratory experiments. In particular, indirect evidence of the existence of gravitational waves has been obtained. Radio pulsars in binary systems (which have come to be known as recycled) have completed the accretion stage, during which neutron star spins reach millisecond periods and their magnetic fields decay 2 to 4 orders of magnitude more weakly than ordinary radio pulsars. Among about a hundred known recycled pulsars, many have turned out to be single neutron stars. The high concentration of single recycled pulsars in globular clusters suggests that close stellar encounters are highly instrumental in the loss of the companion. A system of one recycled pulsar and one 'normal' one discovered in 2004 is the most compact among binaries containing recycled pulsars [2]. Together with the presence of two pulsars in one system, this suggests new prospects for further essential improvements in testing GR. This paper considers theoretical predictions of binary pulsars, their evolutionary formation, and mechanisms by which their companions may be lost. The use of recycled pulsars in testing GR is discussed and their possible relation to the most intriguing objects in the universe, cosmic gamma-ray bursts, is examined.

  14. Michigan Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0Feet)YearFeet) New Field

  15. Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9ThousandFeet) New Field

  16. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic8 Final May 2010 2008Year622

  17. New Field Discoveries of Dry Natural Gas Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan Feb Mar Apr8 0.8 0.8 0.9

  18. New Field Discoveries of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan Feb Mar Apr8 0.8 0.8 0.9229

  19. Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan MonthlyCubic17 34 44 67 58(Billion

  20. Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan MonthlyCubic17

  1. California Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590 1,550 1,460CubicYearFeet)Feet)

  2. Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic 1.YearExtensions

  3. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Summary)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic8 Final May 2010

  4. Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Summary)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic8 Final May 20108,498170 1,372

  5. Natural Gas Liquids New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,960 3,958,315storage35 26 32 1672

  6. Nonassociated Natural Gas New Field Discoveries, Wet After Lease Separation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousand CubicSeparation 29 0Year Jan0Cubic

  7. Nonassociated Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields, Wet

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousand CubicSeparation 29 0Year Jan0CubicAfter Lease

  8. New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousand CubicFeet)perFeet) New Field Discoveries

  9. drug discovery drug discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    drug discovery at Purdue #12;drug discovery 2 #12;drug discovery 3 Introduction The drug discovery and innovative drug candidates to treat chronic and acute illnesses. Our researchers also continue to be invested in various approaches to drug discovery, which include understanding of drug targets for future drug

  10. U.S. Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb MarFields (BillionSalesEstimatedNew Field

  11. U.S. Shale Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0 Year-1(Billion-Field

  12. Discovery of Four Field Methane (T-type) Dwarfs with 2MASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Burgasser; J. D. Kirkpatrick; M. E. Brown; I. N. Reid; J. E. Gizis; C. C. Dahn; D. G. Monet; C. A. Beichman; J. Liebert; R. M. Cutri; M. F. Skrutskie

    1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of four field methane (T-type) brown dwarfs using 2MASS survey data. One additional methane dwarf, previously discovered by SDSS, was also identified. Near-infrared spectra clearly show the 1.6 and 2.2 um CH4 absorption bands characteristic of objects with T_eff < 1300 K, as well as broadened H2O bands at 1.4 and 1.9 um. Comparing the spectra of these objects with Gl 229B, we propose that all new 2MASS T dwarfs are warmer than 950 K, in order from warmest to coolest: 2MASS J1217-03, J1225-27, J1047+21 and J1237+65. Based on this preliminary sample, we find a warm T dwarf surface density of 0.0022 T dwarfs/sq. deg., or ~ 90 warm T dwarfs over the whole sky detectable to J < 16. The resulting space density upper limit, 0.01 T dwarfs/pc^3, is comparable to that of the L dwarf sample from Kirkpatrick et al. (1999).

  13. Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Commercial Buildings S. Kiliccote, M.A. Piette, J. Mathieu, K. Parrish Environmental Energy Technologies;1 Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. It provides a summary of participation, DR strategies and incentives. Commercial buildings can reduce peak

  14. U.S. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb MarFields (BillionSales (MillionA5 -A63

  15. Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugFeet) YearNew Field

  16. DISCOVERY OF A 1.6 YEAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLE IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {iota} HOROLOGII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Judge, P. G.; Knoelker, M.; Mathur, S.; Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Basu, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Henry, T. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302 (United States); Soderblom, D. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mount Wilson Ca HK survey revealed magnetic activity variations in a large sample of solar-type stars with timescales ranging from 2.5 to 25 years. This broad range of cycle periods is thought to reflect differences in the rotational properties and the depths of the surface convection zones for stars with various masses and ages. In 2007, we initiated a long-term monitoring campaign of Ca II H and K emission for a sample of 57 southern solar-type stars to measure their magnetic activity cycles and their rotational properties when possible. We report the discovery of a 1.6 year magnetic activity cycle in the exoplanet host star {iota} Horologii and obtain an estimate of the rotation period that is consistent with Hyades membership. This is the shortest activity cycle so far measured for a solar-type star and may be related to the short-timescale magnetic variations recently identified in the Sun and HD 49933 from helioseismic and asteroseismic measurements. Future asteroseismic observations of {iota} Hor can be compared to those obtained near the magnetic minimum in 2006 to search for cycle-induced shifts in the oscillation frequencies. If such short activity cycles are common in F stars, then NASA's Kepler mission should observe their effects in many of its long-term asteroseismic targets.

  17. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayBarrels) New Field

  18. Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

  19. U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb(MillionCubic Feet)

  20. Michigan Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0Feet)Year JanYear52 55 59 71

  1. New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawalsYear Jan1Lease Separation780

  2. Ohio Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugFeet) Year Jan5 2006

  3. Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic32,876 10,889 11,502 13,84575New Field

  4. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)New Field

  5. Kansas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0Base7 3 2 1301 163

  6. Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0Base7 3 2ExtensionsNew

  7. Alaska Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B uYear Jan Feb Mar Apr3,566

  8. Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B uYear Jan FebExtensions

  9. California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590 1,550 1,460CubicYear Jan,835 2,939

  10. Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic 1.Year Jan Feb8,238Cubic

  11. West Virginia Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810Year Jan Feb39,28720 21 51 57

  12. West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810Year Jan

  13. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58(MillionYearVehicleTrading,781

  14. U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun602 1,397 125Feet) U.S.

  15. U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun602 1,39720 22 27 17

  16. U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun602 1,39720 22

  17. U.S. Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves New Field Discoveries

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr(Percent)Babb,(Million Barrels)

  18. Utah Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecadeFour-Dimensional2009893 725 718

  19. Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecadeFour-Dimensional2009893ExtensionsNew

  20. Virginia Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers35,9291 2 11,851Cubic

  1. Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9Thousand Cubic Feet)7 5Cubic

  2. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun2009 2010(Million

  3. News -Little Geobacter still sparks discoveries after 20 years from the T... file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/pbrown/My%20Documents/re... 1 of 2 6/19/2007 8:33 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    , Geobacter exhale electricity through 20 to 30 hair-like structures, just 3 to 5 nanometers in diameterNews - Little Geobacter still sparks discoveries after 20 years from the T... file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/pbrown/My%20Documents/re... 1 of 2 6/19/2007 8:33 PM Little Geobacter still sparks

  4. Deep Vadose Zone–Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2012.

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 27 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 15 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    96 YEAR 2013 Males 69 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 9 EN 04 27 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2014 Males 48 Females 33 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 10 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 29 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 10 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 9 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 61 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 22 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 YEAR 2013 Males 48 Females 32 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 7 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2013 Males 20 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJEK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 44 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2014 Males 59 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American...

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 62 Females 26 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 28 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2013 Males 58 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 21 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  17. Supporting Yale's Engine of Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supporting Yale's Engine of Discovery #12;#12;"During my years at Yale, I have had over thirty partners in this research. Thomas A. Steitz Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry students are central to Yale's engine of discovery, because they have fresh ideas and are willing to take

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 25 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native...

  19. Astroparticle Physics: Puzzles and Discoveries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Puzzles often give birth to the great discoveries, the false discoveries sometimes stimulate the exiting ideas in theoretical physics. The historical examples of both are described in Introduction and in section ``Cosmological Puzzles''. From existing puzzles most attention is given to Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) puzzle and to cosmological constant problem. The 40-years old UHECR problem consisted in absence of the sharp steepening in spectrum of extragalactic cosmic rays caused by interaction with CMB radiation. This steepening is known as Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff. It is demonstrated here that the features of interaction of cosmic ray protons with CMB are seen now in the spectrum in the form of the dip and beginning of the GZK cutoff. The most serious cosmological problem is caused by large vacuum energy of the known elementary-particle fields which exceeds at least by 45 orders of magnitude the cosmological vacuum energy. The various ideas put forward to solve this problem during last 40 years, have weaknesses and cannot be accepted as the final solution of this puzzle. The anthropic approach is discussed.

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR7

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144 YEAR

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 20138

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EN 05 0 1 100.00% EN 04 4 4 0.00% NN (Engineering) 13 12 -7.69% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 9 -30.77% NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 1...

  12. Discovery Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    and sonar to spot passing ships and submarines. And, for people living in poor, remote communitiesDiscovery Channel :: Bacteria Power: Future Energy? Page 1 September 10, 2003 EDT Bacteria Power: Energy Of The Future? AFP R. ferriducens: "Bacterial Battery" Sept. 9, 2003 -- U

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826 YEAR

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR 2014

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434170

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR4247

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42478

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR40

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR4096

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR17

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196 YEAR

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males16

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144707

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 201447072540

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 563

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 5637831

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378318

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 28

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 2801

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280192

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733

  12. Year

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444 U.S.Working and.

  13. The Landscape Architecture field of study --both the two-year and three-year programs --offers the ideal context for producing tomorrow's leaders in ecological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    The Landscape Architecture field of study -- both the two-year and three-year programs -- offers programs, you will learn to be a designer who authentically employs ecological principles in sustainable in the program. "Our program recognizes that design must celebrate culture if it is to sustain ecological

  14. A Twenty Year Decline in Solar Photospheric Magnetic Fields: Inner-Heliospheric Signatures and Possible Implications?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janardhan, P; Ananthakrishnan, S; Tokumaru, M; Fujiki, K; Jose, L; Sridharan, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report observations of a steady 20 year decline of solar photospheric fields at latitudes $\\geq$45${^{o}}$ starting from $\\sim$1995. This prolonged and continuing decline, combined with the fact that Cycle 24 is already past its peak, implies that magnetic fields are likely to continue to decline until $\\sim$2020, the expected minimum of the ongoing solar Cycle 24. In addition, interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations of the inner heliosphere for the period 1983--2013 and in the distance range 0.2--0.8 AU, have also shown a similar and steady decline in solar wind micro-turbulence levels, in sync with the declining photospheric fields. Using the correlation between the polar field and heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) at solar minimum, we have estimated the value of the HMF in 2020 to be 3.9 ($\\pm$0.6) and a floor value of the HMF of $\\sim$3.2 ($\\pm$0.4) nT. Given this floor value for the HMF, our analysis suggests that the estimated peak sunspot number for solar Cycle 25 is likely to be $\\sim$ 62 (...

  15. Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Smith, Ronald M.; Truex, Michael J.; Matthews, Hope E.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2011. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development's (OTID) mission is to transform science into viable solutions for environmental cleanup. In 2010, OTID developed the Impact Plan, Science and Technology to Reduce the Life Cycle Cost of Closure to outline the benefits of research and development of the lifecycle cost of cleanup across the DOE complex. This plan outlines OTID's ability to reduce by $50 billion, the $200 billion life-cycle cost in waste processing, groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning. The projected life-cycle costs and return on investment are based on actual savings realized from technology innovation, development, and insertion into remedial strategies and schedules at the Fernald, Mound, and Ashtabula sites. To achieve our goals, OTID developed Applied Field Research Initiatives to facilitate and accelerate collaborative development and implementation of new tools and approaches that reduce risk, cost and time for site closure. The primary mission of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) is to protect our nation's water resources, keeping them clean and safe for future generations. The DVZ-AFRI was established for the DOE to develop effective, science-based solutions for remediating, characterizing, monitoring, and predicting the behavior and fate of deep vadose zone contamination. Subsurface contaminants include radionuclides, metals, organics, and liquid waste that originated from various sources, including legacy waste from the nation's nuclear weapons complexes. The DVZ-AFRI project team is translating strategy into action by working to solve these complex challenges in a collaborative environment that leverages technology and scientific expertise from DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, and the broad scientific research community. As project manager for the DVZ-AFRI, I have had the privilege this past year to team with creative, talented members of the scientific community nationwide to develop effective long-term solutions to address deep vadose zone contamination. This report highlights how the DVZ-AFRI project team is delivering results by achieving significant programmatic accomplishments, and developing and field-testing transformational technologies to address the nation's most pressing groundwater and vadose zone contamination problems.

  16. NERSC User Day February 13 - Trends, Discovery, and Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Next 10 Years, Sudip Dosanjh, NERSC Director Discovery 11:00 - Discovery of the Higgs Boson and the role of LBNL and World-Wide Computing, Ian Hinchliffe, Berkeley Lab 11:30 -...

  17. Experimental Discovery of Topological Insulators and Related Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, M. Zahid (Princeton) [Princeton

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most quantum states of condensed matter are categorized by the symmetries they break. The remarkable discovery of charge Quantum Hall effects (1980s) revealed that there exists an organizational principle of matter based only on the topological distinctions, but in the presence of time-reversal symmetry breaking. In the past few years, theoretical developments suggest that new classes of topological states of matter might exist that are purely topological in nature in the sense that they do not break time-reversal symmetry, and hence can be realized without any applied magnetic field: "Quantum Hall-like effects without Magnetic Fields." This talk describes our discovery of new topologically ordered states of matter (topological insulators) and discusses the unusual electro-magnetic, spin, and superconducting properties this novel phase of quantum matter might exhibit and their potential applications.

  18. Where Discoveries Begin the secrets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in which we live, led to life-saving medical advances, enhanced our national security, improved our reality systems provide keys to medical discoveries and diagnoses. Our Broad-Based Mission As the nation and engineers. Each year, NSF awards thousands of grants that collectively advance America's scientific

  19. Quantum Field Theory & Gravity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664...

  20. Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Mathieu, Johanna; Parrish, Kristen

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    California is a leader in automating demand response (DR) to promote low-cost, consistent, and predictable electric grid management tools. Over 250 commercial and industrial facilities in California participate in fully-automated programs providing over 60 MW of peak DR savings. This paper presents a summary of Open Automated DR (OpenADR) implementation by each of the investor-owned utilities in California. It provides a summary of participation, DR strategies and incentives. Commercial buildings can reduce peak demand from 5 to 15percent with an average of 13percent. Industrial facilities shed much higher loads. For buildings with multi-year savings we evaluate their load variability and shed variability. We provide a summary of control strategies deployed, along with costs to install automation. We report on how the electric DR control strategies perform over many years of events. We benchmark the peak demand of this sample of buildings against their past baselines to understand the differences in building performance over the years. This is done with peak demand intensities and load factors. The paper also describes the importance of these data in helping to understand possible techniques to reach net zero energy using peak day dynamic control capabilities in commercial buildings. We present an example in which the electric load shape changed as a result of a lighting retrofit.

  1. Decades of Discovery

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past two-and-a-half decades, the Office of Science at the U.S. Department of Energy has been at the forefront of scientific discovery. Over 100 important discoveries supported by the Office of Science are represented in this document.

  2. Ground-Based CCD Astrometry with Wide Field Imagers. I. [Observations just a few years apart allow decontamination of field objects from members in two Globular clusters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Anderson; Luigi R. Bedin; Giampaolo Piotto; Ramakant Singh Yadav; Andrea Bellini; .

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the first of a series of papers in which we will apply the methods we have developed for high-precision astrometry (and photometry) with the Hubble Space Telescope to the case of wide-field ground-based images. In particular, we adapt the software originally developed for WFPC2 to ground-based, wide field images from the WFI at the ESO 2.2m telescope. In this paper, we describe in details the new software, we characterize the WFI geometric distortion, discuss the adopted local transformation approach for proper-motion measurements, and apply the new technique to two-epoch archive data of the two closest Galactic globular clusters: NGC 6121 (M4) and NGC 6397. The results of this exercise are more than encouraging. We find that we can achieve a precision of ~7 mas (in each coordinate) in a single exposure for a well-exposed star, which allows a very good cluster-field separation in both M4, and NGC 6397, with a temporal baseline of only 2.8, and 3.1 years, respectively.

  3. Ground-Based CCD Astrometry with Wide Field Imagers. I. [Observations just a few years apart allow decontamination of field objects from members in two Globular clusters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, J; Bellini, A; Piotto, G; Yadav, R S; Anderson, Jay; Bedin, Luigi R.; Bellini, Andrea; Piotto, Giampaolo; Yadav, Ramakant Singh

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the first of a series of papers in which we will apply the methods we have developed for high-precision astrometry (and photometry) with the Hubble Space Telescope to the case of wide-field ground-based images. In particular, we adapt the software originally developed for WFPC2 to ground-based, wide field images from the WFI at the ESO 2.2m telescope. In this paper, we describe in details the new software, we characterize the WFI geometric distortion, discuss the adopted local transformation approach for proper-motion measurements, and apply the new technique to two-epoch archive data of the two closest Galactic globular clusters: NGC 6121 (M4) and NGC 6397. The results of this exercise are more than encouraging. We find that we can achieve a precision of ~7 mas (in each coordinate) in a single exposure for a well-exposed star, which allows a very good cluster-field separation in both M4, and NGC 6397, with a temporal baseline of only 2.8, and 3.1 years, respectively.

  4. Class Discovery in Galaxy Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Bazell; David J. Miller

    2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, automated, supervised classification techniques have been fruitfully applied to labeling and organizing large astronomical databases. These methods require off-line classifier training, based on labeled examples from each of the (known) object classes. In practice, only a small batch of labeled examples, hand-labeled by a human expert, may be available for training. Moreover, there may be no labeled examples for some classes present in the data, i.e. the database may contain several unknown classes. Unknown classes may be present due to 1) uncertainty in or lack of knowledge of the measurement process, 2) an inability to adequately ``survey'' a massive database to assess its content (classes), and/or 3) an incomplete scientific hypothesis. In recent work, new class discovery in mixed labeled/unlabeled data was formally posed, with a proposed solution based on mixture models. In this work we investigate this approach, propose a competing technique suitable for class discovery in neural networks, and evaluate both methods for classification and class discovery on several astronomical data sets. Our results demonstrate up to a 57% reduction in classification error compared to a standard neural network classifier that uses only labeled data.

  5. Trimble field, Smith Co. , MS: 100 bcf of bypassed pay at minus 7000 ft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneeflock, R.D.; Bush, J.D.; Marble, J.C. (Schneeflock Corp., Jackson, MS (USA)); Cook, P.L. Jr.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Eutaw Formation of Mississippi has produced almost 2 TCFG since its initial discovery at Gwinville field in 1944. Prior to Trimble field, the last major Eutaw gas discovery in Mississippi was at Maxie-Pistol Ridge in 1951. Consequently, the Trimble discovery is the most important shallow gas find in the Interior Salt Basin in nearly 40 years. Trimble field will likely develop into at least 20 wells with reserves in excess of 100 BCFG and a flow rate of 40 MMCFGPD. The Trimble discovery was made on a faulted structural closure that had been drilled twice before. Both operators drilled excellent locations but failed to detect low resistivity pay The discovery of gas on the third attempt by Cobra and Paramount was facilitated by the 1987 accidental discovery of Eutaw gas at Gitano field where a flow test of 2 MMCFGPD from an EPA-permitted salt water disposal well proved a new gas pay zone for the field. A petrophysical examination of the Gitano discovery and its implications to the dry holes at Trimble has resulted in a renewed Eutaw play in Mississippi. The history of the Eutaw play and current field development, as well as applied seismic and log analysis techniques, are presented herein to document our exploratory efforts to date.

  6. The requirements discovery process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahill, A.T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirement process. This paper provides a high-level overview of the requirements discovery process.

  7. The over 20 year operating experience with carbon steel tubings at Abu Attifel Field. Problems and solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheldi, T. [ENI-AGIP Div., Milan (Italy); Rumash, K. [AGIP Oil, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Bazzoni, B. [Cescor srl, Milan (Italy)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abu Attifel onshore oil field (Libya) was discovered in 1968 and put in production in November 1972. The total average production is nowadays about 140,000 BOPD (22,260 m{sup 3}/d) with 46 producing wells. All the production wells were originally completed with carbon steel tubing, although the produced fluids contain CO{sub 2}-4% in the gas phase. After several years of production with minor downhole corrosion problems, several corrosion failures started to occur in the nineties at extremely high corrosion rate. In some cases corrosion attacks occurred although the water cut was negligible (lower than 1%). A detailed corrosion study was initiated to investigate the problem in order to identify the most critical production wells and the priority of intervention for well; this paper reports the corrosion assessment results and the actions undertaken to control the corrosion. A occurred corrosion events is also reported.

  8. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  9. The Assessment of Evidence in the Discovery of a Higgs Boson David A. van Dyk*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    The Assessment of Evidence in the Discovery of a Higgs Boson David A. van Dyk* Imperial College London, United Kingdom dvandyk@imperial.ac.uk The 2012-2013 discovery of a Higgs boson filled the last in a 40-year search that culminated in the discovery of a Higgs boson. This talk reviews these statistical

  10. Discovery Grant Program Awards, Listed by PI Last Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simaan, Nabil

    in the Desaguaero Basin, Bolivia #12;Discovery Grant Program Awards, Listed by PI Last Name 1999-Present Award Year facility 2000 (Spring 2000) Tom Weiler Physics & Astronomy Particle Astrophysics at Extreme Energies 2001

  11. Trimble field, Mississippi; 100 bcf of bypassed, low resistivity cretaceous Eutaw pay at 7,000 ft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, P.L. Jr. (Cook Energy Inc., Jackson, MS (US)); Schneeflock, R.D.; Bush, J.D.; Marble, J.C. (Paramount Petroleum Co., Jackson, MS (US))

    1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Eutaw formation of Mississippi has produced almost 2 tcf of gas since its initial discovery at Gwinville field in 1944. Prior to Trimble field, the last major Eutaw gas discovery in the state was Maxie-Pistol Ridge field in 1951. Consequently, the Trimble discovery is the most important shallow gas find in the Interior Salt basin in nearly 40 years. Trimble field will likely develop into at least 20 wells with combined reserved in excess of 100 bcf of gas and a production rate of 40 MMcfd. The Trimble discovery was made on a faulted structural closure drilled twice before. Both operators drilled excellent locations but failed to detect low resistivity pay. The discovery of gas on the third attempt was facilitated by the 1987 accidental discovery of Eutaw gas at Gitano field, where a flow test of 2 MMcfd from an Environmental Protection Agency permitted salt water disposal well proved a new gas pay zone for the field. A petrophysical examination of the Gitano discovery and its implications to the dry holes at Trimble has initiated intensive industry activity in a renewed Eutaw play in Mississippi.

  12. Discovery from Contributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Winston H.

    Knowledge Discovery from Community- Contributed Multimedia Tao Mei Microsoft Research Asia Winston drastically increased the volume of community-contributed multimedia. For example, there are reportedly more. Such a vast amount of photos, videos, and music shared via websites is bound to exert a profound social impact

  13. Magnetic Fields in Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Short Racah Institute for Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Grant J.

    Magnetic Fields in Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Short Overview Tsvi Piran Racah Institute for Physics Abstract. Magnetic fields play a crucial role in the physics of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Strong thirty years, after the discovery of Gamma-Ray bursts (GRBs) we have now a reasonable GRB model

  14. A brief history of the Delayed'' discovery of nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This year marks the Fiftieth Anniversary of the discovery of Nuclear Fission. In the early 1930's, the neutron was discovered, followed by the discovery of artificial radioactivity and then the use of the neutron to produce artificial radioactivity. The first experiments resulting in the fission of uranium took place in 1934. A paper which speculated on fission as an explanation was almost immediately published, yet no one took it seriously not even the author herself. Why did it take an additional five years before anyone realized what had occurred This is an abnormally long time in a period when discoveries, particularly in nuclear physics, seemed to be almost a daily occurrence. The events which led up to the discovery are recounted, with an attempt made to put them into their historical perspective. The role played by Mendeleev's Periodic Table, the role of the natural radioactive decay chain of uranium, the discovery of protactinium, the apparent discovery of masurium (technetium) and a speculation on the reason why Irene Curie may have missed the discovery of nuclear fission will all be discussed. 43 refs.

  15. Use the drop-down search menus and operators (AND, OR, NOT) to customize your search. Search by topic, author, journal title, publication year, and other fields.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    by topic, author, journal title, publication year, and other fields. Topic Enter your search words, joined, and subject terms; choose Title from the drop-down search menu to restrict your search to document titles only for the most comprehensive search. 1.To find all articles by Francis Harry Compton Crick, click , enter Crick F

  16. Bloomfield discovery: A case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hector, S. [Gary Drilling Co., Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    North Valley Oil and Gas Company drilled and completed the most exciting discovery on the West Coast in 1992. The {open_quotes}Bloomfield{close_quotes} No. 1 RD No. 1 well tapped some 180 feet of pay in the Fourth Massive Sand and flowed 15,600 Mcf/D through a 33/64` bean. The perforated interval was 7792`-7900`. The well was drilled in September 1992 and went on line in January 1993. This well was the discovery well for the Bixler Gas Field, which at present has two gas wells and has made almost 4 billion cubic feet of gas. The original prospect was designed to be a redrill of the 1985 dryhole drilled by Natural Gas Corp. The proposal was to drill 800 feet to the west and look for gas in the Blewett sand, which had a gas show in the original well. The Fourth Massive sand was considered to be a secondary objective. Isopach and isochron work from available seismic lines indicated a strong chance that some of the Fourth Massive Sand could be present beneath the shale-filled Meganos Gorge next to a large fault that formed the west boundary to the Prospect (one of the faults of the Midland Fault System). The original NGC well had no fourth Massive Sand present, but did log a good show in the Blewett Sand (300 units) and appeared to have thin gas pay on water. The resulting redrill had none of the main target, the Blewett Sand, which had shaled out between the Redrill No. 1 and the Original Hole. However, the redrill also found some 200 feet of the Fourth Massive Sand. This required a 30% angle to the Gorge Wall to preserve that much section in the 800 feet that separated the Redrill No. 1 from the Original Hole. It is very likely that other small but prolific traps exist beneath the Meganos Gorge. Structural and stratigraphic analysis of seismic data will be the keys to unlock future discoveries in this part of the Sacramento Basin.

  17. Motif discovery in sequential data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Kyle L. (Kyle Lawrence)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I discuss the application and development of methods for the automated discovery of motifs in sequential data. These data include DNA sequences, protein sequences, and real-valued sequential data such as ...

  18. Discovery of the Tungsten Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fritsch; J. Q. Ginepro; M. Heim; A. Schuh; A. Shore; M. Thoennessen

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  19. Discovery of the Titanium Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Meierfrankenfeld; M. Thoennessen

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Twentyfive titanium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  20. Metagenomic biomarker discovery and explanation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segata, Nicola

    This study describes and validates a new method for metagenomic biomarker discovery by way of class comparison, tests of biological consistency and effect size estimation. This addresses the challenge of finding organisms, ...

  1. Discovery of the Tin Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Amos; M. Thoennessen

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-eight tin isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  2. Discovery of the tungsten isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritsch, A.; Ginepro, J.Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Shore, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Thoennessen, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)], E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  3. Discovery of the Tungsten Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritsch, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Shore, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  4. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    ): the Solar Economy IGERT (SEIGERT); Amendment 3 for Grant 103965." (a Discovery Park award -- Energy Center

  5. Knowledge discovery using data mined from Nuclear Magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Knowledge discovery using data mined from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectral images William J cyberinfrastructure · Method ­ Solid State ab initio calculations ­ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) ­ Support Vector refined (and/or relaxed) structure, perform Self-Consistent Field calculation for electronic structure

  6. THE PULSAR SEARCH COLLABORATORY: DISCOVERY AND TIMING OF FIVE NEW PULSARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosen, R.; Swiggum, J.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Yun, M.; Boyles, J. [West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Heatherly, S. A.; Scoles, S. [NRAO, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Lynch, R. [McGill University, Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Kondratiev, V. I. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Ransom, S. M. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Moniot, M. L.; Thompson, C. [James River High School, 9906 Springwood Road, Buchanan, VA 24066 (United States); Cottrill, A.; Raycraft, M. [Lincoln High School, 100 Jerry Toth Drive, Shinnston, WV 26431 (United States); Weaver, M. [Broadway High School, 269 Gobbler Drive, Broadway, VA 22815 (United States); Snider, A. [Sherando High School, 185 South Warrior Drive, Stephens City, VA 22655 (United States); Dudenhoefer, J.; Allphin, L. [Hedgesville High School, 109 Ridge Road North, Hedgesville, WV 25427 (United States); Thorley, J., E-mail: Rachel.Rosen@mail.wvu.edu [Strasburg High School, 250 Ram Drive, Strasburg, VA 22657 (United States); and others

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the discovery and timing solutions of five new pulsars by students involved in the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, a NSF-funded joint program between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to excite and engage high-school students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) and related fields. We encourage students to pursue STEM fields by apprenticing them within a professional scientific community doing cutting edge research, specifically by teaching them to search for pulsars. The students are analyzing 300 hr of drift-scan survey data taken with the Green Bank Telescope at 350 MHz. These data cover 2876 deg{sup 2} of the sky. Over the course of five years, more than 700 students have inspected diagnostic plots through a web-based graphical interface designed for this project. The five pulsars discovered in the data have spin periods ranging from 3.1 ms to 4.8 s. Among the new discoveries are PSR J1926-1314, a long period, nulling pulsar; PSR J1821+0155, an isolated, partially recycled 33 ms pulsar; and PSR J1400-1438, a millisecond pulsar in a 9.5 day orbit whose companion is likely a white dwarf star.

  7. Evidence for neutrino mass: A decade of discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino mass and mixing are amongst the major discoveries of recent years. From the observation of flavor change in solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments to the measurements of neutrino mixing with terrestrial neutrinos, recent experiments have provided consistent and compelling evidence for the mixing of massive neutrinos. The discoveries at Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND have solved the long-standing solar neutrino problem and demand that we make the first significant revision of the Standard Model in decades. Searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay probe the particle nature of neutrinos and continue to place limits on the effective mass of the neutrino. Possible signs of neutrinoless double-beta decay will stimulate neutrino mass searches in the next decade and beyond. I review the recent discoveries in neutrino physics and the current evidence for massive neutrinos.

  8. A CULTURAL RESOURCES MONITORING AND DISCOVERY PLAN FOR MAINTENANCE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to potential discovery situations and to evaluate the discoveries eligibility for NRHP listing. FINAL Monitoring and Discovery Plan 12 EPG Western Area Power Administration...

  9. Ameliorating risk: Culturable and metagenomic monitoring of the 14 year decline of a genetically engineered microorganism at a bioremediation field site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, Alice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Smart, Abby E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chauhan, Archana [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ripp, Steven Anthony [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Williams, Daniel [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burton, Whitney [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Moser, Scott [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Sayler, Gary [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 represented the first genetically engineered microorganism to be approved in the United States for field release for applications related to subsurface soil bioremediation. In October 1996, strain HK44 was introduced into a replicated semi-contained array of soil lysimeters where its luciferase (luxCDABE)-based bioluminescent response to soil-borne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminants was detected and monitored for the next two years. At the termination of this experiment, it was decided that the lysimeters remain available for future longer-term monitoring efforts, and were thus covered and left essentially undisturbed until the initiation of a large sampling event in 2010, fourteen years after the original release. Although after extensive sampling culturable HK44 cells were not found, additional molecular and metagenomic analyses indicated that genetic signatures of HK44 cells still persisted, with genes diagnostic for the bioluminescent transposon carried by strain HK44 (luxA and tetA) being found at low concentrations (< 5000 copies/g).

  10. The Future of Information Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneiderman, Ben

    fact finding (known-item search) On what day was Barack Obama born? #12;Discovery Process: Task Analysis Specific fact finding (known-item search) On what day was Barack Obama born a Senator? Exploration of availability (vague result request) What genealogical information on Barack Obama

  11. Salt dome discoveries mounting in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericksen, R.L. [Mississippi Office of Geology, Jackson, MS (United States)

    1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploratory drilling around piercement salt domes in Mississippi has met with a string of successes in recent months. Exploration of these salt features is reported to have been initiated through the review of non-proprietary, 2D seismic data and subsurface control. This preliminary data and work were then selectively upgraded by the acquisition of additional, generally higher quality, conventional 2D seismic lines. This current flurry of successful exploration and ensuing development drilling by Amerada Hess Corp. on the flanks of salt domes in Mississippi has resulted in a number of significant Hosston discoveries/producers at: Carson salt dome in Jefferson Davis County; Dry Creek salt dome in Covington County, Midway salt dome in lamar County, Monticello salt dome in Lawrence County, and Prentiss salt dome in Jefferson Davis County. The resulting production from these fields is gas and condensate, with wells being completed on 640 acre production units.

  12. Planetary Microlensing: From Prediction to Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas James Rattenbury

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Four planets have recently been discovered by gravitational microlensing. The most recent of these discoveries is the lowest-mass planet known to exist around a normal star. The detection of planets in gravitational microlensing events was predicted over a decade ago. Microlensing is now a mature field of astrophysical research and the recent planet detections herald a new chapter in the hunt for low mass extra-solar planets. This paper reviews the basic theory of planetary microlensing, describes the experiments currently in operation for the detection and observation of microlensing events and compares the characteristics of the planetary systems found to date by microlensing. Some proposed schemes for improving the detection rate of planets via microlensing are also discussed.

  13. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  14. Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Each year, about 150 kids gather during the summer at Camp Discovery in Kerrville, Texas, to learn new things and have fun. But this isn't an ordinary summer camp — the attendees, ages seven to 16, all have been diagnosed with cancer. During the course of a week, campers get a great learning experience, but they also have the opportunity to talk about their experiences.

  15. Graphene 'gateway' discovery opens possibilities for improved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dawn Levy Communications 865.576.6448 Graphene 'gateway' discovery opens possibilities for improved energy technologies Computer simulations show a single proton (pink) can cross...

  16. Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 1 Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 2 Abstract Scientific discovery learning is a highly self-directed and constructivistic form of learning. A computer simulation is a type of computer-based environment that is very

  17. For the first 15 years of my life, I lived in the shadow of the oil and gas fields of South Louisiana and became accustomed to the oil indus-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jacqueline

    For the first 15 years of my life, I lived in the shadow of the oil and gas fields of South Louisiana and became accustomed to the oil indus- try and the people involved in this business. I of this world. My father worked for Humble Oil (which was acquired later by Exxon) and we moved from place

  18. Security Services Discovery by ATM Endsystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sholander, Peter; Tarman, Thomas

    1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution proposes strawman techniques for Security Service Discovery by ATM endsystems in ATM networks. Candidate techniques include ILMI extensions, ANS extensions and new ATM anycast addresses. Another option is a new protocol based on an IETF service discovery protocol, such as Service Location Protocol (SLP). Finally, this contribution provides strawman requirements for Security-Based Routing in ATM networks.

  19. Discovery Park Impact Network for Photovoltaic Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Discovery Park Impact Network for Photovoltaic Technology NEED Discovery Park provides for Photovoltaic Technology (NPT). The NPT is designed to be a unique venue for industry-directed, university aims to become an international center of gravity for photovoltaic research that connects islands

  20. WISDOM: A Grid-Enabled Drug Discovery Initiative Against Malaria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    14 WISDOM: A Grid-Enabled Drug Discovery Initiative Against Malaria Vincent Breton, Doman Kim ................................................................................ 354 14.2 Grid-Enabled Drug Discovery .................................................. 354 14.2.1 In Silico Drug Discovery: Requirements and Grid Added Value

  1. A method for dense packing discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoav Kallus; Veit Elser; Simon Gravel

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting \\textit{de novo} (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the \\textit{divide and concur} framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing which are reported in [arXiv:0910.5226]. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest known lattice sphere packings and the best known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and 11 dimensions respectively (the first such numerical evidence for their optimality in some of these dimensions). For non-spherical particles, we report a new dense packing of regular four-dimensional simplices with density $\\phi=128/219\\approx0.5845$ and with a similar structure to the densest known tetrahedron packing.

  2. A method for dense packing discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallus, Yoav; Gravel, Simon

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing which are reported in [arXiv:0910.5226]. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest known lattice sphere packings and the best known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and ...

  3. Application of proteomics in the discovery of candidate protein...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proteomics in the discovery of candidate protein biomarkers in a Diabetes Autoantibody Standardization Program Application of proteomics in the discovery of candidate protein...

  4. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama -- Year 2. Annual report, March 1997--March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and has produced oil from fractured chalk of the Cretaceous Selma Group and glauconitic sandstone of the Eutaw Formation. Nearly all of Gilbertown Field is still in primary recovery, although waterflooding has been attempted locally. The objective of this project is to analyze the geologic structure and burial history of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas in order to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. Indeed, the decline of oil production to marginally economic levels in recent years has made this type of analysis timely and practical. Key technical advancements being sought include understanding the relationship of requisite strain to production in Gilbertown reservoirs, incorporation of synsedimentary growth factors into models of area balance, quantification of the relationship between requisite strain and bed curvature, determination of the timing of hydrocarbon generation, and identification of the avenues and mechanisms of fluid transport.

  5. Dragon Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Can you believe it? It's New Year again. It seems like only yesterday we were celebrating the advent of the year of the Rabbit and now, here it is, the year of the Dragon. January 22nd is New Year's ...

  6. Continuous Time Group Discovery in Dynamic Graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, K; Eliassi-Rad, T

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    With the rise in availability and importance of graphs and networks, it has become increasingly important to have good models to describe their behavior. While much work has focused on modeling static graphs, we focus on group discovery in dynamic graphs. We adapt a dynamic extension of Latent Dirichlet Allocation to this task and demonstrate good performance on two datasets. Modeling relational data has become increasingly important in recent years. Much work has focused on static graphs - that is fixed graphs at a single point in time. Here we focus on the problem of modeling dynamic (i.e. time-evolving) graphs. We propose a scalable Bayesian approach for community discovery in dynamic graphs. Our approach is based on extensions of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA). LDA is a latent variable model for topic modeling in text corpora. It was extended to deal with topic changes in discrete time and later in continuous time. These models were referred to as the discrete Dynamic Topic Model (dDTM) and the continuous Dynamic Topic Model (cDTM), respectively. When adapting these models to graphs, we take our inspiration from LDA-G and SSN-LDA, applications of LDA to static graphs that have been shown to effectively factor out community structure to explain link patterns in graphs. In this paper, we demonstrate how to adapt and apply the cDTM to the task of finding communities in dynamic networks. We use link prediction to measure the quality of the discovered community structure and apply it to two different relational datasets - DBLP author-keyword and CAIDA autonomous systems relationships. We also discuss a parallel implementation of this approach using Hadoop. In Section 2, we review LDA and LDA-G. In Section 3, we review the cDTM and introduce cDTMG, its adaptation to modeling dynamic graphs. We discuss inference for the cDTM-G and details of our parallel implementation in Section 4 and present its performance on two datasets in Section 5 before concluding in Section 6.

  7. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubsch, Tristan [Howard University

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  8. Unitizing and waterflooding the California Yowlumne Oil Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burzlaff, A.A.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yowlumne field, located at the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley of California, is one of the largest new onshore oil fields discovered in California in the past twenty years. The field, at an average depth of 12,200', has produced over 42 million barrels of oil since its discovery in 1974. In May, 1982, a portion of the Yowlumne field was unitized and called Yowlumne Unit ''B''. Nine operators and about 160 royalty owners cooperated to form this unit. A two phase unitization formula based on remaining primary and initial hydrocarbon pore volume was used to form Unit ''B''. A secondary waterflood project is being implemented which is estimated to increase oil recovery by some 25 million barrels.

  9. Discovery of New Alloys by Bulk Combinatorial Synthesis | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers Subfolders inDiscovery of Dark Energy Ushered

  10. Torsion discovery potential and its discrimination at CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almeida, F. M. L. Jr. de; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Vale, M. A. B. do [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Ciencias Naturais, Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del Rei, Sao Joao del Rei, 36301-160, MG (Brazil)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Torsion models constitute a well-known class of extended quantum gravity models. In this paper we study some phenomenological consequences of a torsion field interacting with fermions at LHC. A torsion field could appear as a new heavy state characterized by its mass and couplings to fermions. These new states will form a resonance decaying into difermions, as occurs in many extensions of the standard model, such as models predicting the existence of additional neutral gauge bosons, usually named Z{sup '}. Using the dielectron channel we evaluate the integrated luminosity needed for a 5{sigma} discovery as a function of the torsion mass, for different coupling values. We also calculate the luminosity needed to discriminate, with 95% C.L., the two possible different torsion natures. Finally, we show that the observed signal coming from the torsion field could be distinguished from a signal coming from a new neutral gauge boson, provided there is enough luminosity.

  11. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Low-CostTechnologyfortheNextGeneration of High Efficiency Solar Cells; Modification 3 for Grant 105663." (a Discovery Park award -- Energy Center engineering, electrical & computer engineering, from U.S. Department of Energy, $25,999, "Development of

  12. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    , and Repair of the CH-53K Composite Rotor Blades and Structures." (a Discovery Park award -- Institute)." Bickham, John W; forestry & natural resources, from North Slope Borough, $100,000, "The Bow- head Whale

  13. Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novak, Petra Kralj

    1 Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes Petra Kralj Novak Petra.Kralj.Novak@ijs.si and exam · 2013/1/15: Written exam, seminar proposal discussion · 2013/2/12: Data mining seminar

  14. Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novak, Petra Kralj

    1 Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes Petra Kralj Novak Petra.Kralj.Novak@ijs.si on Weka 3: Descriptive data mining ­ Discussion about seminars and exam · 2013/12/16: Written exam

  15. Applications of motif discovery in biological data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Styczynski, Mark Philip-Walter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequential motif discovery, the ability to identify conserved patterns in ordered datasets without a priori knowledge of exactly what those patterns will be, is a frequently encountered and difficult problem in computational ...

  16. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    High Resolution Laser Velocimetry." (a Discovery Park award -- Institute for Defense Initiatives,000, "Testing Combustion Response of Secondary Fuel Injection to Acoustice Oscillations-Extension." Anderson and Support of Project Constellation ­ Modification M." Anderson, William E; aeronautical & as- tronautical

  17. Financing drug discovery for orphan diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagnan, David Erik

    Recently proposed ‘megafund’ financing methods for funding translational medicine and drug development require billions of dollars in capital per megafund to de-risk the drug discovery process enough to issue long-term ...

  18. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having their origin in antiquity. Still other elements have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements, because these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature. The names of the elements come from many sources including mythological concepts or characters; places, areas or countries; properties of the element or its compounds, such as color, smell or its inability to combine; and the names of scientists. There are also some miscellaneous names as well as some obscure names for particular elements. The claim of discovery of an element has varied over the centuries. Many claims, e.g., the discovery of certain rare earth elements of the lanthanide series, involved the discovery of a mineral ore from which an element was later extracted. The honor of discovery has often been accorded not to the person who first isolated the element but to the person who discovered the original mineral itself, even when the ore was impure and contained many elements. The reason for this is that in the case of these rare earth elements, the ''earth'' now refers to oxides of a metal not to the metal itself. This fact was not realized at the time of their discovery, until the English chemist Humphry Davy showed that earths were compounds of oxygen and metals in 1808. In the early discoveries, the atomic weight of an element and spectral analysis of the element were not available. Later both of these elemental properties would be required before discovery of the element would be accepted. In general, the requirements for discovery claims have tightened through the years and claims that were previously accepted would no longer meet the minimum constraints now imposed. There are cases where the honor of discovery is not given to the first person to actually discover the element but to the first person to claim the discovery in print. If a publication was delayed, the discoverer has often historically been ''scooped'' by another scientist.

  19. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensions (Billion Cubic

  20. Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569 0 0 0 0Feet)Feet) New

  1. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercialper Thousand70 349252 254 245

  2. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercialper Thousand70Extensions

  3. Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14DecadeDecade(Million31Feet) New

  4. Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April 25, 2013 IndependentProduct: Crude:

  5. http://www.purdue.edu/discoverypark June 2012_NT3 Discovery Park Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    http://www.purdue.edu/discoverypark June 2012_NT3 Discovery Park Impact Infusion Pump Informatics per year. Infusion pumps can assist hospitals in administering drugs safely and consistently over the infusion pump informatics system. Eight hospital systems across four states now participate in the Infusion

  6. In Retirement, Rex Hess Recalls the Pathway to Discovery IlliniStudio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    In Retirement, Rex Hess Recalls the Pathway to Discovery IlliniStudio Faculty Retirement By Lisa Chung After more than 20 years at the University of Illinois, Dr. Rex Hess retired in 2009 the prepared mind." An early interest in the arts followed by pre-law studies at the University of Missouri

  7. Discovery of a luminous white dwarf in a young star cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebecca A. W. Elson; Steinn Sigurdsson; Jarrod Hurley; Melvyn B. Davies; Gerard F. Gilmore

    1998-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have identified a candidate 1-2 x 10^5 year old luminous white dwarf in NGC 1818, a young star cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This discovery strongly constrains the boundary mass M_c at which stars stop forming neutron stars and start forming white dwarfs, to M_c > 7.6 Msun.

  8. VBD-0063- In the Matter of Bruce R. Field

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by Bruce R. Field (Field). This Motion, dated August 2, 2001, concerns the hearing...

  9. Electromagnetic Lorenz Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Potter

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge transformations are potential transformations that leave only specific Maxwell fields invariant. To reveal more, I develop Lorenz field equations with full Maxwell form for nongauge, sans gauge function, transformations yielding mixed, superposed retarded and outgoing, potentials. The form invariant Lorenz condition is then a charge conservation equivalent. This allows me to define three transformation classes that screen for Lorenz relevance. The nongauge Lorentz conditions add polarization fields which support emergent, light-like rays that convey energy on charge conserving phase points. These localized rays escape discovery in modern Maxwell fields where the polarizations are suppressed by gauge transformations.

  10. Northland science discovery. Final report, February 15, 1995--February 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigford, A.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a final report on the US Department of Energy`s grant of $39,900 to the PLUS Center at The College of St. Scholastica for a PREP program called Northland Science Discovery (NSD). This report includes an overview of the past year`s progress toward achieving the goals established for the project, a description of the results of these efforts and their relationship to the project goals, and appendices documenting program activities, accomplishments, and expenditures. The goal of Northland Science Discovery is to provide science and math enrichment activities for students traditionally underrepresented in science (girls, minorities, low-income, and rural children). The program works toward this goal by providing a four-week residential, research-based, science and math youth camp which serves approximately 25 students per year. NSD has been held each summer since 1992. This program also has an academic-year component consisting of reunions.

  11. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Copping, Andrea E.; Marshall, Kathryn E.

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy generated by the world’s oceans and rivers offers the potential to make substantial contributions to the domestic and global renewable energy supply. However, the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry faces challenges related to siting, permitting, construction, and operation of pilotand commercial-scale facilities. One of the challenges is to understand the potential effects to marine organisms from electromagnetic fields, which are produced as a by-product of transmitting power from offshore to onshore locations through underwater transmission cables. This report documents the progress of the third year of research (fiscal year 2012) to investigate environmental issues associated with marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) generation. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Wind and Water Technologies Office. The report addresses the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on selected marine species where significant knowledge gaps exist. The species studied this fiscal year included one fish and two crustacean species: the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister), and American lobster (Homarus americanus).

  12. Analysis of peak characterization and data alignment of a differential mobility spectrometer for the discovery of TB biomarkers in human breath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Amy Yuen-Lee

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomarkers have become a growing field for disease research and diagnostics. For the infectious, deadly disease, tuberculosis (TB), the discovery of effective TB biomarkers in the human breath may enable the development ...

  13. Outlook: The Next Twenty Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the bigquestions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

  14. Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Moose, WY Grand Teton National Park's rugged landscape and stunning array of wildlife attract nearly three million visitors every year, making it one of our most popular national parks. A new Grand Teton National Park visitor center near the park's headquarters north of Jackson, Wyoming, replaces an outdated building, educates an increased number of visitors, and inspires further exploration of this extraordinary landscape. The project site is located along the Snake River, between a riparian forest and a sagebrush meadow.

  15. Discoveries in Energy & Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers Subfolders in "Papers"WirelessDiscover

  16. Project Year Project Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve-specialized, but practically useless skill. Solution One goal of this summer's Applied Geographic Information Systems in Public lessons about observational epidemiology. Technologies Used Geographic Info System (GIS), Blackboard

  17. Discovery of single top quark production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillberg, Dag

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The top quark is by far the heaviest known fundamental particle with a mass nearing that of a gold atom. Because of this strikingly high mass, the top quark has several unique properties and might play an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking - the mechanism that gives all elementary particles mass. Creating top quarks requires access to very high energy collisions, and at present only the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is capable of reaching these energies. Until now, top quarks have only been observed produced in pairs via the strong interaction. At hadron colliders, it should also be possible to produce single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. Studies of single top quark production provide opportunities to measure the top quark spin, how top quarks mix with other quarks, and to look for new physics beyond the standard model. Because of these interesting properties, scientists have been looking for single top quarks for more than 15 years. This thesis presents the first discovery of single top quark production. An analysis is performed using 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Boosted decision trees are used to isolate the single top signal from background, and the single top cross section is measured to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.74{sub -0.74}{sup +0.95} pb. Using the same analysis, a measurement of the amplitude of the CKM matrix element V{sub tb}, governing how top and b quarks mix, is also performed. The measurement yields: |V{sub tb}|f{sub 1}{sup L}| = 1.05{sub -0.12}{sup +0.13}, where f{sub 1}{sup L} is the left-handed Wtb coupling. The separation of signal from background is improved by combining the boosted decision trees with two other multivariate techniques. A new cross section measurement is performed, and the significance for the excess over the predicted background exceeds 5 standard deviations.

  18. Resource Discovery Services for Grid Computing Training 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Boon; Fergusson, David; MacColl, John

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    discovery services developed as part of an initiative to pilot e-learning and a shared digital library infrastructure for Grid Computing training projects in Europe. The development is also related to a project funded by the UK Joint Information Systems...

  19. Molecular Classification of Cancer: Class Discovery and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    the distinction between acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) without previous leukemias into those arising from lymphoid precursors (acute lymphoblastic leukemia, ALL) or from myeloid and applied to human acute leukemias as a test case. A class discovery procedure automatically discovered

  20. Exploratory Search Interfaces to Support Image Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneiderman, Ben

    Director (1983-2000), Human-Computer Interaction Lab Professor, Department of Computer Science MemberExploratory Search Interfaces to Support Image Discovery Ben Shneiderman ben@cs.umd.edu Founding;Interdisciplinary research community - Computer Science & Psychology - Information Studies & Education (www

  1. Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission D. S. Burnett1 and Genesis Science Team2: the isoto- pic compositions of O, N, and noble gases differ in the Sun from other inner solar system objects in the noble gas data from solar wind implanted in lunar soils. (ii) The most advanced analytical instruments

  2. Unraveling the Higgs Boson Discovery - Rik Yoshida

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rik Yoshida

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne physicist Rik Yoshida explains what the Higgs boson is and what its discovery means for physics, the universe, and life. The third of Argonne's "OutLoud" public lecture series, held at the lab on September 27, 2012. Find out when the next one is at http://www.anl.gov/community/outloud

  3. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    .S. Department of Energy, $65,000, "Midwest Consortium for Wind Turbine Reliabililty and Optimization." (a Discovery Park award -- Energy Center) Agnew, Christopher R; psychological sciences, from Ross Graduate -- Energy Center) Agrawal, Rakesh; chemical engineering, from Purdue University F N Andrews Fel- lowship

  4. Discovery Park Impact NNSA PRISM Center for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Discovery Park Impact NNSA PRISM Center for Prediction of Reliability, Integrity and Survivability in PRISM. Purdue is one of 5 centers funded under NNSA's Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Computing, a division of Information Technology at Purdue. The NNSA national laboratories will be involved

  5. Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novak, Petra Kralj

    1 Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Practice Notes dr. Petra Kralj Novak Petra.Kralj.Novak@ijs.si and exam · 2013/12/16: Written exam, seminar proposal discussion · 2014/1/8: Data mining seminar gain becomes the root 7. Divide the set S into subsets Si according to the values of A 8. Repeat steps

  6. Unraveling the Higgs Boson Discovery - Rik Yoshida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rik Yoshida

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne physicist Rik Yoshida explains what the Higgs boson is and what its discovery means for physics, the universe, and life. The third of Argonne's "OutLoud" public lecture series, held at the lab on September 27, 2012. Find out when the next one is at http://www.anl.gov/community/outloud

  7. Sequence-Structure Patterns: Discovery and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Giri

    Sequence-Structure Patterns: Discovery and Applications T. Milledge1 S. Khuri2 X. Wei1 C. Yang1 G School of Medicine Abstract Protein sequence data is being generated at a tremendous rate; however that proteins that share a similar function often exhibit conserved sequence patterns. Such sequence patterns

  8. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    for Research Abbott,Angela R; consumer & family sciences, from Crown Point Community Foundation, $500, "Gift Letter - Crown Point Community Founda- tion, Inc." Abel, Steven R; pharmacy practice, fromAmeri- can." (a Discovery Park award -- Institute for Defense Initiatives) Adams, Douglas E; mechanical

  9. Imaging in Drug Discovery and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    Imaging in Drug Discovery and Development Raymond Gibson Senior Investigator Merck, Sharp and Dohme aaarrrccchhhiiivvveeesss aaannnddd aaabbbssstttrrraaaccctttsss... #12;Abstract With the desire to develop novel drugs faster and more cost-effectively, drug companies are searching for clear strategies to manage the complex

  10. Automated Discovery: a Fusion of Multidisciplinary Principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Automated Discovery: a Fusion of Multidisciplinary Principles Jan M. _Zytkow Computer Science; Piatetsky-Shapiro & Frawley, 1991; Shen, 1993; Shrager & Langley; Simon, Valdes-Perez & Sleeman, 1997; Kulkarni & Simon, 1987; Kocabas & Langley, 1995; Valdes- Perez, 1993. The mere accumulation of new

  11. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards May 2013 Office of the Vice President for ResearchFunds." Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; chemistry, from U.S. DepartmentofEnergy,$165,000,"OxoCata- lysts for the Conversion pathobiology, from PHS-NIH National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, $2,963, "Animal-Assisted

  12. SyracuSe univerSity Discovery Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raina, Ramesh

    . Past Discovery Florence courses have included Italian Art and Society, Liberty and Power from country and trust in the people there gave me a lot more faith in people in general. --Briana r. Discovery

  13. Geothermal Discovery Offers Hope for More Potential Across the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Discovery Offers Hope for More Potential Across the Country Geothermal Discovery Offers Hope for More Potential Across the Country October 17, 2012 - 12:50pm Addthis The solution...

  14. Drug Discovery and Development from Marine Biology-Based Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Drug Discovery and Development from Marine Biology- Based Research Oceanyx Pharmaceuticals is a novel drug discovery and development company that leverages marine biology-based natural identified two lead candidates, largazole and apratoxin, as potential drug candidates for the treatment

  15. Issues in Security Service Discovery and Routing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sholander, P.; Tarman, T.

    1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Security Specification, Version 1.0 allows security services to be provided by many devices in a network. It correctly presumes that if a virtual circuit needs these security services, then network topology and device policy will act to ensure that the appropriate security services are applied to the virtual circuit. This contribution moves that the Security Service Discovery and Routing function be included in the Security Version 2.0 work scope.

  16. REVIEWS Drug Discovery Today Volume 12, Numbers 1/2 January 2007 Drug-target identification in Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrimon, Norbert

    the combination of RNAi and small-molecule HTS can lead to effective identification of targets in drug discovery studies over the years has relied on the ease of growing this organism and the powerful genetic tools such as the insulin, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor b, Wnt, Hedgehog, JAK/STAT and Notch pathways

  17. Process Mining, Discovery, and Integration using Distance Measures Joonsoo Bae Ling Liu James Caverlee William B. Rouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ling

    Process Mining, Discovery, and Integration using Distance Measures Joonsoo Bae Ling Liu James Institute of Technology, USA bill.rouse@isye.gatech.edu Abstract Business processes continue to play, and integrating process- oriented services has attracted growing attention in the recent year. In this paper we

  18. When Fields Collide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, David I.

    Particle cosmology is among the hottest of hot topics in physics today. The field investigates the smallest units of matter and their role in determining the shape and fate of the entire universe. In recent years the field ...

  19. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates: Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Marshall, Kathryn E.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fiscal year (FY) 2011 progress report (Task 2.1.3 Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.3.1.1 Electromagnetic Fields) describes studies conducted by PNNL as part of the DOE Wind and Water Power Program to examine the potential effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from marine and hydrokinetic devices on aquatic organisms, including freshwater and marine fish and marine invertebrates. In this report, we provide a description of the methods and results of experiments conducted in FY 2010-FY 2011 to evaluate potential responses of selected aquatic organisms. Preliminary EMF laboratory experiments during FY 2010 and 2011 entailed exposures with representative fish and invertebrate species including juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), California halibut (Paralicthys californicus), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister). These species were selected for their ecological, commercial, and/or recreational importance, as well as their potential to encounter an MHK device or transmission cable during part or all of their life cycle. Based on previous studies, acute effects such as mortality were not expected to occur from EMF exposures. Therefore, our measurement endpoints focused on behavioral responses (e.g., detection of EMF, interference with feeding behavior, avoidance or attraction to EMF), developmental changes (i.e., growth and survival from egg or larval stage to juvenile), and exposure markers indicative of physiological responses to stress. EMF intensities during the various tests ranged from 0.1 to 3 millitesla, representing a range of upper bounding conditions reported in the literature. Experiments to date have shown there is little evidence to indicate distinct or extreme behavioral responses in the presence of elevated EMF for the species tested. Several developmental and physiological responses were observed in the fish exposures, although most were not statistically significant. Additional species are currently planned for laboratory testing in the next fiscal year (e.g. an elasmobranch, American lobster) to provide a broader assessment of species important to stakeholders. The collective responses of all species will be assessed in terms of life stage, exposure scenarios, and biological relevance, to address current uncertainties related to effects of EMF on aquatic organisms.

  20. Discovery of plutonium-based superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrao, John L.,; Thompson, J. D. (Joe David); Moreno, N. O.; Morales, L. A. (Luis A.); Wastin, F. (Franck); Rebizant, J.; Boulet, P.; Colineau, E.; Lander, G. H.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of superconductivity in single crystals of PuCoGa{sub 5} with transition temperature T{sub c}=18.5 K is discussed. The existing data lead to the speculation that the superconductivity in PuCoGa{sub 5} may be unconventional. In such a scenario the properties of PuCoGa{sub 5} would be intermediate between those of isostructural UCoGa{sub 5} and CeCoIn{sub 5}, more heavily studied f-electron materials.

  1. Trends, Discovery, & Innovation at NUG User

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site MapTrends, Discovery, & Innovation

  2. Stories of Discovery & Innovation: From Human Genome to Materials...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    of Discovery & Innovation, was supported in part by the Center for Electrical Energy Storage, an EFRC led by Michael Thackeray at Argonne National Laboratory. Last modified: 4...

  3. Discovery of the Transuranium Elements (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Darleane

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Darleane Hoffman, a Berkeley Lab nuclear chemist, chronicles the discovery of the heaviest elements ? those much heavier than uranium and plutonium.

  4. Supercomputers Drive Discovery of Materials for More Efficient...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Supercomputers Drive Discovery of Materials for More Efficient Carbon Capture Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights...

  5. A Scalable Framework for Cyber Attack Discovery and Situational...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scalable Framework for Cyber Attack Discovery and Situational Understanding (SITU) May 15, 2013 Problem Statement: Cyber attacks cost commercial and governmental organizations vast...

  6. atlas discovery potential: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: This contribution summarizes the discovery potential of the Standard Model Higgs boson using the H gamma gamma decay with the ATLAS detector. The relevant detector...

  7. Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Reports Summer Science Writing Internship Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event By Angela Hardin * November 20, 2014 Tweet...

  8. Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High-Resolution Sonar Imaging, Seismic Reflection Profiling, And Submersible Studies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  9. DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRAMASSIVE PULSATING WHITE DWARF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermes, J. J.; Castanheira, Barbara G.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Harrold, Samuel T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kepler, S. O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gianninas, A. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Brown, Warren R., E-mail: jjhermes@astro.as.utexas.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We announce the discovery of the most massive pulsating hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarf (WD) ever discovered, GD 518. Model atmosphere fits to the optical spectrum of this star show it is a 12, 030 {+-} 210 K WD with a log g =9.08 {+-} 0.06, which corresponds to a mass of 1.20 {+-} 0.03 M{sub Sun }. Stellar evolution models indicate that the progenitor of such a high-mass WD endured a stable carbon-burning phase, producing an oxygen-neon-core WD. The discovery of pulsations in GD 518 thus offers the first opportunity to probe the interior of a WD with a possible oxygen-neon core. Such a massive WD should also be significantly crystallized at this temperature. The star exhibits multi-periodic luminosity variations at timescales ranging from roughly 425 to 595 s and amplitudes up to 0.7%, consistent in period and amplitude with the observed variability of typical ZZ Ceti stars, which exhibit non-radial g-mode pulsations driven by a hydrogen partial ionization zone. Successfully unraveling both the total mass and core composition of GD 518 provides a unique opportunity to investigate intermediate-mass stellar evolution, and can possibly place an upper limit to the mass of a carbon-oxygen-core WD, which in turn constrains Type Ia supernovae progenitor systems.

  10. RIKEN Program for Drug Discovery and Medical Technology PlatformsRIKEN Program for Drug Discovery and Medical Technology Platforms Toshio Goto Program Director (D.Agr.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    RIKEN Program for Drug Discovery and Medical Technology PlatformsRIKEN Program for Drug Discovery-2007, Associate Senior VP, Drug Discovery Research, Astellas. 2007-2009, Adviser, PGXIS. 2009-2010, Special Adviser, RIKEN, and 2010-present, Director, RIKEN Program for Drug Discovery and Medical Technology

  11. Announcement Discoveries in Photosynthesis, Volume 20, Advances in Photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee "Gov"

    Announcement Discoveries in Photosynthesis, Volume 20, Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration I am delighted to announce the publication, in the Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration (AIPH) series, of the first book that focuses on the historical aspects of photosynthesis research `Discoveries

  12. Wormhole-Resilient Secure Neighbor Discovery in Underwater Acoustic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Rui

    ), Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUV), and surface stations, and nearby nodes communicate via acoustic ratherWormhole-Resilient Secure Neighbor Discovery in Underwater Acoustic Networks Rui Zhang and Yanchao in underwater acoustic networks (UANs) with floating node mobility. In hostile environments, neighbor discovery

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Creativity and scientific discovery with infused design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shai, Offer

    ORIGINAL PAPER Creativity and scientific discovery with infused design and its analysis with C of a theory. As a first step, we use infused design (ID) method to generate new concepts and methods. Keywords Design theory Á Creativity Á Infused design Á C­K theory Á Scientific discovery 1 Introduction

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in elite north american potato germplasm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in elite north american potato germplasm Hamilton et al;RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery in elite north american potato- making. Results: To identify a large number of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in elite potato

  15. TEMPORAL PATTERN DISCOVERY FOR ANOMALY DETECTION IN A SMART HOME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    TEMPORAL PATTERN DISCOVERY FOR ANOMALY DETECTION IN A SMART HOME Vikramaditya Jakkula , Diane J, cook}@eecs.wsu.edu Keywords: Knowledge discovery, smart homes, anomaly detection, temporal relations and relations on smart home datasets [10]. This paper describes a method of discovering temporal relations

  16. I' om Data Mining to Knowledge Discovery: Usama M. Fayyad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Vijay

    I' om Data Mining to Knowledge Discovery: Overview Usama M. Fayyad Jet Propulsion Laboratory knowledge discovery and data ~g. We begin with a definition of the KDD process and basic data mining :=c on the order of 50 giga- bytes of remotely sensed image data per hour when operational in the late 1990s

  17. SRI International Discovery of Photocatalysts for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 wafers/year/system · Fifth-generation technology CO2 Laser Controller Chemical Delivery System Scrubber

  18. Wide-Field Astronomical Surveys in the Next Decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U.; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC, Davis; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Axelrod, T.S.; /LSST Corp.; Becker, Andrew C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bickerton, Steven J.; /Princeton U.; Blanton, Michael R.; /New York U.; Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Condon, J.J.; /NRAO, Socorro; Connolly, A.J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cooray, Asantha R.; /UC, Irvine; Covey, Kevin R.; /Harvard U.; Csabai, Istvan; /Eotvos U.; Ferguson, Henry C.; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Kantor, Jeffrey; /LSST Corp.; Kent, Stephen M.; /Fermilab; Knapp, G.R.; /Princeton U.; Myers, Steven T.; /NRAO, Socorro; Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst. /Caltech, IPAC /Potsdam, Max Planck Inst. /Harvard U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /NOAO, Tucson /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Wide-angle surveys have been an engine for new discoveries throughout the modern history of astronomy, and have been among the most highly cited and scientifically productive observing facilities in recent years. This trend is likely to continue over the next decade, as many of the most important questions in astrophysics are best tackled with massive surveys, often in synergy with each other and in tandem with the more traditional observatories. We argue that these surveys are most productive and have the greatest impact when the data from the surveys are made public in a timely manner. The rise of the 'survey astronomer' is a substantial change in the demographics of our field; one of the most important challenges of the next decade is to find ways to recognize the intellectual contributions of those who work on the infrastructure of surveys (hardware, software, survey planning and operations, and databases/data distribution), and to make career paths to allow them to thrive.

  19. Systems and methods for knowledge discovery in spatial data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Obradovic, Zoran; Fiez, Timothy E.; Vucetic, Slobodan; Lazarevic, Aleksandar; Pokrajac, Dragoljub; Hoskinson, Reed L.

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are provided for knowledge discovery in spatial data as well as to systems and methods for optimizing recipes used in spatial environments such as may be found in precision agriculture. A spatial data analysis and modeling module is provided which allows users to interactively and flexibly analyze and mine spatial data. The spatial data analysis and modeling module applies spatial data mining algorithms through a number of steps. The data loading and generation module obtains or generates spatial data and allows for basic partitioning. The inspection module provides basic statistical analysis. The preprocessing module smoothes and cleans the data and allows for basic manipulation of the data. The partitioning module provides for more advanced data partitioning. The prediction module applies regression and classification algorithms on the spatial data. The integration module enhances prediction methods by combining and integrating models. The recommendation module provides the user with site-specific recommendations as to how to optimize a recipe for a spatial environment such as a fertilizer recipe for an agricultural field.

  20. Discovery potential of xenon-based neutrinoless double beta decay experiments in light of small angular scale CMB observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gómez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martín-Albo, J.; Vidal, J. Muńoz; Peńa-Garay, C., E-mail: gomez@mail.cern.ch, E-mail: jmalbos@ific.uv.es, E-mail: jmunoz@ific.uv.es, E-mail: penya@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universitat de Valencia Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46090 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has probed an expanded angular range of the CMB temperature power spectrum. Their recent analysis of the latest cosmological data prefers nonzero neutrino masses, with ?m{sub ?} = (0.32±0.11) eV. This result, if confirmed by the upcoming Planck data, has deep implications on the discovery of the nature of neutrinos. In particular, the values of the effective neutrino mass m{sub ??} involved in neutrinoless double beta decay (??0?) are severely constrained for both the direct and inverse hierarchy, making a discovery much more likely. In this paper, we focus in xenon-based ??0? experiments, on the double grounds of their good performance and the suitability of the technology to large-mass scaling. We show that the current generation, with effective masses in the range of 100 kg and conceivable exposures in the range of 500 kg·year, could already have a sizeable opportunity to observe ??0? events, and their combined discovery potential is quite large. The next generation, with an exposure in the range of 10 ton·year, would have a much more enhanced sensitivity, in particular due to the very low specific background that all the xenon technologies (liquid xenon, high-pressure xenon and xenon dissolved in liquid scintillator) can achieve. In addition, a high-pressure xenon gas TPC also features superb energy resolution. We show that such detector can fully explore the range of allowed effective Majorana masses, thus making a discovery very likely.

  1. Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Webinar: Using the New Bioenergy KDF for Data Discovery and Research Webinar Slides about the new Bioenergy KDF...

  2. DISCOVERY OF A PROTOCLUSTER AT z {approx} 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshikawa, Jun; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ishizaki, Yoshifumi [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ota, Kazuaki; Nagao, Tohru [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Hayashi, Masao [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Jiang, Linhua; Egami, Eiichi [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Chery Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Malkan, Matthew A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro, E-mail: jun.toshikawa@nao.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of a protocluster at z {approx} 6 containing at least eight cluster member galaxies with spectroscopic confirmations in the wide-field image of the Subaru Deep Field (SDF). The overdensity of the protocluster is significant at the 6{sigma} level, based on the surface number density of i'-dropout galaxies. The overdense region covers {approx}6' Multiplication-Sign 6' (14 Mpc Multiplication-Sign 14 Mpc in comoving units at z = 6) and includes 30 i'-dropout galaxies. Follow-up spectroscopy revealed that 15 of these are real z {approx} 6 galaxies (5.7 < z < 6.3). Of these 15, 8 are clustering in a narrow redshift range ({Delta}z < 0.05 centered at z = 6.01), corresponding to a seven-fold increase in number density over the average in redshift space. We found no significant difference in the observed properties, such as Ly{alpha} luminosities and UV continuum magnitudes, between the eight protocluster members and the seven non-members. The velocity dispersion of the eight protocluster members is 647 {+-} 124 km s{sup -1}, which is about three times higher than that predicted by the standard cold dark matter model. This discrepancy could be attributed to the distinguishing three-dimensional distribution of the eight protocluster members. We discuss two possible explanations for this discrepancy: either the protocluster is already mature, with old galaxies at the center, or it is still immature and composed of three subgroups merging to become a larger cluster. In either case, this concentration of z = 6.01 galaxies in the SDF may be one of the first sites of formation of a galaxy cluster in the universe.

  3. The discovery ~10 years ago that pro-inflammatory responses are controlled by evolutionarily ancient neu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    established is that the immune system can no longer be regarded as almost entirely autonomous previously considered the immune system to be essentially autonomous. We have now learnt how to study of a motor vehicle driver begins racing minutes after a near- miss collision with another car. By analogy

  4. Sixty years from discovery to solution: crystal structure of bovine liver catalase form III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foroughi, Leila M.; Kang, You-Na; Matzger, Adam J. (Michigan)

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystallization and structural characterization of bovine liver catalase (BLC) has been intensively studied for decades. Forms I and II of BLC have previously been fully characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Form III has previously been analyzed by electron microscopy, but owing to the thinness of this crystal form an X-ray crystal structure had not been determined. Here, the crystal structure of form III of BLC is presented in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.7, b = 173.7, c = 186.3 {angstrom}. The asymmetric unit is composed of the biological tetramer, which is packed in a tetrahedron motif with three other BLC tetramers. This higher resolution structure has allowed an assessment of the previously published electron-microscopy studies.

  5. XMM-Newton discovery of 217 s pulsations in the brightest persistent supersoft X-ray source in M31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Trudolyubov; William Priedhorsky

    2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the discovery of a periodic modulation in the bright supersoft X-ray source XMMU J004252.5+411540 detected in the 2000-2004 XMM-Newton observations of M31. The source exhibits X-ray pulsations with a period P~217.7 s and a quasi-sinusoidal pulse shape and pulsed fraction ~7-11%. We did not detect statistically significant changes in the pulsation period on the time scale of 4 years. The X-ray spectra of XMMU J004252.5+411540 are extremely soft and can be approximated with an absorbed blackbody of temperature 62-77 eV and a weak power law tail of photon index ~1.7-3.1 in the 0.2-3.0 keV energy band. The X-ray properties of the source and the absence of an optical/UV counterpart brighter than 19 mag suggest that it belongs to M31. The estimated bolometric luminosity of the source varies between ~2e38 and ~8e38 ergs/s at 760 kpc, depending on the choice of spectral model. The X-ray pulsations and supersoft spectrum of XMMU J004252.5+411540 imply that it is almost certainly an accreting white dwarf, steadily burning hydrogen-rich material on its surface. We interpret X-ray pulsations as a signature of the strong magnetic field of the rotating white dwarf. Assuming that the X-ray source is powered by disk accretion, we estimate its surface field strength to be in the range 4e5 G

  6. Discovery of an X-Ray Pulsar in the SMC: AX J0058-7203

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Tsujimoto; Kensuke Imanishi; Jun Yokogawa; Katsuji Koyama

    1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the discovery and analysis of an X-ray pulsar, AX J0058-7203, in the Small Magellanic Cloud. This pulsar exhibits coherent pulsations at P= 280.3 s with a double-peak structure. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted with a simple power-law model of photon index ~ 0.7. No significant change of the pulsation period over the observation was found. A comparison with ROSAT observations in the same field reveals that AX J0058-7203 is highly variable, and is most likely a Be star binary pulsar.

  7. Discovery of Dark Energy Ushered in a New Era in Computational Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers Subfolders inDiscovery of Dark Energy Ushered in

  8. Discovery of New Materials to Capture Methane | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers Subfolders inDiscovery of Dark Energy

  9. Discovery of Pu-based superconductors and relation to other classes of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers Subfolders inDiscovery of Dark

  10. Discovery of a Single Topological Dirac Fermion in the Strong Inversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers Subfolders inDiscovery of DarkAsymmetric Compound

  11. Discovery of oxygen in atmosphere could mean life for Saturn's moon Dione

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers Subfolders inDiscovery of DarkAsymmetric

  12. Past discovery pattern: A key to future exploration potential in ARKLA-MAFLA trend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, M.A. (State of California, Santa Rosa, CA (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discovery patterns and field size have been analyzed in Arkansas, Louisiana (ARKLA), Mississippi, Alabama and Florida (MAFLA) for fields producing from Norphlet, Smackover, Buckner, and Hynesville formations. A total of 325 fields are in this 400-mi-long, 250-mi-wide play. The ultimate recoverable reserves are 1600 million bbl of oil and 9000 billion ft[sup 3] of gas. The play is 56 yr old and mature by all standards. If discovered reserves were to follow log-normal distribution, then the reserves remaining to be discovered are small. However, combining statistical analyses with known geology indicate the possibility of larger reserves. Larger undiscovered reserves dictate a different exploration strategy. One must consider the size of the remaining reserves, the exploration signature, and the economics for each group within the play. A case history of strategies for large undiscovered reserves compares drilling of a deep wildcat well in Mobil County, Alabama, with drilling of California's mature plays.

  13. Discovery of a peculiar DQ white dwarf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Carollo; S. T. Hodgkin; A. Spagna; R. L. Smart; M. G. Lattanzi; B. J. McLean; D. J. Pinfield

    2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of a new carbon rich white dwarf that was identified during a proper motion survey for cool white dwarfs based on photographic material used for the construction of the Guide Star Catalog II. Its large proper motion (0.48 arcsec/yr) and faint apparent magnitude (V = 18.7) suggest a nearby object of low luminosity. A low-resolution spectrum taken with the William Herschel Telescope clearly shows strong C2 Deslandres-d'Azambuja and Swan bands, which identify the star as a DQ white dwarf. The strength of the Deslandres-d'Azambuja bands and the depression of the continuum in the Swan-band region are signs of enhanced carbon abundance for the given Teff. Comparison of our spectrophotometric data to published synthetic spectra suggests 6000 K < Teff < 8000 K although further analysis with specialized synthetic models appear necessary to derive both Teff and chemical composition. Finally, the range of spatial velocity estimated for this object makes it a likely member of the halo or thick disk population.

  14. Benchmarking Grid Information Systems Laurence Field1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakellariou, Rizos

    Benchmarking Grid Information Systems Laurence Field1 and Rizos Sakellariou2 1 CERN, Geneva. Grid information systems play a central role in today's pro- duction Grid infrastructures, enabling the discovery of a range of in- formation about the Grid services that exist in an infrastructure. As the number

  15. Domain-specific Web Service Discovery with Service Class Descriptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocco, D; Caverlee, J; Liu, L; Critchlow, T J

    2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents DynaBot, a domain-specific web service discovery system. The core idea of the DynaBot service discovery system is to use domain-specific service class descriptions powered by an intelligent Deep Web crawler. In contrast to current registry-based service discovery systems--like the several available UDDI registries--DynaBot promotes focused crawling of the Deep Web of services and discovers candidate services that are relevant to the domain of interest. It uses intelligent filtering algorithms to match services found by focused crawling with the domain-specific service class descriptions. We demonstrate the capability of DynaBot through the BLAST service discovery scenario and describe our initial experience with DynaBot.

  16. Automatic Multimedia Knowledge Discovery, Summarization and Evaluation Ana B. Benitez *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jianping

    Automatic Multimedia Knowledge Discovery, Summarization and Evaluation Ana B. Benitez * Department for automatically discovering, summarizing and evaluating multimedia knowledge from annotated images in the form for applications to intelligently, efficiently and coherently deal with multimedia. The proposed methods include

  17. Optimization of preclinical profiling operations in drug discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiney, John P. (John Patrick)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early-stage drug discovery, thousands of compounds must be tested using in vitro assays to determine their exposure and safety characteristics. This data is used to guide the selection of potential drug candidates and ...

  18. Discovery of Isotopes of Elements with Z $\\ge$ 100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Thoennessen

    2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, 163 isotopes of elements with Z $\\ge$ 100 have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  19. Endogenous Peptide Discovery of the Rat Circadian Clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillette, Martha U.

    rhythms, pain, hunger, feeding, and body weight regulation (1­4). Neuropeptides are produced from larger at ultrahigh mass accuracy (16) with a software pipeline designed for neuropeptide discovery. We use

  20. atlas discovery reach: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status from ATLAS CERN Preprints Summary: An overview of the latest results of the Higgs boson search with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, following its discovery, is presented....

  1. Exploration and Empire: Iconographic Evidence of Iberian Ships of Discovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojakowski, Katie

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation research project focuses on maritime exploration during the Age of Discovery and the vessels that were the technological impetus for this dynamic era that ultimately led Christopher Columbus to the New ...

  2. Diverse Applications of Flow Technology in Discovery Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, Jennifer Lynn

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    the throughput, safety, and convenience of organic synthesis. The last two chapters describe the use of microfluidic technology as a platform for rapid reaction discovery. Working with researchers at Abbott Laboratories, a droplet-based library method...

  3. Germanium: From Its Discovery to SiGe Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, E.E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From Its Discovery to SiGe Devices E.E. Haller Department ofrapidly rising interest in SiGe alloys, we are just startingstrained and unstrained SiGe multilayer structures [58]. 9.

  4. How to Nurture Scientific Discoveries Despite Their Unpredictable Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The history of science reveals that major discoveries are not predictable. Naively, one might conclude therefore that it is not possible to artificially cultivate an environment that promotes discoveries. I suggest instead that open research without a programmatic agenda establishes a fertile ground for unexpected breakthroughs. Contrary to current practice, funding agencies should allocate a small fraction of their funds to support research in centers of excellence without programmatic reins tied to specific goals.

  5. Discovery stories in the science classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arya, Diana Jaleh

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IE? . o [Page 2] Eyeglasses help many people to see3] People have been using eyeglasses for seeing more clearlya thousand years. But eyeglasses cannot help us see clearly

  6. Discovery of a Topological Insulator Bi2Se3 with a Single Surface Dirac Cone. (DMR-0819860) IRG-A: M. Z. Hasan and R. J. Cava

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Discovery of a Topological Insulator Bi2Se3 with a Single Surface Dirac Cone. (DMR-0819860) IRG field is applied. Recent research has uncovered a new class of insulators, called topological insulators spectroscopy (ARPES). In a new breakthrough, Hasan and Cava have now identified a second Topological Insulator

  7. Fermi Discovery of Gamma-Ray Emission from NGC 1275

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Asano, K.; /Tokyo Inst. Tech.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Caliandro, G.A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /SISSA, Trieste /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /ASDC, Frascati /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of high-energy (E > 100 MeV) {gamma}-ray emission from NGC 1275, a giant elliptical galaxy lying at the center of the Perseus cluster of galaxies, based on observations made with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The positional center of the {gamma}-ray source is only {approx}3{prime} away from the NGC 1275 nucleus, well within the 95% LAT error circle of {approx}5{prime}. The spatial distribution of {gamma}-ray photons is consistent with a point source. The average flux and power-law photon index measured with the LAT from 2008 August 4 to 2008 December 5 are F{sub {gamma}} = (2.10 {+-} 0.23) x 10{sup -7} ph (>100 MeV) cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and {Gamma} = 2.17 {+-} 0.05, respectively. The measurements are statistically consistent with constant flux during the four-month LAT observing period. Previous EGRET observations gave an upper limit of F{sub {gamma}} < 3.72 x 10{sup -8} ph (>100 MeV) cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} to the {gamma}-ray flux from NGC 1275. This indicates that the source is variable on timescales of years to decades, and therefore restricts the fraction of emission that can be produced in extended regions of the galaxy cluster. Contemporaneous and historical radio observations are also reported. The broadband spectrum of NGC 1275 is modeled with a simple one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model and a model with a decelerating jet flow.

  8. Technology development for gene discovery and full-length sequencing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcelo Bento Soares

    2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous years, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, we developed methods for construction of normalized and subtracted cDNA libraries, and constructed hundreds of high-quality libraries for production of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). Our clones were made widely available to the scientific community through the IMAGE Consortium, and millions of ESTs were produced from our libraries either by collaborators or by our own sequencing laboratory at the University of Iowa. During this grant period, we focused on (1) the development of a method for preferential cloning of tissue-specific and/or rare transcripts, (2) its utilization to expedite EST-based gene discovery for the NIH Mouse Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, (3) further development and optimization of a method for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, and (4) modification of a plasmid vector to maximize efficiency of full-length cDNA sequencing by the transposon-mediated approach. It is noteworthy that the technology developed for preferential cloning of rare mRNAs enabled identification of over 2,000 mouse transcripts differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In addition, the method that we optimized for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries was successfully utilized for the production of approximately fifty libraries from the developing mouse nervous system, from which over 2,500 full-ORF-containing cDNAs have been identified and accurately sequenced in their entirety either by our group or by the NIH-Mammalian Gene Collection Program Sequencing Team.

  9. Using EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) Step 1: Type topic into the Search Box on the Library's Homepage (latech.edu/library/) & click "Search."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    Becomes Using EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) Step 1: Type topic into the Search Box on the Library's Homepage (latech.edu/library/) & click "Search." Step 2: You will get many results . . . too many checks in "Full Text" and type in current years for "Publication Date." Then click "Update" button. #12

  10. Livermore Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Livermore Field Office Livermore Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year...

  11. Sandia Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Sandia Field Office Sandia Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  12. Pantex Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Pantex Field Office Pantex Field Office FY12 Semi Annual Report FY11 Year End...

  13. Nevada Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Nevada Field Office Nevada Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  14. Taken from: Hubble 2006 Science Year in Review The full contents of this book include more Hubble science articles, an overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Philip S.

    Taken from: Hubble 2006 Science Year in Review The full contents of this book include more Hubble are available for download online at: www.hubblesite.org/hubble_discoveries/science_year_in_review National #12;Hubble 2006: Science Year in Review #12;Hubble 2006: Science Year in Review 33 Jupiter's New "Red

  15. Accelerating scientific discovery : 2007 annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, P.; Dave, P.; Drugan, C.

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As a gateway for scientific discovery, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) works hand in hand with the world's best computational scientists to advance research in a diverse span of scientific domains, ranging from chemistry, applied mathematics, and materials science to engineering physics and life sciences. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, researchers are using the IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer at the ALCF to study and explore key scientific problems that underlie important challenges facing our society. For instance, a research team at the University of California-San Diego/ SDSC is studying the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease. The researchers plan to use the knowledge they gain to discover new drugs to treat the disease and to identify risk factors for other diseases that are equally prevalent. Likewise, scientists from Pratt & Whitney are using the Blue Gene to understand the complex processes within aircraft engines. Expanding our understanding of jet engine combustors is the secret to improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. Lessons learned from the scientific simulations of jet engine combustors have already led Pratt & Whitney to newer designs with unprecedented reductions in emissions, noise, and cost of ownership. ALCF staff members provide in-depth expertise and assistance to those using the Blue Gene/L and optimizing user applications. Both the Catalyst and Applications Performance Engineering and Data Analytics (APEDA) teams support the users projects. In addition to working with scientists running experiments on the Blue Gene/L, we have become a nexus for the broader global community. In partnership with the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, we have created an environment where the world's most challenging computational science problems can be addressed. Our expertise in high-end scientific computing enables us to provide guidance for applications that are transitioning to petascale as well as to produce software that facilitates their development, such as the MPICH library, which provides a portable and efficient implementation of the MPI standard--the prevalent programming model for large-scale scientific applications--and the PETSc toolkit that provides a programming paradigm that eases the development of many scientific applications on high-end computers.

  16. Michigan Technological University Generations of Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Tech to acquire the resources needed to continue to grow as a premier research university, the University also has been able to establish the Pavlis Institute for Global Technological Leadership and bring Mineral Museum, and Sherman Field. Alumni play a key role in any capital campaign. We invite you and other

  17. Discovery Research in Magnetic Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    a magnetic torus? Helical Coils (Wound in Place) +Toroidal Currents #12;Non-symmetric plasma torus J · P = 0 Surfaces of constant plasma pressure form nested tori not so easy without symmetry-symmetric plasma torus with external helical coils ("stellarator") #12;How to make a magnetic torus? Toroidal Field

  18. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    ,869, "Ag Leader Yield Monitoring System for SEPAC JD9550." Bigelow, Cale A; agronomy, from Agrotain Initiative (MURI): Sound and Electromagnetic Interacting Waves; Modi- fication 8." Adams, George B and Comer Processing in Aged Animals." Beard, Jane A; field extension educators, from Daviess County, $26,653, "Kiesel

  19. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    of Numerical Models for the Near- Field Physics of Diesel Sprays with Specific Focus on Flame Lift and Technology) Robotics Program Support Huntington County." Alexeenko, Alina and Topp, Elizabeth M; aeronautical-Abbott Collaboration on Pharmaceutical Freeze- Drying." Anan,MuhammadT; electrical & computer engineering -- Calumet

  20. BOUNDLESSLEARNING EXPLORERS FIELD EDUCATION FUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    FOR FIELD EDUCATION The Department of Earth Sciences is expanding the field study components of our programs account. · Claim charitable donations up to 75 per cent of your net income (a five-year carry forward

  1. DIMENSIONS of DISCOVERY Sponsored Program Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    - pus,mathematics,computerscience&statistics --Calumetcampus,Englishandphilosophy-- Calumetcampus and Morality." Bermel, Peter A; electrical & computer engineering, from Energy Research Inc., $85,000, "High (Extension to 12.31.13 + Year 2 Funding) -- Genome- Enabled Plant Research (GEPR): Mineral Nutrient Gene

  2. The Discovery and History of the Dalgaranga Meteorite Crater, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dalgaranga meteorite crater, 100 km northeast of Yalgoo, Western Australia, was one of the first impact structures identified in Australia, the smallest isolated crater found in Australia, and the only confirmed crater in the world associated with a mesosiderite projectile. 17 years passed before the Dalgaranga meteorites were described in the scientific literature and nearly 40 years passed before a survey of the structure was published. The reasons for the time-gap were never explained and a number of factual errors about the discovery and early history remain uncorrected in the scientific literature. Using historical and archival documents, and discussions with people involved in Dalgaranga research, the reasons for this time gap are explained by a series of minor misidentifications and coincidences. The age of the crater has yet to be determined, but using published data, we estimate the projectile mass to be 500-1000 kg.

  3. Einstein's Miraculous Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasant Natarajan; V Balakrishnan; N Mukunda

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    With each passing year, the young Albert Einstein's achievements in physics in the year 1905 seem to be ever more miraculous. We describe why the centenary of this remarkable year is worthy of celebration.

  4. Final Technical Report: Ocean CO{sub 2} Measurements for the WOCE Hydrographic Survey in the Pacific Ocean, 1992-1995 Field Years: Shore Based Analysis of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon January 1, 1993-April 15, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeling, Charles D.

    1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Participation in the hydrographic survey of the world ocean circulation experiment (WOCE) began in December 1990 with a two year grant from DOE for shore related analyses of inorganic carbon in sea water. These analyses were intended to assure that the measurements carried out under difficult laboratory conditions on board ships were consistent with measurements made under more carefully controlled shore laboratory conditions.

  5. Year of last Year of last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring 2003 2002 Transboundary Resource Assessment Committee Monkfish Northern Monkfish 2003 2003FMP Stock Year of last assessment Year of last data used in last stock assessment Source document for stock assessment Atlantic Sea Scallop Atlantic Sea Scallop 2000 2000 Stock Assessment Workshop (SAW

  6. NIST 3-Year Programmatic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (vehicles and buildings),and from the physical (renewable energy sources) to the virtual (cybersecurity science,nanotechnol- ogy discovery and fabrication,and other emerging technology areas through the NIST

  7. The Discovery of the Higgs Boson: America's Role

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of the Higgs boson was an international endeavor, involving thousands of physicists from across the world. While the accelerator at which the experimental work was done is located on Europe, the US supplied more physicists than any other single country. America had a very large role in the discovery of the Higgs particle and continues to have a leading role in the ongoing studies of the boson's properties. This video describes some of the contributions of U.S. universities and laboratories.

  8. The Discovery of the Higgs Boson: America's Role

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of the Higgs boson was an international endeavor, involving thousands of physicists from across the world. While the accelerator at which the experimental work was done is located on Europe, the US supplied more physicists than any other single country. America had a very large role in the discovery of the Higgs particle and continues to have a leading role in the ongoing studies of the boson's properties. This video describes some of the contributions of U.S. universities and laboratories.

  9. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Discovery of Luminous, Metal-poor, Sta r-forming Galaxies at Redshifts z~0.7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Hoyos; David C. Koo; Andrew C. Phillips; Christopher N. A. Willmer; Puragra Guhathakurta

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have discovered a sample of 17 metal-poor, yet luminous, star-forming galaxies at redshifts z~0.7. They were selected from the initial phase of the DEEP2 survey of 3900 galaxies and the Team Keck Redshift Survey (TKRS) of 1536 galaxies as those showing the temperature-sensitive [OIII]l4363 auroral line. These rare galaxies have blue luminosities close to L*, high star formation rates of 5 to 12 solar masses per year, and oxygen abundances of 1/3 to 1/10 solar. They thus lie significantly off the luminosity-metallicity relation found previously for field galaxies with strong emission lines at redshifts z~0.7. The prior surveys relied on indirect, empirical calibrations of the R23 diagnostic and the assumption that luminous galaxies are not metal-poor. Our discovery suggests that this assumption is sometimes invalid. As a class, these newly-discovered galaxies are: (1) more metal-poor than common classes of bright emission-line galaxies at z~0.7 or at the present epoch; (2) comparable in metallicity to z~3 Lyman Break Galaxies but less luminous; and (3) comparable in metallicity to local metal-poor eXtreme Blue Compact Galaxies (XBCGs), but more luminous. Together, the three samples suggest that the most-luminous, metal-poor, compact galaxies become fainter over time.

  10. Discovery of a Giant Lya Emitter Near the Reionization Epoch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Egami, Eiichi; Saito, Tomoki; Oguri, Masamune; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Farrah, Duncan; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Momcheva, Ivelina; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Furusawa, Hisanori; Akiyama, Masayuki; Dunlop, James S.; Mortier, Angela M.J.; Okamura, Sadanori; Hayashi, Masao; Cirasuolo, Michele; Dressler, Alan; Iye, Masanori; Jarvis, Matt.J.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of a giant Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE) with a Spitzer/IRAC counterpart near the reionization epoch at z = 6.595. The giant LAE is found from the extensive 1 deg{sup 2} Subaru narrow-band survey for z = 6.6 LAEs in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) field, and subsequently identified by deep spectroscopy of Keck/DEIMOS and Magellan/IMACS. Among our 207 LAE candidates, this LAE is not only the brightest narrow-band object with L(Ly{alpha}) = 3.9 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} in our survey volume of 10{sup 6} Mpc{sup 3}, but also a spatially extended Ly{alpha} nebula with the largest isophotal area whose major axis is at least {approx_equal} 3-inches. This object is more likely to be a large Ly{alpha} nebula with a size of {approx}> 17-kpc than to be a strongly-lensed galaxy by a foreground object. Our Keck spectrum with medium-high spectral and spatial resolutions suggests that the velocity width is v{sub FWHM} = 251 {+-} 21 km s{sup -1}, and that the line-center velocity changes by {approx_equal} 60 km s{sup -1} in a 10-kpc range. The stellar mass and star-formation rate are estimated to be 0.9-5.0 x 10{sup 10}M{sub {circle_dot}} and > 34 M{sub {circle_dot}}yr{sup -1}, respectively, from the combination of deep optical to infrared images of Subaru, UKIDSS-Ultra Deep Survey, and Spitzer/IRAC. Although the nature of this object is not yet clearly understood, this could be an important object for studying cooling clouds accreting onto a massive halo, or forming-massive galaxies with significant outflows contributing to cosmic reionization and metal enrichment of inter-galactic medium.

  11. Licensing Support Network: An Electronic Discovery System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gil, A. V.; Jensen, D.; McKinnon, B.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessary authorization for the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) to submit a License Application (LA) is contingent upon the policy process defined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended (NWPA), with some steps yet to occur. In spite of this uncertainty, the DOE must take prudent and appropriate action now, and over the next several years, to prepare for submittal of an application and to facilitate the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review of this application, if the Yucca Mountain site is recommended and approved for repository development. One of these steps the DOE has taken involves working with the NRC's Advisory Review Panel to develop Licensing Support Network (LSN) requirements and guidelines. The NRC has made a prototype of the LSN web page available at www.LSNNET.gov. The OCRWM part of the LSN currently has an indefinite life cycle and may need to remain in existence until the repository is closed, which could be as long as 325 years.

  12. Solar Water Splitting: Photocatalyst Materials Discovery and Systems Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNulty, Thomas F.

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen promises to be an attractive transportation fuel in the post-fossil fuel era. Relatively abundant and clean burning (water being the principal byproduct), hydrogen offers the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, there are significant technical barriers that require solutions before hydrogen can be implemented in large scale. These are: · Sources (e.g. hydrocarbon, water) · Transportation · Storage Each of the aforementioned barriers carries with it important considerations. First, would a hydrocarbon-based hydrogen source be of any benefit compared to conventional fossil fuels? Second, will a system based on centralized generation and distribution be viable? Finally, methods of on-board storage, whether they are liquefaction, adsorption, or intercalation, are far from optimized. The scope of this program is limited to hydrogen generation, specifically generation using solarinitiated water electrolysis. Though concept of making hydrogen using water and sunlight may sound somewhat far-fetched, in reality the concept is very real. Since the discovery of solar-generated hydrogen, termed photoelectrochemical hydrogen, nearly 30 years ago by Fujishima and Honda, significant advances in both fundamental understanding and technological capability have been made. Using solar radiation to generate hydrogen in a fashion akin to using solar to generate electricity offers many advantages. First, hydrogen can be generated at the point of use, reducing the importance of transportation. Second, using water as the hydrogen source eliminates greenhouse gas evolution and the consequences that come with it. Finally, because the process uses very little electricity (pumps and compressors predominantly), the quantity of chemical fuel produced far exceeds the amount of electricity consumed. Consequently, there is some level of truth to the notion that photoelectrochemically-derived hydrogen offers the potential to nearly eliminate greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation landscape. This report focuses primarily on the technical issues inherent to developing an economically viable photoelectrochemical hydrogen system. This involves research intended to address technology gaps as well as research to address commercial feasibility. Though a firm cost target is not identified explicitly, much of the economics are presented in terms of “dollars per gallon of gasoline equivalent” ($/gge). Obviously this is a moving target, but it is important to understand cost in terms of current gasoline pricing, since the intended target is gasoline replacement. However, this does put the cost contribution into a perspective that at least allows for a reasonable assessment of technological viability. It also allows for the identification of need areas beyond the obvious technology gaps.

  13. THE EINSTEIN-HOME SEARCH FOR RADIO PULSARS AND PSR J2007+2722 DISCOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, B.; Knispel, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Cordes, J. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Anderson, D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Demorest, P. B. [NRAO (National Radio Astronomy Observatory), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Gotthelf, E. V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Hammer, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A2T8 (Canada); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, M. A., E-mail: bruce.allen@aei.mpg.de [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); and others

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Einstein-Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 193 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using Pulsar ALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 minutes. We also describe the first Einstein-Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However, there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but cannot prove that PSR J2007+2722 is at least {approx}100 kyr old. In the future, we expect that the massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many additional radio pulsar discoveries.

  14. Sensitivity and Discovery Potential of CUORE to Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Alessandria; R. Ardito; D. R. Artusa; F. T. Avignone III; O. Azzolini; M. Balata; T. I. Banks; G. Bari; J. Beeman; F. Bellini; A. Bersani; M. Biassoni; T. Bloxham; C. Brofferio; C. Bucci; X. Z. Cai; L. Canonica; X. Cao; S. Capelli; L. Carbone; L. Cardani; M. Carrettoni; N. Casali; D. Chiesa; N. Chott; M. Clemenza; C. Cosmelli; O. Cremonesi; R. J. Creswick; I. Dafinei; A. Dally; V. Datskov; A. De Biasi; M. M. Deninno; S. Di Domizio; M. L. di Vacri; L. Ejzak; R. Faccini; D. Q. Fang; H. A. Farach; M. Faverzani; G. Fernandes; E. Ferri; F. Ferroni; E. Fiorini; M. A. Franceschi; S. J. Freedman; B. K. Fujikawa; A. Giachero; L. Gironi; A. Giuliani; J. Goett; P. Gorla; C. Gotti; E. Guardincerri; T. D. Gutierrez; E. E. Haller; K. Han; K. M. Heeger; H. Z. Huang; R. Kadel; K. Kazkaz; G. Keppel; L. Kogler; Yu. G. Kolomensky; D. Lenz; Y. L. Li; C. Ligi; X. Liu; Y. G. Ma; C. Maiano; M. Maino; M. Martinez; R. H. Maruyama; Y. Mei; N. Moggi; S. Morganti; T. Napolitano; S. Newman; S. Nisi; C. Nones; E. B. Norman; A. Nucciotti; T. O'Donnell; F. Orio; D. Orlandi; J. L. Ouellet; M. Pallavicini; V. Palmieri; L. Pattavina; M. Pavan; M. Pedretti; G. Pessina; G. Piperno; S. Pirro; E. Previtali; V. Rampazzo; F. Rimondi; C. Rosenfeld; C. Rusconi; E. Sala; S. Sangiorgio; N. D. Scielzo; M. Sisti; A. R. Smith; F. Stivanello; L. Taffarello; M. Tenconi; W. D. Tian; C. Tomei; S. Trentalange; G. Ventura; M. Vignati; B. S. Wang; H. W. Wang; T. Wise; A. Woodcraft; L. Zanotti; C. Zarra; B. X. Zhu; S. Zucchelli

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the sensitivity and discovery potential of CUORE, a bolometric double-beta decay experiment under construction at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. Two approaches to the computation of experimental sensitivity for various background scenarios are presented, and an extension of the sensitivity formulation to the discovery potential case is also discussed. Assuming a background rate of 10^-2 cts/(keV kg y), we find that, after 5 years of live time, CUORE has a 1 sigma sensitivity to the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life of T_1/2(1 sigma) = 1.6 \\times 10^26 y and thus a potential to probe the effective Majorana neutrino mass down to 40-100 meV; the sensitivity at 1.64 sigma, which corresponds to 90% C.L., will be T_1/2(1.64 sigma) = 9.5 \\times 10^25 y. This range is compared with the claim of observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge and the preferred range of the neutrino mass parameter space from oscillation results.

  15. Theory Revision in Equation Discovery Ljupco Todorovski and Saso Dzeroski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dzeroski, Saso

    . Section 5 presents the experiments with revising the earth-science equation model. The last sectionTheory Revision in Equation Discovery Ljupco Todorovski and Saso Dzeroski Department of Intelligent than from an initial hypothesis in the space of equations. On the other hand, theory revision systems

  16. Backbone Discovery In Thick Wireless Linear Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    , lower energy consumption, as well as larger storage and communication capacities. In addition and provided a classification and motivation for designing networking protocols that can take advantage, energy consumption, and network lifetime. In this paper, we provide a topology discovery protocol

  17. Automated Discovery of Structural Signatures of Protein Fold and Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muggleton, Stephen H.

    Automated Discovery of Structural Signatures of Protein Fold and Function Marcel Turcotte1 sys- tematically for protein fold signatures, we have explored the use of Inductive Logic Programming fold. The work showed that signatures of protein folds exist, about half of rules discov- ered

  18. Minnesota Discovery, Research and InnoVation Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    and surveillance for existing and emerging plant, human and animal pathogens Novel food processing10/16/12 1 Minnesota Discovery, Research and InnoVation Economy (MnDRIVE) Board of Regents October the challenges and capture the opportunities for MN 4. What difference can we make? Catalyze innovation, empower

  19. Transmission Power Adaptation Based Energy Efficient Neighborhood Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Transmission Power Adaptation Based Energy Efficient Neighborhood Discovery Jovan Radak, Nathalie such as optimization of energy consumption, connectivity of the WSN, routing in mobile networks and many more. Nodes Mitton INRIA Lille - Nord Europe, France, firstname.lastname.mitton@inria.fr Abstract--Neighborhood

  20. Node discovery and replacement using mobile Kalypso Magklara1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Node discovery and replacement using mobile robot Kalypso Magklara1 , Dimitrios Zorbas1 and Tahiry, that discovers the nodes around it and replaces the active nodes, whose energy is drained, by fully charged and that decide, which nodes to replace. We simulate our algorithms and our findings show that all nodes that fail

  1. NASA Exploration and Innovation Lead to New Discoveries Five heavyweight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    NASA Exploration and Innovation Lead to New Discoveries Five heavyweight lifting-body designs 1960 1961 1962 19641963 1965 1966 1967 1968 19691959 Lifting Bodies 1962-1975 Gemini 1962 disposal. Weather Satellites 1960-Present NASA launched the first Television Infrared

  2. Discovery of the actinium, thorium, protactinium, and uranium isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Fry; M. Thoennessen

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, 31 actinium, 31 thorium, 28 protactinium, and 23 uranium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  3. An Event Set Approach to Sequence Discovery in Medical Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    are many. With advances in medical technology have come many methods for treating such illnesses. AnalysisAn Event Set Approach to Sequence Discovery in Medical Data Jorge C. G. Ramirez1,2 , Diane J. Cook1, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA 75235-9103 dpeter@mednet.swmed.edu Contact

  4. Rigor Through the Lens of Drug Discovery and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    flavors of incentives: economic, social, and moral. · Academic and Industrial cultures/ incentivesRigor Through the Lens of Drug Discovery and Development · The game · Culture and incentives · Our and development? · Resources: Money, time, and access to multiple non-academic skill sets · Incentives/ Culture

  5. Clustering WSDL Documents to Bootstrap the Discovery of Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clustering WSDL Documents to Bootstrap the Discovery of Web Services Khalid Elgazzar, Ahmed E}@cs.queensu.ca Abstract--The increasing use of the Web for everyday tasks is making Web services an essential part of the Internet customer's daily life. Users query the Internet for a required Web service and get back a set

  6. Piton Peaks, St. Lucia 515 Caribbean Discovery V1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Ed

    · · · · · #12;V1 Piton Peaks, St. Lucia 515 Caribbean Discovery V1 PRSRTSTD U.S.POSTAGE PERMIT cruise the turquoise waters of the Caribbean. Sail from Miami to the beautiful island of Tortola, home beaches, and explore colorful towns as you discover the Caribbean. Cruise to celebrated ports aboard

  7. AVMON: Optimal and Scalable Discovery of Consistent Availability Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Indranil

    AVMON: Optimal and Scalable Discovery of Consistent Availability Monitoring Overlays--This paper proposes to build overlays that help in the monitoring of long-term availability histories of such an availability monitoring overlay. We motivate six significant goals for these problems--the first three goals

  8. A Directionality based Location Discovery Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Dong S.

    A Directionality based Location Discovery Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks Asis Nasipuri and Kai is a large ad hoc network of densely dis- tributed sensors that are equipped with low power wireless number of such wireless sensors can be networked to coordinate amongst themselves and per- form the much

  9. THE DISCOVERY OF LOWER ACICULAR FERRITE 10.1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    CHAPTER 10 THE DISCOVERY OF LOWER ACICULAR FERRITE 10.1 INTRODUCTION There is general agreement that a weld microstructure primarily containing acicu- lar ferrite will exhibit high strength and excellent of allotriomorphic ferrite, ferrite plates with aligned carbides, or grain-boundary nucleated bainite is considered

  10. DISCOVERY OF MUTATED SUBNETWORKS ASSOCIATED WITH CLINICAL DATA IN CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael, Ben J.

    DISCOVERY OF MUTATED SUBNETWORKS ASSOCIATED WITH CLINICAL DATA IN CANCER FABIO VANDIN, PATRICK CLAY,pclay,eli,braphael}@cs.brown.edu A major goal of cancer sequencing projects is to identify genetic alterations that determine clinical phenotypes, such as survival time or drug response. Somatic mutations in cancer are typically very diverse

  11. Discovery of dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, and ytterbium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, thirty-one dysprosium, thirty-two holmium, thirty-two erbium, thirty-three thulium, and thirty-one ytterbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  12. Discovery of palladium, antimony, tellurium, iodine, and xenon isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathawa, J.; Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, thirty-eight palladium, thirty-eight antimony, thirty-nine tellurium, thirty-eight iodine, and forty xenon isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  13. Discovery of the astatine, radon, francium, and radium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-nine astatine, thirty-nine radon, thirty-five francium, and thirty-four radium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is described. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  14. Discovery of samarium, europium, gadolinium, and terbium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, E.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, thirty-four samarium, thirty-four europium, thirty-one gadolinium, and thirty-one terbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. A MACHINE LEARNING APPROACH TO BIOCHEMICAL REACTION RULES DISCOVERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    perspective and from the Systems Biology perspective. In this paper, we report on the machine learning systemA MACHINE LEARNING APPROACH TO BIOCHEMICAL REACTION RULES DISCOVERY Laurence Calzone, Nathalie to the design of new automated reasoning tools for biologists/modelers. The Biochemical Abstract machine BIOCHAM

  16. Discovery of Yttrium, Zirconium, Niobium, Technetium, and Ruthenium Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Nystrom; M. Thoennessen

    2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, thirty-four yttrium, thirty-five zirconium, thirty-four niobium, thirty-five technetium, and thirty-eight ruthenium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  17. Discovery of Yttrium, Zirconium, Niobium, Technetium, and Ruthenium Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nystrom, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, thirty-four yttrium, thirty-five zirconium, thirty-four niobium, thirty-five technetium, and thirty-eight ruthenium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  18. Discovery of Scandium, Titanium, Mercury, and Einsteinium Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Meierfrankenfeld; A. Bury; M. Thoennessen

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, twenty-three scandium, twenty-five titanium, forty mercury and seventeen einsteinium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  19. MCW Libraries Empowering MCW missions in the discovery of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including Ovid Medline and PubMed LinkOut. Look for the green and white "Get it From MCW Libraries" buttonA Guide to MCW Libraries #12;Empowering MCW missions in the discovery of knowledge to improve College of Wisconsin (MCW) Libraries consist of the Todd Wehr Library and two branch libraries, Froedtert

  20. Optimization of a Neutrino Factory: Discovery Machine versus Precision Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Winter

    2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the optimization of a neutrino factory experiment for the purpose of sin^2(2theta_13), mass hierarchy, and CP violation discoveries. This includes a review of possible optimization strategies, as well as an application of these to different sin^2(2theta_13) regions.

  1. A Decentralized Approach for Topology Discovery in Home Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeom, Ikjun

    -- As electronic home appliances become smart, there have been many attempts to connect these appliances home appliances become smart, there have been many attempts to connect these appliances with a networkA Decentralized Approach for Topology Discovery in Home Networks Euiyul Ko and Ikjun Yeom Abstract

  2. Discovery of Samarium, Europium, Gadolinium, and Terbium Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. May; M. Thoennessen

    2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, thirty-four samarium, thirty-four europium, thirty-one gadolinium, and thirty-one terbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  3. Discovery of Samarium, Europium, Gadolinium, and Terbium Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, thirty-four samarium, thirty-four europium, thirty-one gadolinium, and thirty-one terbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  4. Integrating Bioinformatics, Medical Sciences and Drug Discovery M. Madan Babu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, M. Madan

    .com Bioinformatics Bioinformatics, a term coined for the applications of computer science in biology is now emerging., Bioinformatics plays an important role for the integration of broad disciplines of Biology to understandIntegrating Bioinformatics, Medical Sciences and Drug Discovery M. Madan Babu Centre

  5. Big Data Ecosystems Enable Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Critchlow, Terence J.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 5 years, advances in experimental, sensor and computational technologies have driven the exponential growth in the volumes, acquisition rates, variety and complexity of scientific data. As noted by Hey et al in their 2009 e-book The Fourth Paradigm, this availability of large-quantities of scientifically meaningful data has given rise to a new scientific methodology - data intensive science. Data intensive science is the ability to formulate and evaluate hypotheses using data and analysis to extend, complement and, at times, replace experimentation, theory, or simulation. This new approach to science no longer requires scientists to interact directly with the objects of their research; instead they can utilize digitally captured, reduced, calibrated, analyzed, synthesized and visualized results - allowing them carry out 'experiments' in data.

  6. Secretary Moniz's First Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We're looking back at some of the biggest moments from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's first year in office.

  7. Discovery of 17 new sharp-lined Ap stars with magnetically resolved lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Freyhammer; V. G. Elkin; D. W. Kurtz; G. Mathys; P. Martinez

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemically peculiar A stars (Ap) are extreme examples of the interaction of atomic element diffusion processes with magnetic fields in stellar atmospheres. The rapidly oscillating Ap stars provide a means for studying these processes in 3D and are at the same time important for studying the pulsation excitation mechanism in A stars. As part of the first comprehensive, uniform, high resolution spectroscopic survey of Ap stars, which we are conducting in the southern hemisphere with the Michigan Spectral Catalogues as the basis of target selection, we report here the discovery of 17 new magnetic Ap stars having spectroscopically resolved Zeeman components from which we derive magnetic field moduli in the range 3 - 30 kG. Among these are 1) the current second-strongest known magnetic A star, 2) a double-lined Ap binary with a magnetic component and 3) an A star with particularly peculiar and variable abundances. Polarimetry of these stars is needed to constrain their field geometries and to determine their rotation periods. We have also obtained an additional measurement of the magnetic field of the Ap star HD 92499.

  8. Discovery of two candidate pulsar wind nebulae in very-high-energy gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; :; F. Aharonian

    2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the discovery of two very-high-energy gamma-ray sources in an ongoing systematic search for emission above 100 GeV from pulsar wind nebulae in survey data from the H.E.S.S. telescope array. Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes are ideal tools for searching for extended emission from pulsar wind nebulae in the very-high-energy regime. H.E.S.S., with its large field of view of 5 degrees and high sensitivity, gives new prospects for the search for these objects. An ongoing systematic search for very-high-energy emission from energetic pulsars over the region of the Galactic plane between -60 degrees wind nebulae, HESS J1718-385 and HESS J1809-193. H.E.S.S. has proven to be a suitable instrument for pulsar wind nebula searches.

  9. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: We have audited

  10. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31 Auditors' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 Expenditures 22­23 #12;INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History

  11. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year in Review.............................................................. 8 Academic Accomplishments

  12. The LHC Higgs Boson Discovery: Implications for Finite Unified Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Heinemeyer; M. Mondragon; G. Zoupanos

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite Unified Theories (FUTs) are N = 1 supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) which can be made finite to all-loop orders, based on the principle of reduction of couplings, and therefore are provided with a large predictive power. We confront the predictions of an SU(5) FUT with the top and bottom quark masses and other low-energy experimental constraints, resulting in a relatively heavy SUSY spectrum, naturally consistent with the non-observation of those particles at the LHC. The light Higgs boson mass is automatically predicted in the range compatible with the Higgs discovery at the LHC. Requiring a light Higgs-boson mass in the precise range of M_h = 125.6 +- 2.1 GeV favors the lower part of the allowed spectrum, resulting in clear predictions for the discovery potential at current and future pp, as well as future e+e- colliders.

  13. Directional Bias and Pheromone for Discovery and Coverage on Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Glenn A.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural multi-agent systems often rely on “correlated random walks” (random walks that are biased toward a current heading) to distribute their agents over a space (e.g., for foraging, search, etc.). Our contribution involves creation of a new movement and pheromone model that applies the concept of heading bias in random walks to a multi-agent, digital-ants system designed for cyber-security monitoring. We examine the relative performance effects of both pheromone and heading bias on speed of discovery of a target and search-area coverage in a two-dimensional network layout. We found that heading bias was unexpectedly helpful in reducing search time and that it was more influential than pheromone for improving coverage. We conclude that while pheromone is very important for rapid discovery, heading bias can also greatly improve both performance metrics.

  14. Calendar Year 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    > Year1999NEFINA1.pdf" class"">Inspection Report: INS-O-00-02

  15. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growth in network traffic to storage over the years. Network Traffic Growth Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2009 Network Distribution...

  16. Discovery of a Potent And Selective Aurora Kinase Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oslob, J.D.; Romanowski, M.J.; Allen, D.A.; Baskaran, S.; Bui, M.; Elling, R.A.; Flanagan, W.M.; Fung, A.D.; Hanan, E.J.; Harris, S.; Heumann, S.A.; Hoch, U.; Jacobs, J.W.; Lam, J.; Lawrence, C.E.; McDowell, R.S.; Nannini, M.A.; Shen, W.; Silverman, J.A.; Sopko, M.M.; Tangonan, B.T.

    2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This communication describes the discovery of a novel series of Aurora kinase inhibitors. Key SAR and critical binding elements are discussed. Some of the more advanced analogues potently inhibit cellular proliferation and induce phenotypes consistent with Aurora kinase inhibition. In particular, compound 21 (SNS-314) is a potent and selective Aurora kinase inhibitor that exhibits significant activity in pre-clinical in vivo tumor models.

  17. DISCOVERY OF FIVE NEW PULSARS IN ARCHIVAL DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickaliger, M. B.; Collins, A.; Hough, L.; Tehrani, N.; Tenney, C.; Liska, A.; Swiggum, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Boyles, J. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Reprocessing of the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has resulted in the discovery of five previously unknown pulsars and several as-yet-unconfirmed candidates. PSR J0922-52 has a period of 9.68 ms and a dispersion measure (DM) of 122.4 pc cm{sup -3}. PSR J1147-66 has a period of 3.72 ms and a DM of 133.8 pc cm{sup -3}. PSR J1227-6208 has a period of 34.53 ms, a DM of 362.6 pc cm{sup -3}, is in a 6.7 day binary orbit, and was independently detected in an ongoing high-resolution Parkes survey by Thornton et al. and also in independent processing by Einstein-Home volunteers. PSR J1546-59 has a period of 7.80 ms and a DM of 168.3 pc cm{sup -3}. PSR J1725-3853 is an isolated 4.79 ms pulsar with a DM of 158.2 pc cm{sup -3}. These pulsars were likely missed in earlier processing efforts due to the fact that they have both high DMs and short periods, and also due to the large number of candidates that needed to be looked through. These discoveries suggest that further pulsars are awaiting discovery in the multibeam survey data.

  18. Discovery of a candidate inner Oort cloud planetoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael E. Brown; Chadwick Trujillo; David Rabinowitz

    2004-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of the minor planet 2003 VB12 (popularly named Sedna), the most distant object ever seen in the solar system. Pre-discovery images from 2001, 2002, and 2003 have allowed us to refine the orbit sufficiently to conclude that 2003 VB12 is on a highly eccentric orbit which permanently resides well beyond the Kuiper belt with a semimajor axis of 480$\\pm$40 AU and a perihelion of 76$\\pm$4AU. Such an orbit is unexpected in our current understanding of the solar system, but could be the result of scattering by a yet-to-be-discovered planet, perturbation by an anomalously close stellar encounter, or formation of the solar system within a cluster of stars. In all of these cases a significant additional population is likely present, and in the two most likely cases 2003 VB12 is best considered a member of the inner Oort cloud, which then extends to much smaller semimajor axes than previously expected. Continued discovery and orbital characterization of objects in this inner Oort cloud will verify the genesis of this unexpected population.

  19. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK LiquefiedCubic Feet) New

  20. Louisiana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2013480

  1. Montana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic32,876 10,889 11,502 13,84575 37 64 25

  2. Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation 7,559 8,762 10,130 13,507

  3. Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation 7,559 8,762Extensions (Billion

  4. Alabama Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l d w

  5. Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l d w3,290ExtensionsNew

  6. Arkansas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14DecadeDecade(Million31 22 28 21

  7. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas New Field Discoveries, Wet After Lease

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14SalesSame Month Previous1 0Separation,

  8. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14SalesSame Month Previous1

  9. Florida Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.Gas ProvedCommercial Consumers by Local0 0 0

  10. Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.Gas ProvedCommercial Consumers byExtensionsNew

  11. New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto ChinaThousand Cubic

  12. New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousand CubicFeet)per Thousand

  13. North Dakota Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire" "Unit","Summerper

  14. North Dakota Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet) Estimated Production (BillionFeet)

  15. Los Alamos Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Los Alamos Field Office Los Alamos Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year...

  16. Landslide oil field, San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, B.P.; March, K.A.; Caballero, J.S.; Stolle, J.M.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Landslide field, located at the southern margin of the San Joaquin basin, was discovered in 1985 by a partnership headed by Channel Exploration Company, on a farm out from Tenneco Oil Company. Initial production from the Tenneco San Emidio 63X-30 was 2064 BOPD, making landslide one of the largest onshore discoveries in California during the past decade. Current production is 7100 BOPD from a sandstone reservoir at 12,500 ft. Fifteen wells have been drilled in the field, six of which are water injectors. Production from the Landslide field occurs from a series of upper Miocene Stevens turbidite sandstones that lie obliquely across an east-plunging structural nose. These turbidite sandstones were deposited as channel-fill sequences within a narrowly bounded levied channel complex. Both the Landslide field and the larger Yowlumne field, located 3 mi to the northwest, comprise a single channel-fan depositional system that developed in the restricted deep-water portion of the San Joaquin basin. Information from the open-hole logs, three-dimensional surveys, vertical seismic profiles, repeat formation tester data, cores, and pressure buildup tests allowed continuous drilling from the initial discovery to the final waterflood injector, without a single dry hole. In addition, the successful application of three-dimensional seismic data in the Landslide development program has helped correctly image channel-fan anomalies in the southern Maricopa basin, where data quality and severe velocity problems have hampered previous efforts. New exploration targets are currently being evaluated on the acreage surrounding the Landslide discovery and should lead to an interesting new round of drilling activity in the Maricopa basin.

  17. Managing discovery risks--A Tevatron case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakul Banerjee

    2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the increasing need for higher performance, Management of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has undertaken various projects to improve systems associated with the Tevatron high-energy particle collider located at Batavia, Illinois. One of the larger projects is the Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system. The objective of this project is to replace the existing BPM electronics and software system that was originally installed during early 1980s, along with the original construction of the Tevatron.The original system consists of 236 beam position monitors located around the underground tunnel of the accelerator. Above ground control systems are attached to these monitors using pickup cables. When the Tevatron collider is operational, signals received from the BPMs are used to perform a number of control and diagnostic tasks. The original system can only capture the proton signals from the collider. The new system, when fully operational, will be able to capture combined proton and antiproton signals and will be able to separate the antiproton signal from the combined signal at high resolution. This significant enhancement was beyond the range of technical capabilities when the Tevatron was constructed about two decades ago. To take advantage of exceptional progress made in the hardware and software area in past two decades, Department of Energy approved funding of the BPM electronics and software replacement project. The approximate length of the project is sixteen months with a budget of four million dollars not including overhead, escalation, and contingencies. Apart from cost and schedule risks, there are two major risks associated with this research and development project. The primary risk is the risk of discovery. Since the Tevatron beam path is highly complex, BPMs have to acquire and process a large amount of data. In this environment, analysis of data to separate antiproton signals is even more complex. Finding an optimum algorithm that can be implemented with current state of the art hardware and software technology is even more complex. The second most important risk is the risk of unavailability of the premiere high energy physics scientific facility to worldwide users. This paper presents a model of minimizing these risks using a phased model of project management. To complete the project successfully, it is essential to keep track of the constraints imposed by uncertainties in the discovery phase while maintaining the highest possible availability of the Tevatron. In this paper, a methodology based on earned value management system is explained to measure and manage discovery risks. Metrics based on the initial basis of estimate and familiar earned value measures are used to monitor risks of discovery. Subsequently, these metrics are used to refine the project and adjust tasks and resource assignments to minimize the unavailability of the user facility. One of the measures is the variance at phase completion. From the phased model of the WBS, variance at completion is examined for various project baselines at the end of project phases. This allowed for understanding the risk of not only cost and schedule, but also the discovery risks. Since similar risk measurement data is not available within the organization, these metrics will also allow us to define risk baselines for future scientific projects that involve discovery along with state of the art system development.

  18. Oyo-first field Deepwater Nigeria?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lilletveit, R.; Nelson, L. [The Statoil and BP Alliance, Stavanger (Norway); Osahon, G. [Allied Energy Resources (Nig) Ltd., Lagos (Nigeria)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oyo-1 well was drilled in 3Q95 in OPL 210. The partners in the block are Allied Energy (Operator) and the Statoil and BP Alliance. This well was the first well drilled in Deepwater Nigeria and is a reported hydrocarbon discovery. Although the well was within the Niger Delta depositional system, the deepwater play types drilled were quite different than anything previously tested on the Nigerian shelf or onshore. One year on, some of the questions to be asked are: (1) What did Oyo-1 discover? (2) What has been done to establish the commerciality, or otherwise, of the hydrocarbon pools encountered? (3) What impact does this discovery have on other prospects identified in the deepwater area? The answer to these questions will help to identify whether a new hydrocarbon province in the deepwater Nigeria area can be developed, or not.

  19. Current Fiscal Year FOIA Requests received by Golden Field Office |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergyRev.CuriosityDepartment of

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature StoriesgovCampaignsSurface Heat

  1. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (3/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  2. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (2/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  3. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (1/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  4. Statistics and Discoveries at the LHC (4/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lectures will give an introduction to statistics as applied in particle physics and will provide all the necessary basics for data analysis at the LHC. Special emphasis will be placed on the the problems and questions that arise when searching for new phenomena, including p-values, discovery significance, limit setting procedures, treatment of small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Specific issues that will be addressed include the advantages and drawbacks of different statistical test procedures (cut-based, likelihood-ratio, etc.), the look-elsewhere effect and treatment of systematic uncertainties.

  5. Cobalt discovery replaces precious metals as industrial catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate,Cobalt discovery replaces

  6. Advanced Technology & Discovery at Niskayuna | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 PowerAdvancedInstituteTechnology & Discovery

  7. Natural Gas Discovery and Development Impacts on Rio Vista and Its Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbedema, Tometi Koku

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of several localities’ economy (Natural Gas Bulletin, 2004).the natural gas discovery operations and the economy of thein our economy, that certain aspects of natural gas industry

  8. DISCOVERY OF AN UNUSUALLY BLUE L DWARF WITHIN 10 pc OF THE SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgasser, Adam J.

    We report the discovery of an unusually blue L5 dwarf within 10 pc of the Sun from a search of Sloan Digital Sky

  9. High-throughput Microfluidics and Ultrafast Optics for in Vivo Compound/Genetic Discoveries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Christopher Benjamin

    Therapeutic treatment of spinal cord injuries, brain trauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases will greatly benefit from the discovery of compounds that enhance neuronal regeneration following injury. We previously ...

  10. 1975 -Ferroelectric LCs (Meyer, Liebert, Stryzlecki, Keller) 1980 -Discovery of SSFLC Device concept (Clark, Lagerwall)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walba, David

    1975 - Ferroelectric LCs (Meyer, Liebert, Stryzlecki, Keller) 1980 - Discovery of SSFLC Deviceh symmetry #12;Ferroelectric LCs Bob Meyer Noel Clark Sven Torbjörn Lagwerwall #12;Robert Meyer

  11. Discovery of Active Galactic Nuclei in Mid- and Far-Infrared Deep Surveys with ISO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshiaki Taniguchi

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a summary on the discovery of active galactic nuclei in mid- and far-infrared deep surveys with use of the Infrared Space Observatory.

  12. LEGUS Discovery of a Light Echo Around Supernova 2012aw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Anderson, Jay; Andrews, Jennifer E; Calzetti, Daniela; Bright, Stacey N; Ubeda, Leonardo; Smith, Linda J; Sabbi, Elena; Grebel, Eva K; Herrero, Artemio; de Mink, Selma E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have discovered a luminous light echo around the normal Type II-Plateau Supernova (SN) 2012aw in Messier 95 (M95; NGC 3351), detected in images obtained approximately two years after explosion with the Wide Field Channel 3 on-board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by the Legacy ExtraGalactic Ultraviolet Survey (LEGUS). The multi-band observations span from the near-ultraviolet through the optical (F275W, F336W, F438W, F555W, and F814W). The apparent brightness of the echo at the time was ~21--22 mag in all of these bands. The echo appears circular, although less obviously as a ring, with an inhomogeneous surface brightness, in particular, a prominent enhanced brightness to the southeast. The SN itself was still detectable, particularly in the redder bands. We are able to model the light echo as the time-integrated SN light scattered off of diffuse interstellar dust in the SN environment. We have assumed that this dust is analogous to that in the Milky Way with R_V=3.1. The SN light curves that we consider ...

  13. An Extended Network Coding Opportunity Discovery Scheme in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yunlong; Iwai, Masayuki; Sezaki, Kaoru; Tobe, Yoshito; 10.5121/ijcnc.2012.4106

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Network coding is known as a promising approach to improve wireless network performance. How to discover the coding opportunity in relay nodes is really important for it. There are more coding chances, there are more times it can improve network throughput by network coding operation. In this paper, an extended network coding opportunity discovery scheme (ExCODE) is proposed, which is realized by appending the current node ID and all its 1-hop neighbors' IDs to the packet. ExCODE enables the next hop relay node to know which nodes else have already overheard the packet, so it can discover the potential coding opportunities as much as possible. ExCODE expands the region of discovering coding chance to n-hops, and have more opportunities to execute network coding operation in each relay node. At last, we implement ExCODE over the AODV protocol, and efficiency of the proposed mechanism is demonstrated with NS2 simulations, compared to the existing coding opportunity discovery scheme.

  14. Structural Genomics and Drug Discovery for Infectious Diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, W.F.

    2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of structural genomics methods and approaches to proteins from organisms causing infectious diseases is making available the three dimensional structures of many proteins that are potential drug targets and laying the groundwork for structure aided drug discovery efforts. There are a number of structural genomics projects with a focus on pathogens that have been initiated worldwide. The Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID) was recently established to apply state-of-the-art high throughput structural biology technologies to the characterization of proteins from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) category A-C pathogens and organisms causing emerging, or re-emerging infectious diseases. The target selection process emphasizes potential biomedical benefits. Selected proteins include known drug targets and their homologs, essential enzymes, virulence factors and vaccine candidates. The Center also provides a structure determination service for the infectious disease scientific community. The ultimate goal is to generate a library of structures that are available to the scientific community and can serve as a starting point for further research and structure aided drug discovery for infectious diseases. To achieve this goal, the CSGID will determine protein crystal structures of 400 proteins and protein-ligand complexes using proven, rapid, highly integrated, and cost-effective methods for such determination, primarily by X-ray crystallography. High throughput crystallographic structure determination is greatly aided by frequent, convenient access to high-performance beamlines at third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources.

  15. Discovery of a Transiting Planet Near the Snow-Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kipping, David M; Buchhave, Lars A; Kenyon, Scott J; Henze, Christopher E; Isaacson, Howard; Kolbl, Rea; Marcy, Geoff W; Bryson, Stephen T; Stassun, Keivan G; Bastien, Fabienne A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In most theories of planet formation, the snow-line represents a boundary between the emergence of the interior rocky planets and the exterior ice giants. The wide separation of the snow-line makes the discovery of transiting worlds challenging, yet transits would allow for detailed subsequent characterization. We present the discovery of Kepler-421b, a Uranus-sized exoplanet transiting a G9/K0 dwarf once every 704.2 days in a near-circular orbit. Using public Kepler photometry, we demonstrate that the two observed transits can be uniquely attributed to the 704.2 day period. Detailed light curve analysis with BLENDER validates the planetary nature of Kepler-421b to >4 sigmas confidence. Kepler-421b receives the same insolation as a body at ~2AU in the Solar System and for a Uranian albedo would have an effective temperature of ~180K. Using a time-dependent model for the protoplanetary disk, we estimate that Kepler-421b's present semi-major axis was beyond the snow-line after ~3Myr, indicating that Kepler-421b...

  16. Distributed Semantic Discovery for Web-of-Things Enabled Smart Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Distributed Semantic Discovery for Web-of-Things Enabled Smart Buildings G´er^ome Bovet and Jean-of-Things. As proof of concept, we apply our proposal to the domain of smart buildings, composing a novel ontology on the energetic aspect and is optimized for constrained environments. Keywords--Smart buildings, Discovery

  17. The OD Theory of TOD: The Use and Limits of Temporal Information for Object Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randal

    The OD Theory of TOD: The Use and Limits of Temporal Information for Object Discovery Brandon C. S with physical objects must first be able to discover and recognize them. "Object Discovery" (OD) is the problem by other objects (for an exam- ple see Figure 1). Because robust OD is a prerequisite for reasoning about

  18. Activity discovery from video employing soft computing relations Luis Patino, Francois Bremond and Monique Thonnat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    a methodological and systematic exploration of the database. Knowledge discovery systems (KDS) aim at helping, and particularly important for activity discovery from video. Soft computing methodologies are particularly adapted systems employ soft computing techniques to characterize video activity patterns [3], [4]; the use

  19. College of Engineering Discovery with Purpose www.engineering.iastate.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    with Purpose www.engineering.iastate.edu Filling out the Application · Concurrently enrolled students12/6/2011 1 College of Engineering Discovery with Purpose www.engineering.iastate.edu College of Engineering Scholarship Program Joel Johnson, Director, ESS College of Engineering Discovery with Purpose www.engineering

  20. Discovery of molecular hydrogen line emission associated with methanol maser emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    Discovery of molecular hydrogen line emission associated with methanol maser emission J.-K. Lee March 9 A B S T R AC T We report the discovery of H2 line emission associated with 6.67-GHz methanol emission was found associated with an ultracompact H II region IRAS 14567­5846 and isolated methanol maser

  1. SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY WITH LAW ENCODING DIAGRAMS Peter C-H. Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Peter

    - 1 - SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY WITH LAW ENCODING DIAGRAMS Peter C-H. Cheng ESRC Centre for Research the concept of Law Encoding Diagrams, LEDs, and argues that they have had a role in scientific discovery the underlying relations of a law, or a system of simultaneous laws, in the structure of a diagram by the means

  2. Fondation de coopration scientifique Campus Paris Saclay Parc Technologique -Immeuble Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, LĂ©onie

    Fondation de coopération scientifique Campus Paris Saclay Parc Technologique - Immeuble Discovery'alinéa 4 de l'article L.711.2 du Code de l'Education et qui prendra le nom « Université Paris Saclay coopération scientifique Campus Paris Saclay Parc Technologique - Immeuble Discovery Route de l'Orme aux

  3. An LDA-based Community Structure Discovery Approach for Large-Scale Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : {bqiu}@cse.psu.edu Abstract-- Community discovery has drawn significant re- search interests among even more attentions with the prevalence of social network websites, such as MySpace, Live of this paper include: (1) an LDA-based probabilistic community discovery model in large-sc

  4. SOFTWARE Open Access Promzea: a pipeline for discovery of co-regulatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    SOFTWARE Open Access Promzea: a pipeline for discovery of co-regulatory motifs in maize and other and cis-acting DNA motifs underlying their regulation is a major objective of transcriptome studies motif prediction. These principles were integrated into a user-friendly pipeline for motif discovery

  5. Lung Cancer Discovery Award (LCD) Program Description Page 1 of 7 5/25/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Lung Cancer Discovery Award (LCD) Program Description Page 1 of 7 5/25/2011 IMPORTANT NOTES REFERENCE. The Lung Cancer Discovery Award supports the development of novel medical treatments, advancing current treatment options and/or finding a cure for lung cancer through clinical, laboratory

  6. Multi-University Research to Advance Discovery Fusion Energy Science using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dept of Applied Physics and Applied Math, Columbia University, New York, NY Plasma Science and FusionMulti-University Research to Advance Discovery Fusion Energy Science using a Superconducting Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA Outline · Intermediate scale discovery fusion energy science needs support

  7. Performance Evaluation of a Resource Monitoring and Discovery Service for the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis, Stephen

    Performance Evaluation of a Resource Monitoring and Discovery Service for the Grid H´el`ene N. Lim, 2003 Abstract The Grid Information Service (GIS) is one of the Grid Common Services which make up the basic functions belonging to Grids. This service offers a resource discovery mechanism, of which

  8. 2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review The Science of Communication Disorders Departmental Research Committee. #12;2 2008 Year in Review Billinghurst, M., Moran, C., Gostomski, P., Basu, A

  9. Forecasting petroleum discoveries in sparsely drilled areas: Nigeria and the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attanasi, E.D.; Root, D.H.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decline function methods for projecting future discoveries generally capture the crowding effects of wildcat wells on the discovery rate. However, these methods do not accommodate easily situations where exploration areas and horizons are expanding. In this paper, a method is presented that uses a mapping algorithm for separating these often countervailing influences. The method is applied to Nigeria and the North Sea. For an amount of future drilling equivalent to past drilling (825 wildcat wells), future discoveries (in resources found) for Nigeria are expected to decline by 68% per well but still amount to 8.5 billion barrels of oil equivalent (BOE). Similarly, for the total North Sea for an equivalent amount and mix among areas of past drilling (1322 wildcat wells), future discoveries are expected to amount to 17.9 billion BOE, whereas the average discovery rate per well is expected to decline by 71%.

  10. Feedstock Production Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  11. Biofuel Distribution Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and individuals' data uploads.

  12. Biofuel Production Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections arel growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  13. Feedstock Logistics Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. [from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about

  14. Integration Goal: By integrating learning, discovery and engagement, and by working across disciplines, the MSU community will improve the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Integration Goal: By integrating learning, discovery and engagement, and by working across Metric Accomplishments/Successes Person Responsible for Success $ Objective I.1: Increase the integration a substantial curricular experience that integrates learning, discovery and engagement. 100% Institute

  15. Environmental report for calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.; Turrin, R.P.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for Calendar Year 1989 (CY89). The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations. The objective of the environmental report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. During CY89, there were no accidents, incidents, or occurrences that had a significant impact on PPPL facilities or program operations. The accidental overfilling of an underground storage tank (UST) during 1988, along with the discovery of residual hydrocarbons in the soil of an area used for unloading fuel oil trucks over the last 30 years, has the potential for a minor environmental impact and has resulted in a costly clean up in this area. Surface water analyses for both radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants have shown nothing above normally expected background values. Ambient tritium levels at less than 100 pCi/liter (3.7 Bq/liter) were measured in D-site well water. New groundwater monitoring wells were added in 1989 as a requirement for the groundwater part of our New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NJPDES) permit. Initial sampling of these wells indicated the presence of lead in two shallow wells next to the detention basin. Radiation exposure via airborne effluents into the environment is still at insignificant levels; however, a stack monitor for tritium is planned for 1990 to ensure compliance with new EPA regulations. Off-site surface water, soils, and biota continued to be analyzed for radioactive baselines in CY89. 51 refs., 27 figs., 40 tabs.

  16. 70 Years of Innovations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are70 Years of Innovations

  17. 50 Years of Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th MeetingAllocation50 Years of

  18. Allocation Year Rollover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA,Portal Allocation Year

  19. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIV and evolution studiedHPSSHPSS Yearly

  20. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  1. Toward a Data Scalable Solution for Facilitating Discovery of Science Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Jesse R.; Castellana, Vito G.; Morari, Alessandro; Tumeo, Antonino; Purohit, Sumit; Chappell, Alan R.; Haglin, David J.; Villa, Oreste; Choudhury, Sutanay; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Feo, John T.

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Science is increasingly motivated by the need to process larger quantities of data. It is facing severe challenges in data collection, management, and processing, so much so that the computational demands of “data scaling” are competing with, and in many fields surpassing, the traditional objective of decreasing processing time. Example domains with large datasets include astronomy, biology, genomics, climate/weather, and material sciences. This paper presents a real-world use case in which we wish to answer queries pro- vided by domain scientists in order to facilitate discovery of relevant science resources. The problem is that the metadata for these science resources is very large and is growing quickly, rapidly increasing the need for a data scaling solution. We propose a system – SGEM – designed for answering graph-based queries over large datasets on cluster architectures, and we re- port performance results for queries on the current RDESC dataset of nearly 1.4 billion triples, and on the well-known BSBM SPARQL query benchmark.

  2. THE DISCOVERY OF THE MOST DISTANT KNOWN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA AT REDSHIFT 1.914

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, David O.; Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Dahlen, Tomas; Casertano, Stefano; Koekemoer, Anton [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); McCully, Curtis; Keeton, Charles R.; Patel, Brandon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Hjorth, Jens [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Strolger, Louis-Gregory [Department of Physics, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Wiklind, Tommy G. [Joint ALMA Observatory, ESO, Santiago (Chile); Challis, Peter [Harvard/Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Graur, Or [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Hayden, Brian; Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); and others

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the discovery of a Type Ia supernova (SN) at redshift z = 1.914 from the CANDELS multi-cycle treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This SN was discovered in the infrared using the Wide-Field Camera 3, and it is the highest-redshift Type Ia SN yet observed. We classify this object as a SN Ia by comparing its light curve and spectrum with those of a large sample of Type Ia and core-collapse SNe. Its apparent magnitude is consistent with that expected from the {Lambda}CDM concordance cosmology. We discuss the use of spectral evidence for classification of z > 1.5 SNe Ia using HST grism simulations, finding that spectral data alone can frequently rule out SNe II, but distinguishing between SNe Ia and SNe Ib/c can require prohibitively long exposures. In such cases, a quantitative analysis of the light curve may be necessary for classification. Our photometric and spectroscopic classification methods can aid the determination of SN rates and cosmological parameters from the full high-redshift CANDELS SN sample.

  3. The Subaru high-z quasar survey: discovery of faint z~6 quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Willott, Chris J; Onoue, Masafusa; Im, Myungshin; Furusawa, Hisanori; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo; Niino, Yuu; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Masami; Hibon, Pascale

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z~6 quasars in 6.5 deg^2 utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z_B) and (z_B-z_R) colors, where z_B and z_R are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842A and 9841A, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z~6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z_R<24.0, which is 3.5 mag. deeper than SDSS. We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z=6.156 with M_1450=-23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z=6.041 with a faint continuum of M_1450=-22.58 and a narrow Lyman-alpha emission with HWHM=427 km/s, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman-alpha emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z~6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number...

  4. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13,Conservation BillingFieldField

  5. EINSTEIN-HOME DISCOVERY OF 24 PULSARS IN THE PARKES MULTI-BEAM PULSAR SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knispel, B.; Kim, H.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Eatough, R. P.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Anderson, D. [University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Crawford, F.; Rastawicki, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Hammer, D.; Papa, M. A.; Siemens, X. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Miller, R. B. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, 111 White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Sarkissian, J., E-mail: benjamin.knispel@aei.mpg.de [CSIRO Parkes Observatory, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia); and others

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of Almost-Equal-To 17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein-Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s{sup -1}. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM ( Almost-Equal-To 420 pc cm{sup -3}). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  6. DISCOVERY OF A NEW TeV GAMMA-RAY SOURCE: VER J0521+211

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T.; Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Behera, B.; Federici, S. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Falcone, A., E-mail: fortin@veritas.sao.arizona.edu, E-mail: errando@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: jholder@physics.udel.edu, E-mail: sfegan@llr.in2p3.fr [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of a new TeV gamma-ray source, VER J0521+211, based on observations made with the VERITAS imaging atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope Array. These observations were motivated by the discovery of a cluster of >30 GeV photons in the first year of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations. VER J0521+211 is relatively bright at TeV energies, with a mean photon flux of (1.93 ± 0.13{sub stat} ± 0.78{sub sys}) × 10{sup –11} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} above 0.2 TeV during the period of the VERITAS observations. The source is strongly variable on a daily timescale across all wavebands, from optical to TeV, with a peak flux corresponding to ?0.3 times the steady Crab Nebula flux at TeV energies. Follow-up observations in the optical and X-ray bands classify the newly discovered TeV source as a BL Lac-type blazar with uncertain redshift, although recent measurements suggest z = 0.108. VER J0521+211 exhibits all the defining properties of blazars in radio, optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths.

  7. Discovery of a flux-related change of the cyclotron line energy in Her X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Staubert; N. I. Shakura; K. Postnov; J. Wilms; R. E. Rothschild; W. Coburn; L. Rodina; D. Klochkov

    2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of ten years of repeated measurements of the Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Feature (CRSF) in the spectrum of the binary X-ray pulsar Her X-1 and report the discovery of a positive correlation of the centroid energy of this absorption feature in pulse phase averaged spectra with source luminosity.Our results are based on a uniform analysis of observations bythe RXTE satellite from 1996 to 2005, using sufficiently long observations of 12 individual 35-day Main-On states of the source. The mean centroid energy E_c of the CRSF in pulse phase averaged spectra of Her X-1 during this time is around 40 keV, with significant variations from one Main-On state to the next. We find that the centroid energy of the CRSF in Her X-1 changes by ~5% in energy for a factor of 2 in luminosity. The correlation is positive, contrary to what is observed in some high luminosity transient pulsars. Our finding is the first significant measurement of a positive correlation between E_c and luminosity in any X-ray pulsar. We suggest that this behaviour is expected in the case of sub-Eddington accretion and present a calculation of a quantitative estimate, which is very consistent with the effect observed in Her X-1.We urge that Her X-1 is regularly monitored further and that other X-ray pulsars are investigated for a similar behaviour.

  8. Scully field - Marion County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salgat, B.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Scully field is a multipay new-field discovery located in the southern end of Salina basin, Marion County, Kansas. The Scully field was discovered using a combination of satellite imagery and subsurface control. The overall trapping mechanism at the Scully field is anticlinal closure. Infield drilling has demonstrated, however, that significant stratigraphic variations do exist within the productive area. The Simpson sands have been subdivided in five separate units which range from 4 to 12 ft (1 to 4 m) in thickness. Three of these are of economic importance in the field. In general, the sands with the most economic potential are distributed within relative Ordovician paleolows. The Viola has four main lithologic divisions. The uppermost of these is a relatively thin dolomite cap which ranges from 2 to 15 ft (1 to 5 m). This upper dolomite is the primary Viola pay zone. The Mississippian section is eroded deeply over the Scully structure and demonstrates about 70 ft (20 m) of thinning. The potential pay interval is chert which has 25 to 30% porosity based on log analysis. The trapping mechanism is a combination of erosional truncation and structural closure. In addition to the structural information obtained from satellite imagery, R.J. Walker Oil Co., Inc., evaluated the hydrocarbon potential of T18S, R1E, Marion County, Kansas, which contains the Scully field, using remote sensing technology developed by Earth Reference Systems of Long Beach, California. The technology involves direct detection of hydrocarbons in place, using satellite data, nonlinear mathematics, and the fundamental principles of molecular structure and electromagnetic wave propagation.

  9. Tachyonic field interacting with Scalar (Phantom) Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  10. Using domain-specific and generic knowledge to support discovery learning about geometrical optics in a computer-based simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . These studies aimed at clarifying some of the constraints of discovery learning in computer-based simulations to elicit scientific discovery learning behavior. The Optics simulation offers a versatile and dynamic discovery learning processes, all actions that students performed in the Optics simulation were registered

  11. ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE NEARBY GAS-RICH DWARF GALAXY LEO P. I. H I OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cannon, John M.; Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W., E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: betsey@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: ebernste@macalester.edu, E-mail: rhode@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a previously unknown 21 cm H I line source identified as an ultra-compact high velocity cloud in the ALFALFA survey is reported. The H I detection is barely resolved by the Arecibo 305 m telescope {approx}4' beam and has a narrow H I linewidth (half-power full width of 24 km s{sup -1}). Further H I observations at Arecibo and with the Very Large Array corroborate the ALFALFA H I detection, provide an estimate of the H I radius, {approx}1' at the 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} isophote, and show the cloud to exhibit a velocity field which, if interpreted as disk rotation, has an amplitude of {approx_equal}9.0 {+-} 1.5 km s{sup -1}. In other papers, Rhode et al. show the H I source to have a resolved stellar counterpart and ongoing star forming activity, while Skillman et al. reveal it as having extremely low metallicity: 12 + log (O/H) = 7.16 {+-} 0.04. The H I mass to stellar mass ratio of the object is found to be 2.6. We use the Tully-Fisher template relation in its baryonic form to obtain a distance estimate D{sub Mpc}=1.3{sup +0.9}{sub -0.5}. Additional constraints on the distance are also provided by the optical data of Rhode et al. and McQuinn et al., both indicating a distance in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 Mpc. The three estimates are compatible within their errors. The object appears to be located beyond the dynamical boundaries of, but still in close proximity to the Local Group. Its pristine properties are consistent with the sedate environment of its location. At a nominal distance of 1.75 Mpc, it would have an H I mass of {approx_equal} 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }, a stellar mass of {approx_equal} 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M {sub Sun }, and a dynamical mass within the H I radius of {approx_equal} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }. This discovery supports the idea that optically faint-or altogether dark-low mass halos may be detectable through their non-stellar baryons.

  12. Discovery ~ Learning~ Engagement Purdue Center for Regional Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Year in Review 2007 PCRD Purdue Center for Regional Development 2007 Annual Report #12;2 #12;3 PCRD

  13. NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    ;Nuclear Engineering Four Year Plan Starting Fall 2009 FALL Year 1 Credits WINTER Year 1 Credits SPRINGNUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan Fall 2009 Nuclear Engineering (67 hrs) CH Grade Perspectives (15 I NE 452 3 Neutronic Analysis II NE 457 2 Nuclear Reactor Lab Western Culture (3): NE 467 4 Nucl

  14. Projects of the year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

  15. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  16. ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT INSPIRING INNOVATION AND DISCOVERY | mcmaster.ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    .ca TABLE OF CONTENTS Year In Review..............................................................4 http://www.mcmaster.ca/presidentsoffice/fwi.html #12;4 2013/14 FINANCIAL ANALYSIS AND COMMENTARY T YEAR IN REVIEW McMaster University's Mosaic Enterprise Resource Planning System represents the confluence

  17. Oil and gas field code master list 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997 is the sixteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the US. It is updated with field information collected through October 1997. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry. As a result of their widespread adoption they have in effect become a national standard. The use of field names and codes listed in this publication is required on survey forms and other reports regarding field-specific data collected by EIA. There are 58,366 field records in this year`s FCML, 437 more than last year. The FCML includes: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (definition of alias is listed); fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. This report also contains an Invalid Field Record List of 4 records that have been removed from the FCML since last year`s report. These records were found to be either technically incorrect or to represent field names which were never recognized by State naming authorities.

  18. Biofuel Enduse Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. This is a very new resource, but the collections will grow due to both DOE contributions and individualsĆ data uploads. Currently the Biofuel Enduse collection includes 133 items. Most of these are categorized as literature, but 36 are listed as datasets and ten as models.

  19. Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDDM) survey report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Jordan, Danyelle N.; Bauer, Travis L.; Elmore, Mark T. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Treadwell, Jim N. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Homan, Rossitza A.; Chapman, Leon Darrel; Spires, Shannon V.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The large number of government and industry activities supporting the Unit of Action (UA), with attendant documents, reports and briefings, can overwhelm decision-makers with an overabundance of information that hampers the ability to make quick decisions often resulting in a form of gridlock. In particular, the large and rapidly increasing amounts of data and data formats stored on UA Advanced Collaborative Environment (ACE) servers has led to the realization that it has become impractical and even impossible to perform manual analysis leading to timely decisions. UA Program Management (PM UA) has recognized the need to implement a Decision Support System (DSS) on UA ACE. The objective of this document is to research the commercial Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDDM) market and publish the results in a survey. Furthermore, a ranking mechanism based on UA ACE-specific criteria has been developed and applied to a representative set of commercially available KDDM solutions. In addition, an overview of four R&D areas identified as critical to the implementation of DSS on ACE is provided. Finally, a comprehensive database containing detailed information on surveyed KDDM tools has been developed and is available upon customer request.

  20. Discovery of two new methanol masers in NGC 7538

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pestalozzi; V. Minier; F. Motte; J. Conway

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: NGC7538 is known to host a 6.7 and 12.2GHz methanol maser cospatial with a Ultra Compact (UC) HII region, IRS1. Aims: We report on the serendipitous discovery of two additional 6.7GHz methanol masers in the same region, not associated with IRS1. Methods: Interferometry maser positions are compared with recent single-dish and interferometry continuum observations. Results: The positions of the masers agree to high accuracy with the 1.2mm continuum peak emission in NGC7538 IRS9 and NGC7538 S. This clear association is also confirmed by the positional agreement of the masers with existing high resolution continuum observations at cm and/or mm wavelengths. Conclusions: Making use of the established strong relation between methanol masers and high-mass star formation, we claim that we have accurately positioned the high-mass protostars within the regions where they are detected. The variety of objects hosting a 6.7GHz methanol maser in NGC7538 shows that this emission probably traces different evolutionary stages within the protostellar phase.

  1. Discovery of Highly Obscured Galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. R. Marleau; A. Noriega-Crespo; R. Paladini; D. Clancy; S. Carey; S. Shenoy; K. E. Kraemer; T. Kuchar; D. R. Mizuno; S. Price

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of twenty-five previously unknown galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance. Our systematic search for extended extra-galactic sources in the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL mid-infrared surveys of the Galactic plane has revealed two overdensities of these sources, located around l ~ 47 and 55 degrees and |b| less than 1 degree in the Sagitta-Aquila region. These overdensities are consistent with the local large-scale structure found at similar Galactic longitude and extending from |b| ~ 4 to 40 degrees. We show that the infrared spectral energy distribution of these sources is indeed consistent with those of normal galaxies. Photometric estimates of their redshift indicate that the majority of these galaxies are found in the redshift range z = 0.01 - 0.05, with one source located at z = 0.07. Comparison with known sources in the local Universe reveals that these galaxies are located at similar overdensities in redshift space. These new galaxies are the first evidence of a bridge linking the large-scale structure between both sides of the Galactic plane at very low Galactic latitude and clearly demonstrate the feasibility of detecting galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance using mid-to-far infrared surveys.

  2. The Discovery of Balmer-filaments Encircling SNR RCW 86

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Chris Smith

    1997-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of Balmer-dominated filaments along almost the complete periphery of the supernova remnant RCW 86 (also known as G 315.2-2.3 or MSH 14-63). Using the UM/CTIO Curtis Schmidt telescope, we obtained deep CCD images in the emission of Halpha and [S II], together with continuum images to remove stellar confusion. After continuum subtraction, we discovered a network of Halpha filaments reaching almost completely around the remnant. Most of the newly identified filaments show no corresponding [S II] emission, indicating that they belong to the peculiar ''Balmer-dominated'' class of filaments. Comparison of these Balmer filaments with existing radio and X-ray images of RCW 86 shows an overall similarity, although interesting differences are apparent upon detailed inspection. While further observations of these newly identified optical filaments may eventually provide more detailed information on the kinematics and distance to RCW 86, the distance currently remains uncertain. We argue that the shorter distance estimates of ~1 kpc are still favored.

  3. THE DISCOVERY OF PULSATING HOT SUBDWARFS IN NGC 2808

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Thomas M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Landsman, Wayne B. [Adnet Systems, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Adnet Systems, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Randall, Suzanna K. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)] [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Sweigart, Allen V. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lanz, Thierry, E-mail: tbrown@stsci.edu, E-mail: Wayne.Landsman@nasa.gov, E-mail: srandall@eso.org, E-mail: allen.sweigart@gmail.com, E-mail: Thierry.Lanz@oca.eu [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte dAzur, F-06304 Nice (France)] [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte dAzur, F-06304 Nice (France)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope program to search for pulsating hot subdwarfs in the core of NGC 2808. These observations were motivated by the recent discovery of such stars in the outskirts of ? Cen. Both NGC 2808 and ? Cen are massive globular clusters exhibiting complex stellar populations and large numbers of extreme horizontal branch stars. Our far-UV photometric monitoring of over 100 hot evolved stars has revealed six pulsating subdwarfs with periods ranging from 85 to 149 s and UV amplitudes of 2.0%-6.8%. In the UV color-magnitude diagram of NGC 2808, all six of these stars lie immediately below the canonical horizontal branch, a region populated by the subluminous 'blue-hook' stars. For three of these six pulsators, we also have low-resolution far-UV spectroscopy that is sufficient to broadly constrain their atmospheric abundances and effective temperatures. Curiously, and in contrast to the ? Cen pulsators, the NGC 2808 pulsators do not exhibit the spectroscopic or photometric uniformity one might expect from a well-defined instability strip, although they all fall within a narrow band (0.2 mag) of far-UV luminosity.

  4. North African geology: exploration matrix for potential major hydrocarbon discoveries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanes, W.H.; O'Connor, T.E.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on results and models presented previously, it is possible to consider an exploration matrix that examines the 5 basic exploration parameters: source, reservoir, timing, structure, and seal. This matrix indicates that even those basins that have had marginal exploration successes, including the Paleozoic megabasin and downfaulted Triassic grabens of Morocco, the Cyrenaican platform of Libya, and the Tunisia-Sicily shelf, have untested plays. The exploration matrix also suggests these high-risk areas could change significantly, if one of the 5 basic matrix parameters is upgraded or if adjustments in political or financial risk are made. The Sirte basin and the Gulf of Suez, 2 of the more intensely explored areas, also present attractive matrix prospects, particularly with deeper Nubian beds or with the very shallow Tertiary sections. The Ghadames basin of Libya and Tunisia shows some potential, but its evaluation responds strongly to stratigraphic and external nongeologic matrix variations based on degree of risk exposure to be assumed. Of greatest risk in the matrix are the very deep Moroccan Paleozoic clastic plays and the Jurassic of Sinai. However, recent discoveries may upgrade these untested frontier areas. Based on the matrix generated by the data presented at a North African Petroleum Geology symposium, significant hydrocarbon accumulations are yet to be found. The remaining questions are: where in the matrix does each individual company wish to place its exploration capital and how much should be the risk exposure.

  5. Discovery of a Jupiter/Saturn Analog with Gravitational Microlensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Gaudi; D. P. Bennett; A. Udalski; A. Gould; G. W. Christie; D. Maoz; S. Dong; J. McCormick; M. K. Szymanski; P. J. Tristram; S. Nikolaev; B. Paczynski; M. Kubiak; G. Pietrzynski; I. Soszynski; O. Szewczyk; K. Ulaczyk; L. Wyrzykowski; D. L. DePoy; C. Han; S. Kaspi; C. -U. Lee; F. Mallia; T. Natusch; R. W. Pogge; B. -G. Park; F. Abe; I. A. Bond; C. S. Botzler; A. Fukui; J. B. Hearnshaw; Y. Itow; K. Kamiya; A. V. Korpela; P. M. Kilmartin; W. Lin; K. Masuda; Y. Matsubara; M. Motomura; Y. Muraki; S. Nakamura; T. Okumura; K. Ohnishi; N. J. Rattenbury; T. Sako; To. Saito; S. Sato; L. Skuljan; D. J. Sullivan; T. Sumi; W. L. Sweatman; P. C. M. Yock; M. D. Albrow; A. Allan; J. -P. Beaulieu; M. J. Burgdorf; K. H. Cook; C. Coutures; M. Dominik; S. Dieters; P. Fouque; J. Greenhill; K. Horne; I. Steele; Y. Tsapras; B. Chaboyer; A. Crocker; S. Frank; B. Macintosh

    2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Searches for extrasolar planets have uncovered an astonishing diversity of planetary systems, yet the frequency of solar system analogs remains unknown. The gravitational microlensing planet search method is potentially sensitive to multiple-planet systems containing analogs of all the solar system planets except Mercury. We report the detection of a multiple-planet system with microlensing. We identify two planets with masses of ~0.71 and ~0.27 times the mass of Jupiter and orbital separations of ~2.3 and ~4.6 astronomical units orbiting a primary star of mass ~0.50 solar masses at a distance of ~1.5 kiloparsecs. This system resembles a scaled version of our solar system in that the mass ratio, separation ratio, and equilibrium temperatures of the planets are similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. These planets could not have been detected with other techniques; their discovery from only six confirmed microlensing planet detections suggests that solar system analogs may be common.

  6. General Critical Properties of the Dynamics of Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettencourt, L. M. A. (LANL); Kaiser, D. I. (MIT)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific fields are difficult to define and compare, yet there is a general sense that they undergo similar stages of development. From this point of view it becomes important to determine if these superficial similarities can be translated into a general framework that would quantify the general advent and subsequent dynamics of scientific ideas. Such a framework would have important practical applications of allowing us to compare fields that superficially may appear different, in terms of their subject matter, research techniques, typical collaboration size, etc. Particularh' important in a field's history is the moment at which conceptual and technical unification allows widespread exchange of ideas and collaboration, at which point networks of collaboration show the analog of a percolation phenomenon, developing a giant connected component containing most authors. Here we investigate the generality of this topological transition in the collaboration structure of scientific fields as they grow and become denser. We develop a general theoretical framework in which each scientific field is an instantiation of the same large-scale topological critical phenomenon. We consider whether the evidence from a variety of specific fields is consistent with this picture, and estimate critical exponents associated with the transition. We then discuss the generality of the phenomenon and to what extent we may expect other scientific fields — including very large ones — to follow the same dynamics.

  7. HR 5907: Discovery of the most rapidly rotating magnetic B-type star by the MiMeS Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunhut, J H; Wade, G A; Townsend, R H D; Marcolino, W L F; Bohlender, D A; Szeifert, Th; Petit, V; Matthews, J M; Rowe, J F; Moffat, A F J; Kallinger, T; Kuschnig, R; Guenther, B D; Rucinski, S M; Sasselov, D; Weiss, W W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery and analysis of a very strong magnetic field in the rapidly rotating early B-type star HR 5907, based on observations obtained as part of the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project. We infer a rotation period of 0.508276 +0.000015/-0.000012 d from photometric and H{\\alpha} EW measurements, making this the shortest period, non-degenerate, magnetic massive star known to date. From the comparison of IUE UV and optical spectroscopy with LTE BRUCE/KYLIE models we find a solid-angle integrated, uniform black-body temperature of 17 000 \\pm 1000 K, a projected rotational velocity of 290 \\pm 10 km/s, an equatorial radius of 3.1 \\pm 0.2 R_sun, a stellar mass of 5.5 \\pm 0.5 M_sun, and an inclination angle of the rotation axis to our line-of-sight of 70 \\pm 10\\circ. Our measurements of the longitudinal magnetic field, which vary between -500 and -2000 G, phase coherently with the rotation period and imply a surface dipole field strength of \\sim15.7 kG. On the other hand, from fits to mean Leas...

  8. Knowledge Discovery, Knowledge Management and Enterprise-Wide Information Technology Tools Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Symons, Christopher T [ORNL; Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL; Treadwell, Jim N [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A final report on an ORNL task to establish a knowledge discovery and management tool to retrieve and recommend information from existing S&T documents for the Office of Naval Research Global.

  9. The Discovery reach of $CP$ violation in neutrino oscillation with non-standard interaction effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Zini; Adhikari, Rathin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the $CP$ violation discovery reach in neutrino oscillation experiment with superbeam, neutrino factory and monoenergetic neutrino beam. For NSI satisfying model-dependent bound for shorter baselines (like CERN-Fr\\'ejus set-up ) there is insignificant effect of NSI on the the discovery reach of $CP$ violation due to $\\delta$. Particularly, for superbeam and neutrino factory we have also considered relatively longer baselines for which there could be significant NSI effects on $CP$ violation discovery reach for higher allowed values of NSI. For monoenergetic beam only shorter baselines are considered to study $CP$ violation with different nuclei as neutrino sources. Interestingly for non-standard interactions - $\\varepsilon_{e\\mu}$ and $\\varepsilon_{e\\tau}$ of neutrinos with matter during propagation in longer baselines in superbeam, there is possibility of better discovery reach of $CP$ violation than that with only Standard Model interactions of neutrinos with matter. For complex NSI we have s...

  10. Deep Blue No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Deep Blue No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at...

  11. Deep Blue No.1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    At Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Deep Blue No.1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At...

  12. Target-guided synthesis approach to the discovery of novel bivalent inhibitors of Glutathione Transferases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clipson, Alexandra Jayne

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Target-guided synthesis is an approach to drug discovery that uses the biological target as a template to direct synthesis of its own best inhibitors from small molecule fragments. The process bridges the gap between ...

  13. UAC Rule R655-1 Wells Used for the Discovery and Production of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 Wells Used for the Discovery and Production of Geothermal Energy in the State of Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  14. Discovery of Human sORF-Encoded Polypeptides (SEPs) in Cell Lines and Tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Jiao

    The existence of nonannotated protein-coding human short open reading frames (sORFs) has been revealed through the direct detection of their sORF-encoded polypeptide (SEP) products. The discovery of novel SEPs increases ...

  15. The design and characterization of a microcalorimeter to aid drug discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEuen, Scott Jacob

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design and characterization of a microcalorimeter used to aid drug discovery. There are four key functional requirements for the device: (1.) 8.4 [mu]J energy resolution, (2.) 20 [mu]L reactant ...

  16. Discovery of the Higgs boson is being hailed as the most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskaran, Mark

    Discovery of the Higgs boson is being hailed as the most significant event in physics in the past oversimplified, the Higgs boson is the particle responsible for giving mass to all other particles. WSU team

  17. The Use of Fragment-Based Lead Discovery Towards the Design and Development of Metalloenzyme Inhibitors /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sardo, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 1. B. 1 Fragment Based Lead Discovery A Strategy for5 1. B. 3. Hit to Leadenzyme’s metal ion cofactor may lead to advancements in 5-LO

  18. Discovery and Mechanistic Studies of Facile N-Terminal C?-C...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Mechanistic Studies of Facile N-Terminal C-C Bond Cleavages in the Dissociation of Tyrosine-Containing Peptide Discovery and Mechanistic Studies of Facile N-Terminal C-C...

  19. Discovery of Genes and Genomes through Deep Metagenomic Sequencing of Cow Rumen (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rubin, Eddy

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Director Eddy Rubin on "Discovery of Genes and Genomes through Deep Metagenomic Sequencing of Cow Rumen" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  20. Systematic Discovery of TLR Signaling Components Delineates Viral-Sensing Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chevrier, Nicolas

    Deciphering the signaling networks that underlie normal and disease processes remains a major challenge. Here, we report the discovery of signaling components involved in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) response of immune ...

  1. Fullerenes Buckminster Fullerenes ("Buckyballs") have fascinated chemists since the original discovery of C60, leading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    discovery of C60, leading to the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for Curl, Kroto, and Smalley. Although metal ion, such as titanium, zirconium, or uranium directly from carbon vapor. The resulting M@C28

  2. Discovery of the Most Distant Supernovae and the Quest for Omega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldhaber, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Most Distant Supernovae and the Quest for .Q G.Discovery of the Most Distant Supernovae and the Quest for QOF THE MOST DISTANT SUPERNOVAE AND THE QUEST FOR fl* GERSON

  3. Impact of Recent Discoveries on Petroleum and Natural Gas Exploration: Emphasis on India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two discoveries have greatly impacted understanding relevant to the origination and emplacement of petroleum and natural gas deposits. One discovery, pertaining to hydrocarbon formation from methane broadens significantly potential regions where abiotic petroleum and natural gas deposits might be found. The other, discovery of the physical impossibility of Earth-mantle convection, restricts the range and domain of geodynamic behavior, and leads to new insights on the formation of petroleum and natural gas deposits. This article highlights the impact and implications of those discoveries, especially as they relate to petroleum and natural gas exploration in India and throughout the world. From the reasoning developed here, the generality of the considerations involved, the understanding developed with respect to the East African Rift System, and the experience garnered from the larger and older Siberian Traps, the prognosis and potential for the region beneath the Deccan Traps of India to eventually become a major source of petroleum and natural gas seems quite favorable.

  4. Feature Space Transformation using Equation Discovery Freek Stulp, Mark Pfluger, Michael Beetz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Feature Space Transformation using Equation Discovery Freek Stulp, Mark Pfl¨uger, Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous Systems Group, Technische Universit¨at M¨unchen, Munich, Germany {stulp,pflueger,beetz

  5. The Major Role of Clinicians in the Discovery of Off-Label Drug Therapies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMonaco, Harold J.

    2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective: To determine, through a review of the medical literature and author contact, the role of clinicians in the discovery of off label use of Food and Drug Administration approved prescription drugs.

  6. Situ Discovery Electrostatic Potential, Trapping Electrons and Mediating Fast Reconnection Earth's Magnetotail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan

    Situ Discovery Electrostatic Potential, Trapping Electrons and Mediating Fast Reconnection Earth phase distributions, measured Wind spacecraft a rare crossing diffusion region in Earth's magnetotail, the presence a strong electrostatic potential within ion diffusion region is revealed. potential reaching

  7. Metagenomics for Etiologic Agent Discovery (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ross, Matthew [Baylor College of Medicine

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Matthew Ross on "Metagenomics for etiological agent discovery" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  8. The melting pot of automated discovery: principles for a new science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    The melting pot of automated discovery: principles for a new science Jan M. _Zytkow Computer, 1993, Si- mon, Valdes-Perez & Sleeman 1997, and in Proceedings of 1995 AAAI Spring Symposium

  9. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have been recastEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2012 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total Arts

  10. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Harvard Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have beenEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return REPORTS Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2011 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total

  11. Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Migration Year Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 1 #12;Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 NIDS NCCR North-South #12;Book Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Publishers Nepal Institute of Development Studies (NIDS) G.P.O. Box: 7647, Kathmandu, Nepal Email: nids@mail.com.np Web: www.nids.org.np National Centre of Competence in Research

  12. Steering Acoustically Propelled Nanowire Motors toward Cells in a Biologically Compatible Environment Using Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environment Using Magnetic Fields Suzanne Ahmed, Wei Wang, Lamar O. Mair,#, Robert D. Fraleigh, Sixing Li discovery of fuel-free propulsion of nanomotors using acoustic energy has provided a new avenue for using cells and tissues. We demonstrate in vitro magnetic steering of acoustically powered nanorod motors

  13. Smooth Field Theories and Homotopy Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Alan Cameron

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 . . . . . . . . 4 Categories of Field Theories 4.1 Functorto super symmetric field theories. CRM Proceedings and0-dimensional super symmetric field theories. preprint 2008.

  14. Discovery of An Aurora Kinase Inhibitor Through Site-Specific Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cancilla, M.T.; He, M.M.; Viswanathan, N.; Simmons, R.L.; Taylor, M.; Fung, A.D.; Cao, K.; Erlanson, D.A.

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a fragment-based lead discovery method that combines site-directed ligand discovery with dynamic combinatorial chemistry. Our technique targets dynamic combinatorial screening to a specified region of a protein by using reversible disulfide chemistry. We have used this technology to rapidly identify inhibitors of the drug target Aurora A that span the purine-binding site and the adaptive pocket of the kinase. The binding mode of a noncovalent inhibitor has been further characterized through crystallography.

  15. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2005-06 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2005-06 Year in Review 2 Message from the Acting Director

  16. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2004-05 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2004-05 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director This has

  17. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2006-07 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2006-07 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director Academic

  18. Representation discovery in non-parametric reinforcement learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zewdie, Dawit (Dawit Habtamu)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have seen a surge of interest in non-parametric reinforcement learning. There are now practical non-parametric algorithms that use kernel regression to approximate value functions. The correctness guarantees ...

  19. Discovery and Characterization of Radiation Mitigator Yel002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivina, Yelena Olegovna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    years at the time of the chernobyl accident. Int. J. Canceremergency workers of the chernobyl accident: Estimation ofS.E. Incidence of post-chernobyl leukemia and thyroid cancer

  20. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

  1. ATNI Mid-year Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

  2. Undergraduate Lecture Notes in Topological Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir G. Ivancevic; Tijana T. Ivancevic

    2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    These third-year lecture notes are designed for a 1-semester course in topological quantum field theory (TQFT). Assumed background in mathematics and physics are only standard second-year subjects: multivariable calculus, introduction to quantum mechanics and basic electromagnetism. Keywords: quantum mechanics/field theory, path integral, Hodge decomposition, Chern-Simons and Yang-Mills gauge theories, conformal field theory

  3. Creating a Discovery Platform for Confined-Space Chemistry and Materials: Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Greathouse, Jeffery A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Simmons, Blake

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) are a recently discovered class of nanoporous, defect-free crystalline materials that enable rational design and exploration of porous materials at the molecular level. MOFs have tunable monolithic pore sizes and cavity environments due to their crystalline nature, yielding properties exceeding those of most other porous materials. These include: the lowest known density (91% free space); highest surface area; tunable photoluminescence; selective molecular adsorption; and methane sorption rivaling gas cylinders. These properties are achieved by coupling inorganic metal complexes such as ZnO4 with tunable organic ligands that serve as struts, allowing facile manipulation of pore size and surface area through reactant selection. MOFs thus provide a discovery platform for generating both new understanding of chemistry in confined spaces and novel sensors and devices based on their unique properties. At the outset of this project in FY06, virtually nothing was known about how to couple MOFs to substrates and the science of MOF properties and how to tune them was in its infancy. An integrated approach was needed to establish the required knowledge base for nanoscale design and develop methodologies integrate MOFs with other materials. This report summarizes the key accomplishments of this project, which include creation of a new class of radiation detection materials based on MOFs, luminescent MOFs for chemical detection, use of MOFs as templates to create nanoparticles of hydrogen storage materials, MOF coatings for stress-based chemical detection using microcantilevers, and %22flexible%22 force fields that account for structural changes in MOFs that occur upon molecular adsorption/desorption. Eight journal articles, twenty presentations at scientific conferences, and two patent applications resulted from the work. The project created a basis for continuing development of MOFs for many Sandia applications and succeeded in securing %242.75 M in funding from outside agencies to continue the research. 3

  4. Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abruna, H.D.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery and understanding of new, improved materials to advance fuel cell technology are the objectives of the Cornell Fuel Cell Institute (CFCI) research program. CFCI was initially formed in 2003. This report highlights the accomplishments from 2006-2009. Many of the grand challenges in energy science and technology are based on the need for materials with greatly improved or even revolutionary properties and performance. This is certainly true for fuel cells, which have the promise of being highly efficient in the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy. Fuel cells offer the possibility of efficiencies perhaps up to 90 % based on the free energy of reaction. Here, the challenges are clearly in the materials used to construct the heart of the fuel cell: the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The MEA consists of two electrodes separated by an ionically conducting membrane. Each electrode is a nanocomposite of electronically conducting catalyst support, ionic conductor and open porosity, that together form three percolation networks that must connect to each catalyst nanoparticle; otherwise the catalyst is inactive. This report highlights the findings of the three years completing the CFCI funding, and incudes developments in materials for electrocatalyts, catalyst supports, materials with structured and functional porosity for electrodes, and novel electrolyte membranes. The report also discusses developments at understanding electrocatalytic mechanisms, especially on novel catalyst surfaces, plus in situ characterization techniques and contributions from theory. Much of the research of the CFCI continues within the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2), a DOE funded, Office of Science Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC).

  5. Entomology 489 Field Entomology Field Project Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    with information, people, materials). Field Projects (your project should...) FEntomology 489 ­ Field Entomology Field Project Guide A small-group field project is required for ENTO 489 ­ Field Entomology. This guide provides general information about the field-project

  6. Strong laser fields as a probe for fundamental physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holger Gies

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Upcoming high-intensity laser systems will be able to probe the quantum-induced nonlinear regime of electrodynamics. So far unobserved QED phenomena such as the discovery of a nonlinear response of the quantum vacuum to macroscopic electromagnetic fields can become accessible. In addition, such laser systems provide for a flexible tool for investigating fundamental physics. Primary goals consist in verifying so far unobserved QED phenomena. Moreover, strong-field experiments can search for new light but weakly interacting degrees of freedom and are thus complementary to accelerator-driven experiments. I review recent developments in this field, focusing on photon experiments in strong electromagnetic fields. The interaction of particle-physics candidates with photons and external fields can be parameterized by low-energy effective actions and typically predict characteristic optical signatures. I perform first estimates of the accessible new-physics parameter space of high-intensity laser facilities such as POLARIS and ELI.

  7. Recent Jurassic discoveries in southeastern Cass County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubrey, J.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southeastern Cass County had lain virtually dormant as a prospective Jurassic oil and gas province since the mid-1960s, when East Linden field was discovered and developed. Then, in 1978, Hilliard Oil and Gas drilled the 1 Johnson and discovered Kildare field (Smackover). Subsequent development thru 1982 proved additional reserves in several Cotton Valley sandstones as well, reconfirming southeastern Cass County as territory for viable Jurassic drilling. Additional drilling occurred when Marshall Exploration redrilled and expanded the old Bloomburg field and Heflin redrilled Queen City field. All of this drilling was successful in the Smackover reservoir, finding sour gas and condensate. Wildcat activity included the two Smackover completions finding South Atlanta field, as well as two completions in formations that are highly debated as to their nomenclature. Cities Service reportedly their well in the Eagle Mills. This well brought national attention to southeastern Cass County, when it was reported on the CBS Saturday evening news. The well initially flowed at rates that were as high as 1800 BOPD, 1396 MCFGD, and 32 BWPD, with pressure of 3250 psi. Just as the excitement was dying down, Primary Fuels, Inc. reentered and deepened the Highland Resources 1 Glass and completed that well in a zone correlative to the Cities Service 1-A Pruitt. The 1 glass potentialed for 200 BOPD, 570 MCFGD, and 32 BWPD, at pressure of 2900 psi. The producing zone was determined to be the Norphlet, which once again was made wildcatters of all previous upper Smackover explorers.

  8. The 11 years solar cycle as the manifestation of the dark Universe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zioutas, K.; Semertzidis, Y.; Tsagri, M.; Papaevangelou, T.; Hoffmann, D. H.H.; Anastassopoulos, V.

    2014-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Sun’s luminosity in the visible changes at the 10-3 level, following an 11 years period. In X-rays, which should not be there, the amplitude varies even ~105 times stronger, making their mysterious origin since the discovery in 1938 even more puzzling, and inspiring. We suggest that the multifaceted mysterious solar cycle is due to some kind of dark matter streams hitting the Sun. Planetary gravitational lensing enhances (occasionally) slow moving flows of dark constituents towards the Sun, giving rise to the periodic behaviour. Jupiter provides the driving oscillatory force, though its 11.8 years orbital period appears slightly decreased, just asmore »11 years, if the lensing impact of other planets is included. Then, the 11 years solar clock may help to decipher (overlooked) signatures from the dark sector in laboratory experiments or observations in space.« less

  9. The 11 years solar cycle as the manifestation of the dark Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zioutas, K. [Univ. of Patras (Greece); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Semertzidis, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsagri, M. [Nikhef-Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Papaevangelou, T. [IRFU, Centre d'Etudes Nuclaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hoffmann, D. H.H. [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, TU-Darmstadt (Germany); Anastassopoulos, V. [Univ. of Patras (Greece)

    2014-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Sun’s luminosity in the visible changes at the 10-3 level, following an 11 years period. In X-rays, which should not be there, the amplitude varies even ~105 times stronger, making their mysterious origin since the discovery in 1938 even more puzzling, and inspiring. We suggest that the multifaceted mysterious solar cycle is due to some kind of dark matter streams hitting the Sun. Planetary gravitational lensing enhances (occasionally) slow moving flows of dark constituents towards the Sun, giving rise to the periodic behaviour. Jupiter provides the driving oscillatory force, though its 11.8 years orbital period appears slightly decreased, just as 11 years, if the lensing impact of other planets is included. Then, the 11 years solar clock may help to decipher (overlooked) signatures from the dark sector in laboratory experiments or observations in space.

  10. The 11 years solar cycle as the manifestation of the dark Universe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zioutas, K. [Univ. of Patras (Greece); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Semertzidis, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsagri, M. [Nikhef-Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Papaevangelou, T. [IRFU, Centre d'Etudes Nuclaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hoffmann, D. H.H. [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, TU-Darmstadt (Germany); Anastassopoulos, V. [Univ. of Patras (Greece)

    2014-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Sun’s luminosity in the visible changes at the 10-3 level, following an 11 years period. In X-rays, which should not be there, the amplitude varies even ~105 times stronger, making their mysterious origin since the discovery in 1938 even more puzzling, and inspiring. We suggest that the multifaceted mysterious solar cycle is due to some kind of dark matter streams hitting the Sun. Planetary gravitational lensing enhances (occasionally) slow moving flows of dark constituents towards the Sun, giving rise to the periodic behaviour. Jupiter provides the driving oscillatory force, though its 11.8 years orbital period appears slightly decreased, just as 11 years, if the lensing impact of other planets is included. Then, the 11 years solar clock may help to decipher (overlooked) signatures from the dark sector in laboratory experiments or observations in space.

  11. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) a schedule of monitoring and sampling routines for the Operational Environmental Monitoring (OEM) program during calendar year (CY) 1995. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Near-Field Monitoring. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Near-Field Monitoring and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1995.

  12. THE DISCOVERY OF HD 37605c AND A DISPOSITIVE NULL DETECTION OF TRANSITS OF HD 37605b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Sharon Xuesong; Wright, Jason T.; Mahadevan, Suvrath [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Cochran, William; Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip J. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kane, Stephen R.; Von Braun, Kaspar [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Caltech, MS 100-22, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Henry, Gregory W. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard, Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Valenti, Jeff A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Antoci, Victoria; Dragomir, Diana; Matthews, Jaymie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T1Z1 (Canada); Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard, E-mail: xxw131@psu.edu, E-mail: jtwright@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the radial velocity discovery of a second planetary mass companion to the K0 V star HD 37605, which was already known to host an eccentric, P {approx} 55 days Jovian planet, HD 37605b. This second planet, HD 37605c, has a period of {approx}7.5 years with a low eccentricity and an Msin i of {approx}3.4 M{sub Jup}. Our discovery was made with the nearly 8 years of radial velocity follow-up at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and Keck Observatory, including observations made as part of the Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey effort to provide precise ephemerides to long-period planets for transit follow-up. With a total of 137 radial velocity observations covering almost 8 years, we provide a good orbital solution of the HD 37605 system, and a precise transit ephemeris for HD 37605b. Our dynamic analysis reveals very minimal planet-planet interaction and an insignificant transit time variation. Using the predicted ephemeris, we performed a transit search for HD 37605b with the photometric data taken by the T12 0.8 m Automatic Photoelectric Telescope (APT) and the MOST satellite. Though the APT photometry did not capture the transit window, it characterized the stellar activity of HD 37605, which is consistent of it being an old, inactive star, with a tentative rotation period of 57.67 days. The MOST photometry enabled us to report a dispositive null detection of a non-grazing transit for this planet. Within the predicted transit window, we exclude an edge-on predicted depth of 1.9% at the >>10{sigma} level, and exclude any transit with an impact parameter b > 0.951 at greater than 5{sigma}. We present the BOOTTRAN package for calculating Keplerian orbital parameter uncertainties via bootstrapping. We made a comparison and found consistency between our orbital fit parameters calculated by the RVLIN package and error bars by BOOTTRAN with those produced by a Bayesian analysis using MCMC.

  13. Vega field and potential of Ragusa basin, Offshore Sicily

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, M. Jr.; Livraga, G.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vega, the largest single oil field in the Mediterranean Sea, is located between the southeastern coast of Sicily and the Island of Malta. The field lies entirely in Italian waters. Its discovery in October 1980 was based on interpretation of a very poor-quality seismic survey which, nevertheless, roughly outlined a relatively small structure. A limestone and dolomite fractured reservoir of the Inici, or Siracusa Formation, of Late Jurasic age, may contain in excess of 1 billion bbl of heavy crude (15.5 API) within a productive area of approximately 10,000 acres (4000 ha.). Reservoir properties are excellent, with permeabilities in darcys. The field extends northwest-southeast for 8.5 mi (14 km) and averages 1.7 mi (3 km) in width, according to the 3D seismic survey (2000 km) shot soon after the discovery well was drilled. The gross oil column reaches approximately 820 ft (250 m). The southeasternmost part of the Vega structure is not yet completely defined, and an additional 3D seismic survey is in progress. Should the new seismic results confirm expectations, the Vega structure could extend over 10 mi (17 km). The overlying Inici reservoir consists of dolomite and underlain by limestone in the southwestern part of the basin, and entirely of limestone in the northwestern portion of the basin. The Inici Formation represents the platform facies of the open-sea Villagonia and Giardini sediments. The Cammarata-Pozzillo (discovered in 1959), Perla (1979), Vega (1980), and Prezioso (1983) heavy crude oil fields are related to this formation. The potential for discovery of other fields similar to Vega in the Ragusa basin is excellent.

  14. 900-MHz NMR: Accelerating Scientific Discovery Scientific Innovation Through Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the magnet for the 900-MHz NMR spectrometer brought engineering challenges. Can the superconducting wire the development and purchase of the world's first 900-MHz NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectrometer in 1992, the highest magnetic field available was 750 MHz. DOE's decision and the ultimate success of its 900-MHz NMR

  15. Chemistry and ONE WORD To Drive Discovery --RENSSELAER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    with ties to top researchers in biomedical science and nanotechnology APPLICATION PROCESS Application fields, such as energy and the environment, nanotechnology, biotechnology and computational science. We biochemical solar energy research 110 8th Street http://gradadmissions.rpi.edu/ Troy, NY 121803590 USA

  16. Competency Knowledge Sub Domain Principles of Scientific Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    communication skills that should be mastered and applied to the fields of medicine and scientific inquiry to use the methodologies that particular disciplines apply for understanding and communicating results question (1,2) · Describes hypothesis testing (1) · Describes skills required for communication

  17. Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the ninth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1990 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. There are 54,963 field records in this year's Oil and Gas Field Code Master List (FCML). This amounts to 467 more than in last year's report. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes: Field records for each state and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides;field records for each alias field name; fields crossing state boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective state naming authorities.

  18. Microprocessors --10 Years Back, 10 Years Gurindar S. Sohi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohi, Guri S.

    Microprocessors -- 10 Years Back, 10 Years Ahead Gurindar S. Sohi Computer Sciences Department computer architects with an increasing number of faster transistors with which to build microprocessors. In the past decade, architects have seized these opportunities to build microprocessors that bear lit- tle

  19. Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure Filling and Maintaining Compost Georgia://ceps.georgiasouthern.edu/garden This brochure is funded in part by a grant from a Museums for America Grant. Types of Composting Bins To fill your compost bin, alternate brown and green materials. Keep in mind that the ideal ratio is three

  20. On Field Constraint Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wies, Thomas

    2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce field constraint analysis, a new technique for verifying data structure invariants. A field constraint for a field is a formula specifying a set of objects to which the field can point. Field constraints ...