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1

Power counting regime of chiral effective field theory and beyond.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chiral effective field theory ({chi}EFT) complements numerical simulations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) on a space-time lattice. It provides a model-independent formalism for connecting lattice simulation results at finite volume and a variety of quark masses to the physical world. The asymptotic nature of the chiral expansion places the focus on the first few terms of the expansion. Thus, knowledge of the power-counting regime (PCR) of {chi}EFT, where higher-order terms of the expansion may be regarded as negligible, is as important as knowledge of the expansion itself. Through the consideration of a variety of renormalization schemes and associated parameters, techniques to identify the PCR where results are independent of the renormalization scheme are established. The nucleon mass is considered as a benchmark for illustrating this general approach. Because the PCR is small, the numerical simulation results are also examined to search for the possible presence of an intrinsic scale which may be used in a nonperturbative manner to describe lattice simulation results outside of the PCR. Positive results that improve on the current optimistic application of chiral perturbation theory ({chi}PT) beyond the PCR are reported.

Hall, J. M.M.; Leinweber, D. B.; Young, R. D.; Physics; Univ. of Adelaide

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

Power counting regime of chiral effective field theory and beyond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chiral effective field theory ({chi}EFT) complements numerical simulations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) on a space-time lattice. It provides a model-independent formalism for connecting lattice simulation results at finite volume and a variety of quark masses to the physical world. The asymptotic nature of the chiral expansion places the focus on the first few terms of the expansion. Thus, knowledge of the power-counting regime (PCR) of {chi}EFT, where higher-order terms of the expansion may be regarded as negligible, is as important as knowledge of the expansion itself. Through the consideration of a variety of renormalization schemes and associated parameters, techniques to identify the PCR where results are independent of the renormalization scheme are established. The nucleon mass is considered as a benchmark for illustrating this general approach. Because the PCR is small, the numerical simulation results are also examined to search for the possible presence of an intrinsic scale which may be used in a nonperturbative manner to describe lattice simulation results outside of the PCR. Positive results that improve on the current optimistic application of chiral perturbation theory ({chi}PT) beyond the PCR are reported.

Hall, J. M. M.; Leinweber, D. B. [Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM), School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Young, R. D. [Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM), School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Chiral Effective Field Theory Beyond the Power-Counting Regime  

SciTech Connect

Novel techniques are presented, which identify the chiral power-counting regime (PCR), and realize the existence of an intrinsic energy scale embedded in lattice QCD results that extend outside the PCR. The nucleon mass is considered as a benchmark for illustrating this new approach. Using finite-range regularization, an optimal regularization scale can be extracted from lattice simulation results by analyzing the renormalization of the low energy coefficients. The optimal scale allows a description of lattice simulation results that extend beyond the PCR by quantifying and thus handling any scheme-dependence. Preliminary results for the nucleon magnetic moment are also examined, and a consistent optimal regularization scale is obtained. This indicates the existence of an intrinsic scale corresponding to the finite size of the source of the pion cloud.

Hall, Jonathan M. M.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Young, Ross D. [Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM), School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

4

Counting Photons in Static Electric and Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the electromagnetic field by the massless limit of a massive vector field in the presence of a Coulomb gauge fixing term. The gauge fixing term ensures that, in the massless limit, the longitudinal mode is removed from the spectrum and only the two transverse modes survive. The system, coupled to a classical conserved current, is quantized in the canonical formalism. The classical field configurations due to time-independent electric charges and currents are represented by coherent states of longitudinal and transverse photons, respectively. The occupation number in these states is finite. In particular, the number of longitudinal photons bound by an electric charge q is given by N=q^2/(16\\pi\\hbar).

Wolfgang Mueck

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:06 PM"

6

Regular Article: Counting Polynomials with Zeros of Given Multiplicities in Finite Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the set of polynomials inrindeterminates over a finite field and with bounded degree. We give here a way to count the number of elements of some of its subsets, namely those sets defined by the multiplicities of their elements at some points ...

Jean-François Ragot

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

GalaxyCount: a JAVA calculator of galaxy counts and variances in multiband wide-field surveys to 28 AB mag  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a consistent framework for estimating galaxy counts and variances in wide-field images for a range of photometric bands. The variances include both Poissonian noise and variations due to large scale structure. We demonstrate that our statistical theory is consistent with the counts in the deepest multiband surveys available. The statistical estimates depend on several observational parameters (e.g. seeing, signal to noise ratio), and include a sophisticated treatment of detection completeness. The JAVA calculator is freely available and offers the user the option to adopt our consistent framework or a different scheme. We also provide a summary table of statistical measures in the different bands for a range of different fields of view. Reliable estimation of the background counts has profound consequences in many areas of observational astronomy. We provide two such examples. One is from a recent study of the Sculptor galaxy NGC 300 where stellar photometry has been used to demonstrate that the outer disc extends to 10 effective radii, far beyond what was thought possible for a normal low-luminosity spiral. We confirm this finding by a reanalysis of the background counts. Secondly, we determine the luminosity function of the galaxy cluster Abell 2734, both through spectroscopically determined cluster membership, and through statistical subtraction of the background galaxies using the calculator and offset fields. We demonstrate very good agreement, suggesting that expensive spectroscopic follow-up, or off-source observations, may often be bypassed via determination of the galaxy background with GalaxyCount.

S. C. Ellis; J. Bland-Hawthorn

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Job Counting Guidelines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Environmental Management Definitions and Guidelines for Counting Monthly and Quarterly EM Recovery Act Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) and Cumulative Head-Count The following updated definitions and guidelines are intended to provide EM Recovery Act sites with information to collect and report timely and accurate full-time equivalent and cumulative head-count data for both monthly and quarterly jobs data calls. These revised guidelines supersede the previous monthly jobs data reporting definitions and guidelines dated February 9, 2010. These revised guidelines remain consistent with OMB guidance issued December 18, 2009 and cover subcontractors and vendors as well as prime

9

Primer on Cumulative Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative impacts have become one of the most important aspects of environmental analysis and reporting in terms of transmission siting. This primer provides EPRI members with background information and fundamental understanding of the analysis process. The primer reviews the legal and regulatory framework, briefly examines case law that has helped to define both the cumulative impacts concept and subsequent analysis, and provides a structure for conducting or reviewing cumulative impacts analyses.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Cumulative Impacts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cumulative Impacts Cumulative Impacts Cumulative Impacts Selected documents on the topic of Cumulative Impacts and NEPA. June 24, 2005 Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects Analysis In this Memorandum, the Council on Environmental Quality provides guidance on the extent to which agencies of the Federal government are required to analyze the environmental effects of past actions when they describe the cumulative environmental effect of a proposed action. May 1, 1999 Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on specific issues that are

11

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Report - Considering Cumulative Effects Under NEPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considering Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act Council on Environmental Quality January 1997 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY I INTRODUCTION TO CUMULATIVE EFFECTS ANALYSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Purpose of Cumulative Effect sAnalysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Agency Experience with Cumulative Effects Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Principles of Cumulative Effects Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 How Environmental EffectsAccumulate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Roadmap tothe Handbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2 SCOPING FOR CUMULATIVE EFFECTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Identifying Cumulative Effects Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Bounding Cumulative Effects Analysis . . . . . . . . . .

13

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Cumulative Index | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Requirements Lessons Learned Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Cumulative Index Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Cumulative Index Guidance Requirements Lessons...

14

Cumulative Crude Production Additions (Annual)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This graph shows the cumulative growth of the Atlantic Basin light sweet crude oil production relative to the growth in crude oil production from the rest of the ...

15

Counting Bacteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Counting Bacteria Counting Bacteria Name: Tammy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am working with my daughter on her Science Fair Project. We are testing daily items that we come in contact with to see how many germs and bacteria it has. How can we differentiate between the types of bacteria? How can we decide which one has the most? We are using the growth medium Agar in petri dishes. Where can I find more scientific info as to why this happens so we can write up the project? Replies: These are complex questions. First, the agar medium is used as a solid phase so that one can see colonies formed. These are round mounds of growth because bacteria multiply in all directions, but they cannot normally move in or on a solid phase so they remain at the site of multiplication. Every bacterial cell can multiply into a colony. Thus, the number of colonies is a measure for the number of cells present, if you have taken quantitative samples. If you want to quantitate, you should try to standardize your samples (for example, use 1 ml liquid to wash surfaces, food particles, 1 ml of liquids, etc. and add of this one drop (with a micropipette would be more accurate) per agar plate and let the drop form a tear on the plate. The number of colonies that grow in this tear are a measure for the original number of bacteria present in the drop, because each colony is derived from a single bacterial cell.

16

Job Counting Guidelines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mission » Recovery Act » Job Counting Guidelines Mission » Recovery Act » Job Counting Guidelines Job Counting Guidelines The following updated definitions and guidelines are intended to provide EM Recovery Act sites with information to collect and report timely and accurate full-time equivalent and cumulative head-count data for both monthly and quarterly jobs data calls. These revised guidelines supersede the previous monthly jobs data reporting definitions and guidelines dated February 9, 2010. These revised guidelines remain consistent with OMB guidance issued December 18, 2009 and cover subcontractors and vendors as well as prime contractors. Job Counting Guidelines More Documents & Publications EA-1548: Finding of No Significant Impact Microsoft Word - Horizon Wind Energy Comments.docx Proceedings of the Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric

17

Counting statistics of collective photon transmissions  

SciTech Connect

We theoretically study cooperative effects in the steady-state transmission of photons through a medium of N radiators. Using methods from quantum transport, we find a cross-over in scaling from N to N{sup 2} in the current and to even higher powers of N in the higher cumulants of the photon counting statistics as a function of the tunable source occupation. The effect should be observable for atoms confined within a nano-cell with a pumped optical cavity as photon source. - Highlights: > Super-radiance transfers to super-transmittance in steady-state transport. > Higher cumulants are much more sensitive indicators for collective behavior than the first cumulant. > Effects should be measurable by pumped-cavity experiment.

Vogl, M., E-mail: malte.vogl@tu-berlin.de; Schaller, G., E-mail: gernot.schaller@tu-berlin.de; Brandes, T.

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act This handbook presents the results of research and consultations by the Council on Environmental...

19

Gait identification using cumulants of accelerometer data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes gait identification using cumulants of accelerometer data. Accelerometer data of three different walking speeds for each subject (normal, slow and fast) was acquired by a cell phone placed on the person's hip. Data analysis was based ... Keywords: accelerometer, body sensor, cumulants, gait identification, gait recognition, high-order statistics, pattern recognition

Sebastijan Sprager; Damjan Zazula

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

RESEARCH and RELATED BUDGET - Cumulative Budget  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cumulative Budget Cumulative Budget 0 Totals ($) Section A, Senior/Key Person - $ Section B, Other Personnel - $ Total Number Other Personnel 0 Total Salary, Wages and Fringe Benefits (A+B) - $ Section C, Equipment - $ Section D, Travel - $ 1. Domestic - $ 2. Foreign - $ Section E, Participant/Trainee Support Costs - $ 1. Tuition/Fees/Health Insurance - $ 2. Stipends - $ 3. Travel - $ 4. Subsistence - $ 5. Other - $ 6. Number of Participants/Trainees 0 Section F, Other Direct Costs - $ 1. Materials and Supplies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 31, 2013 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through August 31, 2013 Graph of cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

22

EPA: Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

how cumulative impacts are assessed in environmental impact analysis, CEQ developed a handbook entitled "Considering Cumulative Effects under the National Environmental Policy Act"...

23

Neutron source capability assessment for cumulative fission yields measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent analysis of high-quality cumulative fission yields data for Pu-239 published in the peer-reviewed literature showed that the quoted experimental uncertainties do not allow a clear statement on how the fission yields vary as a function of energy. [Prussin2009] To make such a statement requires a set of experiments with well 'controlled' and understood sources of experimental errors to reduce uncertainties as low as possible, ideally in the 1 to 2% range. The Inter Laboratory Working Group (ILWOG) determined that Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) would benefit from an experimental program with the stated goal to reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Following recent discussions between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there is a renewed interest in developing a concerted experimental program to measure fission yields in a neutron energy range from thermal energy (0.025 eV) to 14 MeV with an emphasis on discrete energies from 0.5 to 4 MeV. Ideally, fission yields would be measured at single energies, however, in practice there are only 'quasi-monoenergetic' neutrons sources of finite width. This report outlines a capability assessment as of June 2011 of available neutron sources that could be used as part of a concerted experimental program to measure cumulative fission yields. In a framework of international collaborations, capabilities available in the United States, at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom and at the Commissariat Energie Atomique (CEA) in France are listed. There is a need to develop an experimental program that will reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Fission and monoenergetic neutron sources are available that could support these fission yield experiments in the US, as well as at AWE and CEA. Considerations that will impact the final choice of experimental venues are: (1) Availability during the timeframe of interest; (2) Ability to accommodate special nuclear materials; (3) Cost; (4) Availability of counting facilities; and (5) Expected experimental uncertainties.

Descalle, M A; Dekin, W; Kenneally, J

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

24

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act This handbook presents the results of research and consultations by the Council on Environmental Quality concerning the consideration of cumulative effects in analyses prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). It introduces the NEPA practitioner and other interested parties to the complex issue of cumulative effects, outlines general principles, presents useful steps, and provides information on methods of cumulative effects analysis and data sources. Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act More Documents & Publications EIS-0333: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

26

Cumulative mass approach for column testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cumulative mass approach for laboratory column testing using an analytical solution for miscible transport through soil is presented. The cumulative mass approach differs from the more traditional approach for column testing in that the analysis of the measured data is in terms of mass of solute instead of solute concentration. The potential advantages of the cumulative mass approach are: (1) The influence of increment in effluent sample volume on the measured concentrations is removed from consideration; (2) the effluent sampling procedure is less labor-intensive, and therefore potentially more cost-effective; and (3) the retardation factor and effective porosity can be evaluated directly from plots of the test results. A comparison of analyses of measured data based on the cumulative mass approach with the more traditional concentration-based approach indicates slight differences (less than 3%) in the regressed values of the dispersion coefficient and retardation factor. These differences are attributed to greater scatter in the data for the more traditional approach and to slight errors involved in the traditional approach due to plotting the average, incremental concentrations at the pore volumes of flow corresponding to the middle of the sampling interval.

Shackelford, C.D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)] [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented for approximately 165 abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma that have produced 10,000 or more barrels of oil prior to abandonment. The following information is provided for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date of field; year of last production, if known; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Chism, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a /sup 3/He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

Swansen, J.E.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a .sup.3 He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output ) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

Swansen, James E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

LOW ENERGY COUNTING CHAMBERS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beta particle counter adapted to use an end window made of polyethylene terephthalate was designed. The extreme thinness of the film results in a correspondingly high transmission of incident low-energy beta particles by the window. As a consequence, the counting efficiency of the present counter is over 40% greater than counters using conventional mica end windows.

Hayes, P.M.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Crossover of aging dynamics in polymer glass: from cumulative aging to non-cumulative aging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aging behavior of polymer glass, poly(methyl methacrylate), has been investigated through the measurement of ac dielectric susceptibility ata fixed frequency after a temperature shift $\\Delta T$ ($\\le $ 20 K)between two temperatures, $T_1$ and $T_2$. A crossover from cumulative aging to non-cumulative aging could be observed with increasing $\\Delta T$ using a twin temperature ($T$-) shift measurement. Based on a growth law of a dynamical coherent length given by activated dynamics, we obtained a unique coherent length for positive and negative $T$-shifts. The possibility of the existence of temperature chaos in polymer glasses is discussed.

Koji Fukao; Sinpei Yamawaki

2008-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

32

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Counting decompositions of additive polynomials Mark Giesbrecht  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Computer Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada (joint work with Joachim von zur Gathen, B-IT, Universit¨at Bonn, Germany) We consider the problem of counting decompositions of r-additive (or lin- earized) polynomials over a finite field Fq, for q a power of a prime power r. The r-additive polynomials

Giesbrecht, Mark

34

Abandoned oil fields in Kansas and Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

Data on approximately 400 abandoned oil fields in Kansas and 90 abandoned oil fields in Nebraska are presented. The following information is obtained on each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date; year of last production; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; API gravity; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (DMC)

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Figure 65. Cumulative growth in value of shipments from energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cumulative growth in value of shipments from energy-intensive industries in three cases, 2011-2040 ... Iron and steel Bulk Chemicals Glass Paper products Food products

36

Figure 67. Cumulative growth in value of shipments from energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cumulative growth in value of shipments from energy-intensive industries, 2011-2040, 2011-2025, and 2025 ... Iron and steel Bulk chemicals Glass Paper products Food ...

37

Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity  

SciTech Connect

EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on specific issues that are critical in EPA's review of NEPA documents under Section 309 of the Clean Air Act. The guidance offers information on what issues to look for in the analysis, what practical considerations should be kept in mind when reviewing the analysis, and what should be said in EPA comments concerning the adequacy of the analysis. Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents More Documents & Publications

39

EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon This document presents information supplemental to the Environmental Assessment (EA), Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon (DOE/EA-1758) prepared by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). This document addresses potential impacts associated with other proposed future geothermal projects in the area of the Newberry National Volcanic Monument that may be cumulative with those described in the EA. Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis of Drilling, Testing, and

40

EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis : Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon This document presents information supplemental to the Environmental Assessment (EA), Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon (DOE/EA-1758) prepared by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). This document addresses potential impacts associated with other proposed future geothermal projects in the area of the Newberry National Volcanic Monument that may be cumulative with those described in the EA. Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis of Drilling, Testing, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

BASIC PRINCIPLES OF SCINTILLATION COUNTING  

SciTech Connect

The basic principles of scintillation counting are reviewed. The design, performance, and operation of a placed on instruments ior medical uses. (C.H.)

Harris, C.C.; Hamblen, D.P.; Francis, J.E.

1959-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

CDFTBL: A statistical program for generating cumulative distribution functions from data  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the theory underlying the CDFTBL code and gives details for using the code. The CDFTBL code provides an automated tool for generating a statistical cumulative distribution function that describes a set of field data. The cumulative distribution function is written in the form of a table of probabilities, which can be used in a Monte Carlo computer code. A a specific application, CDFTBL can be used to analyze field data collected for parameters required by the PORMC computer code. Section 2.0 discusses the mathematical basis of the code. Section 3.0 discusses the code structure. Section 4.0 describes the free-format input command language, while Section 5.0 describes in detail the commands to run the program. Section 6.0 provides example program runs, and Section 7.0 provides references. The Appendix provides a program source listing. 11 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

Eslinger, P.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Offline count-limited certificates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the idea of offline count-limited certificates (or clics for short), and show how these can be implemented using minimal trusted hardware functionality already widely available today. Offline count-limited ... Keywords: authentication, offline payments, smartcards, trusted platform module (TPM)

Luis F. G. Sarmenta; Marten van Dijk; Jonathan Rhodes; Srinivas Devadas

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effectiveness of a Commercially Available Automated Pedestrian Counting Device in Urban Environments: Comparison with Manual Counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environments: Comparison with Manual Counts Ryan Greene-Environments: Comparison with Manual Counts Submission Date:labor cost associated with manual pedestrian counting and

Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R.; Lindau, Luis Antonio

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Convergence Characteristics of the Cumulant Expansion for Fourier Path Integrals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cumulant representation of the Fourier path integral method is examined to determine the asymptotic convergence characteristics of the imaginary-time density matrix with respect to the number of path variables $N$ included. It is proved that when the cumulant expansion is truncated at order $p$, the asymptotic convergence rate of the density matrix behaves like $N^{-(2p+1)}$. The complex algebra associated with the proof is simplified by introducing a diagrammatic representation of the contributing terms along with an associated linked-cluster theorem. The cumulant terms at each order are expanded in a series such that the the asymptotic convergence rate is maintained without the need to calculate the full cumulant at order $p$. Using this truncated expansion of each cumulant at order $p$, the numerical cost in developing Fourier path integral expressions having convergence order $N^{-(2p+1)}$ is shown to be approximately linear in the number of required potential energy evaluations making the method promising for actual numerical implementation.

Sharif D. Kunikeev; David L. Freeman; J. D. Doll

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

46

Session: What do we know about cumulative or population impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of a panel discussion followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The panelists were Paul Kerlinger, Curry and Kerlinger, LLC, Al Manville, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bill Kendall, US Geological Service. The panel addressed the potential cumulative impacts of wind turbines on bird and bat populations over time. Panel members gave brief presentations that touched on what is currently known, what laws apply, and the usefulness of population modeling. Topics addressed included which sources of modeling should be included in cumulative impacts, comparison of impacts from different modes of energy generation, as well as what research is still needed regarding cumulative impacts of wind energy development on bird and bat populations.

Kerlinger, Paul; Manville, Al; Kendall, Bill

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hanford whole body counting manual  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Hanford Whole Body Counting Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy--Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include providing in vivo measurements of internally deposited radioactivity in Hanford employees (or visitors). Specific chapters of this manual deal with the following subjects: program operational charter, authority, administration, and practices, including interpreting applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for in vivo measurement frequency, etc., for the plant-wide whole body counting services; state-of-the-art facilities and equipment used to provide the best in vivo measurement results possible for the approximately 11,000 measurements made annually; procedures for performing the various in vivo measurements at the Whole Body Counter (WBC) and related facilities including whole body counts; operation and maintenance of counting equipment, quality assurance provisions of the program, WBC data processing functions, statistical aspects of in vivo measurements, and whole body counting records and associated guidance documents. 16 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Lynch, T.P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Counting Strings, Wound and Bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze zero mode counting problems for Dirac operators that find their origin in string theory backgrounds. A first class of quantum mechanical models for which we compute the number of ground states arises from a string winding an isometric direction in a geometry, taking into account its energy due to tension. Alternatively, the models arise from deforming marginal bound states of a string winding a circle, and moving in an orthogonal geometry. After deformation, the number of bound states is again counted by the zero modes of a Dirac operator. We count these bound states in even dimensional asymptotically linear dilaton backgrounds as well as in Euclidean Taub-NUT. We show multiple pole behavior in the fugacities keeping track of a U(1) charge. We also discuss a second class of counting problems that arises when these backgrounds are deformed via the application of a heterotic duality transformation. We discuss applications of our results to Appell-Lerch sums and the counting of domain wall bound states.

Sujay K. Ashok; Suresh Nampuri; Jan Troost

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

49

LINEAR COUNT-RATE METER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A linear count-rate meter is designed to provide a highly linear output while receiving counting rates from one cycle per second to 100,000 cycles per second. Input pulses enter a linear discriminator and then are fed to a trigger circuit which produces positive pulses of uniform width and amplitude. The trigger circuit is connected to a one-shot multivibrator. The multivibrator output pulses have a selected width. Feedback means are provided for preventing transistor saturation in the multivibrator which improves the rise and decay times of the output pulses. The multivibrator is connected to a diode-switched, constant current metering circuit. A selected constant current is switched to an averaging circuit for each pulse received, and for a time determined by the received pulse width. The average output meter current is proportional to the product of the counting rate, the constant current, and the multivibrator output pulse width.

Henry, J.J.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Double Cumulative and Lorenz Curves in Weather Modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A graphical presentation of precipitation data has been used for some years in which the cumulative percentage of the total mass falling on various days of a sample of precipitation days, ordered from the largest to the smallest mass, is plotted ...

Edwin L. Crow

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A cumulative belief-degree approach for nuclear safeguards evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear safeguards are a set of activities to verify that a State is living up to its international undertakings not to use nuclear programs for nuclear weapons purposes. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uses a hierarchical assessment system ... Keywords: cumulative belif degree, decision making, fuzzy linguistic terms, nuclear safeguards

Özgür Kabak; Da Ruan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (<60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10.sup.5 counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

Hanson, James A. (Madison, WI); Kopp, Manfred K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (< 60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10/sup 5/ counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

Hanson, J.A.; Kopp, M.K.

1980-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

54

Coincident count rates in absorbing dielectric media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the effects of absorption on the nonlinear process of parametric down conversion is presented. Absorption within the nonlinear medium is accounted for by employing the framework of macroscopic QED and the Green tensor quantization of the electromagnetic field. An effective interaction Hamiltonian, which describes the nonlinear interaction of the electric field and the linear noise polarization field, is used to derive the quantum state of the light leaving a nonlinear crystal. The signal and idler modes of this quantum state are found to be a superpositions of the electric and noise polarization fields. Using this state, the expression for the coincident count rates for both Type I and Type II conversion are found. The nonlinear interaction with the noise polarization field were shown to cause an increase in the rate on the order of 10^{-12} for absorption of 10% per cm. This astonishingly small effect is found to be negligible compared to the decay caused by linear absorption of the propagating modes. From the expressions for the biphoton amplitude it can be seen the maximally entangled states can still be produced even in the presence of strong absorption.

J. A. Crosse; Stefan Scheel

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

55

Coincident count rates in absorbing dielectric media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the effects of absorption on the nonlinear process of parametric down conversion is presented. Absorption within the nonlinear medium is accounted for by employing the framework of macroscopic QED and the Green tensor quantization of the electromagnetic field. An effective interaction Hamiltonian, which describes the nonlinear interaction of the electric field and the linear noise polarization field, is used to derive the quantum state of the light leaving a nonlinear crystal. The signal and idler modes of this quantum state are found to be a superpositions of the electric and noise polarization fields. Using this state, the expression for the coincident count rates for both Type I and Type II conversion are found. The nonlinear interaction with the noise polarization field were shown to cause an increase in the rate on the order of 10^{-12} for absorption of 10% per cm. This astonishingly small effect is found to be negligible compared to the decay caused by linear absorption of the propagating mo...

Crosse, J A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Abandoned oil fields in Alaska, California, Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, Utah and Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication lists approximately 250 abandoned oil fields in Alaska, California, Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, Utah and Wyoming that have produced 10,000 or more barrels of oil before abandonment. The following information is provided for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery data of field; year of last production; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect

The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Property:EditCount | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Property:EditCount Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "EditCount"...

59

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Draft annual report for the Cumulative Effects Study for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

A SAS-macro for estimation of the cumulative incidence using Poisson regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In survival analyses, we often estimate the hazard rate of a specific cause. Sometimes the main focus is not the hazard rates but the cumulative incidences, i.e., the probability of having failed from a specific cause prior to a given time. The cumulative ... Keywords: Competing risks, Cox regression, Cumulative incidence, Hazard rate, Poisson regression, Survival analysis

Berit Lindum Waltoft

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Happy Earth Day! 39 and Counting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Day! 39 and Counting Day! 39 and Counting Happy Earth Day! 39 and Counting April 22, 2009 - 10:55am Addthis Drew Bittner Web Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy It was in 1970 that Sen. Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin established "Earth Day" as a teaching opportunity for budding environmentalists. Seems like a long time ago-I was all of six years old and to me, "green" was something Kermit the Frog sang about being. We've come a long way since then. Earth Day is now a national celebration of environmentalism and conservation. A lot of what we in EERE do is directly supporting the ideals and aspirations of Earth Day, and you can see growing support from major corporations, media and academia. It's pretty exciting, and definitely an exciting time to be in the energy field.

62

Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems  

SciTech Connect

Systems that allow users to store and retrieve spatial data, provide for analyses of spatial data, and offer highly detailed display of spatial data are referred to as geographic information systems, or more typically, GIS. Since their initial usage in the 1960s, GISs have evolved as a means of assembling and analyzing diverse data pertaining to specific geographical areas, with spatial locations of the data serving as the organizational basis for the information systems. The structure of GISs is built around spatial identifiers and the methods used to encode data for storage and manipulation. This paper examines how GIS has been used in typical environmental assessment, its use for cumulative impact assessment, and explores litigation that occurred in the United States Federal court system where GIS was used in some aspect of cumulative effects. The paper also summarizes fifteen case studies that range from area wide transportation planning to wildlife and habitat impacts, and draws together a few lessons learned from this review of literature and litigation.

Atkinson, Samuel F., E-mail: atkinson@unt.edu [Institute of Applied Science, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 310559, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Canter, Larry W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [Environmental Impact Training, P.O. Box 9143, Horseshoe Bay, TX 78657 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents, EPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents, EPA Office of Federal Activities Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents, EPA Office of Federal Activities The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on specific issues that are critical in EPA's review of NEPA documents under Section 309 of the Clean Air Act. G-EPA-cumulative_impacts.pdf More Documents & Publications Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and

64

Public service impacts of geothermal development: cumulative impacts study of the Geysers KGRA. Final staff report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in the Geysers are identified. Using two different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in the Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdications are examined, and these costs are compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed and a framework presented for calculating mitigation costs for school and road impacts.

Matthews, K.M.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Microsoft Word - SGIG FAQ SIPRIS Jobs cumulative 11222010 1300.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2010 1 Reporting of Jobs Created/Retained in SIPRIS November 2010 1 Reporting of Jobs Created/Retained in SIPRIS Reporting of Jobs Created/Retained in SIPRIS This FAQ compliments the DOE SGIG Reporting Guidance (Section 4) available at the following URL: http://www.oe.energy.gov/DocumentsandMedia/SGIG_DOE_REPORTING_GUIDANCE_OCT_2010.pdf For more information regarding SIPRIS reporting, please contact the SIPRIS Help Desk at 1-202-251- 4181 or siprishelpdesk@hq.doe.gov. For information regarding federalreporting.gov, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse at 1-888-363-7289 or http://www.energy.gov/recovery/ARRA_Reporting_Requirements.htm. Question: I will be reporting jobs data into SIPRIS for the first time in the next quarterly cycle. Do I report cumulative jobs created/retained or just jobs created/retained during the quarter?

66

On counting untyped lambda terms Pierre Lescanne  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On counting untyped lambda terms Pierre Lescanne University of Lyon, ENS de Lyon, 46 all´ee d counting -terms has been proposed yet, and the combinatorics of -calculus is considered a hard problem. The difficulty lies in the fact that the recursive expression of the numbers of terms of size n with at most m

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

On counting untyped lambda terms Pierre Lescanne  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On counting untyped lambda terms Pierre Lescanne University of Lyon, ENS de Lyon, 46 all´ee d'Italie, 69364 Lyon, France Abstract We present several results on counting untyped lambda terms, i.e., on telling how many terms belong to such or such class, according to the size of the terms and

68

May 19, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Meeting - HSS Project, Cumulative...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 HSS total directives: 107 (as of 312010) Safety and Security Directives Reform - Cumulative Progress (June 15, 2011) 90 100 Total - Directives with JMs Approved by DRB Total -...

69

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

70

Cumulative biological impacts of The Geysers geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cumulative nature of current and potential future biological impacts from full geothermal development in the steam-dominated portion of The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA are identified by the California Energy Commission staff. Vegetation, wildlife, and aquatic resources information have been reviewed and evaluated. Impacts and their significance are discussed and staff recommendations presented. Development of 3000 MW of electrical energy will result in direct vegetation losses of 2790 acres, based on an estimate of 11.5% loss per lease-hold of 0.93 acres/MW. If unmitigated, losses will be greater. Indirect vegetation losses and damage occur from steam emissions which contain elements (particularly boron) toxic to vegetation. Other potential impacts include chronic low-level boron exposure, acid rain, local climate modification, and mechanical damage. A potential exists for significant reduction and changes in wildlife from direct habitat loss and development influences. Highly erosive soils create the potential for significant reduction of aquatic resources, particularly game fish. Toxic spills have caused some temporary losses of aquatic species. Staff recommends monitoring and implementation of mitigation measures at all geothermal development stages.

Brownell, J.A.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Complexity of Counting CSP with Complex Weights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a complexity dichotomy theorem for the counting Constraint Satisfaction Problem (#CSP in short) with complex weights. To this end, we give three conditions for its tractability. Let F be any finite set of complex-valued functions, then we prove that #CSP(F) is solvable in polynomial time if all three conditions are satisfied; and is #P-hard otherwise. Our complexity dichotomy generalizes a long series of important results on counting problems: (a) the problem of counting graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single symmetric binary function in F; (b) the problem of counting directed graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single not-necessarily-symmetric binary function in F; and (c) the standard form of #CSP is when all functions in F take values in {0,1}.

Cai, Jin-Yi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Counting Distinct Elements in a Data Stream  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present three algorithms to count the number of distinct elements in a data stream to within a factor of 1 ± ¿. Our algorithms improve upon known algorithms for this problem, and offer a spectrum of time/space tradeoffs.

Ziv Bar-Yossef; T. S. Jayram; Ravi Kumar; D. Sivakumar; Luca Trevisan

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Status of Cumulative Risk Methods in Air-Based Risk Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developments in cumulative risk assessment practices and influence on public health and environmental regulation continue to increase. Primary drivers include stakeholder-based concerns over environmental justice, as well as recent initiatives to reevaluate the current regulatory risk assessment paradigm. The United States Environmental Protection Agencyalong with other state agencies, public health advocates, and researcherscontinues to strive toward application of cumulative risk methodologies capable ...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

Equality in cumulative voting: A systematic review with an improvement proposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Context: Prioritization is an essential part of requirements engineering, software release planning and many other software engineering disciplines. Cumulative Voting (CV) is known as a relatively simple method for prioritizing requirements on a ratio ... Keywords: Compositional data, Cumulative voting, Log-ratio, Prioritization, Requirements engineering

K. Rievi?S; R. Torkar

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

EPA: Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Federal Activities (2252A) EPA 315-R-99-002/May 1999 1. INTRODUCTION The combined, incremental effects of human activity, referred to as cumulative impacts, pose a serious threat to the environment. While they may be insignificant by themselves, cumulative impacts accumulate over time, from one or more sources, and can result in the degradation of important resources. Because federal projects cause or are affected by cumulative impacts, this type of impact must be assessed in documents prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent

76

Nonequilibrium time evolution of higher order cumulants of conserved charges and event-by-event analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the time evolution of higher order cumulants of conserved charges in a volume with the diffusion master equation. Applying the result to the diffusion of non-Gaussian fluctuations in the hadronic stage of relativistic heavy ion collisions, we show that the fourth-order cumulant of net-electric charge at LHC energy is suppressed compared with the recently observed second-order cumulant at ALICE, if the higher order cumulants at hadronization are suppressed compared with their values in the hadron phase in equilibrium. The significance of the experimental information on the rapidity window dependence of various cumulants in investigating the history of the dynamical evolution of the hot medium created in relativistic heavy ion collisions is emphasized.

Masakiyo Kitazawa; Masayuki Asakawa; Hirosato Ono

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

77

Abandoned oil fields in Alabama, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, New York, Tennessee and West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented for approximately 240 abandoned oil fields in Alabama, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, New York, Tennessee, and West Virginia. Production data were not available on a majority of abandoned fields in New York, Missouri, and Kentucky. Consequently, some fields with less than 10,000 barrels cumulative production are included. The following information is presented for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date of field; year of last production; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Abandoned Texas oil fields  

SciTech Connect

Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Louisiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

80

Washington Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Tennessee Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

82

Minnesota Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

83

California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

84

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

85

Mississippi Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

86

FLOP Counts for Single-Node Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLOP Counts for "Small" Single-Node Miniapplication Tests FLOP Counts for "Small" Single-Node Miniapplication Tests FLOP Counts for "Small" Single-Node Miniapplication Tests These data, obtained using the NERSC Hopper system, are provided for reference. Code MPI Tasks Threads Reference TFLOP Count Benchmark Time (seconds) # of iterations miniFE 144 1 5.05435E+12 130.2 (total program time) miniGhost 96 1 6.55500E+12 76.5 AMG 96 1 1.30418E+12 66.95 18 UMT 96 1 1.30211E+13 416.99 49 SNAP 96 1 5.84246E+11 15.37 3059 miniDFT 40 1 2.32379E+13 153.97 GTC 64 1 6.63670E+13 1839.4 MILC 24 1 1.45971E+13 744.3 CORRECTION (02 August 2013): The values given for the reference counts are FLOPs, not TFLOPs. Last edited: 2013-08-02 09:40:18

87

Amp-hour counting control for PV hybrid power systems  

SciTech Connect

The performance of an amp-hour (Ah) counting battery charge control algorithm has been defined and tested using the Digital Solar Technologies MPR-9400 microprocessor based PV hybrid charge controller. This work included extensive field testing of the charge algorithm on flooded lead-antimony and valve regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. The test results after one-year have demonstrated that PV charge utilization, battery charge control, and battery state of charge (SOC) has been significantly improved by providing maximum charge to the batteries while limiting battery overcharge to manufacturers specifications during variable solar resource and load periods.

Hund, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, B. [Biri Systems, Ithaca, NY (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Cumulative impacts study of The Geysers KGRA: public-service impacts of geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal development in The Geysers KGRA has affected local public services and fiscal resources in Sonoma, Lake, Mendocino, and Napa counties. Each of these counties underwent rapid population growth between 1970 and 1980, some of which can be attributed to geothermal development. The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in The Geysers is identified. Using three different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in The Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdictions are examined and compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed, and a framework is presented for calculating mitigation costs per unit of public service.

Matthews, K.M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China Authors biophysical effects of small (China's Nu River basin, and compare effects The hydropower sector currently comprises eighty percent of global capacity for renewable energy generation

Tullos, Desiree

90

Constraining the Ratio of Global Warming to Cumulative CO2 Emissions Using CMIP5 Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of warming to cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide has been shown to be approximately independent of time and emissions scenarios and directly relates emissions to temperature. It is therefore a potentially important tool for climate ...

Nathan P. Gillett; Vivek K. Arora; Damon Matthews; Myles R. Allen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Constraining the ratio of global warming to cumulative CO2 emissions using CMIP5 simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of warming to cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide has been shown to be approximately independent of time and emissions scenario, and directly relates emissions to temperature. It is therefore a potentially important tool for climate ...

Nathan P. Gillett; Vivek K. Arora; Damon Matthews; Myles R. Allen

92

Characterization of Weekly Cumulative Rainfall Forecasts over Meteorological Subdivisions of India Using a GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weekly cumulative rainfall forecasts were made for the meteorologically homogeneous areas of the Indian subcontinent, divided into meteorological subdivisions, by performing 7-day integrations of the operational Indian T80 Global Spectral Model ...

S. A. Saseendran; S. V. Singh; L. S. Rathore; Someshwar Das

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Cumulative Impact of Cloud Droplet Nucleating Aerosols on Orographic Snowfall in Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hygroscopic pollution aerosols have the potential to alter winter orographic snowfall totals and spatial distributions by modification of high-elevation supercooled orographic clouds and the riming process. The authors investigate the cumulative ...

Stephen M. Saleeby; William R. Cotton; Jamie D. Fuller

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Counting and generating lambda terms Katarzyna Grygiel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Counting and generating lambda terms Katarzyna Grygiel Theoretical Computer Science Department assistants. However, few is known about combinatorial properties of lambda terms, in particular, about many terms of a given size are there? What is a "typical" structure of a simply typed term? Despite

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

95

Radioactive Background Evaluation by Atom Counting  

SciTech Connect

We propose a new method of measuring 85Kr background levels by direct counting of impurity atoms. The beta-decay of 85Kr is a significant radioactive background for experiments that use liquified noble gases to search for dark matter and measure the low-energy solar neutrino flux. While there are several proposed methods for reducing Kr levels in these experiments, an independent technique is needed for measuring very low Kr levels. By selectively exciting Kr atoms to a metastable state, capturing them in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), and detecting fluorescence from the trapped atoms, individual Kr atoms can be counted with a high signal-to-noise ratio. This approach offers both higher sensitivity and shorter measurement times than more conventional techniques, with an estimated sensitivity of 3 x 10-14 in only 3 hours of integration.

Orzel, Chad [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States); McKinsey, Daniel [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

96

Particle Energy Spectrum, Revisited from a Counting Statistics Perspective  

SciTech Connect

In nuclear science, gamma and neutron spectra are counted energy by energy, and then particle by particle. Until recently, few studies have been performed on how exactly those energy spectra are counted, or how those counts are correlated. Because of lack of investigation, cross section covariance and correlation matrices are usually estimated using perturbation method. We will discuss a statistical counting scheme that shall mimic the gamma and neutron counting process used in nuclear science. From this counting scheme, the cross section covariance and correlation can be statistically derived.

None

2012-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

EMMCVPR 2011, St. Petersburg Minimizing Count-based High Order Terms in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EMMCVPR 2011, St. Petersburg Minimizing Count-based High Order Terms in Markov Random Fields Thomas to handle computer vision problems inducing models with very high order terms - in fact terms of maximal order. Here we consider terms where the cost function depends only on the number of variables

Lunds Universitet

98

Deep UV photon-counting detectors and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photon counting detectors are used in many diverse applications and are well-suited to situations in which a weak signal is present in a relatively benign background. Examples of successful system applications of photon-counting ...

Geboff, Adam B.

99

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print Wednesday, 31 May 2006 00:00 DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips...

100

Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Utah Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

102

Virginia Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

103

Kansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

104

Alabama Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

105

Michigan Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

106

Maryland Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

107

Arkansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

108

Iowa Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

109

Colorado Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

110

Illinois Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

111

Nebraska Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

112

Texas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

113

Ohio Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

114

Missouri Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

115

Oklahoma Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

116

Indiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

117

Wyoming Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

118

Oregon Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

119

Kentucky Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

120

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Locate Stations Locate Stations Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State on AddThis.com... Alternative Fueling Station Counts by State

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

New Mexico Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

122

MOCUS: moving object counting using ultrasonic sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Counting the number of moving objects in a given area has many practical applications. By investigating a series of state-of-the-art technologies, we propose a Moving Object Counting approach using Ultrasonic Sensor networks (MOCUS). ... Keywords: clustering, moving objects, object counting, sensor clusters, ultrasonic sensor networks, ultrasound, wireless networks, wireless sensor networks

Quanbin Chen; Min Gao; Jian Ma; Dian Zhang; Lionel M. Ni; Yunhao Liu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

University of Regina -Student Counts as of AUCC National Fall Count Data URL: http://www.uregina.ca/orp/facts.shtml  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Regina - Student Counts as of AUCC National Fall Count Data URL: http://www.uregina.ca/orp

Argerami, Martin

124

Amp-hour counting charge control for photovoltaic hybrid power systems  

SciTech Connect

An amp-hour counting battery charge control algorithm has been defined and tested using the Digital Solar Technologies MPR-9400 microprocessor based photovoltaic hybrid charge controller. This work included extensive laboratory and field testing of the charge algorithm on vented lead-antimony and valve regulated lead-acid batteries. The test results have shown that with proper setup amp-hour counting charge control is more effective than conventional voltage regulated sub-array shedding in returning the lead-acid battery to a high state of charge.

Hund, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, B. [Biri Systems, Ithaca, NY (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Supporting international entry decisions for construction firms using fuzzy preference relations and cumulative prospect theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper emphasizes on supporting international entry decisions for construction firms in a three-phase analysis process. Phase I identified significant factors as two categories, namely country and project factor levels. Phase II stuck on identifying ... Keywords: Alternative selection, Construction firms, Cumulative prospect theory, Fuzzy preference relations, International construction market

Min-Yuan Cheng; Hsing-Chih Tsai; Kai-Hsiang Chuang

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

Masden, Elizabeth A., E-mail: e.masden.1@research.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom) and Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fox, Anthony D., E-mail: tfo@dmu.d [Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Kalo, Grenavej 14, 8410 Ronde (Denmark); Furness, Robert W., E-mail: r.furness@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bullman, Rhys, E-mail: rhys.bullman@rpsgroup.co [Scottish Natural Heritage, The Beta Centre, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4NF (United Kingdom); Haydon, Daniel T., E-mail: d.haydon@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Interim Report on Cumulative Risk Assessment for Radiological and Chemical Constituents of Concern at Decommissioning Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning nuclear facilities focus extensive efforts on site characterization to demonstrate regulatory compliance in the termination of site licenses. Many decommissioning sites, while recognizing radiological characterization and assessment needs, lacked experience in chemical risk assessment. This report documents plant approaches for performing cumulative risk assessments of both radiological and non-radiological constituents of concern.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

Risk decision analysis in emergency response: A method based on cumulative prospect theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency response of a disaster is generally a risk decision-making problem with multiple states. In emergency response analysis, it is necessary to consider decision-maker's (DM's) psychological behavior such as reference dependence, loss aversion ... Keywords: Cumulative prospect theory (CPT), Emergency response, Ranking, Risk decision-making

Yang Liu, Zhi-Ping Fan, Yao Zhang

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

RECOGNITION OF NOISY SPEECH USING CUMULANT-BASED LINEAR PREDICTION ANALYSIS K.K. Paliwal and M.M. Sondhi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. The cumulant-based LF analysis method can suppress the effects of ad&he Gaussiannoise whether white or colored to deal with thus problem [2,3,4, 5,6,7]. In this paper, we propose to use LF parameters derived through-order cumulants in thuspaper. However, the results reported in this paper can be extended to higher

131

Blind channel identification algorithms based on the Parafac decomposition of cumulant tensors: The single and multiuser cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we exploit the symmetry properties of 4th-order cumulants to develop new blind channel identification algorithms that utilize the parallel factor (Parafac) decomposition of cumulant tensors by solving a single-step (SS) least squares (LS) ... Keywords: Channel identification, Parameter estimation, Tensor decomposition, Underdetermined linear mixtures

Carlos Estêvão R. Fernandes; Gérard Favier; João Cesar M. Mota

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A cumulant-based method for gait identification using accelerometer data with principal component analysis and support vector machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a cumulant-based method for identification of gait using accelerometer data is presented. Acceleration data of three different walking speeds (slow, normal and fast) for each subject was acquired by the accelerometer embedded in cell phone ... Keywords: accelerometer, body sensor, cumulants, gait identification, gait recognition, high-order statistics, pattern recognition

Sebastijan Sprager; Damjan Zazula

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

134

Program on Technology Innovation: Cumulative Risk Assessment of Urban Air Toxics: Pilot Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative risk modeling for estimating the burden of exposure to urban air toxics requires consideration of a range of factors influencing population health. These factors include multiple toxic compounds, a variety of pollutant sources, background levels of air pollutants, and non-chemical stressors not historically considered in regulatory risk assessments. To date, quantitative methods to account for all these factors remain sporadic and relatively untested. However, the United States ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

First AID (Atom counting for Isotopic Determination).  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has established an in vitro bioassay monitoring program in compliance with the requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. One aspect of this program involves monitoring plutonium levels in at-risk workers. High-risk workers are monitored using the ultra-sensitive Therrnal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) technique to ensure compliance with DOE standards. TIMS is used to measure atom ratios of 239Pua nd 240Puw ith respect to a tracer isotope ('Pu). These ratios are then used to calculate the amount of 239Pu and 240Pup resent. This low-level atom counting technique allows the calculation of the concentration levels of 239Pu and 240Pu in urine for at risk workers. From these concentration levels, dose assessments can be made and worker exposure levels can be monitored. Detection limits for TIMS analysis are on the order of millions of atoms, which translates to activity levels of 150 aCi 239Pua nd 500 aCi for 240Pu. pCi for Our poster presentation will discuss the ultra-sensitive, low-level analytical technique used to measure plutonium isotopes and the data verification methods used for validating isotopic measurements.

Roach, J. L. (Jeffrey L.); Israel, K. M. (Kimberly M.); Steiner, R. E. (Robert E.); Duffy, C. J. (Clarence J.); Roench, F. R. (Fred R.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Opacity of Spiral Galaxy Disks: dust opacity from calibrated counts of distant galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The opacity of foreground spiral disks can be probed from the number of distant galaxies seen through them. To calibrate this number for effects other than the dust extinction, Gonzalez et al (1998) developed the "Synthetic Field Method". A synthetic field is an extincted Hubble Deep Field added to the science field. The relation between the dimming and the number of retrieved synthetic galaxies calibrates the number found in the science field. Here I present results from counts in 32 HST/WFPC2 fields. The relation between opacity and radius, arm and disk, surface brightness and HI are presented. The opacity is found to be caused by a clumpy distribution of clouds in the disk. The brighter parts of the disk -the center and arms- are also the more opaque ones. The dust distribution in spiral disks is found to be more extended than the stellar disk. A comparison between HI column densities and opacity shows little relation between the two.

B. W. Holwerda; R. A. Gonzalez; Ronald J. Allen; P. C. van der Kruit

2005-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

137

Gross alpha/beta determination by liquid scintillation counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is used to assay liquid samples for both gross alpha and gross beta (including tritium) activity in order to declare these samples clean.'' This method provides several advantages over traditional gross assay techniques including easy sample preparation, no sample self-absorption, short counting times, acceptable lower limits of detection (LLD's), and convenient sample disposal.

Leyba, J.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Gross alpha/beta determination by liquid scintillation counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is used to assay liquid samples for both gross alpha and gross beta (including tritium) activity in order to declare these samples ``clean.`` This method provides several advantages over traditional gross assay techniques including easy sample preparation, no sample self-absorption, short counting times, acceptable lower limits of detection (LLD`s), and convenient sample disposal.

Leyba, J.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nodal domains on graphs - How to count them and why?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the present manuscript is to collect known results and present some new ones relating to nodal domains on graphs, with special emphasize on nodal counts. Several methods for counting nodal domains will be presented, and their relevance as a tool in spectral analysis will be discussed.

Ram Band; Idan Oren; Uzy Smilansky

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

140

Nodal domains on graphs - How to count them and why?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the present manuscript is to collect known results and present some new ones relating to nodal domains on graphs, with special emphasize on nodal counts. Several methods for counting nodal domains will be presented, and their relevance as a tool in spectral analysis will be discussed.

Band, Ram; Smilansky, Uzy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Los Alamos researchers demonstrated improved technical methods capable of directly counting small RNA molecules in pathogenic (disease-causing) bacteria. June 17, 2013 Artist's concept of the fluorescence labeling and detection of small RNA in pathogenic bacteria. Artist's concept of the fluorescence labeling and detection of small RNA in pathogenic bacteria. The new technique reduced the number of false positives, which improved the accuracy of the count statistics, and it significantly reduced the image processing time. Small molecules of RNA (tens to hundreds of nucleotides in length) play a key regulatory role in bacteria. Due to their small size, directly

142

Whole-body counting in the Marshall Islands  

SciTech Connect

In 1978 the Marshall Islands Radiological Safety Program was organized to perform radiation measurements and assess radiation doses for the people of the Bikini, Enewetak, Rongelap and Utirik Atolls. One of the major field components of this program is whole- body counting (WBC). WBC is used to monitor the quantity of gamma- emitting radionuclides present in individuals. A primary objective of the program was to establish {sup 137}Cesium body contents among the Enewetak, Rongelap and Utirik populations. {sup 137}Cs was the only gamma-emitting fission radionuclide detected in the 1,967 persons monitored. {sup 137}Cs body burdens tended to increase with age for both sexes, and were higher in males. The average {sup 137}Cs dose Annual Effective Dose for the three populations was as follows: For Enewetak, the dose was 22{+-}4 {mu}Sv. For Utirik, the dose was 33{+-} 3 {mu}Sv. Since 1985 the Rongelap people have been self-exiled to Mejatto. Biological elimination should have reduced their dose to virtually zero, and the measured dose was 2{+-}2 {mu}Sv. If they had remained on Rongelap Island, the calculated dose would have been 99 {mu}Sv, which is about one-third of the background dose. 7 refs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Sun, L.C.; Clinton, J.; Kaplan, E.; Meinhold, C.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Quark cluster contribution to cumulative proton emission in fragmentation of carbon ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the FRAGM experiment at heavy ion accelerator complex TWAC-ITEP, the proton yields at an angle 3.5$^\\circ$ have been measured at fragmentation of carbon ions at $T_0 = $ 0.6, 0.95 and 2.0 GeV/nucleon on beryllium target. The data are presented as invariant proton yields on cumulative variable $x$ in the range 0.9 carbon nuclei are estimated to be 8--12% for six-quark clusters and 0.2--0.6% for nine-quark clusters.

B. M. Abramov; P. N. Alekseev; Yu. A. Borodin; S. A. Bulychjov; I. A. Dukhovskoy; A. I. Khanov; A. P. Krutenkova; V. V. Kulikov; M. A. Martemyanov; M. A. Matsyuk; E. N. Turdakina

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

NEPA Lessons Learned Cumulative Index December 2012 1 DOE NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cumulative Index December 2012 1 Cumulative Index December 2012 1 DOE NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report A Accident Analyses Sep 95/12; Dec 95/15; Sep 97/7; Sep 98/7; Dec 98/5; Jun 00/3, 8 guidance issued for preparation of Sep 02/16; Dec 02/20 Adaptive Management also see: Environmental Management Systems Dec 02/8; Jun 07/17; Jun 08/8 training Dec 06/16 Administrative Record also see: Legal Issues Mar 97/13; Sep 97/7; Jun 98/7; Dec 98/4 Advisory Council on Historic Preservation also see: National Historic Preservation Act Dec 98/11; Jun 99/3; Sep 99/2; Dec 00/6; Jun 01/8; Dec 01/6; Sep 02/17; Dec 03/13; Sep 04/16 Affected Environment Sep 95/12; Dec 98/7; Sep 00/8 Air Force Sep 11/10 Alternative Arrangements (emergency actions) see: Council on Environmental Quality: alternative arrangements

145

Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bridge design should take into account not only safety and functionality, but also the cost effectiveness of investments throughout a bridge life-cycle. This work presents a probabilistic approach to compute the life-cycle cost (LCC) of corroding reinforced concrete (RC) bridges in earthquake prone regions. The approach is developed by combining cumulative seismic damage and damage associated to corrosion due to environmental conditions. Cumulative seismic damage is obtained from a low-cycle fatigue analysis. Chloride-induced corrosion of steel reinforcement is computed based on Fick’s second law of diffusion. The proposed methodology accounts for the uncertainties in the ground motion parameters, the distance from source, the seismic demand on the bridge, and the corrosion initiation time. The statistics of the accumulated damage and the cost of repairs throughout the bridge life-cycle are obtained by Monte-Carlo simulation. As an illustration of the proposed approach, the effect of design parameters on the life-cycle cost of an example RC bridge is studied. The results are shown to be valuable in better estimating the condition of existing bridges (i.e., total accumulated damage at any given time) and, therefore, can help schedule inspection and maintenance programs. In addition, by taking into consideration the deterioration process over a bridge life-cycle, it is possible to make an estimate of the optimum design parameters by minimizing, for example, the expected cost throughout the life of the structure.

Kumar, Ramesh

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Assessing cumulative impacts to wintering Bald Eagles and their habitats in western Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) of Washington, the largest wintering population in the lower 48 states, are subject to numerous pressures and impacts from human activites. An evaluative method potential cumulative impacts of multiple hydroelectric development and logging activities on known and potential eagle use areas. Four resource components include food supply, roost sites, mature riparian forest, and disturbance. In addition to actual estimates of losses in food supply (fish biomass in kg) and habitat (km/sup 2/) in one river basin, impact levels from 0 (none) to 4 (high) were assigned for each development and for each component based on the impacts anticipated and the estimated value of the site to eagles. Midwinter eagle surveys, aerial photography, topographic and forest stand maps, and site visits were used in the analysis. Impacts were considered additive for all but the disturbance component, which was adjusted for potential synergism between developments. Adjustments were made for mitigation before the impacts were aggregated into a single, dimensionless cumulative impact score. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Witmer, G.W.; O'Neil, T.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Calculation of the cumulative reaction probability via a discrete variable representation with absorbing boundary conditions  

SciTech Connect

A new method is suggested for the calculation of the microcanonical cumulative reaction probability {ital via} flux autocorrelation relations. The Hamiltonian and the flux operators are computed in a discrete variable representation (DVR) and a well-behaved representation for the Green's operator, {ital G}({ital E}{sup +}), is obtained by imposing absorbing boundary conditions (ABC). Applications to a one-dimensional-model problem and to the collinear H+H{sub 2} reaction show that the DVR-ABC scheme provides a very efficient method for the {ital direct} calculation of the microcanonical probability, circumventing the need to compute the state-to-state dynamics. Our results indicate that the cumulative reaction probability can be calculated to a high accuracy using a rather small number of DVR points, confined to the vicinity of the transition state. Only limited information regarding the potential-energy surface is therefore required, suggesting that this method would be applicable also to higher dimensionality problems, for which the complete potential surface is often unknown.

Seideman, T.; Miller, W.H. (Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

The range and roots constraints: specifying counting and occurrence problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a simple declarative language for specifying a wide range of counting and occurrence constraints. This specification language is executable since it immediately provides a polynomial propagation algorithm. To illustrate the capabilities of ...

Christian Bessiere; Emmanuel Hebrard; Brahim Hnich; Zeynep Kiziltan; Toby Walsh

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips covered with patterns of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These "DNA chips" are revolutionizing biotechnology, allowing scientists to identify and count many DNA sequences simultaneously. They are the enabling technology for genomic-based medicine and are a critical component of advanced diagnostic systems for medical and homeland security applications. Like digital chips, DNA chips are parallel, accurate, fast, and small. These advantages, however, can only be realized if the fragile biomolecules survive the attachment process intact. Furthermore, biomolecules must be properly oriented to perform their biological function. In other words, the DNA literally must stand up to be counted. Understanding both the attachment and orientation of DNA on gold surfaces was the goal of recent experiments performed at ALS Beamline 8.0.1 by an international collaboration of scientists.

150

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips covered with patterns of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These "DNA chips" are revolutionizing biotechnology, allowing scientists to identify and count many DNA sequences simultaneously. They are the enabling technology for genomic-based medicine and are a critical component of advanced diagnostic systems for medical and homeland security applications. Like digital chips, DNA chips are parallel, accurate, fast, and small. These advantages, however, can only be realized if the fragile biomolecules survive the attachment process intact. Furthermore, biomolecules must be properly oriented to perform their biological function. In other words, the DNA literally must stand up to be counted. Understanding both the attachment and orientation of DNA on gold surfaces was the goal of recent experiments performed at ALS Beamline 8.0.1 by an international collaboration of scientists.

151

The Limits of Counting Accuracy in Distributed Neural Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learning about a causal or statistical association depends on comparing frequencies of joint occurrence with frequencies expected from separate occurrences, and to do this, events must somehow be counted. Physiological mechanisms can easily generate ...

A. R. Gardner-medwin; H. B. Barlow

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips covered with patterns of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These "DNA...

153

Tracking system for photon-counting laser radar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to build the tracking system for a photon-counting laser radar specifically a laser radar that has the ability to perform direct and coherent detection measurement at low signal levels with ...

Chang, Joshua TsuKang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Template:CompanyCsvDownloadCount | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

number of companies. Should be called in the following format CompanyCsvDownloadCount |cat Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTemplate:CompanyCsvDownloadC...

155

Correlated neutron counting for the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correlated neutron counting techniques, such as neutron coincidence and multiplicity counting, are widely employed at nuclear fuel cycle facilities for the accountancy of nuclear material such as plutonium. These techniques need to be improved and enhanced to meet the challenges of complex measurement items and future nuclear safeguards applications, for example; the non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel, high counting rate applications, small sample measurements, and Helium-3 replacement. At the same time simulation tools, used for the design of detection systems based on these techniques, are being developed in anticipation of future needs. This seminar will present the theory and current state of the practice of temporally correlated neutron counting. A range of future safeguards applications will then be presented in the context of research projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Overlooking roots: a framework for making nondeferred reference-counting garbage collection fast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous optimizations exist for improving the performance of nondeferred reference-counting (RC) garbage collection. Their designs are ad hoc, intended to exploit different count removal opportunities. This paper shows that many of these optimizations ... Keywords: reference counting, static analysis

Pramod G. Joisha

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

An on-the-fly reference counting garbage collector for Java  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reference counting is not naturally suitable for running on multiprocessors. The update of pointers and reference counts requires atomic and synchronized operations. We present a novel reference counting algorithm suitable for a multiprocessor that does ...

Yossi Levanoni; Erez Petrank

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Appraising the sustainability of project alternatives: An increasing role for cumulative effects assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating and comparing development alternatives with regard to sustainability is an important goal for comprehensive project appraisal. In the United States, this component has been largely missing from standard environmental impact assessment practice. Cumulative effects assessment provides a way to appraise the sustainability of project alternatives in terms of their probable contributions to long-term trends affecting the condition of valued environmental components. Sustainability metrics and predictors are being developed as criteria for rating systems and evaluation processes that are applied to community planning, building design, and transportation infrastructure. Increasing interest in adaptive management is also providing cost-effective solutions to optimizing safety and function throughout the long-term operation of a facility or infrastructure. Recent federal legislation is making it easier to integrate sustainability features into development alternatives through early, community-based planning.

Senner, Robert, E-mail: robin.senner@ch2m.com

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Multiple uses of indicators and indices in cumulative effects assessment and management  

SciTech Connect

Both environmental indicators and multi-metric indices are useful for describing baseline conditions and qualitatively predicting the cumulative consequences of multiple actions. Several examples and case studies associated with indicators and/or indices are presented herein. They can be easily modified for usage in CEAM. Habitat suitability models reflect special indices related to habitat needs and quality for specific species or broad habitat types. Such models have been used to address direct and indirect effects, and with some modification, they can be also used to address cumulative effects of multiple actions. This review has indicated that there are numerous examples of such tools which have been or could be used in both EIA and CEAM. Some key lessons are: (1) in conducting CEAM studies, it is useful to think from the mindset that 'I am the VEC or indicator, and what is my historical and current condition and how have I, or will I, be affected by multiple past, present, and future actions?'; (2) due to the likely absence of detailed information on future actions, the described tools can still be used to 'predict' future conditions by focusing on qualitative up-or-down changes in individual indicators or indices with their aggregated displays; and (3) numerous regional and site-specific tools are currently available, with one example being indices of biological integrity for specific watersheds and water bodies. Such tools, even though they may not have been developed for CEAM usage, can certainly benefit CEAM studies and practice. Finally, usage of selected and appropriate tools as described herein can aid in conducting science-based, systematic, and documentable CEAM studies.

Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma and Environmental Impact Training, Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Atkinson, S.F. [Institute of Applied Science, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Bolocam Lockman Hole Millimeter-Wave Galaxy Survey: Galaxy Candidates and Number Counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of a new deep 1.1 mm survey using Bolocam, a millimeter-wavelength bolometer array camera designed for mapping large fields at fast scan rates, without chopping. A map, galaxy candidate list, and derived number counts are presented. This survey encompasses 324 arcmin^2 to an rms noise level (filtered for point sources) of 1.4 mJy/beam and includes the entire regions surveyed by the published 8 mJy 850 micron JCMT SCUBA and 1.2 mm IRAM MAMBO surveys. We reduced the data using a custom software pipeline to remove correlated sky and instrument noise via a principal component analysis. Extensive simulations and jackknife tests were performed to confirm the robustness of our source candidates and estimate the effects of false detections, bias, and completeness. In total, 17 source candidates were detected at a significance > 3.0 sigma, with six expected false detections. Nine candidates are new detections, while eight candidates have coincident SCUBA 850 micron and/or MAMBO 1.2 mm detections. From our observed number counts, we estimate the underlying differential number count distribution of submillimeter galaxies and find it to be in general agreement with previous surveys. Modeling the spectral energy distributions of these submillimeter galaxies after observations of dusty nearby galaxies suggests extreme luminosities of L = 1.0-1.6 x 10^13 L_solar and, if powered by star formation, star formation rates of 500-800 M_solar/yr.

G. T. Laurent; J. E. Aguirre; J. Glenn; P. A. R. Ade; J. J. Bock; S. F. Edgington; A. Goldin; S. R. Golwala; D. Haig; A. E. Lange; P. R. Maloney; P. D. Mauskopf; H. Nguyen; P. Rossinot; J. Sayers; P. Stover

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Star count density profiles and structural parameters of 26 Galactic globular clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used a proper combination of high-resolution HST observations and wide-field ground based data to derive the radial star density profile of 26 Galactic globular clusters from resolved star counts (which can be all freely downloaded on-line). With respect to surface brightness (SB) profiles (which can be biased by the presence of sparse, bright stars), star counts are considered to be the most robust and reliable tool to derive cluster structural parameters. For each system a detailed comparison with both King and Wilson models has been performed and the most relevant best-fit parameters have been obtained. This is the largest homogeneous catalog collected so far of star count profiles and structural parameters derived therefrom. The analysis of the data of our catalog has shown that: (1) the presence of the central cusps previously detected in the SB profiles of NGC 1851, M13 and M62 is not confirmed; (2) the majority of clusters in our sample are fitted equally well by the King and the Wilson models; (3) ...

Miocchi, P; Ferraro, F R; Dalessandro, E; Vesperini, E; Pasquato, M; Beccari, G; Pallanca, C; Sanna, N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Upper Limits from Counting Experiments with Multiple Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms, or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

Patrick J. Sutton

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

DEEP GALEX OBSERVATIONS OF THE COMA CLUSTER: SOURCE CATALOG AND GALAXY COUNTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a source catalog from a deep 26 ks Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) observation of the Coma cluster in the far-UV (FUV; 1530 A) and near-UV (NUV; 2310 A) wavebands. The observed field is centered {approx}0.{sup 0}9 (1.6 Mpc) southwest of the Coma core in a well-studied region of the cluster known as 'Coma-3'. The entire field is located within the apparent virial radius of the Coma cluster, and has optical photometric coverage with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and deep spectroscopic coverage to r {approx} 21. We detect GALEX sources to NUV = 24.5 and FUV = 25.0, which corresponds to a star formation rate of {approx}10{sup -3} M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} for galaxies at the distance of Coma. We have assembled a catalog of 9700 galaxies with GALEX and SDSS photometry, including 242 spectroscopically confirmed Coma member galaxies that span a large range of galaxy types from giant spirals and elliptical galaxies to dwarf irregular and early-type galaxies. The full multi-wavelength catalog (cluster plus background galaxies) is {approx}80% complete to NUV = 23 and FUV = 23.5. The GALEX images presented here are very deep and include detections of many resolved cluster members superposed on a dense field of unresolved background galaxies. This required a two-fold approach to generating a source catalog: we used a Bayesian deblending algorithm to measure faint and compact sources (using SDSS coordinates as position prior), and used the GALEX pipeline catalog for bright and/or extended objects. We performed simulations to assess the importance of systematic effects (e.g., object blends, source confusion, Eddington Bias) that influence the source detection and photometry when using both methods. The Bayesian deblending method roughly doubles the number of source detections and provides reliable photometry to a few magnitudes deeper than the GALEX pipeline catalog. This method is free from source confusion over the UV magnitude range studied here; we estimate that the GALEX pipeline catalogs are confusion limited at NUV {approx} 23 and FUV {approx} 24. We have measured the UV field galaxy counts using our catalog and report a {approx}50% (30%) excess of counts across FUV = 22-23.5 (NUV = 21.5-23) relative to other GALEX studies. Our number counts are a better match to deeper UV galaxy counts measured with Hubble Space Telescope.

Hammer, D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Miller, N.; Jenkins, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Mobasher, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Smith, R. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Arnouts, S. [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, 65-1238 Mamalahoa Hwy, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Milliard, B. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, BP 8, Traverse du Siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts July 2, 2013 - 5:58pm Addthis (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. Fletcher Honemond Fletcher Honemond

165

2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts July 2, 2013 - 5:58pm Addthis (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. Fletcher Honemond Fletcher Honemond

166

Two Million Smart Meters and Counting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Million Smart Meters and Counting Million Smart Meters and Counting Two Million Smart Meters and Counting August 31, 2010 - 6:02pm Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Smart meter technology will help families and businesses cut their energy costs by reducing response time for energy disruptions and enabling consumers to better monitor their consumption. The implementation of smart grid technologies could reduce electricity use by more than four percent annually by 2030 -- that would mean consumers around the country would see savings of over $20 billion each year. Secretary Steven Chu visited Battelle headquarters in Columbus, Ohio, today to make a big announcement about our nation's electrical grid: an

167

Students Count -- From the Classroom to the Conference | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Students Count -- From the Classroom to the Conference Students Count -- From the Classroom to the Conference Students Count -- From the Classroom to the Conference January 18, 2012 - 5:42pm Addthis Secretary Chu and former Governor of California Arnold Schwarzenegger speak with students at the 2011 Energy Innovation Summit. | Photo courtesy of ARPA-E. Secretary Chu and former Governor of California Arnold Schwarzenegger speak with students at the 2011 Energy Innovation Summit. | Photo courtesy of ARPA-E. Alexa McClanahan Communications Support Contractor to ARPA-E "The Student Program is a unique opportunity for student energy club leaders throughout the nation to gather, share best practices, and engage with policy makers, entrepreneurs, scientists, and engineers..." Shannon Yee, Student Program Coordinator

168

Methodologies for Assessing the Cumulative Environmental Effects of Hydroelectric Development of Fish and Wildlife in the Columbia River Basin, Volume 1, Recommendations, 1987 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume is the first of a two-part set addressing methods for assessing the cumulative effects of hydropower development on fish and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin. Species and habitats potentially affected by cumulative impacts are identified for the basin, and the most significant effects of hydropower development are presented. Then, current methods for measuring and assessing single-project effects are reviewed, followed by a review of methodologies with potential for use in assessing the cumulative effects associated with multiple projects. Finally, two new approaches for cumulative effects assessment are discussed in detail. Overall, this report identifies and reviews the concepts, factors, and methods necessary for understanding and conducting a cumulative effects assessment in the Columbia River Basin. Volume 2 will present a detailed procedural handbook for performing a cumulative assessment using the integrated tabular methodology introduced in this volume. 308 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

Stull, Elizabeth Ann

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Incorporating Environmental Public HealthIncorporating Environmental Public Health Indicators into Cumulative Risk Scores toIndicators into Cumulative Risk Scores to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-vectoring mosquitoes) separate from the risks and benefits of other pesticides (such as those used on field crops. Similarly, analysis of other pesticides will focus on the impacts on other user groups and related effects to determine whether the pesticide will remain effective for at least five years. EPA also requires

170

Energy Research Information System. Volume 1, Number 4. cumulative indexes (project nos. 00000001 through 00000539). Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

This cumulative index includes a state location index, an organization index and a subject keyword index incorporating the indexes from Energy Research Information System (ERIS), Volume 1, Numbers 1, 2, and 3. This issue, plus the first three ERIS reports, comprise a set of 539 research project references for the states of the Old West Region -- Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming.

Givens, B.M.; Boyd, C.A.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When DNA Needs to Stand Up and When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print Wednesday, 31 May 2006 00:00 DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips covered with patterns of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These "DNA chips" are revolutionizing biotechnology, allowing scientists to identify and count many DNA sequences simultaneously. They are the enabling technology for genomic-based medicine and are a critical component of advanced diagnostic systems for medical and homeland security applications. Like digital chips, DNA chips are parallel, accurate, fast, and small. These advantages, however, can only be realized if the fragile biomolecules survive the attachment process intact. Furthermore, biomolecules must be properly oriented to perform their biological function. In other words, the DNA literally must stand up to be counted. Understanding both the attachment and orientation of DNA on gold surfaces was the goal of recent experiments performed at ALS Beamline 8.0.1 by an international collaboration of scientists.

172

Squeezing and photon counting with the cubic phase state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, a non-Gaussian state, which is called cubic phase state has been experimentally realized. In this work we show that, in case one has access to a proper cubic phase state, it is possible to make photon counting experiments and generate extremely squeezed states.

Seckin Sefi

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

173

Time series of count data: modeling, estimation and diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various models for time series of counts which can account for discreteness, overdispersion and serial correlation are compared. Besides observation- and parameter-driven models based upon corresponding conditional Poisson distributions, a dynamic ordered ... Keywords: Efficient importance sampling, Markov chain Monte Carlo, Observation-driven model, Ordered probit, Parameter-driven model

Robert C. Jung; Martin Kukuk; Roman Liesenfeld

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Competitive Carbon Counting: Can Social Networking Sites Make Saving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is designed to raise awareness of domestic energy consumption by means of its display and bundled PC softwareCompetitive Carbon Counting: Can Social Networking Sites Make Saving Energy More Enjoyable Facebook application which displays live autonomously logged data from a commercial off-the-shelf energy

Cairns, Paul

175

Counting and generating lambda terms Katarzyna Grygiel 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Counting and generating lambda terms Katarzyna Grygiel 1 and Pierre Lescanne 1,2 1 Theoretical properties of lambda terms, in particular, about their asymptotic distribution and random generation. This paper tries to answer questions like: How many terms of a given size are there? What is a "typical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

176

Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for couting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensation circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

Todd, R.A.

1980-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

177

A priori precision estimation for neutron triples counting  

SciTech Connect

The nondestructive assay of Plutonium bearing items for criticality, safety, security, safeguards, inventory balance, process control, waste management and compliance is often undertaken using correlated neutron counting. In particular Multiplicity Shift Register analysis allows one to extract autocorrelation parameters from the pulse train which can, within the framework of a simple interpretational model, be related to the effective {sup 240}Pu spontaneous fission mass present. The effective {sup 240}Pu mass is a weighted sum of the {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu masses so if the relative isotopic composition of the Pu can be established from the measured {sup 240}Pu effective mass one can estimate the total Pu mass and also the masses of the individual isotopes, example the fissile species {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu. In multiplicity counting three counting rates are obtained. These are the Singles, Doubles and Triples rates. The Singles rate is just the gross, totals or trigger rate. The Doubles and Triples rates are calculated from factorial moments of the observed signal triggered neutron multiplicity distributions following spontaneous fission in the item and can be thought of as the rate of observed coincident pairs and coincident triplets on the pulse train. Coincident events come about because the spontaneous fission and induced fission chains taking place in the item result in bursts of neutrons. These remain time correlated during the detection process and so retain information, through the burst size distribution, about the Pu content. In designing and assessing the performance of a detector system to meet a given goal it is necessary to make a priori estimates of the counting precision for all three kinds of rates. This is non-trivial because the counting does not obey the familiar rules of a Poissonian counting experiment because the pulse train has time correlated events on it and the train is sampled by event triggered gates that may overlap. For Singles and Doubles simple approximate analytical empirical rules for how to estimate the variance have been developed guided by theory and refined by experiment. However, for Triples no equivalent rules have been put forward and tested until now. In this work we propose an analytical expression, the CSH relation, for the variance on the Triples count and exercise it against experimental data gathered for Pu items measured in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). Preliminary results are encouraging and reasonable agreement with observation, considered fit for scoping studies, is obtained. We have also looked at the behavior using Monte Carlo simulations. (authors)

Croft, S.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Henzl, V. [Safeguards Science and Technology Group N-1, Nuclear Nonproliferation Div., Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Synthesis of Reversible Functions Beyond Gate Count and Quantum Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many synthesis approaches for reversible and quantum logic have been proposed so far. However, most of them generate circuits with respect to simple metrics, i.e. gate count or quantum cost. On the other hand, to physically realize reversible and quantum hardware, additional constraints exist. In this paper, we describe cost metrics beyond gate count and quantum cost that should be considered while synthesizing reversible and quantum logic for the respective target technologies. We show that the evaluation of a synthesis approach may differ if additional costs are applied. In addition, a new cost metric, namely Nearest Neighbor Cost (NNC) which is imposed by realistic physical quantum architectures, is considered in detail. We discuss how existing synthesis flows can be extended to generate optimal circuits with respect to NNC while still keeping the quantum cost small.

Robert Wille; Mehdi Saeedi; Rolf Drechsler

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

High rate 4. pi. beta. -. gamma. coincidence counting system  

SciTech Connect

A high count rate 4..pi.. ..beta..-..gamma.. coincidence counting system for the determination of absolute disintegration rates of short half-life radionuclides is described. With this system the dead time per pulse is minimized by not stretching any pulses beyond the width necessary to satisfy overlap coincidence requirements. The equations used to correct for the ..beta.., ..gamma.., and coincidence channel dead times and for accidental coincidences are presented but not rigorously developed. Experimental results are presented for a decaying source of /sup 56/Mn initially at 2 x 10/sup 6/ d/s and a set of /sup 60/Co sources of accurately known source strengths varying from 10/sup 3/ to 2 x 10/sup 6/ d/s. A check of the accidental coincidence equation for the case of two independent sources with varying source strengths is presented.

Johnson, L.O.; Gehrke, R.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Total Gamma Count Rate Analysis Method for Nondestructive Assay Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach to nondestructively characterize waste for disposal, based on total gamma response, has been developed at the Idaho Cleanup Project by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC and Idaho State University, and is called the total gamma count rate analysis method. The total gamma count rate analysis method measures gamma interactions that produce energetic electrons or positrons in a detector. Based on previous experience with waste assays, the radionuclide content of the waste container is then determined. This approach potentially can yield minimum detection limits of less than 10 nCi/g. The importance of this method is twofold. First, determination of transuranic activity can be made for waste containers that are below the traditional minimum detection limits. Second, waste above 10 nCi/g and below 100 nCi/g can be identified, and a potential path for disposal resolved.

Cecilia R. Hoffman; Yale D. Harker

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Research Information System. Projects report. Volume 2, Number 4. Cumulative Indexes (Project Nos. 00000540 through 00001080)  

SciTech Connect

The Cumulative Indexes include a state-location index, a personal name index, an organization index and a subject keyword index incorporating the indexes from ERIS Volume 2, Nos. 1, 2, and 3. This issue, plus the entire contents of Volume 1 and Volume 2, comprise a set of 1080 research project references for the states of the Old West region - Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Nebraska.

Boyd, C.A.; Schillinger, L.A.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for temperature correction and count rate expansion of inorganic scintillation detectors. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for temperature correction and count rate expansion of inorganic scintillation detectors. A temperature sensor is attached to an inorganic scintillation detector. The inorganic scintillation detector, due to interaction with

183

Unified single-photon and single-electron counting statistics: From cavity QED to electron transport  

SciTech Connect

A key ingredient of cavity QED is the coupling between the discrete energy levels of an atom and photons in a single-mode cavity. The addition of periodic ultrashort laser pulses allows one to use such a system as a source of single photons--a vital ingredient in quantum information and optical computing schemes. Here we analyze and time-adjust the photon-counting statistics of such a single-photon source and show that the photon statistics can be described by a simple transport-like nonequilibrium model. We then show that there is a one-to-one correspondence of this model to that of nonequilibrium transport of electrons through a double quantum dot nanostructure, unifying the fields of photon-counting statistics and electron-transport statistics. This correspondence empowers us to adapt several tools previously used for detecting quantum behavior in electron-transport systems (e.g., super-Poissonian shot noise and an extension of the Leggett-Garg inequality) to single-photon-source experiments.

Lambert, Neill [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chen, Yueh-Nan [Department of Physics and National Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

NIST_1A 1024 sample_count -i 57202424 sample_n_bytes -i ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST_1A 1024 sample_count -i 57202424 sample_n_bytes -i 2 channel_count -i 1 sample_byte_format -s2 01 sample_rate -i 16000 ...

2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

185

Los Alamos Middle School team wins regional MathCounts competition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alamos Middle School wins regional MathCounts event Competes against 60 other middle schools for the title. March 1, 2013 Los Alamos Middle School won the regional MathCounts...

186

Cluster number counts dependence on dark energy inhomogeneities and coupling to dark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cluster number counts can be used to test dark energy models. We investigate dark energy candidates which are coupled to dark matter. We analyze the cluster number counts dependence on the amount of dark matter coupled to dark energy. Further

M. Manera; D. F. Mota

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors.  

SciTech Connect

Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare {sup 252}Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for {sup 252}Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Full Counting Statistics of Photons Emitted by Double Quantum Dot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the full counting statistics of photons emitted by a double quantum dot (DQD) to a high-quality microwave transmission line due to the dipole coupling. We show that at the resonant condition between the energy splitting of the DQD and the photon energy in the transmission line, photon statistics exhibits both a sub-Poissonian distribution and antibunching. In the ideal case, when the system decoherence stems only from photodetection, the photon noise is reduced below one-half of the noise for the Poisson distribution. The photon distribution remains sub-Poissonian even at moderate decoherence in the DQD.

Canran Xu; Maxim G. Vavilov

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

189

Counting the number of correlated pairs in a nucleus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest that the number of correlated nucleon pairs in an arbitrary nucleus can be estimated by counting the number of proton-neutron, proton-proton, and neutron-neutron pairs residing in a relative $S$ state. We present numerical calculations of those amounts for the nuclei $^{4}$He, $^{9}$Be, $ ^{12}$C, $ ^{27}$Al, $ ^{40}$Ca, $ ^{48}$Ca, $ ^{56}$Fe, $ ^{63}$Cu, $ ^{108}$Ag, and $ ^{197}$Au. The results are used to predict the values of the ratios of the per-nucleon electron-nucleus inelastic scattering cross section to the deuteron in the kinematic regime where correlations dominate.

Maarten Vanhalst; Wim Cosyn; Jan Ryckebusch

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

190

Simultaneous analog and photon counting detection for Raman lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program Raman Lidar was upgraded in 2004 with a new data system that provides simultaneous measurements of both the photomultiplier analog output voltage and photon counts. This paper describes recent improvements to the algorithm used to merge these two signals into a single signal with improved dynamic range. The impact of modifications to the algorithm are evaluated by comparing profiles of water vapor mixing ratio from the lidar with sonde measurements. The modifications that were implemented resulted in a reduction of the mean bias in the daytime mixing ratio from a 4% dry bias to well within 1%.

Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Mielke, Bernd; Clayton, Marian F.; Ferrare, Richard; Sivaraman, Chitra

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

191

On “Field Significance” and the False Discovery Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conventional approach to evaluating the joint statistical significance of multiple hypothesis tests (i.e., “field,” or “global,” significance) in meteorology and climatology is to count the number of individual (or “local”) tests yielding ...

D. S. Wilks

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Comparison of Permian basin giant oil fields with giant oil fields of other U. S. productive areas  

SciTech Connect

Covering over 40 million ac, the Permian basin is the fourth largest of the 28 productive areas containing giant fields. The 56 giant fields in the basin compare with the total of 264 giant oil fields in 27 other productive areas. Cumulative production figures of 18 billion bbl from the giant fields in the Permian basin are the largest cumulative production figures from giant fields in any of the productive areas. An estimated 1.9 billion bbl of remaining reserves in giant fields rank the basin third among these areas and the 19.9 billion bbl total reserves in giant fields in the basin are the largest total reserves in giant fields in any of the productive areas. The 1990 production figures from giant fields place the basin second in production among areas with giant fields. However, converting these figures to by-basin averages for the giant fields places the Permian basin 12th in field size among the areas with giant fields. Based on average reserves per well, the basin ranks 18th. Average 1990 production per giant field place the basin seventh and the average 1990 production per well in giant fields place the Permian basin 14th among the areas with giant fields.

Haeberle, F.R. (Consultant Geologist, Dallas, TX (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

CumInCAD: Cumulative Index of Computer Aided Architectural Design Database Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in as guest__anon. Guests do not have full access to the database. Enter terms in the Search for: box and it will search all words that you enter. Searches are conducted across all fields in the database (i.e., author on the topic you are researching. To do this... Use this: Search a single term Type in your term. Search

Yener, Aylin

195

An experimental evaluation of S-N curves and validity of miner's cumulative damage hypothesis for an ACSR conductor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory simulation of aeolian vibrations was used in determining the fatigue characteristics of an ACSR conductor subjected to constant and varied amplitude loadings. Using linear regression analyses, S-N curves for first through fifth strand breaks were fit to the data, and a pseudo endurance limit of 21.31 MPa (3.09 ksi) estimated. Subjecting the conductor to three different types of load sequences revealed that Miner's Cumulative Damage hypothesis is somewhat conservative, but can be assumed valid for design purposes. This information, in conjunction with the actual load histories, will allow electric utility companies to more accurately design transmission lines.

Brunair, R.M.; Ramey, G. (Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL (US)); Duncan, R.R. III (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Modeling software artifact count attribute with s-curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The estimation of software project attributes, such as size, is important for software project resource planning and process control. However, research regarding software attribute modeling, such as size, effort, and cost, are high-level and static in nature. This research defines a new operation-level software project attribute that describes the operational characteristic of a software project. The result is a measurement based on the s-curve parameter that can be used as a control variable for software project management. This result is derived from modeling the count of artifact instances created by the software engineering process, which are stored by software tools. Because of the orthogonal origin of this attribute in regard to traditional static estimators, this s-curve based software attribute can function as an additional indicator of software project activities and also as a quantitative metric for assessing development team capability.

Ma, Norman K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Counting constituents in molecular complexes by fluorescence photon antibunching  

SciTech Connect

Modern single molecule fluorescence microscopy offers new, highly quantitative ways of studying the systems biology of cells while keeping the cells healthy and alive in their natural environment. In this context, a quantum optical technique, photon antibunching, has found a small niche in the continuously growing applications of single molecule techniques to small molecular complexes. Here, we review some of the most recent applications of photon antibunching in biophotonics, and we provide a guide for how to conduct photon antibunching experiments at the single molecule level by applying techniques borrowed from time-correlated single photon counting. We provide a number of new examples for applications of photon antibunching to the study of multichromophoric molecules and small molecular complexes.

Fore, S; Laurence, T; Hollars, C; Huser, T

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Full Counting Statistics of Photons Emitted by Double Quantum Dot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the full counting statistics of photons emitted by a double quantum dot (DQD) coupled to a high-quality microwave resonator by electric dipole interaction. We show that at the resonant condition between the energy splitting of the DQD and the photon energy in the resonator, photon statistics exhibits both a sub-Poissonian distribution and antibunching. In the ideal case, when the system decoherence stems only from photodetection, the photon noise is reduced below one-half of the noise for the Poisson distribution and is consistent with current noise. The photon distribution remains sub-Poissonian even at moderate decoherence in the DQD. We demonstrate that Josephson junction based photomultipliers can be used to experimentally assess statistics of emitted photons.

Canran Xu; Maxim G. Vavilov

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

199

Candidate wind-turbine generator site cumulative meteorological data summary and data for January 1982 through September 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarized cumulative hourly meteorological data for 20 new sites selected in early 1980 as part of the expanded candidate site program are presented. The reporting period is July 1980 through September 1982. The data collection program at some individual sites may not span this entire period, but will be contained within the reporting period. The purpose of providing the summarized data is to document the data collection program and to provide data that could be considered representative of longer-term meteorological conditions at each site. For each site, data are given in eight tables and in a topographic map showing the approximated location of the meteorological tower and turbine, if applicable. Use of the information from these tables, along with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for longer-term average wind energy production at each site. Two appendices of other data are provided. Appendix A contains summarized data collected at new and original sites during the period January 1982 through September 1982. Appendix B contains cumulative summarized data for those original sites selected in 1976 with data collection programs continuing into 1982.

Sandusky, W.F.; Buck, J.W.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.; Abbey, O.B.; Bradymire, S.L.; Gregory, J.L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Powered by NERSC, A Database of Billions of Genes and Counting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the news" Home News & Publications News Center News Powered by NERSC, a Database of Billions of Genes and Counting Powered by NERSC, a Database of Billions of Genes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

Frank, Matthias (Oakland, CA); Mears, Carl A. (Windsor, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA); Hiller, Larry J. (Livermore, CA); Barfknecht, Andrew T. (Menlo Park, CA)

2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

202

Counting muons to probe the neutrino mass spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experimental evidence that \\theta_{13} is large opens new opportunities to identify the neutrino mass spectrum. We outline a possibility to investigate this issue by means of conventional technology. The ideal setup turns out to be long baseline experiment: the muon neutrino beam, with 10^{20} protons on target, has an average energy of 6 (8) GeV; the neutrinos, after propagating 6000 (8000) km, are observed by a muon detector of 1 Mton and with a muon energy threshold of 2 GeV. The expected number of muon events is about 1000, and the difference between the two neutrino spectra is sizeable, about 30%. This allows the identification of the mass spectrum just counting muon tracks. The signal events are well characterized experimentally by their time and direction of arrival, and 2/3 of them are in a region with little atmospheric neutrino background, namely, between 4 GeV and 10 GeV. The distances from CERN to Baikal Lake and from Fermilab to KM3NET, or ANTARES, fit in the ideal range.

Carolina Lujan-Peschard; Giulia Pagliaroli; Francesco Vissani

2013-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

AC field exposure study: human exposure to 60-Hz electric fields  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to develop a method of estimating human exposure to the 60 Hz electric fields created by transmission lines. The Activity Systems Model simulates human activities in a variety of situations where exposure to electric fields is possible. The model combines maps of electric fields, activity maps, and experimentally determined activity factors to provide histograms of time spent in electric fields of various strengths in the course of agricultural, recreational, and domestic activities. For corroboration, the study team measured actual human exposure at locations across the United States near transmission lines ranging in voltage from 115 to 1200 kV. The data were collected with a specially designed vest that measures exposure. These data demonstrate the accuracy of the exposure model presented in this report and revealed that most exposure time is spent in fields of magnitudes similar to many household situations. The report provides annual exposure estimates for human activities near transmission lines and in the home and compares them with exposure data from typical laboratory animal experiments. For one exposure index, the cumulative product of time and electric field, exposure during some of the laboratory animal experiments is two to four orders of magnitude greater than cumulative exposure for a human during one year of outdoor work on a farm crossed by a transmission line.

Silva, J.M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Cumulative analysis of the association between the gravitational wave detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER and the gamma-ray bursts detected by BATSE and BeppoSAX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The statistical association between the output of the Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS and a list of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by the satellite experiments BATSE and BeppoSAX has been analyzed using cumulative algorithms. GW detector data collected between 1991 and 1999 have been correlated to the GRB flux peak times. The cumulative analysis of a large number of GRBs (387) allows to push the upper bound for the corresponding GW burst amplitude down to $h = 2.5\\cdot10^{-19}$.

P. Astone; D. Babusci; M. Bassan; P. Carelli; E. Coccia; C. Cosmelli; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; F. Frontera; G. Giordano; C. Guidorzi; A. Marini; Y. Minenkov; I. Modena; G. Modestino; A. Moleti; E. Montanari; G. V. Pallottino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; A. Rocchi; F. Ronga; L. Sperandio; R. Terenzi; G. Torrioli; M. Visco

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Pulse pileup statistics for energy discriminating photon counting x-ray detectors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Energy discriminating photon counting x-ray detectors can be subject to a wide range of flux rates if applied in clinical settings. Even when the incident rate is a small fraction of the detector's maximum periodic rate N{sub 0}, pulse pileup leads to count rate losses and spectral distortion. Although the deterministic effects can be corrected, the detrimental effect of pileup on image noise is not well understood and may limit the performance of photon counting systems. Therefore, the authors devise a method to determine the detector count statistics and imaging performance. Methods: The detector count statistics are derived analytically for an idealized pileup model with delta pulses of a nonparalyzable detector. These statistics are then used to compute the performance (e.g., contrast-to-noise ratio) for both single material and material decomposition contrast detection tasks via the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) as a function of the detector input count rate. With more realistic unipolar and bipolar pulse pileup models of a nonparalyzable detector, the imaging task performance is determined by Monte Carlo simulations and also approximated by a multinomial method based solely on the mean detected output spectrum. Photon counting performance at different count rates is compared with ideal energy integration, which is unaffected by count rate. Results: The authors found that an ideal photon counting detector with perfect energy resolution outperforms energy integration for our contrast detection tasks, but when the input count rate exceeds 20%N{sub 0}, many of these benefits disappear. The benefit with iodine contrast falls rapidly with increased count rate while water contrast is not as sensitive to count rates. The performance with a delta pulse model is overoptimistic when compared to the more realistic bipolar pulse model. The multinomial approximation predicts imaging performance very close to the prediction from Monte Carlo simulations. The monoenergetic image with maximum contrast-to-noise ratio from dual energy imaging with ideal photon counting is only slightly better than with dual kVp energy integration, and with a bipolar pulse model, energy integration outperforms photon counting for this particular metric because of the count rate losses. However, the material resolving capability of photon counting can be superior to energy integration with dual kVp even in the presence of pileup because of the energy information available to photon counting. Conclusions: A computationally efficient multinomial approximation of the count statistics that is based on the mean output spectrum can accurately predict imaging performance. This enables photon counting system designers to directly relate the effect of pileup to its impact on imaging statistics and how to best take advantage of the benefits of energy discriminating photon counting detectors, such as material separation with spectral imaging.

Wang, Adam S.; Harrison, Daniel; Lobastov, Vladimir; Tkaczyk, J. Eric [Departments of Electrical Engineering and Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Parallel Color Coding and Graph Partitioning Enabling Subgraph Counting for Massive Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zhao, Maleq Khan, V.S. Anil Kumar, Madhav V. Marathe Virginia Tech The Problem The problem is to count the error.) a) Color each vertex of G uniformly at random with a color from {1,...,k}. b) Count Xi The total running time of ParSE can be bounded by: Here P is the number of partitions, Q is the number

Khan, Maleq

207

Old SmNd ages for cumulate eucrites and redetermination of the solar system initial Maud Boyet a,b,c,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-lived 146 Sm­142 Nd and long-lived 147 Sm­143 Nd chronometers have been measured in three cumulate initial 146 Sm/144 Sm ratio is obtained using the five-point regression line determined for Binda. The 146 different groups of achondrites relative to ordinary chondrites. This work suggests that 146 Sm

Reiners, Peter W.

208

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (Count)" Acquifers Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1392_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1392_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:23 PM"

209

Fatigue analysis of WECS (Wind Energy Conversion System) components using a rainflow counting algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rainflow counting algorithm'' has been incorporated into the LIFE2 fatigue/fracture analysis code for wind turbines. The count algorithm, with its associated pre- and post-count algorithms, permits the code to incorporate time-series data into its analysis scheme. After a description of the algorithms used here, their use is illustrated by the examination of stress-time histories from the Sandia 34-m Test Bed vertical axis wind turbine. The results of the rainflow analysis are compared and contrasted to previously reported predictions for the service lifetime of the fatigue critical component for this turbine. 14 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Sutherland, H.J.; Schluter, L.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Water Vapor Fields Deduced from METEOSAT-1 Water Vapor Channel Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quasi-operational process for the determination of water vapor fields from METEPSAT-1 water vapor channel data is described. Each count of the WV picture is replaced by the corresponding mean relative humidity value using both the calibration ...

M. M. Poc; M. Roulleau

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983)

212

Property:Geothermal/ProjectTypeTopic2Count | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProjectTypeTopic2Count ProjectTypeTopic2Count Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/ProjectTypeTopic2Count Property Type Number Description Number of Project Type Topic 2 values. Pages using the property "Geothermal/ProjectTypeTopic2Count" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Air Cooling + 0 + D Directional Drilling Systems + 0 + Drilling Systems + 2 + E EGS Demonstration + 0 + F Fluid Imaging + 2 + Fracture Characterization Technologies + 0 + G Geophysical Exploration Technologies + 0 + Geothermal Analysis + 0 + Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance + 0 + Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources + 0 + H High Temperature Cements + 0 +

213

Single-use lancet and capillary loading mechanism for complete blood count point of care device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of the development of a point of care complete blood count device, I designed a single use lancet integrated with a blood collection mechanism and interface and successfully tested a prototype. High speed video was ...

Zimmerman, Julia C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Getter-Doped Polymer Transducer for Monitoring Cumulative Exposure: Preliminary Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel prototype optical sensor for monitoring cumulative hydrogen gas exposure was fabricated and evaluated. Chemical-to-optical transduction was accomplished by detecting the intensity of 670 nm laser light transmitted through a hydrogen getter-doped polymer film mounted at the end of an optical fiber; the transmittance of the composite film increased with uptake of hydrogen by the embedded getter. The composite film consisted of the hydrogen getter 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene, also known as DEB, with carbon-supported palladium catalyst embedded in silicone elastomer. Because the change in transmittance was irreversible and occurred continuously as the getter captured hydrogen, the sensor behaved like a dosimeter, providing a unique indication of the cumulative gas exposure.

Small IV, W; Maitland, D J; Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Letts, S A; Trebes, J E

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

Counting giant gravitons in AdS{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect

We quantize the set of all quarter Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) brane probe solutions in global AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xT{sup 4}/K3 found in G. Mandal, S. Raju, and M. Smedback, preceding article, Phys. Rev. D 77, 046011 (2008).. We show that, generically, these solutions give rise to states in discrete representations of the SL(2,R) Wess-Zumino-Witten model on AdS{sub 3}. Our procedure provides us with a detailed description of the low energy (1/4) and (1/2) BPS sectors of string theory on this background. The (1/4) BPS partition function jumps as we move off the point in moduli space where the bulk theta angle and Neveu-Schwarz fields vanish. We show that generic (1/2) BPS states are protected because they correspond to geodesics rather than puffed up branes. By exactly quantizing the simplest of the probes above, we verify our description of (1/4) BPS states and find agreement with the known spectrum of (1/2) BPS states of the boundary theory. We also consider the contribution of these probes to the elliptic genus and discuss puzzles, and their possible resolutions, in reproducing the elliptic genus of the symmetric product.

Raju, Suvrat [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume II, Technical Information, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study to determine the potential cumulative effects of proposed small hydro development on the fisheries of the Swan River drainage. This report contains technical information and is a support document for the main report (Leathe and Enk, 1985). Consequently, discussion of results was minimized. The sections on fish population monitoring, streambed monitoring, habitat survey comparisons, and water temperature are the only portions that were not discussed in the main report. 5 refs., 55 figs., 44 tabs.

Leathe, Stephen A.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Parity of the Solar Magnetic Fields and Related Astrophysical Phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cumulative contribution of odd (Bo) and even (BE) parity zonal magnetic multipoles to the solar magnetic fields is calculated using spherical harmonic coefficients of the photospheric magnetic field for the years 1959-1985. The dominant parity of the solar magnetic field is shown to change from odd to even during every sunspot cycle. The association of variations of Bo and BE with different astrophysical phenomena such as magnetic reversal of solar polar magnetic fields, north-south asymmetry in sunspot activity and strength of the interplanetary magnetic field will be also discussed. Using solar observations we could infer that dominant parity of the solar magnetic field is changing from even to odd during the past 12 solar cycles when the solar activity is showing an increasing trend during this period.

G. Gopkumar; T. E. Girish

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

Parity of the Solar Magnetic Fields and Related Astrophysical Phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cumulative contribution of odd (Bo) and even (BE) parity zonal magnetic multipoles to the solar magnetic fields is calculated using spherical harmonic coefficients of the photospheric magnetic field for the years 1959-1985. The dominant parity of the solar magnetic field is shown to change from odd to even during every sunspot cycle. The association of variations of Bo and BE with different astrophysical phenomena such as magnetic reversal of solar polar magnetic fields, north-south asymmetry in sunspot activity and strength of the interplanetary magnetic field will be also discussed. Using solar observations we could infer that dominant parity of the solar magnetic field is changing from even to odd during the past 12 solar cycles when the solar activity is showing an increasing trend during this period.

Gopkumar, G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Field Emission Electron Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In addition, because of the high count rates possible with the Bruker SDD, heterogeneous materials such as meteorites, clinker, fly ash, alloys and ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Saving Energy in Altoona Where it Counts: City Lights | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Energy in Altoona Where it Counts: City Lights Saving Energy in Altoona Where it Counts: City Lights Saving Energy in Altoona Where it Counts: City Lights July 20, 2010 - 1:53pm Addthis Installed next to an original streetlight, a new LED unit (right) emits a whiter light in addition to saving energy. | Photo courtesy of the city of Altoona, Pa. That's why their first priority after receiving a $205,700 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) was to replace 169 downtown streetlights with energy-efficient LED units. Funded as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the project also gives Altoona a much brighter appearance when the sun goes down.The city of Altoona, Pa. can trace 85 percent of its energy costs back to one area: lights. "Downtown sure looks different with all of that white LED light," says Lee

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221

New detector array improves neutron count capability at HFIR's Bio-SANS |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bio-SANS neutron count capability improves Bio-SANS neutron count capability improves New detector array improves neutron count capability at HFIR's Bio-SANS Agatha Bardoel - June 29, 2012 Bio-SANS team that worked on installation of the new detector system. Front row, left to right: Doug Selby, Steve Hicks, Shuo Qian, Sai Venkatesh Pingali, Kathy Bailey, Amy Black Jones, and Derrick Williams. Back row, left to right: Ed Blackburn, John Palatinus, William Brad O'Dell, Mike Humphreys, Justin Beal, Ken Littrell, Greg Jones, Kevin Berry, Volker Urban, Randy Summers, and Ron Maples. Bio-SANS, the Biological Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Instrument at HFIR recently had a detector upgrade that will provide significantly improved performance that is more in line with the instrument's capability. Shorter experiment times are expected, which means more experiments can be

222

Don't Count Your Ions Before They Dissociate | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Don't Count Your Ions Before They Dissociate Don't Count Your Ions Before They Dissociate Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » June 2013 Don't Count Your Ions Before They Dissociate Ionic liquids found to behave differently than expected. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of J. N. Israelachvili Cartoon depicting how the ionic liquid molecules arrange in electrically charged interfaces (not to scale). The green shading represents the 99.98%

223

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

224

Saving Energy in Altoona Where it Counts: City Lights | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Energy in Altoona Where it Counts: City Lights Saving Energy in Altoona Where it Counts: City Lights Saving Energy in Altoona Where it Counts: City Lights July 20, 2010 - 1:53pm Addthis Installed next to an original streetlight, a new LED unit (right) emits a whiter light in addition to saving energy. | Photo courtesy of the city of Altoona, Pa. That's why their first priority after receiving a $205,700 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) was to replace 169 downtown streetlights with energy-efficient LED units. Funded as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the project also gives Altoona a much brighter appearance when the sun goes down.The city of Altoona, Pa. can trace 85 percent of its energy costs back to one area: lights. "Downtown sure looks different with all of that white LED light," says Lee

225

Trends in Texas youth livestock exhibition and County Extension agent perceptions and adoption of quality counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Each year, County Extension Agents dedicate many hours toward educational programs to serve clientele. One of the largest programs in 4-H is the youth livestock project. Livestock projects take a significant amount of time and there is a variety of programs offered to youth exhibitors. One of these educational programs offered though Texas Cooperative Extension is Quality Counts. Quality Counts focuses on teaching character education and quality assurance to youth livestock exhibitors. The purpose of this study was to determine the total number of youth livestock projects entered in Texas during 2006 and identify any apparent educational trends. The second objective of this study was to determine how Quality Counts is perceived by County Extension Agents. To complete this study, a web based survey was sent administered to every County Extension office in Texas. 250 of 254 counties responded to the survey (98.43% response rate). From data collected, it was revealed that there were a total of 89,839 total livestock projects entered in 2006 at the county level (76,225 market and 13, 614 breeding). This data was compared to a previous study completed in 2001 by Boleman, Howard, Smith, and Couch. This data compared market livestock entry numbers. Based upon the comparison, market livestock projects have increased by 7.06% since 2000. Beef cattle and goats have increased, while sheep and swine have slightly decreased. Roughly a third of Texas counties will be utilizing the Quality Counts curriculum during the year 2007. Qualitative analysis reveals that Quality Counts is seen as educationally useful and easy to implement into traditional livestock educational programming, and is most often used as part of ongoing project clinics. Most importantly, program participants are increasing their knowledge of livestock projects, character, and ethics. Respondents are also beginning to see program participants’ behaviors change because of participating in Quality Counts.

Coufal, Dustin Wayne

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Reply to "Comment on 'Vortex-assisted photon counts and their magnetic field dependence in single-photon superconducting detectors'"  

SciTech Connect

The vortex crossing rate in thin current-biased superconducting strips, calculated within the London approach employing the concept of a vortex as a particle, is very sensitive to the cutoff at the vortex core size. To account properly for the vortex core, one needs to use microscopic theory.

Bulaevskii, L.N.; Graf, Matthias; Kogan, Vladimir G.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

Oil and Gas field code master list 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourteenth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1995 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the US. The Field Code Index, a listing of all field names and the States in which they occur, ordered by field code, has been removed from this year`s publications to reduce printing and postage costs. Complete copies (including the Field Code Index) will be available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA World-Wide Web Site. Future editions of the complete Master List will be available on CD-ROM and other electronic media. There are 57,400 field records in this year`s Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes the following: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (see definition of alias below); and fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. Taking into consideration the double-counting of fields under such circumstances, EIA identifies 46,312 distinct fields in the US as of October 1995. This count includes fields that no longer produce oil or gas, and 383 fields used in whole or in part for oil or gas Storage. 11 figs., 6 tabs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

COUNT OF SENATE ACADEMIC EMPLOYEES BY PRIMARY TITLE TYPE (CTO) AND UNIT AS OF March 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COUNT OF SENATE ACADEMIC EMPLOYEES BY PRIMARY TITLE TYPE (CTO) AND UNIT AS OF March 2013 ARTS BY PRIMARY TITLE TYPE (CTO) AND UNIT AS OF March 2013 ARTS DIVISION DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES ENGINEERING HUMANITIES DIVISION LIBRARY MULTICAMPUS RESEARCH UNITS PHYSICAL & BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES SOCIAL SCIENCES

California at Santa Cruz, University of

229

Characterizing time decay of bibenzyl scintillator using time correlated single photon counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time decay of several scintillation materials has been measured using the time correlated single photon counting method and a new organic crystal with a highly suppressed delayed light has been identified. Results comparing the light decay of the bibenzyl crystal with a xylene based detector, which is currently installed at National Ignition Facility will be presented.

Hatarik, R.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Zaitseva, N. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Wiedeking, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, 7129 Somerset West (South Africa)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

High counting rates of x-ray photon detection using APD detectors on synchrotron machines  

SciTech Connect

In this work we show the results of 10 x 10 mm{sup 2} Si-APD detector's test with guard ring detecting x-rays. The result of mapping surface is also exhibited. We show and discuss the difficulty of single photon detection in high counting rate experiments in synchrotrons machines.

Kakuno, E. M.; Giacomolli, B. A.; Scorzato, C. R. [Universidade Federal do Pampa - UNIPAMPA-Bage, 96413-170 (Brazil); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron - LNLS, 13086-100 (Brazil)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Subcentimeter depth resolution using a single-photon counting time-of-flight laser ranging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a single-mode telecommunications fiber to the rest of the optical ranging system. This type of detector of of the reflected laser sig- nal, which is focused into a multimode optical fiber. An in-line bandpass interferenceSubcentimeter depth resolution using a single-photon counting time-of-flight laser ranging system

Buller, Gerald S.

232

Counting false entries in truth tables of bracketed formulae connected by m-implication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we count the number of rows yn with the value "false" in the truth tables of all bracketed formulae with n distinct variables connected by the binary connective of 2modi?ed-implication". We ?find a recurrence and an asymptotic formulae for yn. We also determine the parity of yn.

Yildiz, Volkan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Core Count vs Cache Size for Manycore Architectures in the Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The number of cores which fit on a single chip is growing at an exponential rate while off-chip main memory bandwidth is growing at a linear rate at best. This core count to off-chip bandwidth disparity causes per-core ...

Agarwal, Anant

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

234

Beyond Travel & Tourism competitiveness ranking using DEA, GST, ANN and Borda count  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Travel & Tourism competitiveness rankings are helpful when we wish to consider the issue of how to enrich the global competitiveness of tourism destinations. However, even if a ranking is obtained from a highly reputed institute, it is important to evaluate ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Borda count, Data envelopment analysis, Grey system theory, Ranking trustworthiness

Wei-Wen Wu

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Solar pp and hep Processes in Effective Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The strategy of modern effective field theory is exploited to pin down accurately the flux $S$ factors for the $pp$ and $hep$ processes in the Sun. The technique used is to combine the high accuracy established in few-nucleon systems of the "standard nuclear physics approach" (SNPA) and the systematic power counting of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) into a consistent effective field theory framework. Using highly accurate wave functions obtained in the SNPA and working to \

T. -S. Park; K. Kubodera; D. -P. Min; M. Rho

2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

236

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume I, Summary, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to develop and apply methods to evaluate the cumulative effects of 20 proposed small hydro projects on the fisheries resources of the Swan River drainage located in northwestern Montana. Fish population and reach classification information was used to estimate total populations of 107,000 brook trout, 65,000 cut-throat trout and 31,000 juvenile bull trout within the tributary system. Distribution, abundance, and life history of fish species in the drainage and their contribution to the sport fishery were considered in the cumulative impact analysis. Bull trout were chosen as the primary species of concern because of their extensive use of project areas, sensitivity to streambed sedimentation, and their importance to the lake and river sport fisheries. Dewatering of hydroelectric diversion zones and streambed sedimentation (resulting from forest and small hydro development) were the major impacts considered. The developer proposed to divert up to the entire streamflow during low flow months because maintenance of recommended minimum bypass flows would not allow profitable project operation. Dewatering was assumed to result in a total loss of fish production in these areas. 105 refs., 19 figs., 38 tabs.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Enk, Michael D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Image-based spectral distortion correction for photon-counting x-ray detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using an image-based method to correct for distortions induced by various artifacts in the x-ray spectrum recorded with photon-counting detectors for their application in breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: The polyenergetic incident spectrum was simulated with the tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) code and carefully calibrated to match the x-ray tube in this study. Experiments were performed on a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) photon-counting detector with five energy thresholds. Energy bins were adjusted to evenly distribute the recorded counts above the noise floor. BR12 phantoms of various thicknesses were used for calibration. A nonlinear function was selected to fit the count correlation between the simulated and the measured spectra in the calibration process. To evaluate the proposed spectral distortion correction method, an empirical fitting derived from the calibration process was applied on the raw images recorded for polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm. Both the corrected counts and the effective attenuation coefficient were compared to the simulated values for each of the five energy bins. The feasibility of applying the proposed method to quantitative material decomposition was tested using a dual-energy imaging technique with a three-material phantom that consisted of water, lipid, and protein. The performance of the spectral distortion correction method was quantified using the relative root-mean-square (RMS) error with respect to the expected values from simulations or areal analysis of the decomposition phantom. Results: The implementation of the proposed method reduced the relative RMS error of the output counts in the five energy bins with respect to the simulated incident counts from 23.0%, 33.0%, and 54.0% to 1.2%, 1.8%, and 7.7% for 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm PMMA phantoms, respectively. The accuracy of the effective attenuation coefficient of PMMA estimate was also improved with the proposed spectral distortion correction. Finally, the relative RMS error of water, lipid, and protein decompositions in dual-energy imaging was significantly reduced from 53.4% to 6.8% after correction was applied. Conclusions: The study demonstrated that dramatic distortions in the recorded raw image yielded from a photon-counting detector could be expected, which presents great challenges for applying the quantitative material decomposition method in spectral CT. The proposed semi-empirical correction method can effectively reduce these errors caused by various artifacts, including pulse pileup and charge sharing effects. Furthermore, rather than detector-specific simulation packages, the method requires a relatively simple calibration process and knowledge about the incident spectrum. Therefore, it may be used as a generalized procedure for the spectral distortion correction of different photon-counting detectors in clinical breast CT systems.

Ding Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

The bias field of dark matter haloes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a stochastic approach to the clustering evolution of dark matter haloes in the Universe. Haloes, identified by a Press-Schechter-type algorithm in Lagrangian space, are described in terms of `counting fields', acting as non-linear operators on the underlying Gaussian density fluctuations. By ensemble averaging these counting fields, the standard Press-Schechter mass function as well as analytic expressions for the halo correlation function and corresponding bias factors of linear theory are obtained, thereby extending the recent results by Mo and White. The non-linear evolution of our halo population is then followed by solving the continuity equation, under the sole hypothesis that haloes move by the action of gravity. This leads to an exact and general formula for the bias field of dark matter haloes, defined as the local ratio between their number density contrast and the mass density fluctuation. Besides being a function of position and `observation' redshift, this random field depends upon the mass and formation epoch of the objects and is both non-linear and non-local. The latter features are expected to leave a detectable imprint on the spatial clustering of galaxies, as described, for instance, by statistics like bispectrum and skewness. Our algorithm may have several interesting applications, among which the possibility of generating mock halo catalogues from low-resolution N-body simulations.

P. Catelan; F. Lucchin; S. Matarrese; C. Porciani

1997-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

GHZ-type and W-type entangled coherent states: generation and Bell-type inequality tests without photon counting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study GHZ-type and W-type three-mode entangled coherent states. Both the types of entangled coherent states violate Mermin's version of the Bell inequality with threshold photon detection (i.e., without photon counting). Such an experiment can be performed using linear optics elements and threshold detectors with significant Bell violations for GHZ-type entangled coherent states. However, to demonstrate Bell-type inequality violations for W-type entangled coherent states, additional nonlinear interactions are needed. We also propose an optical scheme to generate W-type entangled coherent states in free-traveling optical fields. The required resources for the generation are a single-photon source, a coherent state source, beam splitters, phase shifters, photodetectors, and Kerr nonlinearities. Our scheme does not necessarily require strong Kerr nonlinear interactions, i.e., weak nonlinearities can be used for the generation of the W-type entangled coherent states. Furthermore, it is also robust against inefficiencies of the single-photon source and the photon detectors.

Hyunseok Jeong; Nguyen Ba An

2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

240

Selection of non-destructive assay methods: Neutron counting or calorimetric assay?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transition of DOE facilities from production to D&D has lead to more measurements of product, waste, scrap, and other less attractive materials. Some of these materials are difficult to analyze by either neutron counting or calorimetric assay. To determine the most efficacious analysis method, variety of materials, impure salts and hydrofluorination residues have been assayed by both calorimetric assay and neutron counting. New data will be presented together with a review of published data. The precision and accuracy of these measurements are compared to chemistry values and are reported. The contribution of the gamma ray isotopic determination measurement to the overall error of the calorimetric assay or neutron assay is examined and discussed. Other factors affecting selection of the most appropriate non-destructive assay method are listed and considered.

Cremers, T.L.; Wachter, J.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Powered by NERSC, A Database of Billions of Genes and Counting!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by NERSC, a Powered by NERSC, a Database of Billions of Genes and Counting! Powered by NERSC, a Database of Billions of Genes and Counting! With More than a Billion Microbial genes, IMG/M Breaks a Record January 26, 2012 | Tags: Joint Genome Institute Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 IMG/M team celebrates the recording of 1 billionth gene. Microbes are microscopic organisms that live in every nook and cranny of our planet. Without them, plants wouldn't grow, garbage wouldn't decay, humans wouldn't digest food, and there would literally be no life on Earth, or at least as we know it. By examining the genetic makeup of these "bugs," scientists hope to understand how they work, and how they can be used to solve a variety of important problems like identifying new

242

Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration Measurements in a Residence Title Side-by-Side Comparison of Particle Count and Mass Concentration Measurements in a Residence Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., and Federico Noris Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Particulate matter (PM) is a contaminant of concern in many indoor environments, including residential and commercial buildings. Health guidelines for exposure to particles are in units of mass concentrations. Relative to time-integrated mass measurements collected on filters, real-time particle counters are less time-consuming to operate. Studies found reasonable correlation between these two measurement techniques, but agreement may vary in different sampling environments, and depends on the instruments used. We performed a side-by-side comparison of particle counts and mass concentrations estimated by three types of real-time instruments: MetOne BT-637 optical particle counter (OPC), TSI DustTrak aerosol monitor, and TSI aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) spectrometer. In addition to these real-time instruments, time-integrated particle mass was also collected using PM2.5 and PM10 Personal Environmental Monitors (PEMs) manufactured by SKC. Sampling was conducted for two consecutive days in an occupied single-family house in Berkeley, California. Concentration profiles had similar trends, with DustTraks reporting higher particle mass concentrations, partially explained by the density value assumed in the calibration. We made assumptions for particle size and density to calculate the PM2.5 and PM10 mass concentrations for the MetOne and APS, and compared with the filter-based measurements. Despite uncertainties and assumptions, there was generally good agreement for the different methods.

243

Consecutive ones property and PQ-trees for multisets: Hardness of counting their orderings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A binary matrix satisfies the consecutive ones property (c1p) if its columns can be permuted such that the 1s in each row of the resulting matrix are consecutive. Equivalently, a family of setsF={Q"1,...,Q"m}, where Q"i@?R for some universe R, satisfies ... Keywords: Complexity, Consecutive ones property, Counting permutations, Multisets, PQ-trees, Sequences with repeated symbols

Giovanni Battaglia; Roberto Grossi; Noemi Scutellí

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Counting false entries in truth tables of bracketed formulae connected by implication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we count the number of rows f_n with the value "false" in the truth tables of all bracketed formulae with n distinct variables connected by the binary connective of implication. We find a recurrence and an asymptotic formulae for f_n. We also show that the ratio of f_n to the total number of rows converges to \\frac{3-\\sqrt{3}}{6}.

Cameron, Peter J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Event history, spatial analysis and count data methods for empirical research in information systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large number of interesting business and technology problems in IS and e-commerce research center around events and the associated variables that influence them. Researchers are often interested in studying the timing, patterns, and frequencies of ... Keywords: Count data, Duration analysis, E-commerce, Empirical research, Event histories, Hazard models, IS research, IT, Information technology, Research methods, Spatial analysis, Statistics, Survival analysis, Technology adoption

Robert J. Kauffman; Angsana A. Techatassanasoontorn; Bin Wang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A database for The Geysers geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 1985-1986 the Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) began a multi-year project for SLC to organize and analyze the field data from The Geysers. In the first year, most of the work concentrated on the development of a comprehensive database for The Geysers, and conventional reservoir engineering analysis of the data. Essentially, all non-proprietary data for wells at The Geysers have been incorporated into the database, as well as proprietary data from wells located on State leases. In following years, a more detailed analysis of The Geysers data has been carried out. This report is a summary of the non- proprietary work performed in FY 1985--1986. It describes various aspects of the database and also includes: review sections on Field Development, Geology, Geophysics, Geochemistry and Reservoir Engineering. It should be emphasized that these background chapters were written in 1986, and therefore only summarize the information available at that time. The appendices contain individual plots of wellhead pressures, degree of superheat, steam flow rates, cumulative mass flows, injection rates and cumulative injection through 1988 for approximately 250 wells. All of the data contained in this report are non-proprietary, from State and non-State leases. The production/injection and heat flow data from the wells were obtained from the California State Division of Oil and gas (DOG) (courtesy of Dick Thomas). Most of the other data were obtained from SLC files in Sacramento (courtesy of Charles Priddy), or DOG files in Santa Rosa (courtesy of Ken Stelling). 159 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Cox, B.L.; Fuller, P.; Ripperda, M.; Tulinius, H.; Witherspoon, P.A.; Goldstein, N.; Flexser, S.; Pruess, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Truesdell, A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

ANALYSIS OF FUEL ELEMENT CORE BLANKS FOR ARGONNE LOW POWER REACTOR BY GAMMA COUNTING  

SciTech Connect

A technique based on a determinaiion of the differential counting rate exhibited by the 184-kev gamma radiation associated with the decay of U/sup 235/ was developed for the determination of the U/sup 235/ content in Argonne Low Power Reactor fuel element core blanks. The Argonne Low Power Reactor core blanks were an aluminum-highly enriched uranium alloy containing 17.5 weight per cent uranium (approximately 4 g U/sup 235/) having the following dimensions: length, 6.875 inches, width, 3.31 inches, and thickness, 0.200 inch. The gamma- ray spectrum emitied by uranium is rather complex. Using a scintillation spectrometer and scanning the spectrum, the energy is found to be concentrated primarily in two regions, at 184 and 90 kev. The 184-kev gamma rays result primarily from the decay of U/sup 235/ The gammas in the 90-kev region result from the U/sup 235/ decay and daughter products of U/sup 238/ and U/sup 235/. Using a pulse-height analyzer, it is possibie to select the desired radiation emitted from the source and determine the counting rate for a given source. In this work the 184-kev gamma radiation was counted to determine the amount of U/ sup 235/ present in the individual core blanks. (auth)

McGonnagle, W.J.; Perry, R.B.

1959-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Calibration of the Accuscan II In Vivo System for I-125 Thyroid Counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the March 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for I-125 thyroid counting. The source used for the calibration was a DOE manufactured Am-241/Eu-152 source contained in a 22 ml vial BEA Am-241/Eu-152 RMC II-1 with energies from 26 keV to 344 keV. The center of the detector housing was positioned 64 inches from the vault floor. This position places the approximate center line of the detector housing at the center line of the source in the phantom thyroid tube. The energy and efficiency calibration were performed using an RMC II phantom (Appendix J). Performance testing was conducted using source BEA Am-241/Eu-152 RMC II-1 and Validation testing was performed using an I-125 source in a 30 ml vial (I-125 BEA Thyroid 002) and an ANSI N44.3 phantom (Appendix I). This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for counting the thyroid for I-125 and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

Ovard R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Measurement of radionuclides using ion chromatography and flow-cell scintillation counting with pulse shape discrimination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project has been initiated at Clemson Univ. to develop a HPLC/flow- cell system for analysis of non-gamma emitting radionuclides in environmental samples; an important component is development of a low background flow-cell detector that counts alpha and beta particles separately through pulse shape discrimination. Objective of the work presented here is to provide preliminary results of an evaluation of the following scintillators: CaF{sub 2}:Eu, scintillating glass, and BaF{sub 2}. Slightly acidic aqueous solutions of the alpha emitter {sup 233}U and the beta emitter {sup 45}Ca were used. Detection efficiencies and minimum detectable activities were determined.

DeVol, T.A.; Fjeld, R.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Longitudinal Bunch Pattern Measurements through Single Photon Counting at SPEAR3  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), a division of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is a synchrotron light source that provides x-rays for experimental use. As electrons are bent in the storage ring, they emit electromagnetic radiation. There are 372 different buckets which electrons can be loaded into. Different filling patterns produce different types of x-rays. What is the bunch pattern at a given time? Which filling pattern is better? Are there any flaws to the current injection system? These questions can be answered with this single photon counting experiment.

Wang, Hongyi (Jack); /UC, San Diego

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

251

Full counting statistics of laser excited Rydberg aggregates in a one-dimensional geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally study the full counting statistics of few-body Rydberg aggregates excited from a quasi-one-dimensional Rydberg gas. We measure asymmetric excitation spectra and increased second and third order statistical moments of the Rydberg number distribution, from which we determine the average aggregate size. Direct comparisons with numerical simulations reveal the presence of liquid-like spatial correlations, and indicate sequential growth of the aggregates around an initial grain. These findings demonstrate the importance of dissipative effects in strongly correlated Rydberg gases and introduce a way to study spatio-temporal correlations in strongly-interacting many-body quantum systems without imaging.

H. Schempp; G. Günter; M. Robert-de-Saint-Vincent; C. S. Hofmann; D. Breyel; A. Komnik; D. W. Schönleber; M. Gärttner; J. Evers; S. Whitlock; M. Weidemüller

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Statistical method for resolving the photon-photoelectron-counting inversion problem  

SciTech Connect

A statistical inversion method is proposed for the photon-photoelectron-counting statistics in quantum key distribution experiment. With the statistical viewpoint, this problem is equivalent to the parameter estimation for an infinite binomial mixture model. The coarse-graining idea and Bayesian methods are applied to deal with this ill-posed problem, which is a good simple example to show the successful application of the statistical methods to the inverse problem. Numerical results show the applicability of the proposed strategy. The coarse-graining idea for the infinite mixture models should be general to be used in the future.

Wu Jinlong [LMAM and School of Mathematical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li Tiejun, E-mail: tieli@pku.edu.c [LMAM and School of Mathematical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Peng, Xiang, E-mail: xiangpeng@pku.edu.c [CREAM Group, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks (Peking University) and Institute of Quantum Electronics, School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Guo Hong, E-mail: hongguo@pku.edu.c [CREAM Group, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks (Peking University) and Institute of Quantum Electronics, School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

What belongs where? Variable selection for zero-inflated count models with an application to the demand for health care  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops a Bayesian spike and slab model for zero-inflated count models which are commonly used in health economics. We account for model uncertainty and allow for model averaging in situations with many potential regressors. The proposed ... Keywords: Bayesian, C11, C25, Count data, Demand for health care, I11, Model averaging, Model uncertainty, Spike and slab model, Zero-inflation

Markus Jochmann

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Virtual radiation fields for ALARA determination  

SciTech Connect

As computing power has increased, so too has the ability to model and simulate complex systems and processes. In addition, virtual reality technology has made it possible to visualize and understand many complex scientific and engineering problems. For this reason, a virtual dosimetry program called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF) is developed to model radiation dose rate and cumulative dose to a receptor operating in a virtual radiation environment. With the design and testing of many facilities and products taking place in the virtual world, this program facilitates the concurrent consideration of radiological concerns during the design process. Three-dimensional (3D) graphical presentation of the radiation environment is made possible through the use of IGRIP, a graphical modeling program developed by Deneb Robotics, Inc. The VRF simulation program was designed to model and display a virtual dosimeter. As a demonstration of the program`s capability, the Hanford tank, C-106, was modeled to predict radiation doses to robotic equipment used to remove radioactive waste from the tank. To validate VRF dose predictions, comparison was made with reported values for tank C-106, which showed agreement to within 0.5%. Graphical information is presented regarding the 3D dose rate variation inside the tank. Cumulative dose predictions were made for the cleanup operations of tank C-106. A four-dimensional dose rate map generated by VRF was used to model the dose rate not only in 3D space but also as a function of the amount of waste remaining in the tank. This allowed VRF to predict dose rate at any stage in the waste removal process for an accurate simulation of the radiological conditions throughout the tank cleanup procedure.

Knight, T.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Massive, red galaxies in a hierarchical universe I. Counts of Extremely Red Objects and basic properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present predictions for the abundance and nature of Extremely Red Objects (EROs) in the Lambda cold dark matter model. EROs are red, massive galaxies observed at z>= 1 and their numbers and properties pose a challenge to hierarchical galaxy formation models. We compare the predictions from two published models, one of which invokes a "superwind" to regulate star formation in massive haloes and the other which suppresses gas cooling in haloes through "radio-mode" AGN feedback. The superwind model underestimates the number counts of EROs by an order of magnitude, whereas the radio-mode AGN feedback model gives excellent agreement with the number counts and redshift distribution of EROs. In the AGN feedback model the ERO population is dominated by old, passively evolving galaxies, whereas observations favour an equal split between old galaxies and dusty starbursts. Also, the model predicts a more extended redshift distribution of passive galaxies than is observed. These comparisons suggest that star formation may be quenched too efficiently in this model.

V. Gonzalez-Perez; C. M. Baugh; C. G. Lacey; C. Almeida

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

256

The concept of primes and the algorithm for counting the greatest common divisor in Ancient China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When people mention the number theoretical achievements in Ancient China, the famous Chinese Remainder Theorem always springs to mind. But, two more of them--the concept of primes and the algorithm for counting the greatest common divisor, are rarely spoken. Some scholars even think that Ancient China has not the concept of primes. The aim of this paper is to show that the concept of primes in Ancient China can be traced back to the time of Confuciusor (about 500 B.C.) or more ago. This implies that the concept of primes in Ancient China is much earlier than the concept of primes in Euclid's \\emph{Elements}(about 300 B.C.) of Ancient Greece. We also shows that the algorithm for counting the greatest common divisor in Ancient China is essentially the Euclidean algorithm or the binary gcd algorithm. Donald E. Knuth said that "the binary gcd algorithm was discovered by J. Stein in 1961". Nevertheless, Knuth was wrong. The ancient Chinese algorithm is clearly much earlier than J. Stein's algorithm.

Zhang, Shaohua

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The structure of Green functions in quantum field theory with a general state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In quantum field theory, the Green function is usually calculated as the expectation value of the time-ordered product of fields over the vacuum. In some cases, especially in degenerate systems, expectation values over general states are required. The corresponding Green functions are essentially more complex than in the vacuum, because they cannot be written in terms of standard Feynman diagrams. Here, a method is proposed to determine the structure of these Green functions and to derive nonperturbative equations for them. The main idea is to transform the cumulants describing correlations into interaction terms.

Christian Brouder

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

{sup 137}Cs concentration in soil samples from an early survey of Hiroshima atomic bomb and cumulative dose estimation from the fallout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low background gamma-ray measurement has been performed to determine the {sup 137}Cs content in soil samples collected in a very early survey of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. These soil samples were collected just 3 d after the explosion within 5 km from the hypocenter and were not exposed to the global fallout from nuclear weapon tests. Out of 22 samples, {sup 137}Cs was detected for 11 samples, and their radionactivities ranged from 0.16-10.6mBq g{sup {minus}1} at the time of the measurement. A comparison of the {sup 137}Cs deposition with the rainfall area within Hiroshima city indicates that the rainfall area was wider than the previously proposed one. Cumulative exposure by the fallout has been estimated to be 0.31 mC kg{sup {minus}1} (0.12 R) 1.0 mC kg{sup {minus}1} (4 R) in the heavy fallout area. 20 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi [Hiroshima Univ., Kagamiyama (Japan)] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A COMPARISON OF MEASURED AND CALCULATED GAMMA RAY ATTENUATION FOR A COMMON COUNTING GEOMETRY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to perform quantitative gamma spectroscopy, it is necessary to know the sample-specific detection efficiency for photons as a function of energy. The detection efficiency, along with the branching ratio for the isotope and gamma ray of interest, is used to convert observed counts/second to actual disintegrations/second, and, hence, has a large effect on the accuracy of the measurement. In cases where the geometry of the source is simple and reproducible, such as a point source, small vial of solid, or jar of liquid, geometry-specific standards may be counted to determine the detection efficiency. In cases where the samples are large, irregular, or unique, this method generally cannot be used. For example, it is impossible to obtain a NIST-traceable standard glovebox or 55-gallon drum. In these cases, a combination of measured absolute detector efficiency and calculated sample-specific correction factors is commonly used. The correction factors may be calculated via Monte Carlo simulation of the item (the method used by Canberra's ISOCS system), or via semi-empirical calculation of matrix and container attenuations based on the thickness and composition of the container and radioactive matrix (ISOTOPIC by EG&G Ortec uses this method). The accuracy of these correction factors for specific geometries is often of vital interest when assessing the quality of gamma spectroscopy data. During the Building 251 Risk-Reduction Project, over 100 samples of high activity actinides will be characterized via gamma spectroscopy, typically without removing the material from the current storage containers. Most of the radioactive materials in B-251 are stored in cylindrical stainless steel canisters (called USV containers, after the Underground Storage Vaults they are commonly stored in), 13 cm in diameter, by 28 cm high, with walls that are 1.8 mm thick. While the actual samples have a variety of configurations inside the USV container, a very common configuration is the material (usually as an oxide powder pellet of approximately 2 cm diameter by {approx}2 mm thick) in a squat glass jar, with the jar placed in a thin steel food-pack can, which is then placed in the bottom of the USV canister. During data acquisition, the USV containers are typically rotated at approximately 4 rpm on a turntable to eliminate errors due to the material not being centered in the can, or attenuation not being isotropic. An aluminum plate is placed over the container, secured by three vertical rods, to securely hold the container. Pictures of both the containers, and this typical counting configuration are shown below.

Gaylord, R F

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method and means for measuring the anisotropy of a plasma in a magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Anisotropy is measured of a free-free-bremsstrahlungradiation-generating plasma in a magnetic field by collimating the free-free bremsstrahlung radiation in a direction normal to the magnetic field and scattering the collimated free- free bremsstrahlung radiation to resolve the radiation into its vector components in a plane parallel to the electric field of the bremsstrahlung radiation. The scattered vector components are counted at particular energy levels in a direction parallel to the magnetic field and also normal to the magnetic field of the plasma to provide a measure of anisotropy of the plasma. (Official Gazette)

Shohet, J.L.; Greene, D.G.S.

1973-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Laboratory adds a sixth R&D 100 award to its 2009 count  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D 100 awards R&D 100 awards Laboratory adds a sixth R&D 100 award to its 2009 count This year's awards bring the Los Alamos total to 113 since the Laboratory first entered the competition in 1978. November 4, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Communications Office

262

Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LA-UR-11-01857 LA-UR-11-01857 Approved for public release; distribution I unlimited. Title: Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Authors: Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell Intended Use: Deliverable to SB-TS: Safety Basis Technical Services Los Alamos National Laboratory, an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, is operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC52- 06NA25396. By acceptance of this article, the publisher recognizes that the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or to allow others to do so, for U.S.

263

Full counting statistics of energy fluctuations in a driven quantum resonator  

SciTech Connect

We consider the statistics of time-integrated energy fluctuations of a driven bosonic single-mode resonator, as measured by a quantum nondemolition (QND) detector, using the standard Keldysh prescription to define higher moments. We find that, due to an effective cascading of fluctuations, these statistics are surprisingly nonclassical: the low-temperature, quantum probability distribution is not equivalent to the high-temperature classical distribution evaluated at some effective temperature. Moreover, for a sufficiently large drive detuning and low temperatures, the Keldysh-ordered quasiprobability distribution characterizing these fluctuations fails to be positive-definite; this is similar to the full counting statistics of charge in superconducting systems. We argue that this indicates a kind of nonclassical behavior akin to that tested by Leggett-Garg inequalities.

Clerk, A. A. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

An active drop counting device using condenser microphone for superheated emulsion detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An active device for superheated emulsion detector is described. A capacitive diaphragm sensor or condenser microphone is used to convert the acoustic pulse of drop nucleation to electrical signal. An active peak detector is included in the circuit to avoid multiple triggering of the counter. The counts are finally recorded by a microprocessor based data acquisition system. Genuine triggers, missed by the sensor, were studied using a simulated clock pulse. The neutron energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source was measured using the device with R114 as the sensitive liquid and compared with the calculated fission neutron energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf. Frequency analysis of the detected signals was also carried out.

Das, Mala; Marick, C.; Kanjilal, D.; Saha, S. [Nuclear and Atomic Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Arya, A S. [Department of Physics, VIT University, Vellore, Tamilnadu 632014 (India)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Construction of Recurrent Fractal Interpolation Surfaces with Function Scaling Factors and Estimation of Box-counting Dimension on Rectangular Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a construction of recurrent fractal interpolation surfaces with function vertical scaling factors and estimation of their box-counting dimension. A recurrent fractal interpolation surface (RFIS) is an attractor of a recurrent iterated function system (RIFS) which is a graph of bivariate interpolation function. For any given data set on rectangular grids, we construct general recurrent iterated function systems with function vertical scaling factors and prove the existence of bivariate functions whose graph are attractors of the above constructed RIFSs. Finally, we estimate lower and upper bounds for the box-counting dimension of the constructed RFISs.

Chol-Hui Yun; Hui-Chol Choi; Hyong-Chol O

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Characterizing and predicting ultrafine particle counts in Canadian classrooms during the winter months: Model development and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

School classrooms are potentially important micro-environments for childhood exposures owing to the large amount of time children spend in these locations. While a number of airborne contaminants may be present in schools, to date few studies have examined ultrafine particle (0.02-1 {mu}m) (UFP) levels in classrooms. In this study, our objective was to characterize UFP counts (cm{sup -3}) in classrooms during the winter months and to develop a model to predict such exposures based on ambient weather conditions and outdoor UFPs, as well as classroom characteristics such as size, temperature, relative humidity, and carbon dioxide levels. In total, UFP count data were collected on 60 occasions in 37 occupied classrooms at one elementary school and one secondary school in Pembroke, Ontario. On average, outdoor UFP levels exceeded indoor measures by 8989 cm{sup -3} (95% confidence interval (CI): 6382, 11 596), and classroom UFP counts were similar at both schools with a combined average of 5017 cm{sup -3} (95% CI: 4300, 5734). Of the variables examined only wind speed and outdoor UFPs were important determinants of classrooms UFP levels. Specifically, each 10 km/h increase in wind speed corresponded to an 1873 cm{sup -3} (95% CI: 825, 2920) decrease in classroom UFP counts, and each 10 000 cm{sup -3} increase in outdoor UFPs corresponded to a 1550 cm{sup -3} (95% CI: 930, 2171) increase in classroom UFP levels. However, high correlations between these two predictors meant that the independent effects of wind speed and outdoor UFPs could not be separated in multivariable models, and only outdoor UFP counts were included in the final predictive model. To evaluate model performance, classroom UFP counts were collected for 8 days at two new schools and compared to predicted values based on outdoor UFP measures. A moderate correlation was observed between measured and predicted classroom UFP counts (r=0.63) for both schools combined, but this relationship was not valid on days in which a strong indoor UFP source (electric kitchen stove) was active in schools. In general, our findings suggest that reasonable estimates of classroom UFP counts may be obtained from outdoor UFP data but that the accuracy of such estimates are limited in the presence of indoor UFP sources.

Weichenthal, Scott [Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, 1130 Pine Avenue West, Room B10, Charles Meredith House, Montreal, Que., H3A 1A3 (Canada)], E-mail: sweich@po-box.mcgill.ca; Dufresne, Andre; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Joseph, Lawrence [Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, 1130 Pine Avenue West, Room B10, Charles Meredith House, Montreal, Que., H3A 1A3 (Canada)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Suppressant: Electric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Suppressant:Electric Fields. Fire Extinguishment of Pool Flames by Means of a DC electric Field.. ...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

268

Internal split field generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

Thundat; ,Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

Stand Up and Be Counted: Race, Religion, and the Eisenhower Administration's Encounter with Arab Nationalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Stand Up and be Counted" explores how American racial and religious beliefs guided the American encounter with Arab nationalism in the 1950s. It utilizes both traditional archival sources and less traditional cultural texts. Cultural texts, such as, movies, novels, travelogues, periodical articles, and folk sayings, are used to elucidate how Americans viewed and understood Arab peoples, and also religion. Archival records from the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, National Archives, and John Foster Dulles Papers at Princeton University are used to elucidate how these beliefs shaped the Eisenhower administration‘s policy in the Middle East. The first chapter provided a brief introductory history of the Arab nationalist movement, reviews the literature, and introduces the dissertation's argument. The second chapter demonstrates that American culture established a canon of racialized beliefs about Arabs. These beliefs forged a national identity by constructing an Arab, to use Edward Said‘s famed term, "other." Americans to project what they believed they were not onto Arabs in an effort to establish what they were. The third chapter demonstrates that historical events caused subtle, yet important, shifts in how Americans perceived Arab peoples over the years. By focusing on the 1920s, 1940s, and 1950s "Stand Up and Be Counted" elucidates that historical events compelled specific racialized associations to assume greater prominence during these periods. The fourth chapter demonstrates that these racially filtered perceptions guided the Eisenhower administration's decision to oppose Arab nationalism. Arab nationalist leaders, such as Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt, advocated adopting a neutralist stance in the cold war. Administration officials, however, reasoned that Arabs' innate gullibility and irrationality would ultimately allow Soviet leaders to outwit and subjugate them—perhaps without them knowing it had even occurred. These racialized assumptions, the sixth chapter reveals, compelled the administration to labor to contain Arab nationalism, even after the combined British-French invasion of the Suez Canal. The seventh chapter establishes that many considered the United States to be a covenanted nation, a nation chosen by God to lead and save humanity. Beginning in the 1930s, however, many Americans came to fear that material secularism at home and abroad were threatening this mission. The monumental nature of these dual secularist threats prompted many to advocate for the formation of a united front of the religious. Among those who subscribed to this understanding were President Eisenhower and his Secretary of State John Foster Dulles. The eighth chapter established that this conceptualization of religion guided the administration's decision to promote King Saud of Saudi Arabia as a regional counter weight to Nasser and the Arab nationalist movement. The ninth chapter reveals that this strategy was fraught with peril.

Bobal, Rian

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A Bayesian Approach to Upscaling and Downscaling of Aircraft Measurements of Ice Particle Counts and Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses the issue of how to upscale cloud-sized in situ measurements of ice to yield realistic simulations of ice clouds for a variety of modeling studies. Aircraft measurements of ice particle counts along a 79 km zigzag path were ...

A. R. Jameson; A. J. Heymsfield

271

Making Votes Count: Editorial Observer: The Results Are in and the Winner Is . . . or Maybe Not February 29, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Charlie Matulka, who lost to Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska the same year, does not trust the results- counting machines, which happen to have been manufactured by a company Mr. Hagel used to run. Mr. Matulka, against Mr. Matulka, he won more than 80 percent of the vote. What gets conspiracy theorists excited

Rivest, Ronald L.

272

Event Counting of Partially-Observed Discrete-Event Systems with Uniformly and Nonuniformly Bounded Diagnosis Delays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an approach dealing with repeated fault events in the framework of model-based monitoring of discrete-event systems (DES). Various notions of diagnosability reported in the literature deal with uniformly bounded finite detection of counting ... Keywords: Computational complexity, Discrete-event systems, Fault diagnosis, Repeated/intermittent faults

Tae-Sic Yoo; Humberto E. Garcia

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Bayesian Approach to Upscaling and Downscaling of Aircraft Measurements of Ice Particle Counts and Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses the issue of how to upscale cloud-sized in situ measurements of ice to yield realistic simulations of ice clouds for a variety of modeling studies. Aircraft measurements of ice particle counts along a 79-km zigzag path were ...

A. R. Jameson; A. J. Heymsfield

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Recent Developments in Neutron Detection and Multiplicity Counting with Liquid Scintillator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many years at LLNL we have been developing time-correlated neutron detection techniques and algorithms for many applications including Arms Control, Threat Detection and Nuclear Material Assaying. Many of our techniques have been developed specifically for relatively low efficiency (a few %) inherent in the man-portable systems. Historically we used thermal neutron detectors (mainly {sup 3}He) taking advantage of the high thermal neutron interaction cross-sections but more recently we have been investigating fast neutron detection with liquid scintillators and inorganic crystals. We have discovered considerable detection advantages with fast neutron detection as the inherent nano-second production time-scales of fission and neutron induced fission are preserved instead of being lost in neutron thermalization required for thermal neutron detectors. We are now applying fast neutron technology (new fast and portable digital electronics as well as new faster and less hazardous scintillator formulations) to the safeguards regime and faster detector response times and neutron momentum sensitivity show promise in measuring, differentiating and assaying samples that have very high count rates as well as mixed fission sources (e.g. Cm and Pu). We report on measured results with our existing liquid scintillator array and progress on design of nuclear material assaying system that incorporates fast neutron detection.

Nakae, L F; Kerr, P L; Newby, R J; Prasad, M K; Rowland, M S; Snyderman, N J; Verbeke, J M; Wurtz, R E

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

275

Google scholar's ranking algorithm: The impact of citation counts (an empirical study).” to be published  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Scholar is one of the major academic search engines but its ranking algorithm for academic articles is unknown. In recent studies we partly reverse-engineered the algorithm. This paper presents the results of our third study. While the first study provided a broad overview and the second study focused on researching the impact of citation counts, the current study focused on analyzing the correlation of an article’s age and its ranking in Google Scholar. In other words, it was analyzed if older/recent published articles are more/less likely to appear in a top position in Google Scholar’s result lists. For our study, age and rankings of 1,099,749 articles retrieved via 2,100 search queries were analyzed. The analysis revealed that an article’s age seems to play no significant role in Google Scholar’s ranking algorithm. It is also discussed why this might lead to a suboptimal ranking. 1.

Jöran Beel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

DISCUSSIONS ON A TYPE OF RESERVOIR CELL BOUNDARY IN THE GEYSERS STEAM FIELD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The boundaries of reservoir fluid convection cells are discreet and intricate zones, commonly sealed or reduced in permeabilities, which are often quite readily identifiable in many hydrothermal systems. Cell boundaries in the Geysers Steam Field are more vague; however, they are gradually being revealed by cumulative and extensive wellbore data. A profound example of a type of boundary has been revealed by drilling in one area of the steam field. A proposed model utilizes a sericitic alteration scheme to establish cell self-sealing. Mineralogical, permeability, and temperature properties all coincide so as to allow formation of a boundary model. This reinforces previously held views that the reservoir cell rock and hydrothermal system are greatly out of equilibrium. Such similar phenomena are suggested from drilling experiences in other parts of the steam field. Considerably, more work is required to better define and comprehend the nature and location of reservoir cell boundaries within the Geysers Steam Field.

Hebein, J.L.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

277

ENTO 489 Field Entomology Field Project Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENTO 489 ­ Field Entomology Field Project Plan GENERAL Title: A Taxonomic Survey of Late Summer will be using aerial sweep nets as our only technique to collect the butterflies because this is the best way: · Materials needed to implement the project in the field include: o 2 aerial sweep nets o 2-4 killing jars set

Behmer, Spencer T.

278

Recent Developments In Fast Neutron Detection And Multiplicity Counting With Verification With Liquid Scintillator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many years at LLNL, we have been developing time-correlated neutron detection techniques and algorithms for applications such as Arms Control, Threat Detection and Nuclear Material Assay. Many of our techniques have been developed specifically for the relatively low efficiency (a few percent) attainable by detector systems limited to man-portability. Historically, we used thermal neutron detectors (mainly {sup 3}He), taking advantage of the high thermal neutron interaction cross-sections. More recently, we have been investigating the use of fast neutron detection with liquid scintillators, inorganic crystals, and in the near future, pulse-shape discriminating plastics which respond over 1000 times faster (nanoseconds versus tens of microseconds) than thermal neutron detectors. Fast neutron detection offers considerable advantages, since the inherent nanosecond production time-scales of spontaneous fission and neutron-induced fission are preserved and measured instead of being lost by thermalization required for thermal neutron detectors. We are now applying fast neutron technology to the safeguards regime in the form of fast portable digital electronics as well as faster and less hazardous scintillator formulations. Faster detector response times and sensitivity to neutron momentum show promise for measuring, differentiating, and assaying samples that have modest to very high count rates, as well as mixed fission sources like Cm and Pu. We report on measured results with our existing liquid scintillator array, and progress on the design of a nuclear material assay system that incorporates fast neutron detection, including the surprising result that fast liquid scintillator detectors become competitive and even surpass the precision of {sup 3}He-based counters measuring correlated pairs in modest (kg) samples of plutonium.

Nakae, L; Chapline, G; Glenn, A; Kerr, P; Kim, K; Ouedraogo, S; Prasad, M; Sheets, S; Snyderman, N; Verbeke, J; Wurtz, R

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

A catalogue of micro-Jy radio sources in northern legacy fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present catalogues of faint 1.4-GHz radio sources from extremely-deep Very Large Array pointings in the Lockman Hole, the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) and ELAIS N2. Our analysis of the HDF-N data has produced maps that are significantly deeper than those previously published and we have used these to search for counterparts to submm sources. For each of the fields we have derived normalised differential source counts and in the case of the HDF-N find no evidence for the previously-reported under-density of sources; our counts are entirely consistent with those found for the majority of other fields. The catalogues are available as an online supplement to this paper and the maps are also available for download.

A. D. Biggs; R. J. Ivison

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

External split field generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Institutional Logics from the Aggregation of Organizational Networks: Operational Procedures for the Analysis of Counted Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address some problems of network aggregation that are central to organizational studies. We show that concepts of network equivalence (including generalizations and special cases of structural equivalence) are relevant to the modeling of the aggregation ... Keywords: aggregation, co-constitution of organizational identities and practices, loglinear models, organizational fields, structural equivalence

Ronald L. Breiger; John W. Mohr

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Operation of a Single-Photon-Counting X-Ray Charge-Coupled Device Camera Spectrometer in a Petawatt Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a single-photon-counting x-ray CCD (charge-coupled device) camera as an x-ray spectrometer is a well-established technique in ultrashort-pulse laser experiments. In single-photon-counting mode, the pixel value of each readout pixel is proportional to the energy deposited from the incident x-ray photon. For photons below 100 keV, a significant fraction of the events deposits all the energy in a single pixel. A histogram of the pixel readout values gives a good approximation of the x-ray spectrum. This technique requires almost no alignment, but it is very sensitive to signal-to-background issues, especially in a high-energy petawatt environment.

Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Sangster, T.C.; Key, M.H.; Patel, P.; Zhang, B.B.; Clarke, R.; Karsch, S.; Norreys, P.

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

Initial characterization of unequal-length, low-background proportional counters for absolute gas-counting applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of two sets of custom unequal length proportional counters is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). These detectors will be used in measurements to determine the absolute activity concentration of gaseous radionuclides (e.g. 37 Ar ). A set of three detectors has been fabricated based on previous PNNL ultra-low-background proportional counter designs and now operate in PNNL's shallow underground counting laboratory. A second set of four counters has also been fabricated using clean assembly of Oxygen-Free High-Conductivity copper components for use in a shielded above-ground counting laboratory. Characterization of both sets of detectors is underway with measurements of background rates

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Joint anisotropy and source count constraints on the contribution of blazars to the diffuse gamma-ray background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We place new constraints on the contribution of blazars to the large-scale isotropic gamma-ray background (IGRB) by jointly analyzing the measured source count distribution (logN-logS) of blazars and the measured intensity and anisotropy of the IGRB. We find that these measurements point to a consistent scenario in which unresolved blazars make less than 20% of the IGRB intensity at 1-10 GeV while accounting for the majority of the measured anisotropy in that energy band. These results indicate that the remaining fraction of the IGRB intensity is made by a component with a low level of intrinsic anisotropy. We determine upper limits on the anisotropy from non-blazar sources, adopting the best-fit parameters of the measured source count distribution to calculate the unresolved blazar anisotropy. In addition, we show that the anisotropy measurement excludes some recently proposed models of the unresolved blazar population.

Alessandro Cuoco; Eiichiro Komatsu; Jennifer Siegal-Gaskins

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

Detection of Anomalous Reactor Activity Using Antineutrino Count Rate Evolution Over the Course of a Reactor Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the sensitivity of antineutrino count rate measurements to changes in the fissile content of civil power reactors. Such measurements may be useful in IAEA reactor safeguards applications. We introduce a hypothesis testing procedure to identify statistically significant differences between the antineutrino count rate evolution of a standard 'baseline' fuel cycle and that of an anomalous cycle, in which plutonium is removed and replaced with an equivalent fissile worth of uranium. The test would allow an inspector to detect anomalous reactor activity, or to positively confirm that the reactor is operating in a manner consistent with its declared fuel inventory and power level. We show that with a reasonable choice of detector parameters, the test can detect replacement of 73 kg of plutonium in 90 days with 95% probability, while controlling the false positive rate at 5%. We show that some improvement on this level of sensitivity may be expected by various means, including use of the method in conjunction with existing reactor safeguards methods. We also identify a necessary and sufficient daily antineutrino count rate to achieve the quoted sensitivity, and list examples of detectors in which such rates have been attained.

Vera Bulaevskaya; Adam Bernstein

2010-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

286

Bulalo field, Philippines: Reservoir modeling for prediction of limits to sustainable generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bulalo geothermal field, located in Laguna province, Philippines, supplies 12% of the electricity on the island of Luzon. The first 110 MWe power plant was on line May 1979; current 330 MWe (gross) installed capacity was reached in 1984. Since then, the field has operated at an average plant factor of 76%. The National Power Corporation plans to add 40 MWe base load and 40 MWe standby in 1995. A numerical simulation model for the Bulalo field has been created that matches historic pressure changes, enthalpy and steam flash trends and cumulative steam production. Gravity modeling provided independent verification of mass balances and time rate of change of liquid desaturation in the rock matrix. Gravity modeling, in conjunction with reservoir simulation provides a means of predicting matrix dry out and the time to limiting conditions for sustainable levelized steam deliverability and power generation.

Strobel, Calvin J.

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Steamflood production mechanism in an edge pattern Duri field, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Duri field, located in Riau Province in Central Sumatra, Indonesia, is currently the site of the largest steamflood project in the world. Roughly half of the field is being flooded in eight project areas. Low oil rate has been encountered in the edge pattern in Duri field. The source of the problem is believed to be the poor steamflood efficiency due to water coning and steam possibly injected into water zone. Evidences for poor steamflood efficiency are a high Steam-oil Ratio and low wellhead temperature. A reservoir simulation study was performed to model the production mechanism in a typical edge pattern of Duri field. A history-match model was developed using a three- dimensional, black-oil, thermal reservoir simulator. A simple pattern-element, layer-cake model was used. Reservoir properties, except permeability and porosity, from the previous model were used and an excellent match of six years of historical performance was obtained by making minor changes in the water relative permeability data. From the result, it can be explained that there are two mechanisms happening to the steam flow in the reservoir. Gravity segregation tends to move steam upward, and least-resistance-flow-path (LRFP) tends to move steam downward due to water cone formed by the producers. LRFP is dominant in the beginning of the steamflood. Water temperature is lower than that of steam, causing even more flow downward to the water zone. Once temperature equilibrium is reached in the OWC, gravity override starts to take over the role. A horizontal well seems to be a good choice to improve the sweep efficiency, because of better contact between wellborn and pay-zone, resulting in lower pressure drawdown for the same production rate. Sensitivity analysis shows the best horizontal section is perpendicular to the reservoir dip. An experimental design using two-level factorial design was performed to find out what variables are influencing the cumulative production, discounted cumulative production and project life for drilling horizontal well in the situation as in Duri field. Correlations to estimate those quantities were developed using linear regression method. It is no surprise that the oil volume and discount factor are the variables that determine those quantities.

Yuwono, Ipung Punto

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume III, Fish and Habitat Inventory of Tributary Streams, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study of the fisheries of the Swan River drainage in relation to potential small hydro development. This information was collected in order to obtain a reliable basin-wide database which was used to evaluate the potential cumulative effects of a number of proposed small hydro developments on the fisheries of the drainage. For each named tributary stream there is a reach-by-reach narrative summary of general habitat characteristics, outstanding features of the stream, and fish populations and spawning use. An attempt was made to rank many of the measured parameters relative to other surveyed stream reaches in the drainage. 3 refs.

Leathe, Stephen A.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A reservoir management study of a mature oil field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integrated geological, petrophysical and reservoir engineering review was performed for a mature, producing oil field. Like many older fields, important data are missing or were not collected. The techniques used in this thesis may be applied to other mature oil fields to make sound engineering and business decisions. I interpreted the geological structure and stratigaphy of the salt dome oil field. Structure, isopach and cross-sectional maps were constructed. Depositional environments of the producing horizons were identified. Potential for additional reserves was assessed. Well logs, core data, water resistivity and produced fluids data were analyzed. Average values of porosity, permeability, and oil saturation were determined for the field. Potential reserves behind casing were identified. Based on the revised geological and petrophysical data, the original oil in place was estimated from volumetrics to be 42.3 MMSTB. Cumulative oil production was determined for the first time since 1963. The field, individual reservoir, and individual well production performances were reviewed. Initial production histories of more than 220 wells were documented. I collected wellhead fluid samples and analyzed oil gravity and viscosity. Other fluid properties were estimated from correlations. Pressure data from the field was collated and analyzed. Primary production mechanisms and aquifer influx were estimated by reviewing early producing history and performing material balance calculations. Water influx was calculated. The performances of analogous salt dome reservoirs were compared to that of the field. All past well stimulations were reviewed and suggestions made for better implementation. Water injection in the field was reviewed. Problems of implementation and reservoir response were identified. The best areas in the field for waterflooding were identified and analyzed with an analytical model. Based on existing development, the oil ultimate recovery is estimated to be 14.4 MMSTB or 34.0 % of original oil in place. To determine whether oil recovery can be improved, incremental, after tax economic analysis was applied to several schemes. Infill drilling, hydraulic fracturing and waterflooding were analyzed. A course of action to maximize economic return is outlined for the field. Hydraulic fracturing appears to be the most viable technique to improve oil production from the field.

Peruzzi, Tave

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Small integrating meter for assessing long-term exposure to magnetic fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A small, lightweight meter has been developed for magnetic-field measurements, particularly those needed for exposure-assessment purposes. This meter, known as the AMEX-3D, continuously measures all three axes of magnetic-flux density and electronically combines the data into a single estimate of cumulative exposure to the root-mean-square (rms) resultant flux density. The AMEX-3D weighs about 120 g, measures 2.7 cm x 5.1 cm x 10.2 cm, and is battery powered. Two panel-mounted jacks are provided for measuring battery voltage and for reading cumulative exposure data from the unit. The instrument has, within 3 dB, a flat response to magnetic flux densities at all frequencies in its 30-1,000 Hz bandwidth. A detailed analysis of error sources in the AMEX-3D leads to an estimate of [plus minus] 20% as the accuracy of the instrument over its dynamic range, which extends from 0.02 to 15 microT. The AMEX-3D was tested in the field by asking electric-utility distribution linemen to wear AMEX-3D and EMDEX meters simultaneously while working. Agreement between the two measures of exposure was excellent.

Kaune, W.T.; Niple, J.C.; Liu, M.J.; Silva, J.M. (Enertech Consultants, Campbell, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

1 String field theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This elementary introduction to string field theory highlights the features and the limitations of this approach to quantum gravity as it is currently understood. String field theory is a formulation of string theory as a field theory in space-time with an infinite number of massive fields. Although existing constructions of string field theory require expanding around a fixed choice of space-time background, the theory is in principle background-independent, in the sense that different backgrounds can be realized as different field configurations in the theory. String field theory is the only string formalism developed so far which, in principle, has the potential to systematically address questions involving multiple asymptotically distinct string backgrounds. Thus, although it is not yet well defined as a quantum theory, string field theory may eventually be helpful for understanding questions related to cosmology in string theory. 1.1

W. Taylor

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

293

Far field acceleration  

SciTech Connect

Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

Fernow, R.C.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Magnetic field generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

Krienin, Frank (Shoreham, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

arXiv:astro-ph/0401559v126Jan2004 Self-Calibration of Cluster Dark Energy Studies: Counts in Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arXiv:astro-ph/0401559v126Jan2004 Self-Calibration of Cluster Dark Energy Studies: Counts in Cells of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 Cluster number counts can constrain the properties of dark energy if and only constraints on the dark energy equation of state by a factor of 2 or more to (w) = 0.06 for a deep 4000 deg2

Hu, Wayne

296

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

297

South Belridge fields, Borderland basin, U. S. , San Joaquin Valley  

SciTech Connect

South Belridge is a giant field in the west San Joaquin Valley, Kern County. Cumulative field production is approximately 700 MMBO and 220 BCFG, with remaining recoverable reserves of approximately 500 MMBO. The daily production is nearly 180 MBO from over 6100 active wells. The focus of current field development and production is the shallow Tulare reservoir. Additional probable diatomite reserves have been conservatively estimated at 550 MMBO and 550 BCFG. South Belridge field has two principal reservoir horizons; the Mio-Pliocene Belridge diatomite of the upper Monterey Formation, and the overlying Plio-Pleistocene Tulare Formation. The field lies on the crest of a large southeast-plunging anticline, sub-parallel to the nearby San Andreas fault system. The reservoir trap in both the Tulare and diatomite reservoir horizons is a combination of structure, stratigraphic factors, and tar seals; the presumed source for the oil is the deeper Monterey Formation. The diatomite reservoir produces light oil (20-32{degree} API gravity) form deep-marine diatomite and diatomaceous shales with extremely high porosity (average 60%) and low permeability (average 1 md). In contrast, the shallow ({lt}1000 ft (305 m) deep) overlying Tulare reservoir produces heavy oil (13-14{degree} API gravity) from unconsolidated, arkosic, fluviodeltaic sands of high porosity (average 35%) and permeability (average 3000 md). The depositional model is that of a generally prograding fluviodeltaic system sourced in the nearby basin-margin highlands. More than 6000 closely spaced, shallow wells are the key to steamflood production from hundreds of layered and laterally discontinuous reservoir sands which create laterally and vertically discontinuous reservoir flow units.

Miller, D.D. (Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S., Inc., Denver, CO (United States)); McPherson, J.G. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

299

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

300

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

TYPES OF FIELD TESTING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TYPES OF FIELD TESTING Convincing proof of energy savings and performance in a specific building and occupant context If direct proof of savings is desired, the only feasible...

302

Outdoor science field trips.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to assess the cognitive and affective values of an outdoor science field trip. Participants were 28 fifth grade students,… (more)

Loyd, Kerrie Anne Therese

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Electromagnetic Lorenz Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gauge transformations are potential transformations that leave only specific Maxwell fields invariant. To reveal more, I develop Lorenz field equations with full Maxwell form for nongauge, sans gauge function, transformations yielding mixed, superposed retarded and outgoing, potentials. The form invariant Lorenz condition is then a charge conservation equivalent. This allows me to define three transformation classes that screen for Lorenz relevance. The nongauge Lorentz conditions add polarization fields which support emergent, light-like rays that convey energy on charge conserving phase points. These localized rays escape discovery in modern Maxwell fields where the polarizations are suppressed by gauge transformations.

H. C. Potter

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Diamond fiber field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B. (Wilmington, DE); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Devlin, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Eaton, David F. (Wilmington, DE); Silzars, Aris K. (Landenburg, PA); Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Characterization of the Dundee formation, Winterfield Field, Clare County, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Devonian Dundee Formation of the Winterfield field was originally developed in the late 1930`s and early 1940`s and rapid production helped support the U.S. war effort. Poor completion and production practices may have caused the field to have been inefficiently developed, and wells prematurely watered out due to water coning. Production occurs in porous dolomitized {open_quotes}chimneys{close_quotes} where they extend above the oil-water contact within the otherwise {open_quotes}tight{close_quotes} limestone. Cross plots of the PEF (Photoelectric) log and the LLD (deep lateral) log separate the porous, oil-saturated dolomite from water-saturated dolomites and the {open_quotes}tight{close_quotes} limestone. The PEF distinguishes the lithologies (dolomite and limestone) and the LLD separates the fluids (water and oil); other useful logs are the CNL and GR to indicate porous and shale zones respectively. The dolomite {open_quotes}chimneys{close_quotes} are small in scale, less than 60` high and can be laterally discontinuous between wells on 40 acres spacing. The dolomite zones tend to have good porosity and permeability; the API gravity of the oil is 44.2 and the reservoir is produced by a strong, constant water drive. Initial production tests on some wells indicate the ability to produce up to nearly 2000 barrels per day (BOPD). Wells drilled in the 1980`s to the deeper Richfield intercepted and isolated oil pocket in the Dundee off structure, prompting further drilling activity; subsequent production has significantly added to the cumulative production in the field. Due to the heterogeneity of the reservoir, the strong water drive, the low density of the oil and the relatively high permeabilities, the reservoir and others like it are ideal candidates for horizontal drain technology. The horizontal wells could link {open_quotes}chimney`s{close_quotes} that have previously been untapped, significantly adding to the total production of these Dundee fields.

Chittick, S.; Salotti, C.; Wood, J.R. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

THE STUDY OF MENSTRUAL AND OTHER BLOOD LOSS, AND CONSEQUENT IRON DEFICIENCY BY Fe$sup 59$ WHOLE BODY COUNTING  

SciTech Connect

An established method for determining radioiron absorption by whole body counting was used to study six parous women with hypochromic anemia and menorrhagia, and a seventh nulliparous woman with normal blood values and normal menses. In addition to demonstrating iron deficiency by increased radioiron absorption, the method was found useful in estimating the quantity of blood lost with each menstrual period. As much as 550 ml of menstrual loss was noted in two of the patients studied. Estimates in the patient with normal menses were 59 and 33 ml. Two additional patients demonstrated patierns of blood loss found in continuous gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and in severe epistaxis, as further applications of the technique. Where available, the method is to be recommended for routine investigation of hypochromic anemia when episodic or continuous blood loss such as that of menorrhagia is suspected. (auth)

Price, D.C.; Forsyth, E.M.; Cohn, S.H.; Cronkite, E.P.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

308

Remnant field detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for qualitatively detecting remnant magnetic fields in matched pairs of magnet cores is described. Equal magnitude and oppositely oriented magnetic flux is induced in the magnet cores by oppositely wound primary windings and current source. Identically wound secondary windings generate output voltages in response to the induced flux. The output voltages generated should be of equal magnitude and opposite polarity if there is no remnant field in the cores. The output voltage will be unequal which is detected if either core has a remnant field. 1 fig.

Visser, A.T.

1986-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

309

Remnant field detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method apparatus for qualitatively detecting remnant magnetic fields in matched pairs of magnet cores. Equal magnitude and oppositely oriented magnetic flux is induced in the magnet cores by oppositely wound primary windings and current source. Identically wound secondary windings generate output voltages in response to the induced flux. The output voltages generated should be of equal magnitude and opposite polarity if there is no remnant field in the cores. The output voltages will be unequal which is detected if either core has a remnant field.

Visser, Age T. (Geneva, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Analysis Driven Field Testing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ANALYSIS DRIVEN FIELD TESTING ANALYSIS DRIVEN FIELD TESTING Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 MODELING DRIVEN FIELD TESTING Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 MODELING DRIVEN MEASUREMENTS Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 "Modeling without measuring lacks credibility. Measuring without modeling lacks generality." Ed Hancock

311

Field Operations Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMMARY This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery- equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the U.S. Department of Energy's Field...

312

Fields in Circle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Field circled in red shown to the right. ... roughly to the blue circle in the tool on the left. ... Spreadsheet Tool, open a spreadsheet as a tab-delimited text ...

313

Dangerous electromagnetic fields?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dangerous electromagnetic fields? Dangerous electromagnetic fields? Name: Tommy T Joseph Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why are electromagnetic fields supposedly dangerous? Replies: I assume you are asking about power line frequency (60 Hz) fields, since they have been in the news lately. No one knows for sure that they are dangerous. There have been a few studies which seem to show an association between how close homes are to power lines, and the incidence of childhood cancer (mostly leukemia) in children living (or who have lived) in those homes. Other similar studies have not found such an association. In all the studies which have found an association, none has actually measured the fields. Studies which actually have measured the fields find no association. There is no known mechanism for 60 Hz fields to cause cancer. Furthermore, the classic "dose-response relationship," that is, the greater the dose, the greater the response, does not seem to work here. Many laboratory studies have found that 60 Hz fields have an effect on organisms under certain conditions, but none of the observed effects can be convincingly related to a hazard. The bottom line is, no one knows for sure. It is important to realize that it is impossible to prove that anything is completely safe. My personal opinion is that, if there is a risk, it must be very small, or it wouldn't be so hard to prove. I can supply some good unbiased references if you are interested.

314

Radiation Field Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Radiation Management Program is dedicated to reducing nuclear power plant worker personnel exposure by developing practices and technologies to increase the radiation protection of the worker, and to implement methods to reduce radiation fields. The nuclear power industry has recently implemented the RP2020 Initiative to promote positive radiation protection trends. Control of radiation fields is crucial to one of the initiative goals of reducing exposure. This manual provides the current state ...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

315

Field Research Challenge Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Feynman-Y Statistic in Relation to Shift-Register Neutron Coincidence Counting: Precision and Dead Time  

SciTech Connect

The Feynman-Y statistic is a type of autocorrelation analysis. It is defined as the excess variance-to-mean ratio, Y = VMR - 1, of the number count distribution formed by sampling a pulse train using a series of non-overlapping gates. It is a measure of the degree of correlation present on the pulse train with Y = 0 for Poisson data. In the context of neutron coincidence counting we show that the same information can be obtained from the accidentals histogram acquired using the multiplicity shift-register method, which is currently the common autocorrelation technique applied in nuclear safeguards. In the case of multiplicity shift register analysis however, overlapping gates, either triggered by the incoming pulse stream or by a periodic clock, are used. The overlap introduces additional covariance but does not alter the expectation values. In this paper we discuss, for a particular data set, the relative merit of the Feynman and shift-register methods in terms of both precision and dead time correction. Traditionally the Feynman approach is applied with a relatively long gate width compared to the dieaway time. The main reason for this is so that the gate utilization factor can be taken as unity rather than being treated as a system parameter to be determined at characterization/calibration. But because the random trigger interval gate utilization factor is slow to saturate this procedure requires a gate width many times the effective 1/e dieaway time. In the traditional approach this limits the number of gates that can be fitted into a given assay duration. We empirically show that much shorter gates, similar in width to those used in traditional shift register analysis can be used. Because the way in which the correlated information present on the pulse train is extracted is different for the moments based method of Feynman and the various shift register based approaches, the dead time losses are manifested differently for these two approaches. The resulting estimates for the dead time corrected first and second order reduced factorial moments should be independent of the method however and this allows the respective dead time formalism to be checked. We discuss how to make dead time corrections in both the shift register and the Feynman approaches.

Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Santi, Peter A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hauck, Danielle K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

317

Field reversed ion rings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense annular ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp region into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. Assuming the characteristic ionization time is much shorter than the long ({ital t}{approx_gt}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}}) beam evolution time scale, we investigate the formation of an ion ring in the background plasma followed by field reversal, using a 21/2-D hybrid, PIC code FIRE, in which the beam and background ions are treated as particles and the electrons as a massless fluid. We show that beam bunching and trapping occurs downstream in a ramped magnetic field for an appropriate set of experimental parameters. We find that a compact ion ring is formed and a large field reversal {zeta}={delta}{ital B}/{ital B}{approx_gt}1 on axis develops. We also observe significant deceleration of the ring on reflection due to the transfer of its axial momentum to the background ions, which creates favorable trapping conditions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

Sudan, R.N.; Omelchenko, Y.A. [Laboratory of Plasma Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Pulsed hybrid field emitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

Sampayan, S.E.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

319

Field Operations Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

688 688 May 1999 Field Operations Program Activities Status Report Fiscal Years 1997 through mid-1999 J. E. Francfort D. V. O'Hara L. A. Slezak DOE/ID-10688 Field Operations Program Activities Status Report Fiscal Years 1997 through mid-1999 J. E. Francfort 1 D. V. O'Hara 2 L. A. Slezak 2 Published May 1999 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Automotive Systems and Technology Department Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office 1 INEEL/Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. 2 U.S. Department of Energy iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental

320

Pulsed hybrid field emitter  

SciTech Connect

A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect

A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wesnousky...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wesnousky, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details...

323

Digital Pulse-Shape Discrimination Applied to an Ultra-Low-Background Gas-Proportional Counting System: First Results  

SciTech Connect

Abstract A new ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) design was recently developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This design, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS) which provides passive and active shielding with radon exclusion, has been developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (~30 meters water-equivalent) constructed at PNNL. After these steps to mitigate dominant backgrounds (cosmic rays, external gamma-rays, radioactivity in materials), remaining background events do not exclusively arise from ionization of the proportional counter gas. Digital pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) is thus employed to further improve measurement sensitivity. In this work, a template shape is generated for each individual sample measurement of interest, a "self-calibrating" template. Differences in event topology can also cause differences in pulse shape. In this work, the temporal region analyzed for each event is refined to maximize background discrimination while avoiding unwanted sensitivity to event topology. This digital PSD method is applied to sample and background data, and initial measurement results from a biofuel methane sample are presented in the context of low-background measurements currently being developed.

Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, Cory T.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Williams, Richard M.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Low-Intrusion Techniques and Sensitive Information Management for Warhead Counting and Verification: FY2011 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future arms control treaties may push nuclear weapons limits to unprecedented low levels and may entail precise counting of warheads as well as distinguishing between strategic and tactical nuclear weapons. Such advances will require assessment of form and function to confidently verify the presence or absence of nuclear warheads and/or their components. Imaging with penetrating radiation can provide such an assessment and could thus play a unique role in inspection scenarios. Yet many imaging capabilities have been viewed as too intrusive from the perspective of revealing weapon design details, and the potential for the release of sensitive information poses challenges in verification settings. A widely held perception is that verification through radiography requires images of sufficient quality that an expert (e.g., a trained inspector or an image-matching algorithm) can verify the presence or absence of components of a device. The concept of information barriers (IBs) has been established to prevent access to relevant weapon-design information by inspectors (or algorithms), and has, to date, limited the usefulness of radiographic inspection. The challenge of this project is to demonstrate that radiographic information can be used behind an IB to improve the capabilities of treaty-verification weapons-inspection systems.

Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Gilbert, Andrew J.; Misner, Alex C.; Pitts, W. Karl; White, Timothy A.; Seifert, Allen; Miller, Erin A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The solar magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The magnetic field of the Sun is the underlying cause of the many diverse phenomena combined under the heading of solar activity. Here we describe the magnetic field as it threads its way from the bottom of the convection zone, where it is built up by the solar dynamo, to the solar surface, where it manifests itself in the form of sunspots and faculae, and beyond into the outer solar atmosphere and, finally, into the heliosphere. On the way it, transports energy from the surface and the subsurface layers into the solar corona, where it heats the gas and accelerates the solar wind.

Solanki, Sami K; Schüssler, Manfred; 10.1088/0034-4885/69/3/R02

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Virtual radiation fields -- A virtual environment tool for radiological analysis and simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A virtual reality system was developed for computational and graphical modeling and simulation of radiation environments. This system, called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF), demonstrates the usefulness of radiological analysis in simulation-based design for predicting radiation doses for robotic equipment and personnel working in a radiation environment. The system was developed for use in determining the radiation doses for robotic equipment to be used in tank-waste retrieval operations at the Hanford National Laboratory. As a reference case, specific application is made to simulate cleanup operations for Hanford tank C-106. A three-dimensional model representation of the tank and its predicted radiation levels are presented and analyzed. Tank cleanup operations were simulated to understand how radiation levels change during the cleanup phase and to predict cumulative radiation doses to robotic equipment to aid in the development of maintenance and replacement schedules.

Knight, T.W.; Dalton, G.R.; Tulenko, J.S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Sciences

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Neutron Coincidence Counting Studies  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency comparison for measured and simulated responses of a 10B-lined proportional counter and a 3He proportional counter in a close, symmetrical geometry are presented. The measurement geometry was modeled in MCNPX to validate the methods used for simulating the response of both the 3He and 10B-lined tubes. The MCNPX models agree within 1% with the 3He tube measurements and within 3% for the 10B-lined tubes when a 0.75-µm boron-metal lining is used.

Rogers, Jeremy L.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Christmas Bird Count  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

region are the Palos forest preserves, the DesPlaines River and Salt Creek valleys, Lincoln Park and the Chicago lake front, Waukegan and the Illinois Dunes, the...

329

When Do Losses Count?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current global and national databases that monitor losses from natural hazards suffer from a number of limitations, which in turn lead to misinterpretation and fallacies concerning the “truthfulness” of hazard loss data. These biases often go ...

Melanie Gall; Kevin A. Borden; Susan L. Cutter

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Cumulative Gasoline Price Pass-through  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

relatively quickly at retail in the Midwest. However, it's important to note that this process still takes a total of 7 weeks, and that the lag is fairly consistent in both...

331

Cumulative attestation kernels for embedded systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are increasing deployments of networked embedded systems and rising threats of malware intrusions on such systems. To mitigate this threat, it is desirable to enable commonly-used embedded processors known as flash MCUs to provide remote attestation ...

Michael LeMay; Carl A. Gunter

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Corn Fields Shutting Down  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fields of corn around Indiana, especially early-planted ones, are in the process of shutting down for the season. While only 3 % of the state’s crop was estimated to be mature (i.e., kernel black layer) as of the week ending 31 Aug, 41 % of the crop was estimated to be at dent stage or beyond (Indiana Ag Stats Service, 2 Sep 2003). The onset of maturity is naturally accompanied by an eventual senescence of the entire solar harvesting “machinery”, but some fields appear to be shutting down prematurely and deserve to be monitored for potential stalk health issues prior to harvest (Nielsen, 2003). The short-term forecast for cool evening temperatures in the mid-50’s or lower throughout much of the state the remainder of this week will further accelerate premature senescence of these stressed fields. Plant stresses contributing to the premature “shutdown ” of some fields include: Root systems compromised by saturated soil conditions caused by early and midseason “monsoon ” events. Drier than normal conditions throughout much of August, accompanied by stressful low to mid-90 F temperatures in the latter part of the month.

R. L. (bob Nielsen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Light Field Appearance Manifolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Statistical shape and texture appearance models are powerful image representations, but previously had been restricted to 2D or 3D shapes with smooth surfaces and lambertian reflectance. In this paper we present a novel 3D appearance model using image-based rendering techniques, which can represent complex lighting conditions, structures, and surfaces. We construct a light field manifold capturing the multi-view appearance of an object class and extend the direct search algorithm of Cootes and Taylor to match new light fields or 2D images of an object to a point on this manifold. When matching to a 2D image the reconstructed light field can be used to render unseen views of the object. Our technique differs from previous view-based active appearance models in that model coefficients between views are explicitly linked, and that we do not model any pose variation within the shape model at a single view. It overcomes the limitations of polygonal based appearance models and uses light fields that are acquired in real-time. 1

Chris Mario Christoudias; Trevor Darrell

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

335

Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders  

SciTech Connect

Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF{sub 6} spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing {sup 238}U from those containing the lighter {sup 235}U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF{sub 6} gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Japanese refrigerators field testing  

SciTech Connect

Residential refrigerators consume the equivalent of 1700 megawatts (MW) of baseload power in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) service area. Japanese manufacturers have designed refrigerator units that appear more energy efficient than some currently available American models. This report summarizes preliminary findings from field testing of 12 refrigerators of Japanese manufacture to evaluate annual kilowatt hour (kWh) use during actual operation. The units have also undergone laboratory testing sponsored by BPA at ETL Testing Laboratories, Inc. in Cortland, New York. A final report of the project -- due at the end of 1989 -- will correlate in detail the results of field and laboratory tests in comparison to performance ratings determined by the manufacturer.

Lou, A.T.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Japanese Refrigerators Field Testing.  

SciTech Connect

Residential refrigerators consume the equivalent of 1700 megawatts (MW) of baseload power in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) service area. Japanese manufacturers have designed refrigerator units that appear more energy efficient than some currently available American models. This report summarizes preliminary findings from field testing of 12 refrigerators of Japanese manufacture to evaluate annual kilowatt hour (kWh) use during actual operation. The units have also undergone laboratory testing sponsored by BPA at ETL Testing Laboratories, Inc. in Cortland, New York. A final report of the project -- due at the end of 1989 -- will correlate in detail the results of field and laboratory tests in comparison to performance ratings determined by the manufacturer.

Lou, Albert T.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Field Force Data Visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a prototype data visualization app for utility workers. By using commercially available tablet technology, open standards, and open source software, utilities may be able to improve data capabilities of deployed field crews with modest investment in technology.BackgroundUtilities have been investing heavily in communications and information technology (IT) infrastructure in the past several years.  While strides are being ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

339

Ca rlsbad Field Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

En ergy En ergy Ca rlsbad Field Office P. O . Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 AUG 2 9 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling , Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Class 1 Permit Modification to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF

340

Microbial field pilot study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microbial field pilot study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Field Guide: Coatings Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has numerous products to help plant personnel meet the challenges of working with aging systems, structures, and components, but none that comprehensively address protective coatings and linings. This field guide provides a compilation of protective coating and lining information in a form that allows the user to have a ready reference available during condition assessment of the various protective coatings and linings used in the plant.

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

343

Warped Conformal Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study field theories in two spacetime dimensions invariant under a chiral scaling symmetry that acts only on right-movers. The local symmetries include one copy of the Virasoro algebra and a U(1) current algebra. This differs from the 2d conformal group, but in some respects is equally powerful in constraining the theory. In particular, the symmetries on a torus lead to modular covariance of the partition function, which is used to derive a universal formula for the asymptotic density of states. For an application we turn to the holographic description of black holes in quantum gravity, motivated by the fact that the symmetries in the near horizon geometry of any extremal black hole are identical to those of a 2d field theory with chiral scaling. We consider two examples: black holes in warped AdS_3 in topologically massive gravity, and in string theory. In both cases, the density of states in the 2d field theory reproduces the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of black holes in the gravity theory.

Detournay, Stephane; Hofman, Diego M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Warped Conformal Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study field theories in two spacetime dimensions invariant under a chiral scaling symmetry that acts only on right-movers. The local symmetries include one copy of the Virasoro algebra and a U(1) current algebra. This differs from the 2d conformal group, but in some respects is equally powerful in constraining the theory. In particular, the symmetries on a torus lead to modular covariance of the partition function, which is used to derive a universal formula for the asymptotic density of states. For an application we turn to the holographic description of black holes in quantum gravity, motivated by the fact that the symmetries in the near horizon geometry of any extremal black hole are identical to those of a 2d field theory with chiral scaling. We consider two examples: black holes in warped AdS_3 in topologically massive gravity, and in string theory. In both cases, the density of states in the 2d field theory reproduces the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of black holes in the gravity theory.

Stephane Detournay; Thomas Hartman; Diego M. Hofman

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A Ruggedized Ultrasensitive Field Air Sampler for Differentially Determining Tritium Oxide and Gas in Ambient Air Atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The instrument described is an operational, practical, ruggedized, ultrasensitive, tritium field air sampler assembled for the simultaneous, differential sampling of the environmental air for tritium oxide and elemental tritium. The system uses hardware assembled and packaged in such manner as to facilitate use in the field as well as in the laboratory. The sampling system occupies relatively small space and is simple to operate. The detection sensitivity approaches tritium background levels and is achieved by high volume sampling, efficient removal of tritium oxide and elemental tritium ("tritium gas"), and counting the recovered fractions by liquid scintillation spectrometry.

Brown, R.; Meyer, H. E.; Robinson, B.; Sheehan, W. E.

1971-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR A FISK-TYPE HELIOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD. I. ANALYZING ULYSSES/KET ELECTRON OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The propagation of energetic charged particles in the heliospheric magnetic field is one of the fundamental problems in heliophysics. In particular, the structure of the heliospheric magnetic field remains an unsolved problem and is discussed as a controversial topic. The first successful analytic approach to the structure of the heliospheric magnetic field was the Parker field. However, the measurements of the Ulysses spacecraft at high latitudes revealed the possible need for refinements of the existing magnetic field model during solar minimum. Among other reasons, this led to the development of the Fisk field. This approach is highly debated and could not be ruled out with magnetic field measurements so far. A promising method to trace this magnetic field structure is to model the propagation of electrons in the energy range of a few MeV. Employing three-dimensional and time-dependent simulations of the propagation of energetic electrons, this work shows that the influence of a Fisk-type field on the particle transport in the heliosphere leads to characteristic variations of the electron intensities on the timescale of a solar rotation. For the first time it is shown that the Ulysses count rates of 2.5-7 MeV electrons contain the imprint of a Fisk-type heliospheric magnetic field structure. From a comparison of simulation results and the Ulysses count rates, realistic parameters for the Fisk theory are derived. Furthermore, these parameters are used to investigate the modeled relative amplitudes of protons and electrons, including the effects of drifts.

Sternal, O.; Heber, B.; Kopp, A. [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Leibnizstr. 11, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Engelbrecht, N. E.; Burger, R. A.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Potgieter, M. S. [Center for Space Research, North-West University, 2520 Potchefstroom, South Africa. (South Africa); Fichtner, H.; Scherer, K., E-mail: oliver.sternal@rub.de [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum, Germany. (Germany)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field August 2, 2011 - 10:40am Addthis Ramamoorthy Ramesh Former Director, SunShot Initiative & Solar Energy Technologies Program What does this mean for me? Investments by major companies like the Redskins show the growing market demand for solar technology, as the SunShot Initiative works to accelerate this growth to make solar energy cheaper. If solar power could score a touchdown, then this week's news would definitely count. On Wednesday, the Washington Redskins announced they are working with NRG Energy, one of America's largest energy companies, to bring renewable energy to the football franchise. This means more than just a few panels on the roof. Through the partnership, NRG will install 8,000 translucent solar panels to

348

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field A Solar Re-Skin at FedEx Field August 2, 2011 - 10:40am Addthis Ramamoorthy Ramesh Former Director, SunShot Initiative & Solar Energy Technologies Program What does this mean for me? Investments by major companies like the Redskins show the growing market demand for solar technology, as the SunShot Initiative works to accelerate this growth to make solar energy cheaper. If solar power could score a touchdown, then this week's news would definitely count. On Wednesday, the Washington Redskins announced they are working with NRG Energy, one of America's largest energy companies, to bring renewable energy to the football franchise. This means more than just a few panels on the roof. Through the partnership, NRG will install 8,000 translucent solar panels to

349

The development of a versatile field program for measuring tritium in real-time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robust sample handling and liquid scintillation counting procedures have been developed to routinely monitor tritium in the field relative to the 20,000 pCi/L drinking water standard. This procedure allows tritium to be monitored hourly during 24 hour drilling operations at depths in the saturated zone potentially contaminated by sub-surface nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site. Using retrofitted shock hardened and vibration damped counters and strict analytical protocols, tritium may be measured rapidly in the field under hostile conditions. Concentration standards and ``dead`` tritium backgrounds are prepared weekly in a central laboratory and delivered to remote monitoring locations where they are recounted daily as a check on counter efficiency and calibration. Portable counters are located in trailers and powered off a battery pack and line filter fed by mobile generator. Samples are typically ground-waters mixed with drilling fluids returned after circulation through a drill string. Fluids are aerated and ``de-foamed,`` filtered, mixed with scintillation cocktail and subsequently dark-adapted before counting. Besides meeting regulatory requirements, ``real-time`` monitoring affords drilling and field personnel maximum protection against potential exposure to radionuclides; for routine operations, tritium activities may not exceed a 10,000 pCi/L threshold.

Rego, J.H.; Smith, D.K.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Near-field/altered-zone models report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal units. These units are made up of moderately to densely welded, devitrified, fractured tuff. The rock's chemical composition is comparable to that of typical granite, but has textural features and mineralogical characteristics of large-scale, silicic volcanism. Because the repository horizon will be approximately 300 m below the ground surface and 200 m above the water table, the repository will be partially saturated. The welded tuff matrix in the host units is highly impermeable, but water and gas flow readily through fractures. The degree of fracturing in these units is highly variable, and the hydrologic significance of fracturing is an important aspect of site investigation. This report describes the characterization and modeling of a region around the potential repository--the altered zone--a region in which the temperature will be increased significantly by waste-generated heat. Numerical simulation has shown that, depending on the boundary conditions, rock properties, and repository design features incorporated in the models, the altered zone (AZ) may extend from the water table to the ground surface. This report also describes models of the near field, the region comprising the repository emplacement drifts and the surrounding rock, which are critical to the performance of engineered components. Investigations of near-field and altered-zone (NF/AZ) processes support the design of underground repository facilities and engineered barriers and also provide constraint data for probabilistic calculations of waste-isolation performance (i.e., performance assessment). The approach to investigation, which is an iterative process involving hypothesis testing and experimentation, has relied on conceptualizing engineered barriers and on performance analysis. This report is a collection, emphasizing conceptual and numerical models, of the recent results contributed from studies of NF/AZ processes and of quantitative measures of NF/AZ performance. The selection and presentation of contributions are intended to show the iterative development of understand

Hardin, E. L., LLNL

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Golden Field Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S DEEPWATER OFFSHORE FLOATING WIND TURBINE TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - CASTINE DOE/EA-1792-S1 AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed a Supplemental Environmental Assessment (Supplemental EA) DOE/EA-1792-S1 for the University of Maine's (UMaine) Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project - Castine. DOE prepared the Supplemental EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of

352

Quasi light fields: Extending the light field to coherent radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging technologies such as dynamic viewpoint generation are engineered for incoherent radiation using the traditional light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of ...

Accardi, Anthony J.

353

Efficient thermal field computation in phase-field models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We solve the phase-field equations in two dimensions to simulate crystal growth in the low undercooling regime. The novelty is the use of a fast solver for the free space heat equation to compute the thermal field. This solver is based on the efficient ... Keywords: Crystal growth, Dendritic solidification, Diffusion equation, Fast solvers, Integral representation, Phase-field, Unbounded domain

Jing-Rebecca Li; Donna Calhoun; Lucien Brush

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Electric Field Reversal in Sprite Electric Field Signature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In measurements of the electric field associated with the current of a sprite 450 km from ground-based field sensors, it was observed that the sign of the electric field was positive when positive charge was lowered from the ionosphere. A recent ...

Richard G. Sonnenfeld; William W. Hager

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

CALIBRATING 100 YEARS OF POLAR FACULAE MEASUREMENTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF THE HELIOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the Sun's polar magnetic fields are thought to provide important clues for understanding the 11 year sunspot cycle, including the observed variations of its amplitude and period, the current database of high-quality polar field measurements spans relatively few sunspot cycles. In this paper, we address this deficiency by consolidating Mount Wilson Observatory polar faculae data from four data reduction campaigns, validating it through a comparison with facular data counted automatically from Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) intensitygrams, and calibrating it against polar field measurements taken by the Wilcox Solar Observatory and average polar field and total polar flux calculated using MDI line-of-sight magnetograms. Our results show that the consolidated polar facular measurements are in excellent agreement with both polar field and polar flux estimates, making them an ideal proxy to study the evolution of the polar magnetic field. Additionally, we combine this database with sunspot area measurements to study the role of the polar magnetic flux in the evolution of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF). We find that there is a strong correlation between HMF and polar flux at solar minimum and that, taken together, polar flux and sunspot area are better at explaining the evolution of the HMF during the last century than sunspot area alone.

Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; DeLuca, Edward E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sheeley, Neil R. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Zhang, Jie, E-mail: amunoz@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: edeluca@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: neil.sheeley@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

356

Inferring immobile and in-situ water saturation from laboratory and field measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of experimental data and numerical simulation results of dynamic boiling experiments revealed that there is an apparent correlation between the immobile water saturation and the shape of the steam saturation profile. An elbow in the steam saturation profile indicates the sudden drop in steam saturation that marks the transition from steam to two-phase conditions inside the core during boiling. The immobile water saturation can be inferred from this elbow in the steam saturation profile. Based on experimental results obtained by Satik (1997), the inferred immobile water saturation of Berea sandstone was found to be about 0.25, which is consistent with results of relative permeability experiments reported by Mahiya (1999). However, this technique may not be useful in inferring the immobile water saturation of less permeable geothermal rocks because the elbow in the steam saturation profile is less prominent. Models of vapor and liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that were developed based on Darcy's law and material and energy conservation equations proved to be useful in inferring the in-situ and immobile water saturations from field measurements of cumulative mass production, discharge enthalpy, and downhole temperature. Knowing rock and fluid properties, and the difference between the stable initial, T{sub o}, and dry-out, T{sub d}, downhole temperatures, the in-situ and immobile water saturations of vapor-dominated reservoirs can be estimated. On the other hand, the in-situ and immobile water saturations, and the change in mobile water content of liquid-dominated reservoirs can be inferred from the cumulative mass production, {Delta}m, and enthalpy, h{prime}, data. Comparison with two-phase, radial flow, numerical simulation results confirmed the validity and usefulness of these models.

Belen, Rodolfo P., Jr.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Electric Fields in a Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A self-consistent analysis of the electric fields in a tokamak yields the result that the poloidal and radial electrostatic fields must vanish for a toroidally symmetric equilibrium.

Johnson, Robert W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Wavelets and Field Forecast Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current field forecast verification measures are inadequate, primarily because they compress the comparison between two complex spatial field processes into one number. Discrete wavelet transforms (DWTs) applied to analysis and contemporaneous ...

William M. Briggs; Richard A. Levine

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Golden Field Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1617 Cole Boulevard Golden , Colorado 80401-3393 DOE/EA-1791 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIllM PROJECT AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION : Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of Federal funding by the University of Minnesota to design, permit, and construct a wind turbine research facility I. This funding has been appropriated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of2009. The University would use the funding to install a wind turbine research facility at its University of Minnesota Outreach Research and Education (UMore) Park in Rosemount, Minnesota. The proposed research facility would consist of a 2.5-megawatt-

360

Golden Field Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT MONARCH WARREN COUNTY WIND TURBINE PROJECT LENOX TOWNSIDP, WARREN COUNTY, IL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding orNo Significant Impact (FONS!) DOEIEA-JSOO SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided Federal funding appropriated under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act 0(2009 to the Illinois Department ofComrnerce and Econom ic Opportunity (DeEO) under the State Energy Program (SEP). DeEO proposes to provide approximately $5 million of its SEP funds to Monarch Wind Power (MWP) for the Monarch Warren County Wind Turbine Project (MWTP). DOE's Proposed Action is to authorize the expenditure of Federal funding under State Energy Program to design, permit, and construct

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361

ARM - Field Campaigns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

alpacas clouds-anvil german-scene instrumentfield pye-night racoro-inst rhubc-layout snowy-site twpice-ship walter-annemarie alpacas clouds-anvil german-scene instrumentfield pye-night racoro-inst rhubc-layout snowy-site twpice-ship walter-annemarie How Do I Propose a Campaign? First, review the guidelines for submitting proposals. Next, submit a preproposal; a short summary of the proposed campaign. Wait for a response from the Infrastructure Management Board (IMB) and/or ARM Science Board. A full proposal or science plan, may be requested. Decision is made-now what is expected? ARM Climate Research Facility users regularly conduct field campaigns to augment routine data acquisitions and to test and validate new instruments. Announcements 13 Dec 2013 Now accepting proposals for use of an AMF, AAF, or augment observations at one of our fixed sites. Smaller campaigns in FY2014 and FY2015 can also be

362

Golden Field Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

80401 -3393 DOEIEA-1818 80401 -3393 DOEIEA-1818 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT PETTISVILLE WIND ENERGY PROJECT AGENCY: U.S . Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided Federal funding to the Ohio Department of Development (0000) under the State Energy Program (SEP). 0000 proposes to provide $1 ,225 ,000 of its SEP funds to the Pettisvil Ie Local Schools (Pettisville) for the Pettisville Local Schools Wind Energy Project (Wind Energy Project). DOE' s Proposed Action is to authorize the expenditure of Federal funding under State Energy Program to design, permit, and construct the Pettisville Wind Energy Project, a 750-kilowatt wind turbine at the Pettisville Pre-Kindergarten through Twelfth Grade School located at

363

Diamond-graphite field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Direct drive field actuator motors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

Grahn, A.R.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

365

Revitalizing an old oil field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Redevelopment of the Olney oil field in Illinois is described. First discovered in 1936, production peaked in 1941 when over 30,000 bopd were produced. In 1970, 600 wells in the Olney field pumped only 4000 bpd. Since the decontrol of crude oil prices, a redevelopment project has begun in the field. The project includes well stimulation techniques plus newly drilled or deepened wells. Present production in the Olney field has reached 5000 bopd.

Ortiz, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The probability distribution of the number of electron-positron pairs produced in a uniform electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The probability-generating function of the number of electron-positron pairs produced in a uniform electric field is constructed. The mean and variance of the numbers of pairs are calculated, and analytical expressions for the probability of low numbers of electron-positron pairs are given. A recursive formula is derived for evaluating the probability of any number of pairs. In electric fields of supercritical strength |eE| > \\pi m^2/ \\ln 2, where e is the electron charge, E is the electric field, and m is the electron mass, a branch-point singularity of the probability-generating function penetrates the unit circle |z| = 1, which leads to the asymptotic divergence of the cumulative probability. This divergence indicates a failure of the continuum limit approximation. In the continuum limit and for any field strength, the positive definiteness of the probability is violated in the tail of the distribution. Analyticity, convergence, and positive definiteness are restored upon the summation over discrete levels of electrons in the normalization volume. Numerical examples illustrating the field strength dependence of the asymptotic behavior of the probability distribution are presented.

M. I. Krivoruchenko

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

367

Magnetic-field-dosimetry system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Low field magnetic resonance imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

369

Residential Transient Magnetic Field Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential populations are exposed, in some measure, to transient magnetic fields. Such fields result from virtually all electric and electronic switching operations that may occur within the residence or external to the residence. This report presents the first phase of a study to better characterize these fields and, ultimately, describe their relationship to utility wiring configurations.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Field practice internship final report  

SciTech Connect

This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

Foster, T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Field Evaluation of Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Windows Evaluation of Windows Last Updated: 10/20/2009 Various tools can be used to evaluate windows in the field. Unless a new window still has the NFRC label attached to it, it is nearly impossible to determine by sight what the thermal and optical performance of a window is. These tools can provide information, such as low-e coating, gap width and gas fill, that can be used to approximate the performance of a window. Solar gain and Low-e detector This device can be used to determine if a low-e coating is present in the window, what type of coating it is, and where it is located. The type of low-e coating will indicate the amount of solar gain that is admitted through the coating. Readings can be "low", "medium" or "high". The device will also indicate on which glass surface the low-e coating is in relation to the position of the device. Limitations: Only works on glass of 1/8" (3 mm) or thinner. Cost: around $350 from EDTM.com

372

Electronic field permeameter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For making rapid, non-destructive permeability measurements in the field, a portable minipermeameter of the kind having a manually-operated gas injection tip is provided with a microcomputer system which operates a flow controller to precisely regulate gas flow rate to a test sample, and reads a pressure sensor which senses the pressure across the test sample. The microcomputer system automatically turns on the gas supply at the start of each measurement, senses when a steady-state is reached, collects and records pressure and flow rate data, and shuts off the gas supply immediately after the measurement is completed. Preferably temperature is also sensed to correct for changes in gas viscosity. The microcomputer system may also provide automatic zero-point adjustment, sensor calibration, over-range sensing, and may select controllers, sensors, and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements. Electronic sensors may provide increased accuracy and precision. Preferably one microcomputer is used for sensing instrument control and data collection, and a second microcomputer is used which is dedicated to recording and processing the data, selecting the sensors and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements, and instructing the user how to set-up and operate the minipermeameter. To provide mass data collection and user-friendly operation, the second microcomputer is preferably a lap-type portable microcomputer having a non-volatile or battery-backed CMOS memory.

Chandler, Mark A. (Madison, WI); Goggin, David J. (Austin, TX); Horne, Patrick J. (Austin, TX); Kocurek, Gary G. (Roundrock, TX); Lake, Larry W. (Austin, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response of the Columbia River Response of the Columbia River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish ­ presence, abundance, res. time, diet, growth rate, fitness Exchange ­ plant biomass, TOC, NOAA Fisheries, Hammond, OR Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Estuary Science

374

Determination of Pu content in a Spent Fuel Assembly by Measuring Passive Total Neutron count rate and Multiplication with the Differential Die-Away Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inspired by approach of Bignan and Martin-Didier (ESARDA 1991) we introduce novel (instrument independent) approach based on multiplication and passive neutron. Based on simulations of SFL-1 the accuracy of determination of {sup tot}Pu content with new approach is {approx}1.3-1.5%. Method applicable for DDA instrument, since it can measure both multiplication and passive neutron count rate. Comparison of pro's & con's of measuring/determining of {sup 239}Pu{sub eff} and {sup tot}Pu suggests a potential for enhanced diversion detection sensitivity.

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

375

The nucleon and Delta-resonance masses in relativistic chiral effective-field theory  

SciTech Connect

We study the chiral behavior of the nucleon and De-isobar masses within a manifestly covariant chiral effective-field theory, consistent with the analyticity principle. We compute the {pi} N and {pi}{Delta} one-loop contributions to the mass and field-normalization constant, and find that they can be described in terms of universal relativistic loop functions, multiplied by appropriate spin, isospin and coupling constants. We show that these relativistic one-loop corrections, when properly renormalized, obey the chiral power-counting and vanish in the chiral limit. The results including only the {pi} N-loop corrections compare favorably with the lattice QCD data for the pion-mass dependence of the nucleon and De masses, while inclusion of the {pi}/De loops tends to spoil this agreement.

V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen

2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

K-shell spectroscopy of silicon ions as diagnostic for high electric fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a detection scheme, capable of measuring X-ray line shape of tracer ions in {mu}m thick layers at the rear side of a target foil irradiated by ultra intense laser pulses. We performed simulations of the effect of strong electric fields on the K-shell emission of silicon and developed a spectrometer dedicated to record this emission. The combination of a cylindrically bent crystal in von Hamos geometry and a CCD camera with its single photon counting capability allows for a high dynamic range of the instrument and background free spectra. This approach will be used in future experiments to study electric fields of the order of TV/m at high density plasmas close to solid density.

Loetzsch, R.; Jaeckel, O.; Hoefer, S.; Kaempfer, T.; Uschmann, I.; Kaluza, M. C. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Helmholtzweg 4, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Polz, J. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Foerster, E. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Helmholtzweg 4, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Stambulchik, E.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y. [Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Steam Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Steam Field Dictionary.png Steam Field: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Steam field reservoirs are special cases where the fluid is predominantly found in a gas phase between 230°C to 240°C. "This special class of resource needs to be recognized, its uniqueness being the remarkably consistent initial temperature and pressure

378

Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

379

K Basins Field Verification Program  

SciTech Connect

The Field Verification Program establishes a uniform and systematic process to ensure that technical information depicted on selected engineering drawings accurately reflects the actual existing physical configuration. This document defines the Field Verification Program necessary to perform the field walkdown and inspection process that identifies the physical configuration of the systems required to support the mission objectives of K Basins. This program is intended to provide an accurate accounting of the actual field configuration by documenting the as-found information on a controlled drawing.

Booth, H.W.

1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

Non-Gaussian statistics, classical field theory, and realizable Langevin models  

SciTech Connect

The direct-interaction approximation (DIA) to the fourth-order statistic Z {approximately}{l_angle}{lambda}{psi}{sup 2}){sup 2}{r_angle}, where {lambda} is a specified operator and {psi} is a random field, is discussed from several points of view distinct from that of Chen et al. [Phys. Fluids A 1, 1844 (1989)]. It is shown that the formula for Z{sub DIA} already appeared in the seminal work of Martin, Siggia, and Rose (Phys. Rev. A 8, 423 (1973)] on the functional approach to classical statistical dynamics. It does not follow from the original generalized Langevin equation (GLE) of Leith [J. Atmos. Sd. 28, 145 (1971)] and Kraichnan [J. Fluid Mech. 41, 189 (1970)] (frequently described as an amplitude representation for the DIA), in which the random forcing is realized by a particular superposition of products of random variables. The relationship of that GLE to renormalized field theories with non-Gaussian corrections (``spurious vertices``) is described. It is shown how to derive an improved representation, that realizes cumulants through O({psi}{sup 4}), by adding to the GLE a particular non-Gaussian correction. A Markovian approximation Z{sub DIA}{sup M} to Z{sub DIA} is derived. Both Z{sub DIA} and Z{sub DIA}{sup M} incorrectly predict a Gaussian kurtosis for the steady state of a solvable three-mode example.

Krommes, J.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Magnetic response to applied electrostatic field in external magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show, within QED and other possible nonlinear theories, that a static charge localized in a finite domain of space becomes a magnetic dipole, if it is placed in an external (constant and homogeneous) magnetic field in the vacuum. The magnetic moment is quadratic in the charge, depends on its size and is parallel to the external field, provided the charge distribution is at least cylindrically symmetric. This magneto-electric effect is a nonlinear response of the magnetized vacuum to an applied electrostatic field. Referring to a simple example of a spherically-symmetric applied field, the nonlinearly induced current and its magnetic field are found explicitly throughout the space, the pattern of lines of force is depicted, both inside and outside the charge, which resembles that of a standard solenoid of classical magnetostatics.

T. C. Adorno; D. M. Gitman; A. E. Shabad

2013-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

Conservation laws. Generation of physical fields. Principles of field theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the paper the role of conservation laws in evolutionary processes, which proceed in material systems (in material media) and lead to generation of physical fields, is shown using skew-symmetric differential forms. In present paper the skew-symmetric differential forms on deforming (nondifferentiable) manifolds were used in addition to exterior forms, which have differentiable manifolds as a basis. Such skew-symmetric forms (which were named evolutionary ones since they possess evolutionary properties), as well as the closed exterior forms, describe the conservation laws. But in contrast to exterior forms, which describe conservation laws for physical fields, the evolutionary forms correspond to conservation laws for material systems. The evolutionary forms possess an unique peculiarity, namely, the closed exterior forms are obtained from these forms. It is just this that enables one to describe the process of generation of physical fields, to disclose connection between physical fields and material systems and to resolve many problems of existing field theories.

L. I. Petrova

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas is an important energy source that contributes up to 25% of the total US energy reserves (DOE 2011). An increase in natural gas demand spurs further development of unconventional resources, including methane hydrate (Rajnauth 2012). Natural gas from methane hydrate has the potential to play a major role in ensuring adequate future energy supplies in the US. The worldwide volume of gas in the hydrate state has been estimated to be approximately 1.5 x 10^16 m^3 (Makogon 1984). More than 230 gas-hydrate deposits have been discovered globally. Several production technologies have been tested; however, the development of the Messoyakha field in the west Siberian basin is the only successful commercial gas-hydrate field to date. Although the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field was not a certainty, this current study determined the undeniable presence of gas hydrates in the reservoir. This study uses four models of the Messoyakha field structure and reservoir conditions and examines them based on the available geologic and engineering data. CMG STARS and IMEX software packages were used to calculate gas production from a hydrate-bearing formation on a field scale. Results of this analysis confirm the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field and also determine the volume of hydrates in place. The cumulative production from the field on January 1, 2012 is 12.9 x 10^9 m^3, and it was determined in this study that 5.4 x 10^9 m^3 was obtained from hydrates. The important issue of pressure-support mechanisms in developing a gas hydrate reservoir was also addressed in this study. Pressure-support mechanisms were investigated using different evaluation methods such as the use of gas-injection well patterns and gas/water injection using isothermal and non-isothermal simulators. Several aquifer models were examined. Simulation results showed that pressure support due to aquifer activity was not possible. Furthermore, it was shown that the water obtained from hydrates was not produced and remained in the reservoir. Results obtained from the aquifer models were confirmed by the actual water production from the field. It was shown that water from hydrates is a very strong pressure-support mechanism. Water not only remained in the reservoir, but it formed a thick water-saturated layer between the free-gas and gas-hydrate zone. Finally, thermodynamic behavior of gas hydrate decomposition was studied. Possible areas of hydrate preservation were determined. It was shown that the central top portion of the field preserved most of hydrates due to temperature reduction of hydrate decomposition.

Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Fast superconducting magnetic field switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fast superconducting magnetic field switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with an electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater than the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. Magnetic switches and particularly fast kicker magnets are used in the accelerator industry to quickly deflect particle beams into and out of various transport lines, storage rings, dumps, and specifically to differentially route individual bunches of particles from a train of bunches which are injected or ejected from a given ring.

Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Field observations and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Field Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Techniques Field Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map surface geology and hydrothermal alteration. Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Bulk and trace element analysis of rocks, minerals, and sediments. Identify and document surface geology and mineralogy. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Locates active faults in the area of interest. Map fault and fracture patterns, kinematic information. Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

388

PYROTRON WITH TRANSLATIONAL CLOSURE FIELDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Circuit means is described for effecting inward transla- ' tory motion of the intensified terminal reflector field regions of a magnetic mirror plasma containment field with a simultaneous intensification of the over-all field configuration. The circuit includes a segmented magnetic field generating solenoid and sequentially actuated switch means to consecutively short-circuit the solenoid segments and place charged capacitor banks in shunt with the segments in an appropriate correlated sequence such that electrical energy is transferred inwardly between adjacent segments from the opposite ends of the solenoid. The resulting magnetic field is effective in both radially and axially adiabatically compressing a plasma in a reaction chamber disposed concentrically within the solenoid. In addition, one half of the circuit may be employed to unidirectionally accelerate plasma. (AEC)

Hartwig, E.C.; Cummings, D.B.; Post, R.F.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Low-magnetic-field magnetars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is now widely accepted that soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars are the observational manifestations of magnetars, i.e. sources powered by their own magnetic energy. This view was supported by the fact that these `magnetar candidates' exhibited, without exception, a surface dipole magnetic field (as inferred from the spin-down rate) in excess of the electron critical field (~4.4E+13 G). The recent discovery of fully-qualified magnetars, SGR 0418+5729 and Swift J1822.3-1606, with dipole magnetic field well in the range of ordinary radio pulsars posed a challenge to the standard picture, showing that a very strong field is not necessary for the onset of magnetar activity (chiefly bursts and outbursts). Here we summarize the observational status of the low-magnetic-field magnetars and discuss their properties in the context of the mainstream magnetar model and its main alternatives.

Turolla, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

391

Extension of Studies with 3M Empore TM and Selentec MAG *SEP SM Technologies for Improved Radionuclide Field Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Technology Center is evaluating new field sampling methodologies to more easily determine concentrations of radionuclides in aqueous systems. One methodology studied makes use of 3M EmporeTM disks. The disks are composed of selective resins embedded in a Teflon support. The disks remove the ion of interest from aqueous solutions when the solution is passed through the disk. The disk can then be counted directly to quantify the isotope of interest. Four types of disks were studied during this work: for the extraction of technetium (two types), cesium, plutonium, and strontium. A sampler has been developed for automated, unattended, in situ use of the EmporeTM disks.

Beals, D.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bibler, J.P.; Brooks, D.A.

1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the ninth quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Estimation of Radiation Doses in the Marshall Islands Based on Whole Body Counting of Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Plutonium Urinalysis  

SciTech Connect

Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), researchers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have recently implemented a series of initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former nuclear test sites in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The aim of this radiological surveillance monitoring program (RSMP) is to provide timely radiation protection for individuals in the Marshall Islands with respect to two of the most important internally deposited fallout radionuclides-cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and long-lived isotopes 239 and 240 of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) (Robison et al., 1997 and references therein). Therefore, whole-body counting for {sup 137}Cs and a sensitive bioassay for the presence of {sup 239+240}Pu excreted in urine were adopted as the two most applicable in vivo analytical methods to assess radiation doses for individuals in the RMI from internally deposited fallout radionuclides (see Hamilton et al., 2006a-c; Bell et al., 2002). Through 2005, the USDOE has established three permanent whole-body counting facilities in the Marshall Islands: the Enewetak Radiological Laboratory on Enewetak Atoll, the Utrok Whole-Body Counting Facility on Majuro Atoll, and the Rongelap Whole-Body Counting Facility on Rongelap Atoll. These whole-body counting facilities are operated and maintained by trained Marshallese technicians. Scientists from LLNL provide the technical support and training necessary for maintaining quality assurance for data acquisition and dose reporting. This technical basis document summarizes the methodologies used to calculate the annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE; or dose for the calendar year of measurement) based on whole-body counting of internally deposited {sup 137}Cs and the measurement of {sup 239+240}Pu excreted in urine. Whole-body counting provides a direct measure of the total amount (or burden) of {sup 137}Cs present in the human body at the time of measurement. The amount of {sup 137}Cs detected is often reported in activity units of kilo-Becquerel (kBq), where 1 kBq equals 1000 Bq and 1 Bq = 1 nuclear transformation per second (t s{sup -1}). [However, in the United States the Curie (Ci) continues to be used as the unit of radioactivity; where 1 Ci = 3.7 x 10{sup 10} Bq.] The detection of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu in bioassay (urine) samples indicates the presence of internally deposited (systemic) plutonium in the body. Urine samples that are collected in the Marshall Islands from volunteers participating in the RSMP are transported to LLNL, where measurements for {sup 239+240}Pu are performed using a state-of-the-art technology based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) (Hamilton et al., 2004, 2007; Brown et al., 2004). The urinary excretion of plutonium by RSMP volunteers is usually described in activity units, expressed as micro-Becquerel ({micro}Bq) of {sup 239+240}Pu (i.e., representing the sum of the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu activity) excreted (lost) per day (d{sup -1}), where 1 {micro}Bq d{sup -1} = 10{sup -6} Bq d{sup -1} and 1 Bq = 1 t s{sup -1}. The systemic burden of plutonium is then estimated from biokinetic relationships as described by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (e.g., see ICRP, 1990). In general, nuclear transformations are accompanied by the emission of energy and/or particles in the form of gamma rays ({gamma}), beta particles ({beta}), and/or alpha particles ({alpha}). Tissues in the human body may adsorb these emissions, where there is a potential for any deposited energy to cause biological damage. The general term used to quantify the extent of any radiation exposure is referred to as the dose. The equivalent dose is defined by the average absorbed dose in an organ or tissue weighted by the average quality factor for the type and energy of the emission causing the dose. The effective dose equivalent (EDE; as applied to the whole body), is the sum of the average dose equivalent for each tissue weighted by each applicable tissue-specific weighing factor

Daniels, J; Hickman, D; Kehl, S; Hamilton, T

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

394

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2003.04.02 - 2003.09.02 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon, water, and energy varies with climate, soil, and land management, in ways 1) that influence the CO2 flux and planetary boundary layer CO2 concentration in ARM CART and 2) that we can model and predict. This activity repeated portable flux system measurements that we performed in spring 2002, by continuing measurements of the spatial heterogeneity of carbon, water, and energy fluxes in fields surrounding the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF).

395

ARM - Field Campaign - Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Field Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Field Evaluation 1994.04.01 - 1994.05.31 Lead Scientist :...

396

ARM - Field Campaign - Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Field Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Field Evaluation 1995.04.01 - 1995.05.31 Lead Scientist :...

397

Vector-field domain walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We argue that spontaneous Lorentz violation may generally lead to metastable domain walls related to the simultaneous violation of some accompanying discrete symmetries. Remarkably, such domain-wall solutions exist for spacelike Lorentz violation and do not exist for the timelike violation. Because a preferred space direction is spontaneously induced, these domain walls have no planar symmetry and produce a peculiar static gravitational field at small distances, while their long-distance gravity appears the same as for regular scalar-field walls. Some possible applications of vector-field domain walls are briefly discussed.

Chkareuli, J. L. [E. Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, 0177 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); I. Chavchavadze State University, 0162 Tbilisi (Georgia); Kobakhidze, Archil [E. Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, 0177 Tbilisi (Georgia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Volkas, Raymond R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Measurements of magnetic field alignment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

1987-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

399

Quantum field theory without divergences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that loop divergences emerging in the Green functions in quantum field theory originate from correspondence of the Green functions to {\\em unmeasurable} (and hence unphysical) quantities. This is because no physical quantity can be measured in a point, but in a region, the size of which is constrained by the resolution of measuring equipment. The incorporation of the resolution into the definition of quantum fields $\\phi(x)\\to\\phi^{(A)}(x)$ and appropriate change of Feynman rules results in finite values of the Green functions. The Euclidean $\\phi^4$-field theory is taken as an example.

Altaisky, M V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Quantum field theory without divergences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that loop divergences emerging in the Green functions in quantum field theory originate from correspondence of the Green functions to {\\em unmeasurable} (and hence unphysical) quantities. This is because no physical quantity can be measured in a point, but in a region, the size of which is constrained by the resolution of measuring equipment. The incorporation of the resolution into the definition of quantum fields $\\phi(x)\\to\\phi^{(A)}(x)$ and appropriate change of Feynman rules results in finite values of the Green functions. The Euclidean $\\phi^4$-field theory is taken as an example.

M. V. Altaisky

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Field ionization from carbon nanofibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Micro Gas Analyzer project aims to develop power-efficient, high resolution, high sensitivity, portable and real-time gas sensors. We developed a field ionizer array based on gated CNTs. Arrays of CNTs are used because ...

Adeoti, Bosun J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Freedom Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Field Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Freedom Field Name Freedom Field Address 3333 Kishwaukee Street Place Rockford, Illinois Zip 61109 Year founded 2009 Phone number 815-387-7570 Coordinates 42.2243753°, -89.0869292° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2243753,"lon":-89.0869292,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

403

Correlation Models for Temperature Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents derivations of some analytical forms for spatial correlations of evolving random fields governed by a white-noise-driven damped diffusion equation that is the analog of autoregressive order 1 in time and autoregressive order 2 ...

Gerald R. North; Jue Wang; Marc G. Genton

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Carlsbad Field Office - Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the nation's nuclear waste disposal problem Carlsbad Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created the Carlsbad Area Office in late 1993 to lead the nation's transuranic...

405

Quantum fields as gravitational sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The practice of setting quantum fields as sources for classical general relativity is examined. Several conceptual problems are identified which invalidate apparently innocuous equations. Alternative ways to links classical general relativity with quantum theory using Bohm's theory are proposed.

Mark J Hadley

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

406

Field Mapping | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping Field Mapping Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Mapping Details Activities (59) Areas (35) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Collection and Mapping Parent Exploration Technique: Data Collection and Mapping Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map surface geology and hydrothermal alteration. Stratigraphic/Structural: Map fault and fracture patterns, kinematic information. Hydrological: Map surface manifestations of geothermal systems. Thermal: Map surface temperature. Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 400.0040,000 centUSD 0.4 kUSD 4.0e-4 MUSD 4.0e-7 TUSD / hour Median Estimate (USD): 600.0060,000 centUSD

407

Radiative processes: Potentials or Fields?  

SciTech Connect

In this work we prove that the transition amplitudes of processes involving the emission of one or more real photons is gauge invariant through terms that are always proportional to the electromagnetic field tensor.

Moreno, Matias [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Lopez Castro, Gabriel [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

A discussion of the results of the rainflow counting of a wide range of dynamics associated with the simultaneous operation of adjacent wind turbines  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to provide a fatigue load comparison between two identical wind turbines employing different rotor designs. One turbine was fitted with a rotor consisting of a set of NREL (SERI) thin-airfoil blades while the other rotor included the original-equipment AeroStar blades. The data discussed are based on sample load populations derived from the rainflow cycle counting of 405, 10-minute records specifically collected over a wide range of inflow turbulence conditions. The results have shown that the statistical structure of the alternating load cycles on both turbines can be described as a mixture of three stochastic processes. We noted a high degree of load distribution similarity between the two turbines, with the differences attributable to either rotor weight or swept area.

Kelley, N.; Desrochers, G.; Tangler, J.; Smith, B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Determination of total Pu content in a Spent Fuel Assembly by Measuring Passive Neutron Count rate and Multiplication with the Differential Die-Away Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key objective of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is to evaluate and develop non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to determine the elemental plutonium content in a commercial-grade nuclear spent fuel assembly (SFA) [1]. Within this framework, we investigate by simulation a novel analytical approach based on combined information from passive measurement of the total neutron count rate of a SFA and its multiplication determined by the active interrogation using an instrument based on a Differential Die-Away technique (DDA). We use detailed MCNPX simulations across an extensive set of SFA characteristics to establish the approach and demonstrate its robustness. It is predicted that Pu content can be determined by the proposed method to a few %.

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

410

Invariants from classical field theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a method that generates invariant functions from perturbative classical field theories depending on external parameters. By applying our methods to several field theories such as Abelian BF, Chern-Simons, and two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory, we obtain, respectively, the linking number for embedded submanifolds in compact varieties, the Gauss' and the second Milnor's invariant for links in S{sup 3}, and invariants under area-preserving diffeomorphisms for configurations of immersed planar curves.

Diaz, Rafael [Grupo de Fisica-Matematica, Universidad Experimental Politecnica de las Fuerzas Armadas, Caracas 1010 (Venezuela); Leal, Lorenzo [Centro de Fisica Teorica y Computacional, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas 1041-A (Venezuela)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Evolution of twisted magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic field of the solar corona evolves quasistatically in response to slowly changing photospheric boundary conditions. The magnetic topology is preserved by the low resistivity of the solar atmosphere. We show that a magnetic flux coordinate system simplifies the problem of calculating field evolution with invariant topology. As an example, we calculate the equilibrium of a thin magnetic flux tube with small twist per unit length.

Zweibel, E.G.; Boozer, A.H.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Field Research in Bacterial Transport  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the final phase of this project is to incorporate new understanding and practical insights derived from interdisciplinary field studies by DOE and other agencies into a broader research framework to address DOE remediation problems. This effort will lend unique strength to Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD) strategic planning and offer real linkages to remediation problems faced in the field at DOE sites nationwide.

Wildung, Raymond E.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Towards a quantum field theory of primitive string fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We denote generating functions of massless even higher-spin fields 'primitive string fields' (PSF's). In an introduction we present the necessary definitions and derive propagators and currents of these PDF's on flat space. Their off-shell cubic interaction can be derived after all off-shell cubic interactions of triplets of higher-spin fields have become known. Then we discuss four-point functions of any quartet of PSF's. In subsequent sections we exploit the fact that higher-spin field theories in AdS{sub d+1} are determined by AdS/CFT correspondence from universality classes of critical systems in d-dimensional flat spaces. The O(N) invariant sectors of the O(N) vector models for 1 {=} 4, they are distinguished by their anomalous dimensions (in CFT{sub 3}) or by theirmass (in AdS{sub 4}). We sum over these multiplets and the spins to obtain 'string type fields', one for each such monomial.

Ruehl, W., E-mail: wue_ruehl@t-online.de [Technical University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Physics (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2006.01.01 - 2006.12.31 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. In an extension of our earlier work on crop systems, we investigated the effects of burning on the cycles of carbon, water, and energy in an example of grazed land of the Southern Great Plains. In collaboration with Dr. Herman Mayeux, of the USDA Grazing

415

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2004.04.15 - 2004.12.15 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. Models predicting fluxes for un-irrigated agriculture were posed with the challenge of characterizing the onset and severity of plant water stress. We conducted a study that quantified the spatial heterogeneity and temporal variations in land

416

Field Demonstraton of Existing Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) Technology  

SciTech Connect

The performance of an advanced Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) has been measured in the field during the drilling of 25 test wells in the Niobrara formation of Western Kansas and Eastern Colorado. The coiled tubing (CT) rig designed, built and operated by Advanced Drilling Technologies (ADT), was documented in its performance by GTI staff in the course of drilling wells ranging in depth from 500 to nearly 3,000 feet. Access to well sites in the Niobrara for documenting CT rig performance was provided by Rosewood Resources of Arlington, VA. The ADT CT rig was selected for field performance evaluation because it is one of the most advanced commercial CT rig designs that demonstrate a high degree of process integration and ease of set-up and operation. Employing an information collection protocol, data was collected from the ADT CT rig during 25 drilling events that encompassed a wide range of depths and drilling conditions in the Niobrara. Information collected included time-function data, selected parametric information indicating CT rig operational conditions, staffing levels, and field observations of the CT rig in each phase of operation, from rig up to rig down. The data obtained in this field evaluation indicates that the ADT CT rig exhibited excellent performance in the drilling and completion of more than 25 wells in the Niobrara under varied drilling depths and formation conditions. In the majority of the 25 project well drilling events, ROP values ranged between 300 and 620 feet per hour. For all but the lowest 2 wells, ROP values averaged approximately 400 feet per hour, representing an excellent drilling capability. Most wells of depths between 500 and 2,000 feet were drilled at a total functional rig time of less than 16 hours; for wells as deep at 2,500 to 3,000 feet, the total rig time for the CT unit is usually well under one day. About 40-55 percent of the functional rig time is divided evenly between drilling and casing/cementing. The balance of time is divided among the remaining four functions of rig up/rig down, logging, lay down bottomhole assembly, and pick up bottomhole assembly. Observations made during all phases of CT rig operation at each of the project well installations have verified a number of characteristics of the technology that represent advantages that can produce significant savings of 25-35 percent per well. Attributes of the CT rig performance include: (1) Excellent hole quality with hole deviation amounting to 1-2 degrees; (2) Reduced need for auxiliary equipment; (3) Efficient rig mobilization requiring only four trailers; (4) Capability of ''Zero Discharge'' operation; (5) Improved safety; and, (6) Measurement while drilling capability. In addition, commercial cost data indicates that the CT rig reduces drilling costs by 25 to 35% compared to conventional drilling technology. Widespread commercial use of the Microhole Coiled Tubing technology in the United States for onshore Lower-48 drilling has the potential of achieving substantially positive impacts in terms of savings to the industry and resource expansion. Successfully commercialized Microhole CT Rig Technology is projected to achieve cumulative savings in Lower-48 onshore drilling expenditures of approximately 6.8 billion dollars by 2025. The reduced cost of CT microhole drilling is projected to enable the development of gas resources that would not have been economic with conventional methods. Because of the reduced cost of drilling achieved with CT rig technology, it is estimated that an additional 22 Tcf of gas resource will become economic to develop. In the future, the Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig represents an important platform for the continued improvement of drilling that draws on a new generation of various technologies to achieve goals of improved drilling cost and reduced impact to the environment.

Kent Perry; Samih Batarseh; Sheriff Gowelly; Thomas Hayes

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

417

Information field theory for cosmological perturbation reconstruction and nonlinear signal analysis  

SciTech Connect

We develop information field theory (IFT) as a means of Bayesian inference on spatially distributed signals, the information fields. A didactical approach is attempted. Starting from general considerations on the nature of measurements, signals, noise, and their relation to a physical reality, we derive the information Hamiltonian, the source field, propagator, and interaction terms. Free IFT reproduces the well-known Wiener-filter theory. Interacting IFT can be diagrammatically expanded, for which we provide the Feynman rules in position-, Fourier-, and spherical-harmonics space, and the Boltzmann-Shannon information measure. The theory should be applicable in many fields. However, here, two cosmological signal recovery problems are discussed in their IFT formulation. (1) Reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale structure matter distribution from discrete galaxy counts in incomplete galaxy surveys within a simple model of galaxy formation. We show that a Gaussian signal, which should resemble the initial density perturbations of the Universe, observed with a strongly nonlinear, incomplete and Poissonian-noise affected response, as the processes of structure and galaxy formation and observations provide, can be reconstructed thanks to the virtue of a response-renormalization flow equation. (2) We design a filter to detect local nonlinearities in the cosmic microwave background, which are predicted from some early-Universe inflationary scenarios, and expected due to measurement imperfections. This filter is the optimal Bayes' estimator up to linear order in the nonlinearity parameter and can be used even to construct sky maps of nonlinearities in the data.

Ensslin, Torsten A.; Frommert, Mona; Kitaura, Francisco S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, 85741 Garching (Germany)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Coulomb field effect on plasma focusing and wake field acceleration  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the fields generated by relativistic electron (positron) bunches moving in overdense cold plasma have two components -- wake and Coulomb. The existence of the Coulomb component is caused by the absence of the Debay screening of the charge moving in plasma with the velocity greater than the thermal velocity of the plasma electrons. It is shown that at some conditions the contribution of the Coulomb component to focusing and self-focusing of the electron (positron) bunches, and wake field generation could be essential. This conclusion is valid for different descriptions of cold plasma-relativistic electron bunch system.

Amatuni, A.Ts.; Elbakian, S.S.; Sekhpossian, E.V. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole electromagnetic (EM) measurements, using fiberglass-cased boreholes, have proven useful in oil field reservoir characterization and process monitoring (Wilt et al., 1995). It has been presumed that these measurements would be impossible in steel-cased wells due to the very large EM attenuation and phase shifts. Recent laboratory and field studies have indicated that detection of EM signals through steel casing should be possible at low frequencies, and that these data provide a reasonable conductivity image at a useful scale. Thus, we see an increased application of this technique to mature oilfields, and an immediate extension to geothermal industry as well. Along with the field experiments numerical model studies have been carried out for analyzing the effect of steel casing to the EM fields. The model used to be an infinitely long uniform casing embedded in a homogeneous whole space. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the formation signal could be accurately recovered if the casing characteristics were independently known (Becker et al., 1998; Lee el al., 1998). Real steel-cased wells are much more complex than the simple laboratory models used in work to date. The purpose of this study is to develop efficient numerical methods for analyzing EM fields in realistic settings, and to evaluate the potential application of EM technologies to cross-borehole and single-hole environment for reservoir characterization and monitoring.

Lee, Ki Ha; Kim, Hee Joon; Uchida, Toshihiro

2001-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

Remote field eddy current inspection  

SciTech Connect

The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique uses an internal probe to inspect conducting tubes nondestructively. A coaxial solenoidal exciter, energized with low frequency AC, and detector coils near the inside of the pipe wall are separated by about two pipe diameters to obtain through wall transmission and equal sensitivity to defects on the outside or inside of the pipe wall. Calculation methods are outlined and the voltage plane polar plot signal representation for defect measurement is described. Slit defect interactions in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic tubes are discussed. Defect-induced anomalous fields are interpreted in terms of anomalous source eddy current and missing magnetization defect models. The use of computer animations to represent the time variations of high resolution field measurements and calculations is described.

Atherton, D.L. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Air Showers and Geomagnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of the geomagnetic field on the development of air showers is studied. The well known International Geomagnetic Reference Field was included in the AIRES air shower simulation program as an auxiliary tool to allow calculating very accurate estimations of the geomagnetic field given the geographic coordinates, altitude above sea level and date of a given event. Our simulations indicate that the geomagnetic deflections alter significantly some shower observables like, for example, the lateral distribution of muons in the case of events with large zenith angles (larger than 75 degrees). On the other hand, such alterations seem not to be important for smaller zenith angles. Global observables like total numbers of particles or longitudinal development parameters do not present appreciable dependences on the geomagnetic deflections for all the cases that were studied.

A. Cillis; S. J. Sciutto

1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFMRF Overview HFMRF Overview Section 2-3-1 High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility The High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility (HFMRF) focuses a significant portion of its research on developing a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of biochemical and biological systems and their response to environmental effects. A secondary focus is materials science, including catalysis and chemical mechanisms and processes. Staff and science consultants within this facility offer expertise in the areas of structural biology, solid-state materials characterization, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Research activities in the HFMRF include: * structure determination of large molecular assemblies such as protein-DNA (normal and damaged DNA) and protein-RNA complexes

423

Gluon field distribution in baryons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods for revealing the distribution of gluon fields within the three-quark static-baryon potential are presented. In particular, we outline methods for studying the sensitivity of the source on the emerging vacuum response for the three-quark system. At the same time, we explore the possibility of revealing gluon-field distributions in three-quark systems in QCD without the use of gauge-dependent smoothing techniques. Renderings of flux tubes from a preliminary high-statistics study on a 12^3 X 24 lattice are presented.

F. Bissey; F-G. Cao; A. Kitson; B. G. Lasscock; D. B. Leinweber; A. I. Signal; A. G. Williams; J. M. Zanotti

2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

424

High field solenoids for muon cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on axis between the high field low beta coils and the fluxinverse of the field that produces the low beta pinch point.the high field section that creates the low beta pinch in

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

String field theory and tachyon condensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I discuss various aspects of Witten's cubic string field theory. After a brief review of the basics of string field theory we begin by showing how string field theory can be used to check certain conjectures ...

Ellwood, Ian Thomas, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Analytic progress in open string field theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open string field theory provides an action functional for open string fields, and it is thus a manifestly off-shell formulation of open string theory. The solutions to the equation of motion of open string field theory ...

Kiermaier, Michael Stefan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Nordholt, Jane E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The courts and electromagnetic fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines the recent development in eminent domain cases involving power transmission line rights of way, the issue of fear of the mythical buyer. The author feels that the fear of electrocution or of the possible cancer-inducing effects of electromagnetic fields is greatly influencing court decisions in these cases. The results could be more expensive rights of way acquisition by utilities.

Freeman, M. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States))

1990-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

429

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A current concern. [Electromagnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the risk to homeowners of exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF). Studies that link EMF to cancer are described and recommendations are given for prudent avoidance. Appliance manufacturers claim to have found no economically feasible way to shield emissions. Meanwhile the EPA's health effects research in this area has been suspended because of budgetary constraints.

Brinckerhoff, S.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer is described having a low weight and low power requirement, for use in space. It can be used to analyze the ionized particles in the region of the spacecraft on which it is mounted. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically sysmetric linear electric field.

McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

432

Field Guide: Bearing Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1021780, Manual of Bearing Failures and Repair in Power Plant Rotating Equipment, 2011 Update, is a comprehensive document on the subject of fluid film bearing damage modes. This field guide provides a pocket reference based upon the content of that report. ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

433

Quantum Field Theory Frank Wilczeky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Field Theory Frank Wilczeky Institute for Advanced Study, School of Natural Science, Olden Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 I discuss the general principles underlying quantum eld theory, and attempt achieved and prospective. Possible limitations of quantum eld theory are viewed in the light of its history

Wilczek, Frank

434

Quantum fields with topological defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domain walls, strings and monopoles are extended objects, or defects, of quantum origin with topologically non--trivial properties and macroscopic behavior. They are described in Quantum Field Theory in terms of inhomogeneous condensates. We review the related formalism in the framework of the spontaneous breakdown of symmetry.

M. Blasone; P. Jizba; G. Vitiello

2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

Quantum Field Theory in Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a short non-technical introduction to applications of the Quantum Field Theory methods to graphene. We derive the Dirac model from the tight binding model and describe calculations of the polarization operator (conductivity). Later on, we use this quantity to describe the Quantum Hall Effect, light absorption by graphene, the Faraday effect, and the Casimir interaction.

Fialkovsky, I V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Quantum Field Theory in Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a short non-technical introduction to applications of the Quantum Field Theory methods to graphene. We derive the Dirac model from the tight binding model and describe calculations of the polarization operator (conductivity). Later on, we use this quantity to describe the Quantum Hall Effect, light absorption by graphene, the Faraday effect, and the Casimir interaction.

I. V. Fialkovsky; D. V. Vassilevich

2011-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

437

Field Training in Radar Meteorology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NSF Division of Mesoscale Meteorology and the University of Nevada—Reno (UNR) provided support for a two-week field course at the CSU—CHILL radar during 12—24 May 1991. Ten atmospheric science graduate students and two faculty from the Desert ...

John Hallett; Melanie Wetzel; Steven Rutledge

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Computers for Lattice Field Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel computers dedicated to lattice field theories are reviewed with emphasis on the three recent projects, the Teraflops project in the US, the CP-PACS project in Japan and the 0.5-Teraflops project in the US. Some new commercial parallel computers are also discussed. Recent development of semiconductor technologies is briefly surveyed in relation to possible approaches toward Teraflops computers.

Y. Iwasaki

1994-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

439

Performance limits of heliostat fields  

SciTech Connect

Geometric and thermodynamic arguments are used to derive upper limits on the performance of a solar energy collection system, consisting of an axisymmetric heliostat field, a solar tower, secondary optics and a black receiver. Performance limits on collected power, concentration, and work output are presented. Performance of tower systems with several secondary optics options is compared: tower-top Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC), Tailored Edge-Ray Concentrator (TERC) approximated by a cone, and Cassegrainian with ground-level CPC or Compound Elliptic Concentrator (CEC). Optimized ray tracing is used to generate the design parameters of the secondary concentrators that yield the highest optical efficiency. The results show that the tower-top Cone provides the best performance regarding both concentration and efficiency, except for very large fields. The Cassegrainian designs come in second, but become equal and even better than the Cone for large fields. The results for the Cassegrainian are sensitive to the value of the reflectivity, due to the additional reflections incurred. The choice of a CEC is better than a CPC for the terminal concentration in a Cassegrainian system, but the difference is small. The suitability of the different design options for high-temperature solar applications is discussed. The recommendations regarding optical configuration depend on field size, as well as on application-specific constraints.

Kribus, A.; Krupkin, V.; Yogev, A. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Environmental Sciences and Energy Research Dept.; Spirkl, W. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Sektion Physik

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

BLM Stillwater Field Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stillwater Field Office Jump to: navigation, search Name BLM Stillwater Field Office Short Name Stillwater Parent Organization BLM Carson City District Office Address 5665 Morgan...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field counts cumulative" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Web Force-Field (WebFF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web Force-Field (WebFF). Summary: ... WebFF - A web hosted, extensible force field repository with integrated assignment engine. Description: ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

442

Evaluation of Electric Field Exposure Assessment Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This evaluation of electric field exposure assessment methods highlights a renewed interest in characterizing electric field exposures and their attendant perceptible nuisance shocks.

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

443

Nonproliferation & Homeland Security Field Support | Global and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Homeland Security Field Support Group provides radiological assistance to federal and state agencies under the DOE Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), field support for...

444

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

445

Extending Depth of Field via Multifocus Fusion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In digital imaging systems, due to the nature of the optics involved, the depth of field is constricted in the field of view. Parts of… (more)

Hariharan, Harishwaran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Separation of magnetic field lines  

SciTech Connect

The field lines of magnetic fields that depend on three spatial coordinates are shown to have a fundamentally different behavior from those that depend on two coordinates. Unlike two-coordinate cases, a flux tube in a magnetic field that depends on all three spatial coordinates that has a circular cross section at one location along the tube characteristically has a highly distorted cross section at other locations. In an ideal evolution of a magnetic field, the current densities typically increase. Crudely stated, if the current densities increase by a factor {sigma}, the ratio of the long to the short distance across a cross section of a flux tube characteristically increases by e{sup 2{sigma}}, and the ratio of the longer distance to the initial radius increases as e{sup {sigma}}. Electron inertia prevents a plasma from isolating two magnetic field structures on a distance scale shorter than c/{omega}{sub pe}, which is about 10 cm in the solar corona, and reconnection must be triggered if {sigma} becomes sufficiently large. The radius of the sun, R{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }=7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm is about e{sup 23} times larger, so when {sigma} Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 23, two lines separated by c/{omega}{sub pe} at one location can be separated by the full scale of any magnetic structures in the corona at another. The conditions for achieving a large exponentiation, {sigma}, are derived, and the importance of exponentiation is discussed.

Boozer, Allen H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Field Verification of Distributed Renewable Generation, Volume 1: Renewable Energy Field Test Concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes field verification of distributed renewable generation and focuses on renewable energy field test concepts.

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

449

Evolution of primordial magnetic fields in mean-field approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the evolution of phase-transition-generated cosmic magnetic fields coupled to the primeval cosmic plasma in turbulent and viscous free-streaming regimes. The evolution laws for the magnetic energy density and correlation length, both in helical and non-helical cases, are found by solving the autoinduction and Navier-Stokes equations in mean-field approximation. Analytical results are derived in Minkowski spacetime and then extended to the case of a Friedmann universe with zero spatial curvature, both in radiation and matter dominated eras. The three possible viscous free-streaming phases are characterized by a drag term in the Navier-Stokes equation which depends on the free-steaming properties of neutrinos, photons, or hydrogen atoms, respectively. In the case of non-helical magnetic fields, the magnetic intensity $B$ and the magnetic correlation length $\\xi_B$ evolve asymptotically with the temperature $T$ as $B(T) \\simeq \\kappa_B (N_i v_i)^{\\varrho_1} (T/T_i)^{\\varrho_2}$ and $\\xi_B(T) \\simeq \\kap...

Campanelli, Leonardo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Direct Deposition of Microcolumnar Scintillator on CMOS SSPM Array: Toward a Photon Counting Detector for X-Ray/Gamma Ray Imaging  

SciTech Connect

We are developing a modular, low-cost, photon-counting detector based on a scintillator coupled to a solid-state photodetector. A working prototype was successfully developed by depositing CsI:Tl directly onto a CMOS SSPM array designed by RMD and custom-fabricated by a commercial foundry. The device comprised a 6x6 array of 1.5x1.5 mm{sup 2} macro-pixels, each containing a 36x36 array of resistively coupled micro-pixels, that was subjected to vapor deposition of columnar CsI:Tl. Direct deposition eliminates the gap between the scintillator and SSPM and creates a better optical bond than does index-matching grease. This paper compares the performance of SSPMs with directly deposited CsI:Tl, in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and light spread, against devices using monolithic single crystals or pixelated single crystals coupled to the SSPM. Due to the reduction in light scattering and optical losses in the interface, the directly deposited CsI:Tl demonstrated significantly better position sensitivity, with at least a factor of 2 increase in SNR compared to a single crystal. These data indicate that a photodetector with substantially smaller macro-pixel dimensions than used here could be used to implement a low-energy X-ray/gamma-ray imaging and spectroscopy detector, particularly for applications where high resolution is of prime importance.

Prekas, G.; Breen, M.; Sabet, H.; Bhandari, H.; Derderian, G.; Robertson, F. Jr; Stapels, C. J.; Christian, J.; Cool, S.; Nagarkar, V. V. [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc., 44 Hunt Street, Watertown, Massachusetts 02472 (United States)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

451

1000 Calibration Reports . . . And Counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... day on average, with a 96 % on-time completion rate ... Photons transfer their energy to the detector as heat ... 10 pages long, with the costs of calibration ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

452

Counting self-avoiding walks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The connective constant \\mu(G) of a graph G is the asymptotic growth rate of the number of self-avoiding walks on G from a given starting vertex. We survey three aspects of the dependence of the connective constant on the underlying graph G. Firstly, when G is cubic, we study the effect on \\mu(G) of the Fisher transformation (that is, the replacement of vertices by triangles). Secondly, we discuss upper and lower bounds for \\mu(G) when G is regular. Thirdly, we present strict inequalities for the connective constants \\mu(G) of vertex-transitive graphs G, as G varies. As a consequence of the last, the connective constant of a Cayley graph of a finitely generated group decreases strictly when a new relator is added, and increases strictly when a non-trivial group element is declared to be a generator. Special prominence is given to open problems.

Geoffrey R. Grimmett; Zhongyang Li

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

453

Neighbourhood Counting Metric for Sequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The longest common subsequence (LCS) is a well known and popular method for measuring similarity between sequences. In this paper we consider all common subsequences (ACS) as a measure of sequence similarity with the view that all common information ...

Hui Wang; Chang Liu

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Opcode counting for performance measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions of the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.

Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L; Walkup, Robert E

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

455

Carlsbad Field Office Manager Selected  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carlsbad Field Office Manager Selected CARLSBAD, N.M., November 10, 2011 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) Assistant Manager for the River Corridor Joe Franco was selected as Manager for the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), which oversees the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). CBFO Deputy Manager Ed Ziemianski has been acting in the CBFO Manager's position for the past year and will continue to serve as Deputy Manager. In operation since 1999, WIPP is a DOE facility designed to safely isolate defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste from people and the environment. Since 2006, Franco was responsible for cleanup and restoration of the 220 square miles of the

456

The Localized Quantum Vacuum Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for the localized quantum vacuum is proposed in which the zero-point energy of the quantum electromagnetic field originates in energy- and momentum-conserving transitions of material systems from their ground state to an unstable state with negative energy. These transitions are accompanied by emissions and re-absorptions of real photons, which generate a localized quantum vacuum in the neighborhood of material systems. The model could help resolve the cosmological paradox associated to the zero-point energy of electromagnetic fields, while reclaiming quantum effects associated with quantum vacuum such as the Casimir effect and the Lamb shift; it also offers a new insight into the Zitterbewegung of material particles.

Daniela Dragoman

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Diffeomorphisms in group field theories  

SciTech Connect

We study the issue of diffeomorphism symmetry in group field theories (GFT), using the noncommutative metric representation introduced by A. Baratin and D. Oriti [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 221302 (2010).]. In the colored Boulatov model for 3d gravity, we identify a field (quantum) symmetry which ties together the vertex translation invariance of discrete gravity, the flatness constraint of canonical quantum gravity, and the topological (coarse-graining) identities for the 6j symbols. We also show how, for the GFT graphs dual to manifolds, the invariance of the Feynman amplitudes encodes the discrete residual action of diffeomorphisms in simplicial gravity path integrals. We extend the results to GFT models for higher-dimensional BF theories and discuss various insights that they provide on the GFT formalism itself.

Baratin, Aristide [Triangle de la Physique, CPHT Ecole Polytechnique, IPhT Saclay, LPT Orsay and Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Universite Paris XI, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Girelli, Florian [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Oriti, Daniele [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14467 Golm (Germany)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Near-field thermal transistor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a block of three separated solid elements, a thermal source and drain together with a gate made of an insulator-metal transition material exchanging near-field thermal radiation, we introduce a nanos