Sample records for field counts cumulative

  1. A Count of Classical Field Theory Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A generating function is derived that counts the number of diagrams in an arbitrary scalar field theory. The number of graphs containing any number $n_j$ of $j$-point vertices is given. The count is also used to obtain the number of classical graphs in gauge theory and gravity.

  2. Loops and Power Counting in the High Density Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schaefer

    2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the high density effective theory of QCD. We discuss, in particular, the problem of developing a consistent power counting scheme.

  3. Cumulant expansions for atmospheric flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Meyer, Bettina; Marston, J B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equations governing atmospheric flows are nonlinear, and consequently the hierarchy of cumulant equations is not closed. But because atmospheric flows are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, the nonlinearity may manifests itself only weakly through interactions of mean fields with disturbances such as thermals or eddies. In such situations, truncations of the hierarchy of cumulant equations hold promise as a closure strategy. We review how truncations at second order can be used to model and elucidate the dynamics of turbulent atmospheric flows. Two examples are considered. First, we study the growth of a dry convective boundary layer, which is heated from below, leading to turbulent upward energy transport and growth of the boundary layer. We demonstrate that a quasilinear truncation of the equations of motion, in which interactions of disturbances among each other are neglected but interactions with mean fields are taken into account, can successfully capture the growth of the convective boundary layer. Seco...

  4. Counting degrees of freedom in quantum field theory using entanglement entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mezei, Márk (Márk Koppany)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We devote this thesis to the exploration of how to define the number of degrees of freedom in quantum field theory. Intuitively, the number of degrees of freedom should decrease along the renormalization group (RG) flow, ...

  5. Spin counting in electrically detected magnetic resonance via low-field defect state mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochrane, Corey J.; Lenahan, Patrick M. [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The work herein describes a method that allows one to measure paramagnetic defect densities in semiconductor and insulator based devices with electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). The method is based upon the mixing of defect states which results from the dipolar coupling of paramagnetic sites at low magnetic fields. We demonstrate the measurement method with spin dependent tunneling in thin film dielectrics; however, the method should be equally applicable to paramagnetic defect density measurements in semiconductors via the more commonly utilized EDMR technique called spin dependent recombination.

  6. How Can Journal Impact Factors be Normalized across Fields of Science? An Assessment in terms of Percentile Ranks and Fractional Counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leydesdorff, Loet; Bornmann, Lutz

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the CD-ROM version of the Science Citation Index 2010 (N = 3,705 journals), we study the (combined) effects of (i) fractional counting on the impact factor (IF) and (ii) transformation of the skewed citation distributions into a distribution of 100 percentiles and six percentile rank classes (top-1%, top-5%, etc.). Do these approaches lead to field-normalized impact measures for journals? In addition to the two-year IF (IF2), we consider the five-year IF (IF5), the respective numerators of these IFs, and the number of Total Cites, counted both as integers and fractionally. These various indicators are tested against the hypothesis that the classification of journals into 11 broad fields by PatentBoard/National Science Foundation provides (statistically) significant between-field effects. Using fractional counting the between-field variance is reduced by 91.7% in the case of IF5, and by 79.2% in the case of IF2. However, the differences in citation counts are not significantly affected by fractional coun...

  7. Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act This handbook presents the...

  8. The Crab glitches: incidence and cumulative effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Graham Smith; C. Jordan

    2003-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fourteen glitches observed during 33 years do not show the simple pattern expected from a relaxation oscillator. They may however be regarded as three major events separated by about 12 years, the third being a group of smaller glitches. There is a step increase in slowdown rate at each glitch, whose cumulative effect makes a significant contribution to the second differential nu-ddot. The braking index "n" has previously been evaluated only between glitches: the effect of the glitches is to reduce "n" from 2.51 to 2.45. This extra effect due to the glitches would be explained by an increase in dipole field at the fractional rate of 1.5x10^-5 per annum.

  9. Quality Counts Certificate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilek, Kevin

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This certificate accompanies the Quality Counts program. 1 page. It comes in packages of 25 certificates....

  10. Cumulative Probability of Blast Fragmentation Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Mazonka

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents formulae for calculation of cumulative probability of effect made by blast fragments. Analysis with Mott distribution, discrete fragment enumeration, spatial non-uniformity, numerical issues, and a generalisation for a set of effects are also discussed.

  11. Cumulative Probability of Blast Fragmentation Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazonka, Oleg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents formulae for calculation of cumulative probability of effect made by blast fragments. Analysis with Mott distribution, discrete fragment enumeration, spatial non-uniformity, numerical issues, and a generalisation for a set of effects are also discussed.

  12. Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 30, 2014 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through September 30, 2014 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

  13. Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2013 Graph of cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2013. OE...

  14. Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2014 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2014. OE ARRA...

  15. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

  16. Neutron source capability assessment for cumulative fission yields measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Descalle, M A; Dekin, W; Kenneally, J

    2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent analysis of high-quality cumulative fission yields data for Pu-239 published in the peer-reviewed literature showed that the quoted experimental uncertainties do not allow a clear statement on how the fission yields vary as a function of energy. [Prussin2009] To make such a statement requires a set of experiments with well 'controlled' and understood sources of experimental errors to reduce uncertainties as low as possible, ideally in the 1 to 2% range. The Inter Laboratory Working Group (ILWOG) determined that Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) would benefit from an experimental program with the stated goal to reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Following recent discussions between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there is a renewed interest in developing a concerted experimental program to measure fission yields in a neutron energy range from thermal energy (0.025 eV) to 14 MeV with an emphasis on discrete energies from 0.5 to 4 MeV. Ideally, fission yields would be measured at single energies, however, in practice there are only 'quasi-monoenergetic' neutrons sources of finite width. This report outlines a capability assessment as of June 2011 of available neutron sources that could be used as part of a concerted experimental program to measure cumulative fission yields. In a framework of international collaborations, capabilities available in the United States, at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom and at the Commissariat Energie Atomique (CEA) in France are listed. There is a need to develop an experimental program that will reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Fission and monoenergetic neutron sources are available that could support these fission yield experiments in the US, as well as at AWE and CEA. Considerations that will impact the final choice of experimental venues are: (1) Availability during the timeframe of interest; (2) Ability to accommodate special nuclear materials; (3) Cost; (4) Availability of counting facilities; and (5) Expected experimental uncertainties.

  17. A Cumulant-based Analysis of Nonlinear Magnetospheric Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay R. Johnson; Simon Wing

    2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding magnetospheric dynamics and predicting future behavior of the magnetosphere is of great practical interest because it could potentially help to avert catastrophic loss of power and communications. In order to build good predictive models it is necessary to understand the most critical nonlinear dependencies among observed plasma and electromagnetic field variables in the coupled solar wind/magnetosphere system. In this work, we apply a cumulant-based information dynamical measure to characterize the nonlinear dynamics underlying the time evolution of the Dst and Kp geomagnetic indices, given solar wind magnetic field and plasma input. We examine the underlying dynamics of the system, the temporal statistical dependencies, the degree of nonlinearity, and the rate of information loss. We find a significant solar cycle dependence in the underlying dynamics of the system with greater nonlinearity for solar minimum. The cumulant-based approach also has the advantage that it is reliable even in the case of small data sets and therefore it is possible to avoid the assumption of stationarity, which allows for a measure of predictability even when the underlying system dynamics may change character. Evaluations of several leading Kp prediction models indicate that their performances are sub-optimal during active times. We discuss possible improvements of these models based on this nonparametric approach.

  18. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  19. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swansen, James E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a .sup.3 He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output ) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  20. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swansen, J.E.

    1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a /sup 3/He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  1. Quality Counts Exhibitor Card

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilek, Kevin; Gregory, Elizabeth

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This exhibitor card identifies young livestock exhibitors as participants in the Quality Counts! program. The card is printed with a leather-style background on heavy card stock. It features the 4-H clover and the FFA logo, as well as the logo...

  2. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Whiting, Allan H.

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration action in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). The project is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce. Measurement of the cumulative effects of ecological restoration projects in the Columbia River estuary is a formidable task because of the size and complexity of the estuarine landscape and the meta-populations of salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Despite the challenges presented by this system, developing and implementing appropriate indicators and methods to measure cumulative effects is the best way to enable estuary managers to track the overall effectiveness of investments in estuarine restoration projects. This project is developing methods to quantify the cumulative effects of multiple restoration activities in the CRE. The overall objectives of the 2006 study were to continue to develop techniques to assess cumulative effects, refine the standard monitoring protocols, and initiate development of an adaptive management system for Corps of Engineers’ habitat restoration monitoring efforts in the CRE. (The adaptive management effort will be reported at a later date.) Field studies during 2006 were conducted in tidal freshwater at Kandoll Farm on the lower Grays River and tidal brackish water at Vera Slough on Youngs Bay. Within each of area, we sampled one natural reference site and one restoration site. We addressed the overall objectives with field work in 2006 that, coupled with previous field data, had specific objectives and resulted in some important findings that are summarized here by chapter in this report. Each chapter of the report contains data on particular monitored variables for pre- and post-restoration conditions at both the Kandoll and Vera study areas.

  3. Chandra Survey in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep Field. I. X-ray Data, Point-like Source Catalog, Sensitivity Maps, and Number Counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumpe, M; Brunner, H; Hanami, H; Ishigaki, T; Takagi, T; Markowitz, A G; Goto, T; Malkan, M A; Matsuhara, H; Pearson, C; Ueda, Y; Wada, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data products from the 300 ks Chandra survey in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) deep field. This field has a unique set of 9-band infrared photometry covering 2-24 micron from the AKARI Infrared Camera, including mid-infrared (MIR) bands not covered by Spitzer. The survey is one of the deepest ever achieved at ~15 micron, and is by far the widest among those with similar depths in the MIR. This makes this field unique for the MIR-selection of AGN at z~1. We design a source detection procedure, which performs joint Maximum Likelihood PSF fits on all of our 15 mosaicked Chandra pointings covering an area of 0.34 square degree. The procedure has been highly optimized and tested by simulations. We provide a point source catalog with photometry and Bayesian-based 90 per cent confidence upper limits in the 0.5-7, 0.5-2, 2-7, 2-4, and 4-7 keV bands. The catalog contains 457 X-ray sources and the spurious fraction is estimated to be ~1.7 per cent. Sensitivity and 90 per cent confidence upper flux limit...

  4. assessing cumulative impact: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: CEC-500-2010-FS-016 Cumulative Biological Impacts Framework for Solar Energy Projects demand with renewable energy by the year 2020. Large-scale solar developments...

  5. EIA Practice Examples of Cumulative Effects and Final Disposal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EIA Practice Examples of Cumulative Effects and Final Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel Antoienette: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;EIA Practice. Examples of Cumulative Effects and Final Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel Abstract This thesis is about Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) practice

  6. Block Bootstrap Estimation of the Distribution of Cumulative Outdoor Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block Bootstrap Estimation of the Distribution of Cumulative Outdoor Degradation Victor Chan University Ames, IA 50011 October 28, 2003 Abstract An interesting prediction problem involving degradation cumulative degrada- tion using small- to moderate-size degradation data sets. This distribution, which

  7. Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert* Abstract statistic, called cumulative carbon. This statistic is the aggregate amount ofcarbon emitted in theform such activitiespersist.In thispaper the conceptis usedto addressthe question offair allocation of carbon emissions

  8. Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert1 on climate can be characterized by a single statistic, called Cumulative Carbon. This is the aggregate amount of carbon emitted in the form of carbon dioxide by activities such as fossil fuel burning and deforestation

  9. Galaxy counts at 450 and 850 microns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew W. Blain; Rob Ivison; Jean-Paul Kneib; Ian Smail

    1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys of the distant Universe have been made using the SCUBA submillimeter(submm)-wave camera at the JCMT. 450- and 850-micron data is taken simultaneously by SCUBA in the same 5-square-arcmin field. Deep 850-micron counts of high-redshift dusty galaxies have been published; however, at 450 microns both the atmospheric transmission and antenna efficiency are lower, and the atmospheric noise is higher, and so only upper limits to the 450-micron counts have been reported so far. Here we apply the methods used by Blain et al. (1999) to derive deep 850-micron counts from SCUBA images of lensing clusters to the 450-micron images that were obtained in parallel, in which four sources were detected. We present the first 450-micron galaxy count. This analysis has only just become possible because the volume of data and the difficulty of calibration are both greater for the 450-micron array. In light of recent work, in which the identification of two of the galaxies in our sample was clarified, we also update our deep 850-micron counts.

  10. Cumulative Undergraduate Grade Point Average (GPA) Potential Student Name: _____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    in the list from Step "a" and sum them: = ____________Total Quality Points Note: Quality Points assigned Total Quality Points (number from Step "b") by Total Credits (number from Step "a"). Cumulative GPA = Total Quality Points/Total Credits = _______________ #12;

  11. Mapping cumulative noise from shipping to inform marine spatial planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Marine Science and Technology, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845, Australia System, AIS), cumulative underwater acoustic energy from shipping was mapped throughout 2008 in the west

  12. CEC-500-2010-FS-016 Cumulative Biological Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Solar Energy Projects in the California Desert ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental ResearchCEC-500-2010-FS-016 Cumulative Biological Impacts Framework for Solar Energy Projects in the California Desert ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www

  13. assessing cumulative radon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This work describes a pilot study to calculate lung dose from the deposition of radon progeny, via estimates of cumulative exposure derived from in vivo measurements of sup 2...

  14. Cumulants, coherence, and contamination in multiparticle Bose-Einstein interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, J.G.; Kadija, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen, Germany Department of Physics FM--15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen, Germany Department of Physics FM--15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the formalism of multiparticle correlations used in Bose-Einstein interferometry with pions produced in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. We include incoherent and quantum optics coherent contributions as well as the effect of contamination from particles included in the correlation that are not pions. We give expressions for the correlation functions and normalized cumulants for orders 2{endash}5 in the presence of these effects. We show that in the presence of coherence the normalized cumulants include an additional contribution besides that usually called the {open_quote}{open_quote}true{close_quote}{close_quote} multiparticle correlation. We also consider the {ital Q}=0 intercepts of the correlation functions and normalized cumulants in the presence of coherence and of contamination and show that values of the intercept of the normalized cumulant as a function of order can distinguish these two effects. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Three-particle cumulant Study of Conical Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claude Pruneau

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the sensitivity of the three-particle azimuthal cumulant method for a search and study of conical emission in central relativistic $A+A $ collisions. Our study is based on a multi-component Monte Carlo model which include flow background, Gaussian mono-jets, jet-flow, and Gaussian conical signals. We find the observation of conical emission is hindered by the presence of flow harmonics of fourth order ($v_4 $) but remains feasible even in the presence of a substantial background. We consider the use of probability cumulants for the suppression of 2$^{nd}$ order flow harmonics. We find that while probability cumulant significantly reduce $v_2^2$ contributions, they also complicate the cumulant of jets, and conical emission. The use of probability cumulants is therefore not particularly advantageous in searches for conical emission. We find the sensitivity of the (density) cumulant method depends inextricably on strengths of $v_2 $, $v_4 $, background and non-Poisson character of particle production. It thus cannot be expressed in a simple form, and without specific assumptions about the values of these parameters.

  16. Session: What do we know about cumulative or population impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerlinger, Paul; Manville, Al; Kendall, Bill

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of a panel discussion followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The panelists were Paul Kerlinger, Curry and Kerlinger, LLC, Al Manville, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bill Kendall, US Geological Service. The panel addressed the potential cumulative impacts of wind turbines on bird and bat populations over time. Panel members gave brief presentations that touched on what is currently known, what laws apply, and the usefulness of population modeling. Topics addressed included which sources of modeling should be included in cumulative impacts, comparison of impacts from different modes of energy generation, as well as what research is still needed regarding cumulative impacts of wind energy development on bird and bat populations.

  17. Wick polynomials and time-evolution of cumulants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jani Lukkarinen; Matteo Marcozzi

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how Wick polynomials of random variables can be defined combinatorially as the unique choice which removes all "internal contractions" from the related cumulant expansions, also in a non-Gaussian case. We discuss how an expansion in terms of the Wick polynomials can be used for derivation of a hierarchy of equations for the time-evolution of cumulants. These methods are then applied to simplify the formal derivation of the Boltzmann-Peierls equation in the kinetic scaling limit of the discrete nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation (DNLS) with suitable random initial data. We also present a reformulation of the standard perturbation expansion using cumulants which could simplify the problem of a rigorous derivation of the Boltzmann-Peierls equation by separating the analysis of the solutions to the Boltzmann-Peierls equation from the analysis of the corrections. This latter scheme is general and not tied to the DNLS evolution equations.

  18. Event counting alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, R.D.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrostatic detector is disclosed for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure. 6 figs.

  19. Event counting alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM); MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrostatic detector for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure.

  20. Estimating type curve parameters with the cumulative curvature method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Dan Edward

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    curvature of Ramey type curves at a forward span of 40'$ . 32 15 Cumulative curvature of Ramey type curves at a forward span of 50$ . 33 16 Cumulative curvature of Ramey type curves at a forward span of 60$ 34 ix LIST OF FIGURES icontinued) 17..."wand spans ranging f;om 15$ to 60$ are presented in Figure 10 through 12. Since data that bately reaches past the end of the unit slope region is too vague even for this technique, the graph with a forward span of 0$ to 15$ is omitied here because...

  1. PLM: Fast Convergence for Cumulative Layered Multicast Transmission Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legout, Arnaud

    PLM: Fast Convergence for Cumulative Layered Multicast Transmission Schemes A. Legout and E. W- ticast congestion control protocol (called PLM) for audio/video and file transfer applications based PLM for a large variety of scenarios and show that it converges fast to the optimal link utilization

  2. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, J.A.; Kopp, M.K.

    1980-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (< 60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10/sup 5/ counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  3. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, James A. (Madison, WI); Kopp, Manfred K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (<60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10.sup.5 counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  4. Hanford whole body counting manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Lynch, T.P.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the Hanford Whole Body Counting Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy--Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include providing in vivo measurements of internally deposited radioactivity in Hanford employees (or visitors). Specific chapters of this manual deal with the following subjects: program operational charter, authority, administration, and practices, including interpreting applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for in vivo measurement frequency, etc., for the plant-wide whole body counting services; state-of-the-art facilities and equipment used to provide the best in vivo measurement results possible for the approximately 11,000 measurements made annually; procedures for performing the various in vivo measurements at the Whole Body Counter (WBC) and related facilities including whole body counts; operation and maintenance of counting equipment, quality assurance provisions of the program, WBC data processing functions, statistical aspects of in vivo measurements, and whole body counting records and associated guidance documents. 16 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

  5. Optical People Counting for Demand Controlled Ventilation: A Pilot Study of Counter Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas

    2009-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This pilot scale study evaluated the counting accuracy of two people counting systems that could be used in demand controlled ventilation systems to provide control signals for modulating outdoor air ventilation rates. The evaluations included controlled challenges of the people counting systems using pre-planned movements of occupants through doorways and evaluations of counting accuracies when naive occupants (i.e., occupants unaware of the counting systems) passed through the entrance doors of the building or room. The two people counting systems had high counting accuracy accuracies, with errors typically less than 10percent, for typical non-demanding counting events. However, counting errors were high in some highly challenging situations, such as multiple people passing simultaneously through a door. Counting errors, for at least one system, can be very high if people stand in the field of view of the sensor. Both counting system have limitations and would need to be used only at appropriate sites and where the demanding situations that led to counting errors were rare.

  6. Counting Out Loud Counting Objects Give-A-Number Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Kyle

    Characteristics Low-Income Group n = 75 Higher-Income Group n = 45 Mean age at first session (yrs; mos) 4;8 4 ResultsMethod "One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten." Counting Objects Give indicate better performance. Legend Low-Income Group Higher-Income Group Scaffolded Number Line * p

  7. Volume fluctuations and higher order cumulants of the net baryon number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Skokov; B. Friman; K. Redlich

    2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effect of volume fluctuations on cumulants of the net baryon number. Based on a general formalism, we derive universal expressions for the net baryon number cumulants in the presence of volume fluctuations with an arbitrary probability distribution. The relevance of these fluctuations for the baryon-number cumulants and in particular for the ratios of cumulants is assessed in the Polyakov loop extended quark-meson model within the functional renormalization group. We show that the baryon number cumulants are generally enhanced by volume fluctuations and that the critical behavior of higher order cumulants may be modified significantly.

  8. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

  9. Cumulative theoretical uncertainties in lithium depletion boundary age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tognelli, Emanuele; Degl'Innocenti, Scilla

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed a detailed analysis of the main theoretical uncertainties affecting the age at the lithium depletion boundary (LDB). To do that we computed almost 12000 pre-main sequence models with mass in the range [0.06, 0.4] M_sun by varying input physics (nuclear reaction cross-sections, plasma electron screening, outer boundary conditions, equation of state, and radiative opacity), initial chemical elements abundances (total metallicity, helium and deuterium abundances, and heavy elements mixture), and convection efficiency (mixing length parameter, alpha_ML). As a first step, we studied the effect of varying these quantities individually within their extreme values. Then, we analysed the impact of simultaneously perturbing the main input/parameters without an a priori assumption of independence. Such an approach allowed us to build for the first time the cumulative error stripe, which defines the edges of the maximum uncertainty region in the theoretical LDB age. We found that the cumulative error stripe ...

  10. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  11. Polydispersity analysis of Taylor dispersion data: the cumulant method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Cipelletti; Jean-Philippe Biron; Michel Martin; Hervé Cottet

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Taylor dispersion analysis is an increasingly popular characterization method that measures the diffusion coefficient, and hence the hydrodynamic radius, of (bio)polymers, nanoparticles or even small molecules. In this work, we describe an extension to current data analysis schemes that allows size polydispersity to be quantified for an arbitrary sample, thereby significantly enhancing the potentiality of Taylor dispersion analysis. The method is based on a cumulant development similar to that used for the analysis of dynamic light scattering data. Specific challenges posed by the cumulant analysis of Taylor dispersion data are discussed, and practical ways to address them are proposed. We successfully test this new method by analyzing both simulated and experimental data for solutions of moderately polydisperse polymers and polymer mixtures.

  12. Simple derivation of the first cumulant for the Rouse chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Lisy; B. Brutovsky; J. Tothova

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple analytic expression for the first cumulant of the dynamic structure factor of a polymer coil in the Rouse model is derived. The obtained formula is exact within the usual assumption of the continuum distribution of beads along the chain. It reflects the contributions to the scattering of light or neutrons from both the internal motion of the polymer and its diffusion, and is valid in the whole region of the wave-vector change at the scattering.

  13. Bringing science into river systems cumulative effects assessment practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Nicole E. [Centre for Hydrology, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan. 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK. S7N 5C8 (Canada); Westbrook, Cherie J., E-mail: cherie.westbrook@usask.c [Centre for Hydrology, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Saskatchewan. 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK. S7N 5C8 (Canada); Noble, Bram F. [Department of Geography and Planning, School for the Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan. 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK. S7N 5C8 (Canada)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast-paced watershed change, driven by anthropogenic development, is threatening the sustainability of freshwater resources across the globe. Developments within watersheds interact in a manner that is additive and synergistic over space and time. Such cumulative environmental effects are defined as the results of actions that are individually minor but collectively significant when added to other past, present, and reasonably foreseeable future actions. Cumulative effects assessment (CEA) then is broadly defined as the process of evaluating the potential impacts of such collective actions on the environment and is a requirement in many countries, including in Canada at the federal level under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. However, current approaches to CEA for river systems are proving to be ineffective, which is largely attributed to the disconnect between CEA science and practice. We highlight this gap herein by discussing contradictions in the CEA literature, challenges in quantifying cumulative interactions, including overcoming spatiotemporal scale issues, multiple hydrologic and ecological pathways, and lack of predictive analysis. Our analysis shows there is a need for improved CEA for river systems, and in responding to this need we propose a conceptual framework for better integrating science and practice for improved CEA for river systems using one of the most adversely affected rivers basins in Canada, the Athabasca River, as our model. We conclude by addressing the challenges inherent to CEA with the intent of providing scientists with ways to help improve CEA of river systems.

  14. Cumulative belief degrees approach for analyzing the competitiveness of the automotive industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    Cumulative belief degrees approach for analyzing the competitiveness of the automotive industry: Available online xxxx Keywords: Competitiveness Automotive industry Cumulative belief degree Casual the competitiveness of the automotive industry from a national competitiveness perspective, using a three

  15. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Draft annual report for the Cumulative Effects Study for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District

  16. CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Patent quality and value in discrete and cumulative innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Patent quality and value in discrete and cumulative innovation Justus,version2-16Nov2010 #12;2 Patent Quality and Value in Discrete and Cumulative Innovation Cerna Working the relationship between patent quality and patent value in discrete and cumulative innovation. Using factor

  17. Canadian and international EIA frameworks as they apply to cumulative effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connelly, Robert, E-mail: robert.connelly@sympatico.ca

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a brief history of the development of cumulative effects, the current requirements in North America and elsewhere in the world, challenges at the project level, thoughts on how emerging concepts of strategic environmental assessment and regional assessment may offer means to improve the examination of cumulative effects and offers suggestions for current and future needs in cumulative effects assessment.

  18. Count-doubling time safety circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rusch, Gordon K. (Downers Grove, IL); Keefe, Donald J. (Lemont, IL); McDowell, William P. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided a nuclear reactor count-factor-increase time monitoring circuit which includes a pulse-type neutron detector, and means for counting the number of detected pulses during specific time periods. Counts are compared and the comparison is utilized to develop a reactor scram signal, if necessary.

  19. Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 1 Counting Rises, Levels and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heubach, Silvia

    Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 1 Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions Mansour Department of Mathematics, Haifa University, Israel #12;Counting Rises, Levels and Drops;Counting Rises, Levels and Drops in Compositions 3 Definitions · A composition = 12 . . . m of n N

  20. Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, Samuel F., E-mail: atkinson@unt.edu [Institute of Applied Science, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 310559, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Canter, Larry W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [Environmental Impact Training, P.O. Box 9143, Horseshoe Bay, TX 78657 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems that allow users to store and retrieve spatial data, provide for analyses of spatial data, and offer highly detailed display of spatial data are referred to as geographic information systems, or more typically, GIS. Since their initial usage in the 1960s, GISs have evolved as a means of assembling and analyzing diverse data pertaining to specific geographical areas, with spatial locations of the data serving as the organizational basis for the information systems. The structure of GISs is built around spatial identifiers and the methods used to encode data for storage and manipulation. This paper examines how GIS has been used in typical environmental assessment, its use for cumulative impact assessment, and explores litigation that occurred in the United States Federal court system where GIS was used in some aspect of cumulative effects. The paper also summarizes fifteen case studies that range from area wide transportation planning to wildlife and habitat impacts, and draws together a few lessons learned from this review of literature and litigation.

  1. Moisture corrections in neutron coincidence counting of PuO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, J.E.; Menlove, H.O.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive neutron coincidence counting is capable of 1% assay accuracy for pure, well-characterized PuO/sub 2/ samples that contain plutonium masses from a few tens of grams to several kilograms. Moisture in the sample can significantly bias the assay high by changing the (..cap alpha..,n) neutron production, the sample multiplication, and the detection efficiency. Monte Carlo calculations and an analytical model of coincidence counting have been used to quantify the individual and cumulative effects of moisture biases for two PuO/sub 2/ sample sizes and a range of moisture levels from 0 to 9 wt %. Results of the calculations suggest a simple correction procedure for moisture bias that is effective from 0 to 3 wt % H/sub 2/O. The procedure requires that the moisture level in the sample be known before the coincidence measurement.

  2. Public service impacts of geothermal development: cumulative impacts study of the Geysers KGRA. Final staff report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, K.M.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in the Geysers are identified. Using two different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in the Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdications are examined, and these costs are compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed and a framework presented for calculating mitigation costs for school and road impacts.

  3. Cumulative effects in Swedish EIA practice - difficulties and obstacles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waernbaeck, Antoienette [Swedish EIA Centre, Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: antoienette.warnback@sol.slu.se; Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija [Swedish EIA Centre, Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of considering cumulative effects (CE) in the context of environmental assessment is manifested in the EU regulations. The demands on the contents of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) documents explicitly ask for CE to be described. In Swedish environmental assessment documents CE are rarely described or included. The aim of this paper is to look into the reasons behind this fact in the Swedish context. The paper describes and analyse how actors implementing the EIA and SEA legislation in Sweden perceive the current situation in relation to the legislative demands and the inclusion of cumulative effects. Through semi-structured interviews the following questions have been explored: Is the phenomenon of CE discussed and included in the EIA/SEA process? What do the actors include in and what is their knowledge of the term and concept of CE? Which difficulties and obstacles do these actors experience and what possibilities for inclusion of CE do they see in the EIA/SEA process? A large number of obstacles and hindrances emerged from the interviews conducted. It can be concluded from the analysis that the will to act does seem to exist. A lack of knowledge in respect of how to include cumulative effects and a lack of clear regulations concerning how this should be done seem to be perceived as the main obstacles. The knowledge of the term and the phenomenon is furthermore quite narrow and not all encompassing. They experience that there is a lack of procedures in place. They also seem to lack knowledge of methods in relation to how to actually work, in practice, with CE and how to include CE in the EIA/SEA process. It can be stated that the existence of this poor picture in relation to practice concerning CE in the context of impact assessment mirrors the existing and so far rather vague demands in respect of the inclusion and assessment of CE in Swedish EIA and SEA legislation, regulations, guidelines and handbooks.

  4. Power-counting and Renormalizability in Lifshitz Scalar Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshiaki Fujimori; Takeo Inami; Keisuke Izumi; Tomotaka Kitamura

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the renormalizability in theories of a self-interacting Lifshitz scalar field. We show that although the statement of power-counting is true at one-loop order, in generic cases where the scalar field is dimensionless, an infinite number of counter terms are involved in the renormalization procedure. This problem can be avoided by imposing symmetries, the shift symmetry in the present paper, which allow only a finite number of counter terms to appear. The symmetry requirements might have important implications for the construction of matter field sectors in the Horava-Lifshitz gravity.

  5. Power-counting and Renormalizability in Lifshitz Scalar Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimori, Toshiaki; Izumi, Keisuke; Kitamura, Tomotaka

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the renormalizability in theories of a self-interacting Lifshitz scalar field. We show that although the statement of power-counting is true at one-loop order, in generic cases where the scalar field is dimensionless, an infinite number of counter terms are involved in the renormalization procedure. This problem can be avoided by imposing symmetries, the shift symmetry in the present paper, which allow only a finite number of counter terms to appear. The symmetry requirements might have important implications for the construction of matter field sectors in the Horava-Lifshitz gravity.

  6. Low Background Counting At SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce [SNOLAB, 1039 Regional Rd 24, Lively, ON P3Y 1N2 (Canada)

    2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a continuous and ongoing effort to maintain radioactivity in materials and in the environment surrounding most underground experiments at very low levels. These low levels are required so that experiments can achieve the required detection sensitivities for the detection of low-energy neutrinos, searches for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to determine these low background levels in the materials and the underground environment. This proceedings will describe the SNOLAB High Purity Germanium Detector which has been in continuous use for the past five years and give results of many of the items that have been counted over that period. Brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be given, and the radon levels at SNOLAB will be discussed.

  7. Power Counting Regime of Chiral Extrapolation and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derek B. Leinweber; Anthony W. Thomas; Ross D. Young

    2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite-range regularised (FRR) chiral effective field theory is presented in the context of approximation schemes ubiquitous in modern lattice QCD calculations. Using FRR techniques, the power-counting regime (PCR) of chiral perturbation theory can be estimated. To fourth-order in the expansion at the 1% tolerance level, we find m_\\pi < 180 MeV for the PCR, extending only a small distance beyond the physical pion mass.

  8. Power counting regime of chiral extrapolation and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Leinweber; Anthony Thomas; Ross Young

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite-range regularized chiral effective field theory is presented in the context of approximation schemes ubiquitous in modern lattice QCD calculations. Using FRR techniques, the power-counting regime (PCR) of chiral perturbation theory can be estimated. To fourth-order in the expansion at the 1% tolerance level, we find 0 {le} m{sub {pi}} {le} 180 MeV for the PCR, extending only a small distance beyond the physical pion mass.

  9. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  10. Linear Cumulant Control and Its Relationship to Risk-Sensitive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Libin

    Linear Cumulant Control and Its Relationship to Risk-Sensitive Control Libin Mou Stanley R. Liberty in this cumulant control class. 1 Introduction In 1998 Pham, Liberty and Sain introduced a general class of Linear the relationship between the solution to the risk-sensitive control problem (for the linear, memoryless, full

  11. Cumulative biological impacts of The Geysers geothermal development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownell, J.A.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cumulative nature of current and potential future biological impacts from full geothermal development in the steam-dominated portion of The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA are identified by the California Energy Commission staff. Vegetation, wildlife, and aquatic resources information have been reviewed and evaluated. Impacts and their significance are discussed and staff recommendations presented. Development of 3000 MW of electrical energy will result in direct vegetation losses of 2790 acres, based on an estimate of 11.5% loss per lease-hold of 0.93 acres/MW. If unmitigated, losses will be greater. Indirect vegetation losses and damage occur from steam emissions which contain elements (particularly boron) toxic to vegetation. Other potential impacts include chronic low-level boron exposure, acid rain, local climate modification, and mechanical damage. A potential exists for significant reduction and changes in wildlife from direct habitat loss and development influences. Highly erosive soils create the potential for significant reduction of aquatic resources, particularly game fish. Toxic spills have caused some temporary losses of aquatic species. Staff recommends monitoring and implementation of mitigation measures at all geothermal development stages.

  12. Microcanonical thermostatistics analysis without histograms: cumulative distribution and Bayesian approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alves, Nelson A; Rizzi, Leandro G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microcanonical thermostatistics analysis has become an important tool to reveal essential aspects of phase transitions in complex systems. An efficient way to estimate the microcanonical inverse temperature $\\beta(E)$ and the microcanonical entropy $S(E)$ is achieved with the statistical temperature weighted histogram analysis method (ST-WHAM). The strength of this method lies on its flexibility, as it can be used to analyse data produced by algorithms with generalised sampling weights. However, for any sampling weight, ST-WHAM requires the calculation of derivatives of energy histograms $H(E)$, which leads to non-trivial and tedious binning tasks for models with continuous energy spectrum such as those for biomolecular and colloidal systems. Here, we discuss two alternative methods that avoid the need for such energy binning to obtain continuous estimates for $H(E)$ in order to evaluate $\\beta(E)$ by using ST-WHAM: (i) a series expansion to estimate probability densities from the empirical cumulative distrib...

  13. Weighted power counting and chiral dimensional regularization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damiano Anselmi

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We define a modified dimensional-regularization technique that overcomes several difficulties of the ordinary technique, and is specially designed to work efficiently in chiral and parity violating quantum field theories, in arbitrary dimensions greater than 2. When the dimension of spacetime is continued to complex values, spinors, vectors and tensors keep the components they have in the physical dimension, therefore the $\\gamma $ matrices are the standard ones. Propagators are regularized with the help of evanescent higher-derivative kinetic terms, which are of the Majorana type in the case of chiral fermions. If the new terms are organized in a clever way, weighted power counting provides an efficient control on the renormalization of the theory, and allows us to show that the resulting chiral dimensional regularization is consistent to all orders. The new technique considerably simplifies the proofs of properties that hold to all orders, and makes them suitable to be generalized to wider classes of models. Typical examples are the renormalizability of chiral gauge theories and the Adler-Bardeen theorem. The difficulty of explicit computations, on the other hand, may increase.

  14. Electron counting in quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    source drain pg M. Sigrist Ciorga et al., PRB 61, R16315 (2000) Elzerman et al. PRB 67, 161308 (2003) #12 extreme near field optics #12;Photons or phonons? GaAs InAs Gustavsson et al., PRB 78, 035324 (2008) #12S. Schnez et al. PRB 78 (2008) 140 nm circular dot 1000-100-200 Energy (meV) 0 2 4 6 8 B(T) 0 100 200

  15. Power Counting to Better Jet Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. Larkoski; Ian Moult; Duff Neill

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimized jet substructure observables for identifying boosted topologies will play an essential role in maximizing the physics reach of the Large Hadron Collider. Ideally, the design of discriminating variables would be informed by analytic calculations in perturbative QCD. Unfortunately, explicit calculations are often not feasible due to the complexity of the observables used for discrimination, and so many validation studies rely heavily, and solely, on Monte Carlo. In this paper we show how methods based on the parametric power counting of the dynamics of QCD, familiar from effective theory analyses, can be used to design, understand, and make robust predictions for the behavior of jet substructure variables. As a concrete example, we apply power counting for discriminating boosted Z bosons from massive QCD jets using observables formed from the n-point energy correlation functions. We show that power counting alone gives a definite prediction for the observable that optimally separates the background-rich from the signal-rich regions of phase space. Power counting can also be used to understand effects of phase space cuts and the effect of contamination from pile-up, which we discuss. As these arguments rely only on the parametric scaling of QCD, the predictions from power counting must be reproduced by any Monte Carlo, which we verify using Pythia8 and Herwig++. We also use the example of quark versus gluon discrimination to demonstrate the limits of the power counting technique.

  16. Cumulative impacts study of The Geysers KGRA: public-service impacts of geothermal development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, K.M.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal development in The Geysers KGRA has affected local public services and fiscal resources in Sonoma, Lake, Mendocino, and Napa counties. Each of these counties underwent rapid population growth between 1970 and 1980, some of which can be attributed to geothermal development. The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in The Geysers is identified. Using three different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in The Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdictions are examined and compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed, and a framework is presented for calculating mitigation costs per unit of public service.

  17. Fact #843: October 20, 2014 Cumulative Plug-in Electric Vehicle...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    20, 2014 Cumulative Plug-in Electric Vehicle Sales are Two and a Half Times Higher than Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales in the First 45 Months since Market Introduction - Dataset...

  18. Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA Documents, EPA Office of Federal Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on...

  19. HALF INDEPENDENCE AND HALF CUMULANTS By Arup Bose,, Rajat Subhra Hazra and Koushik Saha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    HALF INDEPENDENCE AND HALF CUMULANTS By Arup Bose,, Rajat Subhra Hazra and Koushik Saha Indian described in Banica, Curran and Speicher (2010)[2] and Bose, Hazra and Saha (2010)[7]. In Section 2, we

  20. Amp-hour counting control for PV hybrid power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, B. [Biri Systems, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of an amp-hour (Ah) counting battery charge control algorithm has been defined and tested using the Digital Solar Technologies MPR-9400 microprocessor based PV hybrid charge controller. This work included extensive field testing of the charge algorithm on flooded lead-antimony and valve regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. The test results after one-year have demonstrated that PV charge utilization, battery charge control, and battery state of charge (SOC) has been significantly improved by providing maximum charge to the batteries while limiting battery overcharge to manufacturers specifications during variable solar resource and load periods.

  1. Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peletier, Reynier

    Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of particles energy loss generation of electron-ion+ pairs #12;Gas Filled Detectors Primary and Total Ionization fast charged particles ionize the atoms of a gas fraction of resulting primary electrons have enough kinetic energy to ionize other atoms #12;Gas Filled

  2. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  3. Cumulative exposure to arsenic and its relationship to respiratory cancer among copper-smelter employees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee-Feldstein, A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To explore the role of arsenic as a human carcinogen, the respiratory cancer-mortality experience (1938 to 1977) of 8045 white-male smelter employees in Montana was examined relative to cumulative exposure to arsenic trioxide and was compared with that of the white male population of the same region. Exposure to arsenic was estimated for various work areas from industrial-hygiene reports of average concentrations present in the smelter. Respiratory cancer mortality was analyzed further by time period of first employment and maximum lifetime exposure to arsenic trioxide. When exposure was estimated with arithmetic means of measured concentrations among men first employed prior to 1925, respiratory cancer mortality increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group, ranging from two to nine times expected; among those first employed in the period 1925 to 1947 it also increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group.

  4. Cumulative exposure to arsenic and its relationship to respiratory cancer among copper smelter employees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee-Feldstein, A.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To explore the role of arsenic as a human carcinogen, the respiratory cancer mortality experience (1938 to 1977) of 8,045 while male smelter employees in Montana was examined relative to cumulative exposure to arsenic trioxide and was compared with that of the white male population of the same region. Exposure to arsenic was estimated for various work areas from industrial hygiene reports of average concentrations present in the smelter. Respiratory cancer mortality was analyzed further by time period of first employment and maximum lifetime exposure to arsenic trioxide. When exposure was estimated with arithmetic means of measured concentrations among men first employed prior to 1925, respiratory cancer mortality increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group, ranging from two to nine times expected; among those first employed in the period 1925 to 1947 it also increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group.

  5. Particle Energy Spectrum, Revisited from a Counting Statistics Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear science, gamma and neutron spectra are counted energy by energy, and then particle by particle. Until recently, few studies have been performed on how exactly those energy spectra are counted, or how those counts are correlated. Because of lack of investigation, cross section covariance and correlation matrices are usually estimated using perturbation method. We will discuss a statistical counting scheme that shall mimic the gamma and neutron counting process used in nuclear science. From this counting scheme, the cross section covariance and correlation can be statistically derived.

  6. Gain dispersion in Visible Light Photon Counters as a function of counting rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, A.; /Fermilab; Buscher, V.; /Freiburg U.; Estrada, J.; /Fermilab; Ginther, G.; /Rochester U.; Molina, J.; /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of light signals using Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPC), that indicate an increase in gain dispersion as the counting rate increases. We show that this dispersion can be understood on the basis of a recent observation of localized field reduction in VLPCs at high input rates.

  7. Wholebody radiation counting system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fechter, G.M.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to develop a system that would allow the Health Physics staff of the Nuclear Engineering Department of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute to conduct wholebody radiation counting of all assigned personnel and to determine if a multiple-crystal arrangement had any benefits over the single-crystal system. The research had three main objectives: to design and construct the electronic hardware necessary to collect data from a series of three NaI(Tl) scintilation crystals; to develop the computer software necessary to interpret this data and calculate concentrations present within those individuals tested; and to interface the Helgeson Wholebody Counter with the Vax 11/750 Computer System. This system includes a Texas Instruments TM990-101M Microcomputer which acts as the main control unit for the operator and as the interface with the Vax computer. Additionally, the final system included a computer interface and data acquisition module and it uses a Digital Equipment Corporation VAX 11/750 Computer System for a majority of the data manipulation. This system, as all wholebody counting systems, is characterized by its ability to detect low levels of radionuclide concentration while maintaining adequate resolution to identify the exact isotopes present within the person being counted.

  8. Happy Earth Day! 39 and Counting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Day 39 and Counting Happy Earth Day 39 and Counting April 22, 2009 - 10:55am Addthis Drew Bittner Communications Lead, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization It...

  9. BLIND CHANNEL IDENTIFICATION OF MISO SYSTEMS BASED ON THE CP DECOMPOSITION OF CUMULANT TENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BLIND CHANNEL IDENTIFICATION OF MISO SYSTEMS BASED ON THE CP DECOMPOSITION OF CUMULANT TENSORS algorithm for identifying the parameters of MISO sys- tem. 1. INTRODUCTION We consider the following-Input Single-Output (MISO) channel, y[n] is the output signal. Signals and system are assumed to be complex

  10. Cumulative environmental impacts and integrated coastal management: the case of Xiamen, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    Cumulative environmental impacts and integrated coastal management: the case of Xiamen, China, Environmental Science Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China b Management Science and the implementation of integrated coastal management within the harbour of Xiamen, China, an urban region in which

  11. Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  12. PLM: Fast Convergence for Cumulative Layered Multicast Transmission Schemes (extended version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legout, Arnaud

    PLM: Fast Convergence for Cumulative Layered Multicast Transmission Schemes (extended version) A the properties of a new multicast congestion control protocol (called PLM) for audio/video and file transfer. We evaluated PLM for a large variety of scenarios and show that it converges fast to the optimal link

  13. PLM: Fast Convergence for Cumulative Layered Multicast Transmission Schemes (extended version) \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legout, Arnaud

    PLM: Fast Convergence for Cumulative Layered Multicast Transmission Schemes (extended version the properties of a new multicast congestion control protocol (called PLM) for audio/video and file transfer. We evaluated PLM for a large variety of scenarios and show that it converges fast to the optimal link

  14. Job Placement Rate*: 93% (December 2013) Major Admission Requirements: 2.75 cumulative Texas Tech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westfall, Peter H.

    Coopers · Texas Instruments · Valero Energy · USAA CAREERS Systems Development · Systems analysis · InformationJob Placement Rate*: 93% (December 2013) Major Admission Requirements: 2.75 cumulative Texas Tech to Production and Operations Management (FLP) in Spain *Dependent on market conditions and number of graduates

  15. Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masden, Elizabeth A., E-mail: e.masden.1@research.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom) and Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fox, Anthony D., E-mail: tfo@dmu.d [Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Kalo, Grenavej 14, 8410 Ronde (Denmark); Furness, Robert W., E-mail: r.furness@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bullman, Rhys, E-mail: rhys.bullman@rpsgroup.co [Scottish Natural Heritage, The Beta Centre, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4NF (United Kingdom); Haydon, Daniel T., E-mail: d.haydon@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

  16. Using Prefetching to Improve Reference-Counting Garbage Collectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrank, Erez

    Using Prefetching to Improve Reference-Counting Garbage Collectors Harel Paz 1 and Erez Petrank 2 1-counting collector. We propose potential prefetching opportunities for the advanced reference-counting collector and report an implementation of a collector that employs such prefetch- ing. The proposed prefetch

  17. Anomalous dimensions determine the power counting -- Wilsonian RG analysis of nuclear EFT --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koji Harada; Hirofumi Kubo

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legendre flow equation, a version of exact Wilsonian renormalization group (WRG) equation, is employed to consider the power counting issues in Nuclear Effective Field Theory. A WRG approach is an ideal framework because it is nonperturbative and does not require any prescribed power counting rule. The power counting is determined systematically from the scaling dimensions of the operators at the nontrivial fixed point. The phase structure is emphasized and the inverse of the scattering length, which is identified as a relevant coupling, is shown to play a role of the order parameter. The relations to the work done by Birse, McGovern, and Richardson and to the Kaplan-Savage-Wise scheme are explained.

  18. The 12um ISO-ESO-Sculptor and 24um Spitzer faint counts reveal a population of ULIRG/AGN/dusty massive ellipticals Evolution by types and cosmic star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Rocca-Volmerange; V. de Lapparent; N. Seymour; M. Fioc

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-wavelength galaxy number counts provide clues on the nature of galaxy evolution. The interpretation per galaxy type with the new code PEGASE.3 of the 12mu (ISO) and 24mu (Spitzer) faint galaxy counts provide new constraints on the dust and stellar emission. It also reveals the nature of ULIRGs (L/Lsun > 10^12) and informs on the cosmic star formation history and the time-scales for mass build-up. We firstly present the faint galaxy counts at 12um derived from the catalogue of the ISO-ESO-Sculptor Survey (ISO-ESS) in a companion paper (Seymour et al. 2007) which go down to 0.24 mJy after corrections for incompleteness. We check that they are consistent with ISO number counts at 15um. Secondly we show that the ``normal'' scenarios which fit the deep UV-optical-near-IR counts with PEGASE.2 (Fioc et al. 1999), are unsuccessful in modelling the strong excess simultaneously observed in the cumulative and differential counts at 12um, 15um and 24um. Based on observed 12mu and 25mu IRAS luminosity functions and optical/mid-IR colors, we finally succeed in modelling cumulative and differential counts by only changing 9% of normal galaxies (1/3 of the ellipticals) into ultra-bright dusty elliptical galaxies, interpreted as ULIRGs. This ULIRG population has similarities with high-z radio-galaxy hosts. No number density evolution is included. The Herschel observatory will hopefully confirm these results.

  19. Counting Two-State Transition-Tour Sequences 1 Counting Two-State Transition-Tour Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Edward J.

    Counting Two-State Transition-Tour Sequences 1 Counting Two-State Transition-Tour Sequences Nirmal(k), to count the number of transition-tour sequences of length k for bistable machines. It is shown tests for random pattern generators. Index Terms: Transition-Tours, Sequential Machine Testing

  20. Active neutron multiplicity counting of bulk uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensslin, N.; Krick, M.S.; Langner, D.G.; Miller, M.C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new nondestructive assay technique being developed to assay bulk uranium containing kilogram quantities of {sup 235}U. The new technique uses neutron multiplicity analysis of data collected with a coincidence counter outfitted with AmLi neutron sources. We have calculated the expected neutron multiplicity count rate and assay precision for this technique and will report on its expected performance as a function of detector design characteristics, {sup 235 }U sample mass, AmLi source strength, and source-to-sample coupling. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Cumulative Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -18. 324 "Causal and Geometric Relations". Douglas W. Shrader, Jr. v.4, n.3 (June, 1977), pp. 156- 168. "Causation, Motion, and the Unmoved Mover". Karen Bell, v.8, n.2 (Summer, 1981), pp. 157-173. "Cognition and Identifying Reference". Gary S..., Karen. "Causation, Motion, and the Unmoved Mover", v.8, n.2 (Summer, 1981), pp. 157-173. Blackman, Larry Lee. "Why Every Realist Should Be A Platonist". v.7, n.2 (Spring, 1980), pp. 144- 162. Botwinick, Aryeh. "Hume on Is-Ought: A Reinterpre- tation...

  2. Cumulative Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Significance of Hegel's Four World-Historical Realms" by Eric von der Luft "A Recovery of Innocence: The Dynamics of Sartrean Radical Conversion" by Kerry S. Walters "Freedom and Determinism in Spinoza" by John M. Russell "Locke's Theory of Property: A Re...

  3. Baseline for the cumulants of net-proton distributions at STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaofeng Luo; Bedangadas Mohanty; Nu Xu

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a systematic comparison between the recently measured cumulants of the net-proton distributions by STAR for 0-5% central Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=7.7-200 GeV and two kinds of possible baseline measures, the Poisson and Binomial baselines. These baseline measures are assuming that the proton and anti-proton distributions independently follow Poisson statistics or Binomial statistics. The higher order cumulant net-proton data are observed to deviate from all the baseline measures studied at 19.6 and 27 GeV. We also compare the net-proton with net-baryon fluctuations in UrQMD and AMPT model, and convert the net-proton fluctuations to net-baryon fluctuations in AMPT model by using a set of formula.

  4. FAINT SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY COUNTS AT 450 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.; Williams, Jonathan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Wang, Wei-Hao [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of SCUBA-2 observations at 450 {mu}m and 850 {mu}m of the field lensed by the massive cluster A370. With a total survey area >100 arcmin{sup 2} and 1{sigma} sensitivities of 3.92 and 0.82 mJy beam{sup -1} at 450 and 850 {mu}m, respectively, we find a secure sample of 20 sources at 450 {mu}m and 26 sources at 850 {mu}m with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 4. Using the latest lensing model of A370 and Monte Carlo simulations, we derive the number counts at both wavelengths. The 450 {mu}m number counts probe a factor of four deeper than the counts recently obtained from the Herschel Space Telescope at similar wavelengths, and we estimate that {approx}47%-61% of the 450 {mu}m extragalactic background light resolved into individual sources with 450 {mu}m fluxes greater than 4.5 mJy. The faint 450 {mu}m sources in the 4{sigma} sample have positional accuracies of 3 arcsec, while brighter sources (S/N >6{sigma}) are good to 1.4 arcsec. Using a deep radio map (1{sigma} {approx} 6 {mu}Jy) we find that the percentage of submillimeter sources having secure radio counterparts is 85% for 450 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >6 mJy and 67% for 850 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >4 mJy. We also find that 67% of the >4{sigma} 450 {mu}m sources are detected at 850 {mu}m, while the recovery rate at 450 {mu}m of >4{sigma} 850 {mu}m sources is 54%. Combined with the source redshifts estimated using millimetric flux ratios, the recovered rate is consistent with the scenario where both 450 {mu}m and 20 cm emission preferentially select lower redshift dusty sources, while 850 {mu}m emission traces a higher fraction of dusty sources at higher redshifts. We identify potential counterparts in various wavelengths from X-ray to mid-infrared and measure the multiwavelength photometry, which we then use to analyze the characteristics of the sources. We find three X-ray counterparts to our robust submillimeter sample (S/N > 5), giving an active galactic nucleus fraction for our 450 (850) {mu}m sample of 3/8 (3/9) or 38% (33%). We also find a correlation between the K{sub s} band and the 850 {mu}m/20 cm flux ratio.

  5. Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ramesh

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mauricio Sanchez-Silva Colleen Murphy Head of Department, David Rosowsky December 2007 Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Effect of Cumulative Seismic Damage and Corrosion on Life-Cycle Cost.... Paolo Gardoni for his technical guidance and for helping with financial support during my study period. I thank Dr. Mauricio Sanchez-Silva for helping me at all stages with his promptness to clear my doubts anytime I approached him. I acknowledge...

  6. Particle sizing by dynamic light scattering: non-linear cumulant analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alastair G. Mailer; Paul S. Clegg; Peter N. Pusey

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the method of cumulants for analysing dynamic light scattering data in particle sizing applications. Here the data, in the form of the time correlation function of scattered light, is written as a series involving the first few cumulants (or moments) of the distribution of particle diffusion constants. Frisken (2001 Applied Optics 40, 4087) has pointed out that, despite greater computational complexity, a non-linear, iterative, analysis of the data has advantages over the linear least-squares analysis used originally. In order to explore further the potential and limitations of cumulant methods we analyse, by both linear and non-linear methods, computer-generated data with realistic `noise', where the parameters of the distribution can be set explicitly. We find that, with modern computers, non-linear analysis is straightforward and robust. The mean and variance of the distribution of diffusion constants can be obtained quite accurately for distributions of width (standard deviation/mean) up to about 0.6, but there appears to be little prospect of obtaining meaningful higher moments.

  7. Commencement Bay cumulative impact study: Historic review of special aquatic sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats area, of which Commencement Bay is a part, has been designated by the Environmental Protection Agency as a Superfund site. Development in and around Commencement Bay have resulted in significant shoreline alterations, loss of substantial aquatic, mudflat and delta wetland habitat, and degradation of water quality. Dredging of nearshore areas to support port and harbor facilities for the Port of Tacoma has been carried out since the turn of the century by public and private industry. Areas south of the waterways have been diked, filled, and channelized for construction of storage buildings, shipping facilities, and various commercial and industrial purposes. Continued development pressures, maintenance dredging, and other activities necessitate an evaluation of the cumulative impacts of such activities on the remaining aquatic sites of Commencement Bay. Various resource agency and tribal recommendations resulted in the Commencement Bay Cumulative Impact Study, which was designed to produce the most complete historic record documenting loss of special aquatic sites. The baseline information will be used to quantify the cumulative impacts beginning in the mid-1800's through 1941 as a management tool. Commencement Bay is generally defined as a geographic region of south Puget Sound in Washington State extending from Brown's Point to Point Defiance. It provides a natural harbor for ships because there are no bars or other obstructions at the entrance to the bay.

  8. Models and methods for frequency assignment with cumulative interference constraints Mireille Palpant1, Cristian Oliva2, Christian Artigues3, Philippe Michelon4, Mohamed Didi Biha5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Cumulative Interference Constraints, Linear Programming, Constraint Programming, Large Neighborhood Search. 1Models and methods for frequency assignment with cumulative interference constraints Mireille of interferences for frequency assignment in hertzian telecom- munication networks is presented. In contrast

  9. Low background counting techniques at SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce [SNOLAB, 1039 Regional Rd 24, Lively, ON P3Y 1N2 (Canada)] [SNOLAB, 1039 Regional Rd 24, Lively, ON P3Y 1N2 (Canada)

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the experiments currently searching for dark matter, studying properties of neutrinos or searching for neutrinoless double beta decay require very low levels of radioactive backgrounds both in their own construction materials and in the surrounding environment. These low background levels are required so that the experiments can achieve the required sensitivities for their searches. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to directly measure these radioactive backgrounds. This proceedings will describe SNOLAB's High Purity Germanium Detectors, one of which has been in continuous use for the past seven years measuring materials for many experiments in operation or under construction at SNOLAB. A description of the characterisation of SNOLAB's new germanium well detector will be presented. In addition, brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be presented and a description of SNOLAB's future low background counting laboratory will be given.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Please cite this article in press as: N.L. McCook et al., Cumulative damage modeling of solid lubricant coatings that experience wear and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Wallace

    UNCORRECTEDPROOF Please cite this article in press as: N.L. McCook et al., Cumulative damage.1016/j.wear.2007.01.042 ARTICLE IN PRESS+Model WEA982061­6 Wear xxx (2007) xxx­xxx Cumulative damage fall closely to the fit for the cumulative damage model. This result also shows that these coatings

  12. Integrating Generations with Advanced Reference Counting Garbage Collectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krintz, Chandra

    Integrating Generations with Advanced Reference Counting Garbage Collectors Hezi Azatchi 1 and Erez counting work on the old generation (where many objects survive). Matching the expected survival rate a couple of milliseconds. Keywords: Runtime systems, Memory management, Garbage collection, Genera- tional

  13. Influence of initial size on higher cumulant ratios of net-proton number fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fengbo Xiong; Lizhu Chen; Lin Li; Zhiming Li; Yuanfang Wu

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the help of AMPT default model, we study the influence of initial size (centrality of collisions) on higher cumulant ratios of net-proton distributions. If the centrality is presented by impact parameter, there is a strong centrality dependent, in particular, in those peripheral collisions. This dependence is slightly reduced if the centrality is presented by number of participant, or charged multiplicity. However, the dynamical ratios are almost centrality independent. So the centrality dependence of dynamical ratios at RHIC beam energy scan are presented.

  14. Susceptibilities, the specific heat and a cumulant in two-flavour QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof; Frithjof Karsch; Edwin Laermann

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract We study the quark mass dependence of various response functions, which contribute to chiral susceptibilities and the specific heat in the staggered fermion formulation of two-flavour QCD. This yields information about the critical exponents \\alpha, \\beta and \\delta. In the case of the chiral susceptibility, obtained as derivative of the chiral order parameter with respect to the quark mass, we calculate all contributions. This allows to construct a cumulant of the order parameter, which is a scaling function and yields a direct determination of the critical exponent \\delta. All our results are consistent with a second order phase transition.

  15. Generator parameter uncertainties in the frequency-and-duration of cumulative margin events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tram, Nhat-Hanh

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hea f Depar ent Member Member Mem r 4f~d Q~ (, /U~d~m~ Member May 1977 ABSTRACT Generator Parameter Uncertainties in the Frequency-and-Duration of Cumulative Margin Events. (May 1977) Nhat-Hanh Tram, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman... VITA 69 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. Generating Unit Parameters (Example for Sensitivity Studies) . 10 2. K Constants for Sensitivity Studies . 3. Frequency-and-Duration Sensitivities to A 4. Frequency-and-Duration Sensitivities to u 13 13 14...

  16. Feasibility Study of Single-Photon Counting Using a Fine-mesh Phototube for an Aerogel Readout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Enomoto et al

    1994-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The fine-mesh phototube is one type of photodetector which can be used under a strong magnetic field. For an aerogel readout, the single-photon detection efficiency should be close to 100\\% in order to identify particle species. We carried out a feasibility study of single-photon counting using fine-mesh phototubes, and obtained a possible solution.

  17. Cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer in smelter workers: a dose-response study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaerup, L.P.; Pershagen, G.; Wall, S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cause-specific mortality was followed through 1981 in a cohort of 3,916 male Swedish smelter workers employed for at least 3 months from 1928 through 1967. Arsenic levels in the air of all workplaces within the smelter were estimated for three different time periods. Using this exposure matrix and detailed information of the work history, cumulative arsenic exposure could be computed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for several dose categories using age-specific mortality rates from the county where the smelter was situated. A positive dose-response relationship was found between cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer mortality with an overall SMR of 372 (304-450, 95% confidence interval). The lung cancer mortality was related to the estimated average intensity of exposure to arsenic but not to the duration. No positive dose-response relationship was found between arsenic and ischemic heart disease or cerebrovascular disease. There was also no evident dose-response relationship between estimated exposure to sulfur dioxide and lung cancer.

  18. Energy conservation, counting statistics, and return to equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaksic, Vojkan

    Energy conservation, counting statistics, and return to equilibrium V. Jaksi´c1 , J. Panangaden1 lim t QS(, t), QR = lim 0 lim t QR(, t). As a consequence of energy conservation, we expect that QS

  19. Correlated neutron counting for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlated neutron counting techniques, such as neutron coincidence and multiplicity counting, are widely employed at nuclear fuel cycle facilities for the accountancy of nuclear material such as plutonium. These techniques need to be improved and enhanced to meet the challenges of complex measurement items and future nuclear safeguards applications, for example; the non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel, high counting rate applications, small sample measurements, and Helium-3 replacement. At the same time simulation tools, used for the design of detection systems based on these techniques, are being developed in anticipation of future needs. This seminar will present the theory and current state of the practice of temporally correlated neutron counting. A range of future safeguards applications will then be presented in the context of research projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  20. Algorithmic issues in queueing systems and combinatorial counting problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz-Rogozhnikov, Dmitriy A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) However, these randomized algorithms can never provide proven upper or lower bounds on the number of objects they are counting, but can only give probabilistic estimates. We propose a set of deterministic algorithms ...

  1. Exact Stochastic Unraveling of an Optical Coherence Dynamics by Cumulant Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Olsina; Tobias Kramer; Christoph Kreisbeck; Tomas Mancal

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerically exact Monte Carlo scheme for calculation of open quantum system dynamics is proposed and implemented. The method consists of a Monte-Carlo summation of a perturbation expansion in terms of trajectories in Liouville phase-space with respect to the coupling between the excited states of the molecule. The trajectories are weighted by a complex decoherence factor based on the second-order cumulant expansion of the environmental evolution. The method can be used with an arbitrary environment characterized by a general correlation function and arbitrary coupling strength. It is formally exact for harmonic environments, and it can be used with arbitrary temperature. Time evolution of an optically excited Frenkel exciton dimer representing a molecular exciton interacting with a charge transfer state is calculated by the proposed method. We calculate the evolution of the optical coherence elements of the density matrix and linear absorption spectrum, and compare them with the predictions of standard simulation methods.

  2. A High Count Rate Beam Monitor for Thermal Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Amanda [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Diawara, Yacouba [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL; Hayward, J P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Menhard, Kocsis [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Sedov, Vladislav N [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam monitors are an important diagnostic tool in neutron science facilities. Present beam monitors use either ionization chambers in integration mode, which are slow and have no timing information, or pulse counters which can easily be saturated by high beam intensities. Neutron beam monitors indicate the number of neutrons incident on a scattering sample and allow neutron experimental data to be analyzed even when the source strength varies with time. At high flux neutron scattering facilities, neutron beam monitors with very low efficiency (10-5) are presently selected to keep the counting rate within a feasible range, even when a higher efficiency would improve the counting statistics and yield a better measurement of the incident beam. In this work, we report on a high count rate neutron beam monitor which also offers position sensitivity to provide a beam profile. This beam monitor offers good timing (less than 1 s) in addition to position resolution and will therefore improve the counting statistics at neutron energies up to 10 eV and allow moderator studies. The detector s main characteristics will be presented including its background rate, its count rate capability which is an order of magnitude higher than present counting monitors, and its efficiency for thermal neutrons.

  3. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and President, Canter Associates, Inc., Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Chawla, M.K. [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)] [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States); Swor, C.T. [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)] [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  4. Modelling the number counts of early-type galaxies by pure luminosity evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ping He; Yuan-Zhong Zhang

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we explore the plausible luminosity evolution of early-type galaxies in different cosmological models by constructing a set of pure luminosity evolution (PLE) models via the choices of the star formation rate (SFR) parameters and formation redshift $z_f$ of galaxies, with the observational constraints derived from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) morphological number counts for elliptical and S0 galaxies of the Medium Deep Survey (MDS) and the Hubble Deep Field (HDF). We find that the number counts of early-type galaxies can be explained by the pure luminosity evolution models, without invoking exotic scenarios such as merging or introducing an additional population. But the evolution should be nearly passive, with a high $z_f$ assumed. The conclusion is valid in all of the three cosmological models we adopted in this paper. We also present the redshift distributions for three bins of observed magnitudes in F814w pass-band, to show at which redshift are the objects that dominate the counts at a given magnitude. The predictions of the redshift distribution of $22.5

  5. Petrology and geochemistry of Yamato 984028: a cumulate lherzolitic shergottite with affinities to Y 000027, Y 000047,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    Petrology and geochemistry of Yamato 984028: a cumulate lherzolitic shergottite with affinities 2010 Elsevier B.V. and NIPR All rights reserved. Keywords : Lherzolitic ; Shergottite ; Petrology://ees.elsevier.com/polar/ + MODEL Please cite this article in press as: Amy J.V. Riches et al., Petrology and geochemistry of Yamato

  6. Upper Limits from Counting Experiments with Multiple Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick J. Sutton

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms, or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

  7. Modelling the Deep Counts: Luminosity Evolution, Dust and Faint Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ana Campos; Tom Shanks

    1995-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we analyse the deep number counts problem, taking account of new observational and theoretical developments. First we show that the new Bruzual and Charlot (1993) models allow a new class of spiral dominated luminosity evolution (LE) model where significant amounts of the luminosity evolution needed to fit faint count data are due to spiral rather than early-type galaxies. Second we show that the inclusion of dust may be a vital ingredient for obtaining fits with any LE model. Third we compare the quality of fit of both the spiral and early-type LE models, including dust, for a wide variety of observational data. We find that parameters can be found for both LE models which allow a good fit to all data with the exception of the faintest B>25 counts in the case of q0=0.5 cosmologies, where some luminosity dependent evolution may be needed (see also Metcalfe et al 1995). Otherwise both these classes of LE model, with the inclusion of dust, provide an excellent foundation for understanding the B<25 galaxy counts and galaxy counts and redshift distributions in a variety of other wavebands.

  8. New multi-sample nonparametric tests for panel count data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, N; 10.1214/08-AOS599

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper considers the problem of multi-sample nonparametric comparison of counting processes with panel count data, which arise naturally when recurrent events are considered. Such data frequently occur in medical follow-up studies and reliability experiments, for example. For the problem considered, we construct two new classes of nonparametric test statistics based on the accumulated weighted differences between the rates of increase of the estimated mean functions of the counting processes over observation times, wherein the nonparametric maximum likelihood approach is used to estimate the mean function instead of the nonparametric maximum pseudo-likelihood. The asymptotic distributions of the proposed statistics are derived and their finite-sample properties are examined through Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results show that the proposed methods work quite well and are more powerful than the existing test procedures. Two real data sets are analyzed and presented as illustrative examples.

  9. Large deviations of ergodic counting processes: a statistical mechanics approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budini, Adrian A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The large-deviation method allows to characterize an ergodic counting process in terms of a thermodynamic frame where a free energy function determines the asymptotic non-stationary statistical properties of its fluctuations. Here, we study this formalism through a statistical mechanics approach, i.e., with an auxiliary counting process that maximizes an entropy function associated to the thermodynamic potential. We show that the realizations of this auxiliary process can be obtained after applying a conditional measurement scheme to the original ones, providing is this way an alternative measurement interpretation of the thermodynamic approach. General results are obtained for renewal counting processes, i.e., those where the time intervals between consecutive events are independent and defined by a unique waiting time distribution. The underlying statistical mechanics is controlled by the same waiting time distribution, rescaled by an exponential decay measured by the free energy function. A scale invarianc...

  10. Proceedings of Symposia in Pure Mathematics Nodal domains on graphs -How to count them and why?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smilansky, Uzy

    century by the pioneering work of Chladni on the nodal structures of vibrating plates. Counting nodal

  11. Phase transitions in full counting statistics for periodic pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri A. Ivanov; Alexander G. Abanov

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the problem of full counting statistics for periodic pumping. The probability generating function is usually defined on a circle of the "physical" values of the counting parameter, with its periodicity corresponding to charge quantization. The extensive part of the generating function can either be an analytic function on this circle or have singularities. These two cases may be interpreted as different thermodynamic phases in time domain. We discuss several examples of phase transitions between these phases for classical and quantum systems. Finally, we prove a criterion for the "analytic" phase in the problem of a quantum pump for noninteracting fermions.

  12. A Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (CED), life cycle based, for industrial waste management decision making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puig, Rita, E-mail: rita.puig@eei.upc.edu [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Fullana-i-Palmer, Pere [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Baquero, Grau; Riba, Jordi-Roger [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Bala, Alba [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • We developed a methodology useful to environmentally compare industrial waste management options. • The methodology uses a Net Energy Demand indicator which is life cycle based. • The method was simplified to be widely used, thus avoiding cost driven decisions. • This methodology is useful for governments to promote the best environmental options. • This methodology can be widely used by other countries or regions around the world. - Abstract: Life cycle thinking is a good approach to be used for environmental decision-support, although the complexity of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies sometimes prevents their wide use. The purpose of this paper is to show how LCA methodology can be simplified to be more useful for certain applications. In order to improve waste management in Catalonia (Spain), a Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (LCA-based) has been used to obtain four mathematical models to help the government in the decision of preventing or allowing a specific waste from going out of the borders. The conceptual equations and all the subsequent developments and assumptions made to obtain the simplified models are presented. One of the four models is discussed in detail, presenting the final simplified equation to be subsequently used by the government in decision making. The resulting model has been found to be scientifically robust, simple to implement and, above all, fulfilling its purpose: the limitation of waste transport out of Catalonia unless the waste recovery operations are significantly better and justify this transport.

  13. Probability, conditional probability and complementary cumulative distribution functions in performance assessment for radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A formal description of the structure of several recent performance assessments (PAs) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is given in terms of the following three components: a probability space (S{sub st}, S{sub st}, p{sub st}) for stochastic uncertainty, a probability space (S{sub su}, S{sub su}, p{sub su}) for subjective uncertainty and a function (i.e., a random variable) defined on the product space associated with (S{sub st}, S{sub st}, p{sub st}) and (S{sub su}, S{sub su}, p{sub su}). The explicit recognition of the existence of these three components allows a careful description of the use of probability, conditional probability and complementary cumulative distribution functions within the WIPP PA. This usage is illustrated in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). The paradigm described in this presentation can also be used to impose a logically consistent structure on PAs for other complex systems.

  14. MA10209 Algebra 1A Counting Partitions: GCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Geoff

    a slightly different question. How many ways are there to partition five people into three teams, one of sizeMA10209 Algebra 1A Counting Partitions: GCS 30-x-11 The course website is http://people on enumerating partitions. Suppose that you have five people, and you wish to put them into three teams: a blue

  15. Pin-Count-Aware Online Testing of Digital Microfluidic Biochips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Pin-Count-Aware Online Testing of Digital Microfluidic Biochips Yang Zhao and Krishnendu, and bioassay malfunctions in microfluidic biochips. To reduce product cost for disposable biochips, testing microfluidics is an emerging technology that pro- vides fluid-handling capability on a chip [1]. By reducing

  16. Counting elements and geodesics in Thompson's group F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rechnitzer, Andrew

    Counting elements and geodesics in Thompson's group F Murray Elder School of Mathematics of Thompson's group F with standard generating set. The first of these requires exponential time . Key words: Group growth function, growth series, geodesic growth series, Thompson's group F 2008 MSC

  17. 29Counting Atoms in a Molecule The complex molecule Propanal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29Counting Atoms in a Molecule The complex molecule Propanal was discovered in a dense interstellar is the ratio of carbon atoms to hydrogen atoms in propanal? Problem 4 - If the mass of a hydrogen atom of a propanal molecule in AMUs? Problem 5 - What is the complete chemical formula for propanal? C3 H __ O

  18. A people counting system based on dense and close stereovision.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    systems in transit based on various technologies namely: infrared sensors, ultrasound, car- pet contact. In particular, the sharing of incomes between operators exploiting the same lines and the fraud rate evaluation present also the evaluation results of each block of the chain as well as the counting results

  19. Flexible Reference-Counting-Based Hardware Acceleration for Garbage Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutlu, Onur

    Flexible Reference-Counting-Based Hardware Acceleration for Garbage Collection José A. Joao Onur automatic memory management (garbage col- lection) are increasingly used to write all kinds of applications be- cause they provide clear software engineering and security advan- tages. Unfortunately, garbage

  20. Note on refined topological vertex, Jack polynomials and instanton counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianfeng Wu

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we calculated the refined topological vertex for the one parameter case using the Jack symmetric functions. Also, we obtain the partition function for elliptic N=2 models, the results coincide with those of Nekrasov instanton counting partition functions for the $N=2^{\\ast}$ theories.

  1. The Relationship between Inner Product and Counting Cycles Xiaoming Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Pingzhong

    The Relationship between Inner Product and Counting Cycles Xiaoming Sun ITCS, IIIS, Tsinghua xiaomings@tsinghua.edu.cn Chengu Wang ITCS, IIIS, Tsinghua wangchengu@gmail.com Wei Yu ITCS, IIIS, Tsinghua and Bob each holds a permutation of size n with the promise that there will be either a cycles or b cycles

  2. Full counting statistics as a probe of quantum coherence in a side-coupled double quantum dot system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Hai-Bin, E-mail: xuehaibin@tyut.edu.cn

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study theoretically the full counting statistics of electron transport through side-coupled double quantum dot (QD) based on an efficient particle-number-resolved master equation. It is demonstrated that the high-order cumulants of transport current are more sensitive to the quantum coherence than the average current, which can be used to probe the quantum coherence of the considered double QD system. Especially, quantum coherence plays a crucial role in determining whether the super-Poissonian noise occurs in the weak inter-dot hopping coupling regime depending on the corresponding QD-lead coupling, and the corresponding values of super-Poissonian noise can be relatively enhanced when considering the spins of conduction electrons. Moreover, this super-Poissonian noise bias range depends on the singly-occupied eigenstates of the system, which thus suggests a tunable super-Poissonian noise device. The occurrence-mechanism of super-Poissonian noise can be understood in terms of the interplay of quantum coherence and effective competition between fast-and-slow transport channels. -- Highlights: •The FCS can be used to probe the quantum coherence of side-coupled double QD system. •Probing quantum coherence using FCS may permit experimental tests in the near future. •The current noise characteristics depend on the quantum coherence of this QD system. •The super-Poissonian noise can be enhanced when considering conduction electron spin. •The side-coupled double QD system suggests a tunable super-Poissonian noise device.

  3. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  4. Nano-optomechanical measurement in the photon counting regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lépinay, Laure Mercier; Rohr, Sven; Gloppe, Arnaud; Kuhn, Aurélien; Verlot, Pierre; Dupont-Ferrier, Eva; Besga, Benjamin; Arcizet, Olivier

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optically measuring in the photon counting regime is a recurrent challenge in modern physics and a guarantee to develop weakly invasive probes. Here we investigate this idea on a hybrid nano-optomechanical system composed of a nanowire hybridized to a single Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) defect. The vibrations of the nanoresonator grant a spatial degree of freedom to the quantum emitter and the photon emission event can now vary in space and time. We investigate how the nanomotion is encoded on the detected photon statistics and explore their spatio-temporal correlation properties. This allows a quantitative measurement of the vibrations of the nanomechanical oscillator at unprecedentedly low light intensities in the photon counting regime when less than one photon is detected per oscillation period, where standard detectors are dark-noise-limited. These results have implications for probing weakly interacting nanoresonators, for low temperature experiments and for investigating single moving markers.

  5. Replacing Motors Counting Savings: Results from a 100 Motor Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, N. M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REPLACING MOTORS, COUNTING SAVINGS: RESULTS FROM A 100 MOTOR STUDY Nicole M. Kaufman Motor Systems Engineer Advanced Energy Raleigh, NC ABSTRACT Software tools such as MotorMaster+ aid facility personnel in conducting payback... analyses for replacing motors. These tools make assumptions on the motors’ operational efficiency in their calculations. By observing 100 pre-EPCA (Energy Policy & Conservation Act) motors in operation, removing them from service and conducting IEEE...

  6. Automatic alpha-track counting with image analysis systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shymanski, Michael Joseph

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . Digital Image Processing Particle Track Counting III. MATERIALS AND METHODS LR-115 Type II Film Detector Package and Assembly . Radon Exposure System Uranium Exposure Method LR-115 Thermochemical Etch Process Quality Control of LR-115 Material... (calibration factor). EPA has developed protocols for humidity correction methodologies which are published in EERF Standard 10 Operating Procedures for zziRn Measurement Using Charcoal Canisters (USEPA 1987). Two types of continuous assay techniques...

  7. Power spectrum of the fluctuation of Chebyshev's prime counting function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boon Leong Lan; Shaohen Yong

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The one-sided power spectrum of the fluctuation of Chebyshev's weighted prime counting function is numerically estimated based on samples of the fluctuating function of different sizes. The power spectrum is also estimated analytically for large frequency based on Riemann hypothesis and the exact formula for the fluctuating function in terms of all the non-trivial Riemann zeroes. Our analytical estimate is consistent with our numerical estimate of a 1/f^2 power spectrum.

  8. Automatic alpha-track counting with image analysis systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shymanski, Michael Joseph

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to establish an explanation of why an increased calibration factor, for a track counting system, is observed with increasing photometer readings. Second, TSD measurements were made for films irradiated with a depleted uranium source in order to determine... the usefulness of uranium as a fast exposure facility for quality control (QC) films for the etch process. The results of this work concluded that uranium was not a good QC source for the current etching process for the exposure methods used. Finally, total...

  9. Replacing Motors Counting Savings: Results from a 100 Motor Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, N. M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REPLACING MOTORS, COUNTING SAVINGS: RESULTS FROM A 100 MOTOR STUDY Nicole M. Kaufman Motor Systems Engineer Advanced Energy Raleigh, NC ABSTRACT Software tools such as MotorMaster+ aid facility personnel in conducting payback... analyses for replacing motors. These tools make assumptions on the motors’ operational efficiency in their calculations. By observing 100 pre-EPCA (Energy Policy & Conservation Act) motors in operation, removing them from service and conducting IEEE...

  10. Mirror Symmetry, D-Branes and Counting Holomorphic Discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mina Aganagic; Cumrun Vafa

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a class of special Lagrangian subspaces of Calabi-Yau manifolds and identify their mirrors, using the recent derivation of mirror symmetry, as certain holomorphic varieties of the mirror geometry. This transforms the counting of holomorphic disc instantons ending on the Lagrangian submanifold to the classical Abel-Jacobi map on the mirror. We recover some results already anticipated as well as obtain some highly non-trivial new predictions.

  11. Unified single-photon and single-electron counting statistics: From cavity QED to electron transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Neill [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chen, Yueh-Nan [Department of Physics and National Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A key ingredient of cavity QED is the coupling between the discrete energy levels of an atom and photons in a single-mode cavity. The addition of periodic ultrashort laser pulses allows one to use such a system as a source of single photons--a vital ingredient in quantum information and optical computing schemes. Here we analyze and time-adjust the photon-counting statistics of such a single-photon source and show that the photon statistics can be described by a simple transport-like nonequilibrium model. We then show that there is a one-to-one correspondence of this model to that of nonequilibrium transport of electrons through a double quantum dot nanostructure, unifying the fields of photon-counting statistics and electron-transport statistics. This correspondence empowers us to adapt several tools previously used for detecting quantum behavior in electron-transport systems (e.g., super-Poissonian shot noise and an extension of the Leggett-Garg inequality) to single-photon-source experiments.

  12. Modelling ISO Galaxy Counts with Luminosity and Merger Rate Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Roche; Steve Eales

    1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We model galaxy evolution in the 6.75 and 15 micron passbands of the ISO satellite, by combining models of galaxy evolution at optical wavelengths (which are consistent with the optical galaxy counts) with observed spectral energy distributions in the infra-red. Our model is consistent with the local 12 micron galaxy luminosity, if 3.5 per cent of spirals at z=0 are in interacting pairs with mid-infra-red luminosities enhanced by major starbursts. Source counts from deep ISO surveys exceed non-evolving predictions but are more consistent with our evolving model. The steep number count of 6.75 micron sources appears to be explained primarily by evolving early-type galaxies, whereas at 15 microns the main contributors are star-forming spirals and starbursting interacting/merging galaxies. The 31 per cent of 15 micron sources which are visibly interacting galaxies have high mid-infra-red/optical flux ratios indicating major starbursts combined with dust extinction. The numbers and high mean redshift of these sources suggest the merger-starbursts are increasing in luminosity with redshift, approximately as (1+z)^2, in addition to undergoing (1+z)^2 number evolution reflecting the optically observed increase with redshift in the fraction of interacting galaxies.

  13. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

  14. Automated counting of cell bodies using Nissl stained cross-sectional images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Souza, Aswin Cletus

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    the manual counting of cell numbers is a near impossible task considering the sizes and numbers involved, an automated approach is the obvious alternative to arrive at the cell count. In this thesis, a software application is described that automatically...

  15. Automated counting of cell bodies using Nissl stained cross-sectional images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Souza, Aswin Cletus

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the manual counting of cell numbers is a near impossible task considering the sizes and numbers involved, an automated approach is the obvious alternative to arrive at the cell count. In this thesis, a software application is described that automatically...

  16. Proceedings of Symposia in Pure Mathematics Nodal domains on graphs -How to count them and why?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smilansky, Uzy

    by the pioneering work of Chladni on the nodal structures of vibrating plates. Counting nodal domains started

  17. CHEN, LOY, GONG, XIANG: FEATURE MINING FOR LOCALISED CROWD COUNTING 1 Feature Mining for Localised Crowd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Shaogang

    CHEN, LOY, GONG, XIANG: FEATURE MINING FOR LOCALISED CROWD COUNTING 1 Feature Mining for Localised Crowd Counting Ke Chen1 cory@eecs.qmul.ac.uk Chen Change Loy2 ccloy@visionsemantics.com Shaogang Gong1 in print or electronic forms. #12;2 CHEN, LOY, GONG, XIANG: FEATURE MINING FOR LOCALISED CROWD COUNTING

  18. Wedge and strip image readout systems for photon-counting detectors in space astronomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegmund, O.H.W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Chakrabarti, S.; Vallerga, J.; Bowyer, S.; Malina, R.F.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the application of wedge and strip anodes to photon-counting microchannel plate detector systems for the extreme and far ultraviolet. Performance data, obtained as a result of calibration of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) (Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instrum. Eng. 279, 176 (1981)) satellite detectors (open face) and the FAUST-Spacelab (Space Sci. Instrum. 5, 21 (1979)) far-ultraviolet sensors (sealed tube), are presented. We have achieved CsI quantum detection efficiencies of --80% at 114 A and --40% at 600 and 1300 A that we believe to be the highest ever obtained. Position sensitivity of <10 ..mu..m is demonstrated, and the position resulution, image linearity, background rate, and flat-field characteristics are discussed.

  19. Investigation of inconsistent ENDF/B-VII.1 independent and cumulative fission product yields with proposed revisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigni, Marco T [ORNL; Francis, Matthew W [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent implementation of ENDF/B-VII. independent fission product yields and nuclear decay data identified inconsistencies in the data caused by the use of updated nuclear scheme in the decay sub-library that is not reflected in legacy fission product yield data. Recent changes in the decay data sub-library, particularly the delayed neutron branching fractions, result in calculated fission product concentrations that are incompatible with the cumulative fission yields in the library, and also with experimental measurements. A comprehensive set of independent fission product yields was generated for thermal and fission spectrum neutron induced fission for 235,238U and 239,241Pu in order to provide a preliminary assessment of the updated fission product yield data consistency. These updated independent fission product yields were utilized in the ORIGEN code to evaluate the calculated fission product inventories with experimentally measured inventories, with particular attention given to the noble gases. An important outcome of this work is the development of fission product yield covariance data necessary for fission product uncertainty quantification. The evaluation methodology combines a sequential Bayesian method to guarantee consistency between independent and cumulative yields along with the physical constraints on the independent yields. This work was motivated to improve the performance of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library in the case of stable and long-lived cumulative yields due to the inconsistency of ENDF/B-VII.1 fission p;roduct yield and decay data sub-libraries. The revised fission product yields and the new covariance data are proposed as a revision to the fission yield data currently in ENDF/B-VII.1.

  20. Determination of glomerular filtration rate by external counting methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartor, Tammy Lee

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comparing the DTPA to other accepted methods; the results were very favorable for the use of ggmTC-DTPA. Klopper et al. , sa1d mTc-DTPA ". . . rapidly prepared by a kit method, is a useful addition to the list of radiopharmaceuticals that can be used... points. First, the external counting method is suitable as a true means of determining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Second, the method is applicable to cats. To do this, five dogs were injected with ggmTc(Sn)-DTPA. Plasma samples were drawn...

  1. On the counting of holomorphic discs in toric Fano manifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheol-Hyun Cho

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Open Gromov-Witten invariants in general are not well-defined. We discuss in detail the enumerative numbers of the Clifford torus $T^2$ in $\\CP^2$. For cyclic A-infinity algebras, we show that certain generalized way of counting may be defined up to Hochschild or cyclic boundary elements. In particular we obtain a well-defined function on Hochschild or cyclic homology of a cyclic A-infinity algebra, which has invariance property under cyclic A-infinity homomorphism. We discuss an example of Clifford torus $T^2$ and compute the invariant for a specific cyclic cohomology class.

  2. Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCoolCorrectiveCosts ofCounting small RNA

  3. CumInCAD: Cumulative Index of Computer Aided Architectural Design Database Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    in as guest__anon. Guests do not have full access to the database. Enter terms in the Search for: box and it will search all words that you enter. Searches are conducted across all fields in the database (i.e., author on the topic you are researching. To do this... Use this: Search a single term Type in your term. Search

  4. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. (New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine); Stark, A.; Ju, C. (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology)

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to above-average'' radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject's presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210.

  5. A Levels-of-Evidence Approach for Assessing Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Estuary and River Restoration Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Vogt, Kristiina A.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Dawley, Earl

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even though large-scale ecological restoration programs are beginning to supplement isolated projects implemented on rivers and tidal waterways, the effects of restoration success often continue to be evaluated at project scales or by integration in an additive manner. Today our scientific understanding is sufficient that we can begin to apply lessons learnt from assessing cumulative impacts of anthropogenic stressors on ecosystems to the assessment of ecological restoration. Integration of this knowledge has the potential to increase the efficacy of restoration projects conducted at several locations but co-managed within the confines of a larger integrative program. We introduce here a framework based on a levels-of-evidence approach that facilitates assessment of the cumulative landscape effects of individual restoration actions taken at many different locations. It incorporates data collection at restoration and reference sites, hydrodynamic modeling, geographic information systems, and meta-analyses in a five-stage process: design, data, analysis, synthesis and evaluation, and application. This framework evolved from the need to evaluate the efficacy of restoration projects designed to increase rearing habitat for outmigrating juvenile salmonids, which are being implemented in numerous wetlands on the 235-km tidal portion of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

  6. Maximizing the field of view for a computer-assisted alpha track counting system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buxkemper, Mark Anthony

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . TABLE OF CONTENTS. LIST OF FIGURES. . LIST OF TABLES . CHAPTER INTRODUCTION. . Radon: An Overview. Radon: Detection Techniques . Objective . 1V . Vl via II THEORY Particle Tracks . Track Etching Image Analysis. Calibration... Factor 10 13 III EXPERIMENT Materials and Description. Image Processing System Uramum Foil. Radon Source Detector System. 15 15 15 17 17 18 CHAPTER Etclung. Expenmental Procedure Determinanon of Proper Light Source . . Determination...

  7. Counting of Sieber-Richter pairs of periodic orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutkin, Boris

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the semiclassical approach the universal spectral correlations in the Hamiltonian systems with classical chaotic dynamics can be attributed to the systematic correlations between actions of periodic orbits which (up to the switch in the momentum direction) pass through approximately the same points of the phase space. By considering symbolic dynamics of the system one can introduce a natural ultrametric distance between periodic orbits and organize them into clusters. Each cluster consists of orbits approaching closely each other in the phase space. We study the distribution of cluster sizes for the backer's map in the asymptotic limit of long trajectories. This problem is equivalent to the one of counting degeneracies in the length spectrum of the {\\it de Bruijn} graphs. Based on this fact, we derive the probability $\\P_k$ that $k$ randomly chosen periodic orbits belong to the same cluster. Furthermore, we find asymptotic behaviour of the largest cluster size $|\\Cll_{\\max}|$ and derive th...

  8. The linear power spectrum of observed source number counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Challinor, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We relate the observable number of sources per solid angle and redshift to the underlying proper source density and velocity, background evolution and line-of-sight potentials. We give an exact result in the case of linearized perturbations assuming general relativity. This consistently includes contributions of the source density perturbations and redshift distortions, magnification, radial displacement, and various additional linear terms that are small on sub-horizon scales. In addition we calculate the effect on observed luminosities, and hence the result for sources observed as a function of flux, including magnification bias and radial-displacement effects. We give the corresponding linear result for a magnitude-limited survey at low redshift, and discuss the angular power spectrum of the total count distribution. We also calculate the cross-correlation with the CMB polarization and temperature including Doppler source terms, magnification, redshift distortions and other velocity effects for the sources...

  9. Cumulative analysis of the association between the gravitational wave detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER and the gamma-ray bursts detected by BATSE and BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Astone; D. Babusci; M. Bassan; P. Carelli; E. Coccia; C. Cosmelli; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; F. Frontera; G. Giordano; C. Guidorzi; A. Marini; Y. Minenkov; I. Modena; G. Modestino; A. Moleti; E. Montanari; G. V. Pallottino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; A. Rocchi; F. Ronga; L. Sperandio; R. Terenzi; G. Torrioli; M. Visco

    2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistical association between the output of the Gravitational Wave (GW) detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS and a list of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by the satellite experiments BATSE and BeppoSAX has been analyzed using cumulative algorithms. GW detector data collected between 1991 and 1999 have been correlated to the GRB flux peak times. The cumulative analysis of a large number of GRBs (387) allows to push the upper bound for the corresponding GW burst amplitude down to $h = 2.5\\cdot10^{-19}$.

  10. A generalized and efficient algorithm for estimating transit route ODs from passenger counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yuwei

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    direct sampling of passenger ODs is costly, especially sincefor estimating transit route ODs from passenger counts Yuweibetter suited for predicting ODs in future transit trips.

  11. Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Matthias (Oakland, CA); Mears, Carl A. (Windsor, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA); Hiller, Larry J. (Livermore, CA); Barfknecht, Andrew T. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

  12. This document is the result of a major interdisciplinary effort to synthesize our understanding of the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    understanding of the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. This document is the product of more thanForeword This document is the result of a major interdisciplinary effort to synthesize our topics include overviews of the effects of fuel management on both terrestrial and aquatic watershed

  13. Canonical linearized Regge Calculus: counting lattice gravitons with Pachner moves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp A. Hoehn

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We afford a systematic and comprehensive account of the canonical dynamics of 4D Regge Calculus perturbatively expanded to linear order around a flat background. To this end, we consider the Pachner moves which generate the most basic and general simplicial evolution scheme. The linearized regime features a vertex displacement (`diffeomorphism') symmetry for which we derive an abelian constraint algebra. This permits to identify gauge invariant `lattice gravitons' as propagating curvature degrees of freedom. The Pachner moves admit a simple method to explicitly count the gauge and `graviton' degrees of freedom on an evolving triangulated hypersurface and we clarify the distinct role of each move in the dynamics. It is shown that the 1-4 move generates four `lapse and shift' variables and four conjugate vertex displacement generators; the 2-3 move generates a `graviton'; the 3-2 move removes one `graviton' and produces the only non-trivial equation of motion; and the 4-1 move removes four `lapse and shift' variables and trivializes the four conjugate symmetry generators. It is further shown that the Pachner moves preserve the vertex displacement generators. These results may provide new impetus for exploring `graviton dynamics' in discrete quantum gravity models.

  14. Automated Design of Digital Microfluidic Lab-on-Chip under Pin-Count Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Automated Design of Digital Microfluidic Lab-on-Chip under Pin-Count Constraints Tao Xu, USA. E-mail: {tao,krish}@ee.duke.edu ABSTRACT Digital microfluidic biochips, as referred to as lab-referencing, Lab-on-Chip, Microfluidics, Pin-count constraints 1. INTRODUCTION Microfluidics technology has made

  15. Bioimaging 4 (1996) 93106. Printed in the UK Fluorescent dot counting in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Bioimaging 4 (1996) 93­106. Printed in the UK Fluorescent dot counting in interphase cell nuclei allows the enumeration of chromosomal abnormalities in interphase cell nuclei. This process is called dot counting. To estimate the distribution of chromosomes per cell, a large number of cells have to be analysed

  16. FISH and Chips: Automation of Fluorescent Dot Counting in Interphase Cell Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    ) in each cell nucleus. This system works with two fluorescent dyes, one for the DNA hybridization dotsFISH and Chips: Automation of Fluorescent Dot Counting in Interphase Cell Nuclei Hans Netten,1 Ian abnormalities in inter- phase cell nuclei. This process is called dot counting. To estimate the distribution

  17. THE MITTAGLEFFLER PROCESS AND A SCALING LIMIT FOR THE BLOCK COUNTING PROCESS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Möhle, Martin

    THE MITTAG­LEFFLER PROCESS AND A SCALING LIMIT FOR THE BLOCK COUNTING PROCESS OF THE BOLTHAUSEN, for example an explicit formula for the joint moments of its finite dimensional distributions. The main result states that the block counting process of the Bolthausen­Sznitman n-coalescent, properly scaled

  18. TTDTTi'^'/O^ Riso-R-490 Total-Count Calibration Blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I et · ·Ji 2 TTDTTi'^'/O^ Riso-R-490 Total-Count Calibration Blocks for Use in Uranium Exploration-COUNT CALIBRATION BLOCKS FOR USE IN URANIUM EXPLORATION L. Løvborg Abstract. Transportable calibration blocks; CALIBRATION? CALIBRATION STANDARDS? CONCRETES; EXPLORATION; SCINTILLATION COUNTERS; URANIUM UDC 539

  19. WHERE ARE THE ELECTRIC VEHICLES?1 A SPATIAL MODEL FOR VEHICLE-CHOICE COUNT DATA2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    1 WHERE ARE THE ELECTRIC VEHICLES?1 A SPATIAL MODEL FOR VEHICLE-CHOICE COUNT DATA2 3 T. Donna Chen4 ABSTRACT29 30 Electric vehicles (EVs) are predicted to increase in market share as auto manufacturers: Electric vehicles, spatial count modeling, vehicle choice, vehicle ownership,1 consumer behavior

  20. AACR Cancer Progress Report 2012 Making Research Count for Patients: A New Day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, S. Murray

    AACR Cancer Progress Report 2012 Making Research Count for Patients: A New Day www.cancerprogressreport.org · www.aacr.org #12;AACR Cancer Progress Report 2012 Making Research Count for Patients: A New Day www.cancerprogressreport.org · www.aacr.org Also published as: American Association for Cancer Research. AACR cancer progress report

  1. THE EFFECT OF RADIATIVE COOLING THE SUNYAEVZELDOVICH CLUSTER COUNTS AND ANGULAR POWER SPECTRA: ANALYTIC TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehringer, Hans

    , strength of thermal signals is directly proportional thermal energy of confined clusters. Unlike darkTHE EFFECT OF RADIATIVE COOLING THE SUNYAEV­ZELDOVICH CLUSTER COUNTS AND ANGULAR POWER SPECTRA­Zeldovich (SZ) cluster counts and power spectra. It appears that analytic results good agreement with those

  2. COUNTING DESCENTS, RISES, AND LEVELS, WITH PRESCRIBED FIRST ELEMENT, IN WORDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitaev, Sergey

    COUNTING DESCENTS, RISES, AND LEVELS, WITH PRESCRIBED FIRST ELEMENT, IN WORDS Sergey Kitaev1 the distribution of descents, levels, and rises according to whether the first letter of the descent, rise 0654060 1 #12;2 COUNTING DESCENTS, RISES, AND LEVELS, WITH PRESCRIBED FIRST ELEMENT, IN WORDS Subsequently

  3. Dark counts of superconducting nanowire single-photon detector under illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sijing; Zhang, Weijun; Yang, Xiaoyan; Li, Hao; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An abnormal increase in the SDE was observed for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) when the bias current (Ib) was close to the switching current (Isw). By introducing the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, we investigated the temporal histogram of the detection counts of an SNSPD under illumination. The temporal information helps us to distinguish photon counts from dark counts in the time domain. In this manner, the dark count rate (DCR) under illumination and the accurate SDE can be determined. The DCR under moderate illumination may be significantly larger than the conventional DCR measured without illumination under a high Ib, which causes the abnormal increase in the SDE. The increased DCR may be explained by the suppression of Isw under illumination.

  4. U. S. rig count drops below 600, a post-1940 low

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that the Baker Hughes Inc. count of active U.S. rotary rigs as of June 12 fell to less than 600 the first time since that tally began in 1940. The previous modern record low was set at 610 the previous week. Baker Hughes reported about 1,400 rigs idle in the U.S. last week. Using a different criteria, the Smith International count of U.S. active rigs fell seven units to 653 the week ended June 12, compared with a count of 910 the previous year. Baker Hughes predecessor Hughes Tool Co. began keeping monthly records of active U.S. rigs in January 1940. The lowest monthly count that year was 857. It changed to a weekly count in January 1949. The milestone was met wit calls for relief for the U.S. upstream sector from industry and government officials in Washington.

  5. Energy conservation, counting statistics, and return to equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vojkan Jaksic; Jane Panangaden; Annalisa Panati; Claude-Alain Pillet

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a microscopic Hamiltonian model describing an N-level quantum system S coupled to an infinitely extended thermal reservoir R. Initially, the system S is in an arbitrary state while the reservoir is in thermal equilibrium at temperature T. Assuming that the coupled system S+R is mixing with respect to the joint thermal equilibrium state, we study the Full Counting Statistics (FCS) of the energy transfers S->R and R->S in the process of return to equilibrium. The first FCS describes the increase of the energy of the system S. It is an atomic probability measure, denoted $P_{S,\\lambda,t}$, concentrated on the set of energy differences $\\sigma(H_S)-\\sigma(H_S)$ ($\\sigma(H_S)$ is the spectrum of the Hamiltonian of S, $t$ is the length of the time interval during which the measurement of the energy transfer is performed, and $\\lambda$ is the strength of the interaction between S and R). The second FCS, $P_{R,\\lambda,t}$, describes the decrease of the energy of the reservoir R and is typically a continuous probability measure whose support is the whole real line. We study the large time limit $t\\rightarrow\\infty$ of these two measures followed by the weak coupling limit $\\lambda\\rightarrow 0$ and prove that the limiting measures coincide. This result strengthens the first law of thermodynamics for open quantum systems. The proofs are based on modular theory of operator algebras and on a representation of $P_{R,\\lambda,t}$ by quantum transfer operators.

  6. Unified single-photon and single-electron counting statistics: from cavity-QED to electron transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Neill; Nori, Franco

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key ingredient of cavity quantum-electrodynamics (QED) is the coupling between the discrete energy levels of an atom and photons in a single-mode cavity. The addition of periodic ultra-short laser pulses allows one to use such a system as a source of single photons; a vital ingredient in quantum information and optical computing schemes. Here, we analyze and ``time-adjust'' the photon-counting statistics of such a single-photon source, and show that the photon statistics can be described by a simple `transport-like' non-equilibrium model. We then show that there is a one-to-one correspondence of this model to that of non-equilibrium transport of electrons through a double quantum dot nanostructure. Then we prove that the statistics of the tunnelling electrons is equivalent to the statistics of the emitted photons. This represents a unification of the fields of photon counting statistics and electron transport statistics. This correspondence empowers us to adapt several tools previously used for detecting qu...

  7. Unified single-photon and single-electron counting statistics: from cavity-QED to electron transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neill Lambert; Yueh-Nan Chen; Franco Nori

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A key ingredient of cavity quantum-electrodynamics (QED) is the coupling between the discrete energy levels of an atom and photons in a single-mode cavity. The addition of periodic ultra-short laser pulses allows one to use such a system as a source of single photons; a vital ingredient in quantum information and optical computing schemes. Here, we analyze and ``time-adjust'' the photon-counting statistics of such a single-photon source, and show that the photon statistics can be described by a simple `transport-like' non-equilibrium model. We then show that there is a one-to-one correspondence of this model to that of non-equilibrium transport of electrons through a double quantum dot nanostructure. Then we prove that the statistics of the tunnelling electrons is equivalent to the statistics of the emitted photons. This represents a unification of the fields of photon counting statistics and electron transport statistics. This correspondence empowers us to adapt several tools previously used for detecting quantum behavior in electron transport systems (e.g., super-Poissonian shot noise, and an extension of the Leggett-Garg inequality) to single-photon-source experiments.

  8. Fatigue analysis of WECS (Wind Energy Conversion System) components using a rainflow counting algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, H.J.; Schluter, L.L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rainflow counting algorithm'' has been incorporated into the LIFE2 fatigue/fracture analysis code for wind turbines. The count algorithm, with its associated pre- and post-count algorithms, permits the code to incorporate time-series data into its analysis scheme. After a description of the algorithms used here, their use is illustrated by the examination of stress-time histories from the Sandia 34-m Test Bed vertical axis wind turbine. The results of the rainflow analysis are compared and contrasted to previously reported predictions for the service lifetime of the fatigue critical component for this turbine. 14 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Chapter 26 Cumulative Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaffCeriumfor the 20122-19-13-16-1 November

  10. The spark counting of etched fission-fragment tracks in polycarbonate for a personal neutron dosimetry system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, K G; Holt, P D; Wylie, J W

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spark counting of etched fission-fragment tracks in polycarbonate for a personal neutron dosimetry system

  11. Standard test method for nondestructive assay of plutonium in scrap and waste by passive neutron coincidence counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard test method for nondestructive assay of plutonium in scrap and waste by passive neutron coincidence counting

  12. Measurement of higher cumulants of net-charge multiplicity distributions in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=7.7-200$ GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; R. Akimoto; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; H. Al-Ta'ani; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; Y. Aramaki; H. Asano; E. C. Aschenauer; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; B. Bannier; K. N. Barish; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; V. Baublis; C. Baumann; S. Baumgart; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; D. Black; D. S. Blau; J. S. Bok; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; J. Bryslawskyj; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; S. Butsyk; C. M. Camacho; S. Campbell; P. Castera; C. -H. Chen; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; S. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; B. A. Cole; M. Connors; P. Constantin; N. Cronin; N. Crossette; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; M. S. Daugherity; G. David; K. Dehmelt; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; L. Ding; A. Dion; J. H. Do; M. Donadelli; L. D'Orazio; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; F. Ellinghaus; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; T. Fusayasu; K. Gainey; C. Gal; P. Garg; A. Garishvili; I. Garishvili; F. Giordano; A. Glenn; H. Gong; X. Gong; M. Gonin; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; Y. Gu; T. Gunji; L. Guo; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; J. S. Haggerty; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; R. Han; J. Hanks; E. P. Hartouni; K. Hashimoto; E. Haslum; R. Hayano; S. Hayashi; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. C. Hill; M. Hohlmann; R. S. Hollis; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; Y. Hori; D. Hornback; S. Huang; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; J. Ide; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; Y. Imazu; J. Imrek; M. Inaba; A. Iordanova; D. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; A. Isinhue; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanishchev; B. V. Jacak; M. Javani; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; S. Kaneti; B. H. Kang; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; T. Kempel; J. A. Key; P. K. Khandai; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; B. I. Kim; C. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; E. -J. Kim; H. J. Kim; K. -B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; Y. K. Kim; E. Kinney; K. Kiriluk; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; J. Klatsky; D. Kleinjan; P. Kline; L. Kochenda; Y. Komatsu; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; F. Krizek; G. J. Kunde; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; B. Lee; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; S. H. Lee; S. R. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; M. Leitgab; E. Leitner; B. Lenzi; B. Lewis; X. Li; P. Liebing; S. H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; R. Luechtenborg; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; M. Makek; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; A. Manion; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; T. Maruyama; H. Masui; S. Masumoto; F. Matathias; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; D. McGlinchey; C. McKinney; N. Means; A. Meles; M. Mendoza; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; J. Midori; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; A. Milov; D. K. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; Y. Miyachi; S. Miyasaka; A. K. Mohanty; S. Mohapatra; H. J. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; M. Moskowitz; S. Motschwiller; T. V. Moukhanova; T. Murakami; J. Murata; A. Mwai; T. Nagae; S. Nagamiya; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; C. Nattrass; A. Nederlof; P. K. Netrakanti; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; M. Nihashi; T. Niida; R. Nouicer; N. Novitzky; A. Nukariya; A. S. Nyanin; H. Obayashi; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; M. Oka; K. Okada; Y. Onuki; A. Oskarsson; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; B. H. Park; I. H. Park; J. Park; S. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; L. Patel; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; D. V. Perepelitsa; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; R. Petti; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; K. Reygers; D. Reynolds; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; E. Richardson; N. Riveli; D. Roach; G. Roche; S. D. Rolnick; M. Rosati; C. A. Rosen; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; P. Ruži?ka; M. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; K. Sakashita; H. Sako; V. Samsonov; M. Sano; S. Sano; M. Sarsour; S. Sato; T. Sato; S. Sawada; K. Sedgwick

    2015-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the measurement of cumulants ($C_n, n=1\\ldots4$) of the net-charge distributions measured within pseudorapidity ($|\\eta|energy. These quantities are important to understand the quantum-chromodynamics phase diagram and possible existence of a critical end point. The measured values are very well described by expectation from negative binomial distributions. We do not observe any nonmonotonic behavior in the ratios of the cumulants as a function of collision energy. The measured values of $C_1/C_2 = \\mu/\\sigma^2$ and $C_3/C_1 = S\\sigma^3/\\mu$ can be directly compared to lattice quantum-chromodynamics calculations and thus allow extraction of both the chemical freeze-out temperature and the baryon chemical potential at each center-of-mass energy.

  13. Re-publication of the data from the BILL magnetic spectrometer: The cumulative $?$ spectra of the fission products of $^{235}$U, $^{239}$Pu, and $^{241}$Pu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Haag; W. Gelletly; F. von Feilitzsch; L. Oberauer; W. Potzel; K. Schreckenbach; A. A. Sonzogni

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 1980s, measurements of the cumulative $\\beta$ spectra of the fission products following the thermal neutron induced fission of $^{235}$U, $^{239}$Pu, and $^{241}$Pu were performed at the magnetic spectrometer BILL at the ILL in Grenoble. This data was published in bins of 250 keV. In this paper, we re-publish the original data in a binning of 50 keV for $^{235}$U and 100 keV for $^{239}$Pu and $^{241}$Pu.

  14. Effect of obliteration on crater-count chronologies for Martian surfaces Matthew R. Smith,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Effect of obliteration on crater-count chronologies for Martian surfaces Matthew R. Smith,1 Alan R as evidence for young and geologically significant surface activity. Citation: Smith, M. R., A. R. Gillespie

  15. A High Count Rate Neutron Beam Monitor for Neutron Scattering Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Amanda [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Diawara, Yacouba [ORNL; Hayward, J P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hayward, Jason P [ORNL; Menhard, Kocsis [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Sedov, Vladislav N [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Beam monitors are an important diagnostic tool in neutron science facilities. Present beam monitors use either ionization chambers in integration mode, which are slow and have no timing information, or pulse counters which can easily be saturated by high beam intensities. At high flux neutron scattering facilities, neutron beam monitors with very low intrinsic efficiency (10-5) are presently selected to keep the counting rate within a feasible range, even when a higher efficiency would improve the counting statistics and yield a better measurement of the incident beam. In this work, we report on a high count rate neutron beam monitor. This beam monitor offers good timing with an intrinsic efficiency of 10-3 and a counting rate capability of over 1,000,000 cps without saturation.

  16. Technical Bulletin A Guide to Absolute Counting Using the BD Accuri C6 Flow Cytometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contents 1 Introduction 2 Preventive maintenance 2 Performance validation 3 Sample preparation 5 Counting Preventive maintenance As with any laboratory instrument, optimal performance requires proper system maintenance. The following table shows the suggested preventive maintenance routine. For detailed procedures

  17. Analytical Performance of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Scintillation Counting for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Analytical Performance of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Scintillation Counting for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California of California, San Francisco, California 94143 Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been applied

  18. Note: Operation of gamma-ray microcalorimeters at elevated count rates using filters with constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alpert, B. K.; Horansky, R. D.; Bennett, D. A.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Ullom, J. N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Hoover, A. S.; Rabin, M. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microcalorimeter sensors operated near 0.1 K can measure the energy of individual x- and gamma-ray photons with significantly more precision than conventional semiconductor technologies. Both microcalorimeter arrays and higher per pixel count rates are desirable to increase the total throughput of spectrometers based on these devices. The millisecond recovery time of gamma-ray microcalorimeters and the resulting pulse pileup are significant obstacles to high per pixel count rates. Here, we demonstrate operation of a microcalorimeter detector at elevated count rates by use of convolution filters designed to be orthogonal to the exponential tail of a preceding pulse. These filters allow operation at 50% higher count rates than conventional filters while largely preserving sensor energy resolution.

  19. Trends in Texas youth livestock exhibition and County Extension agent perceptions and adoption of quality counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coufal, Dustin Wayne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    TRENDS IN TEXAS YOUTH LIVESTOCK EXHIBITION AND COUNTY EXTENSION AGENT PERCEPTIONS AND ADOPTION OF QUALITY COUNTS A Thesis by DUSTIN WAYNE COUFAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... COUNTS A Thesis by DUSTIN WAYNE COUFAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Chris...

  20. The Contribution of Faint Blue Galaxies to the Sub-mm Counts and Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geoff S. Busswell; Tom Shanks

    2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations in the submillimetre waveband have recently revealed a new population of luminous, sub-mm sources. These are proposed to lie at high redshift and to be optically faint due to their high intrinsic dust obscuration. The presence of dust has been previously invoked in optical galaxy count models which assume $\\tau=9$ Gyr Bruzual & Charlot evolution for spirals and these fit the count data well from U to K. We now show that by using either a 1/$\\lambda$ or Calzetti absorption law for the dust and re-distributing the evolved spiral galaxy UV radiation into the far infra-red(FIR), these models can account for all of the `faint'($\\leq1$mJy) $850\\mu$m galaxy counts, but fail to fit 'bright'($\\ge2$mJy) sources, indicating that another explanation for the sub-mm counts may apply at brighter fluxes(e.g. QSOs, ULIRGs). We find that the main contribution to the faint, sub-mm number counts is in the redshift range $0.5 < z < 3$, peaking at $z\\approx 1.8$. The above model, using either dust law, can also explain a significant proportion of the extra-galactic background at $850\\mu$m as well as producing a reasonable fit to the bright $60\\mu m$ IRAS counts.

  1. The Asymmetric Thick Disk: A Star Count and Kinematic Analysis. II The Kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeniffer E. Parker; Roberta M. Humphreys; Timothy C. Beers

    2003-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a kinematic signature associated with the observed asymmetry in the distribution of thick disk/inner halo stars interior to the Solar circle described in Paper I. In that paper we found a statistically significant excess (20% to 25 %) of stars in quadrant I (l ~ 20 deg to 55 deg) both above and below the plane (b ~ +/- 25 deg to +/- 45 deg) compared to the complementary region in quadrant IV. We have measured Doppler velocities for 741 stars, selected according to the same magnitude and color criteria, in the direction of the asymmetry and in the corresponding fields in quadrant IV. We have also determined spectral types and metallicities measured from the same spectra. We not only find an asymmetric distribution in the V_LSR velocities for the stars in the two regions, but the angular rate of rotation, w, for the stars in quadrant I reveals a slower effective rotation rate compared to the corresponding quadrant IV stars. We use our [Fe/H] measurements to separate the stars into the three primary population groups, halo, thick disk, and disk, and conclude that it is primarily the thick disk stars that show the slower rotation in quadrant I. A solution for the radial, tangential and vertical components of the V_LSR velocities, reveals a significant lag of ~ 80 to 90 km/s in the direction of Galactic rotation for the thick disk stars in quadrant I, while in quadrant IV, the same population has only a ~ 20 km/s lag. The results reported here support a rotational lag among the thick disk stars due to a gravitational interaction with the bar as the most likely explanation for the asymmetry in both the star counts and the kinematics. The affected thick disk stars, however, may be associated with the recently discovered Canis Major debris stream or a similar merger event (abridged).

  2. Cosmic ray neutron background reduction using localized coincidence veto neutron counting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menlove, Howard O. (Los Alamos, NM); Bourret, Steven C. (Los Alamos, NM); Krick, Merlyn S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to both the apparatus and method for increasing the sensitivity of measuring the amount of radioactive material in waste by reducing the interference caused by cosmic ray generated neutrons. The apparatus includes: (a) a plurality of neutron detectors, each of the detectors including means for generating a pulse in response to the detection of a neutron; and (b) means, coupled to each of the neutrons detectors, for counting only some of the pulses from each of the detectors, whether cosmic ray or fission generated. The means for counting includes a means that, after counting one of the pulses, vetos the counting of additional pulses for a prescribed period of time. The prescribed period of time is between 50 and 200 .mu.s. In the preferred embodiment the prescribed period of time is 128 .mu.s. The veto means can be an electronic circuit which includes a leading edge pulse generator which passes a pulse but blocks any subsequent pulse for a period of between 50 and 200 .mu.s. Alternately, the veto means is a software program which includes means for tagging each of the pulses from each of the detectors for both time and position, means for counting one of the pulses from a particular position, and means for rejecting those of the pulses which originate from the particular position and in a time interval on the order of the neutron die-away time in polyethylene or other shield material. The neutron detectors are grouped in pods, preferably at least 10. The apparatus also includes means for vetoing the counting of coincidence pulses from all of the detectors included in each of the pods which are adjacent to the pod which includes the detector which produced the pulse which was counted.

  3. Fact #843: October 20, 2014 Cumulative Plug-in Electric Vehicle Sales are Two and a Half Times Higher than Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales in the First 45 Months since Market Introduction – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #843: Cumulative Plug-in Electric Vehicle Sales are Two and a Half Times Higher than Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales in the First 45 Months since Market Introduction

  4. Polarization Selectivity for Pulsed Fields in a Reverberation Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -power microwaves (HPM) effects [2]. Unfortunately in this case, it is not simply the level of the field that counts a strong limitation of RCs for HPM testing when -100 -50 0 50 100 -1 -0.8 -0.6 -0.4 -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0

  5. On power-counting renormalizability of Ho?ava gravity with detailed balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Vernieri

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the version of Ho\\v{r}ava gravity where "detailed balance" is consistently implemented, such as to limitate the huge proliferation of couplings in the full theory and to obtain an healthy dynamics at low-energy. Since a superpotential which is third-order in spatial derivatives is not sufficient to guarantee the power-counting renormalizability of the spin-0 graviton, then one needs to go an order beyond in derivatives, building up a superpotential up to fourth-order spatial derivatives. Here, we perturb the action to quadratic order around flat space, and show that power-counting renormalizability of the spin-0 graviton is achieved only by setting to zero a specific coupling of the theory, while the spin-2 graviton is always power-counting renormalizable for any choice of the couplings. This result raises serious doubts about the use of detailed balance.

  6. On power-counting renormalizability of Ho\\v{r}ava gravity with detailed balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernieri, Daniele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the version of Ho\\v{r}ava gravity where "detailed balance" is consistently implemented, such as to limitate the huge proliferation of couplings in the full theory and to obtain an healthy dynamics at low-energy. Since a superpotential which is third-order in spatial derivatives is not sufficient to guarantee the power-counting renormalizability of the spin-0 graviton, then one needs to go an order beyond in derivatives, building up a superpotential up to fourth-order spatial derivatives. Here, we perturb the action to quadratic order around flat space, and show that power-counting renormalizability of the spin-0 graviton is achieved only by setting to zero a specific coupling of the theory, while the spin-2 graviton is always power-counting renormalizable for any choice of the couplings. This result raises serious doubts about the use of detailed balance.

  7. A Monte Carlo procedure for the construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions for comparison with the EPA release limits for radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C.; Shiver, A.W.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Monte Carlo procedure for the construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) for comparison with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) release limits for radioactive waste disposal (40 CFR 191, Subpart B) is described and illustrated with results from a recent performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Monte Carlo procedure produces CCDF estimates similar to those obtained with stratified sampling in several recent PAs for the WIPP. The advantages of the Monte Carlo procedure over stratified sampling include increased resolution in the calculation of probabilities for complex scenarios involving drilling intrusions and better use of the necessarily limited number of mechanistic calculations that underlie CCDF construction.

  8. Coding of attention in temporal Mike W. Oram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oram, Mike

    count matched model SCM Model Calculate the SDF Generate the cumulative SDF Take each observed spike

  9. Photon counting for quantum key distribution with Peltier cooled InGaAs/InP APD's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stucki, D; Stefanov, A; Zbinden, H; Rarity, J G; Wall, T; Stucki, Damien; Ribordy, Gr\\'{e}goire; Stefanov, Andr\\'{e}; Zbinden, Hugo; Rarity, John G.; Wall, Tom

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of three types of InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes is investigated for photon counting at 1550 nm in the temperature range of thermoelectric cooling. The best one yields a dark count probability of $% 2.8\\cdot 10^{-5}$ per gate (2.4 ns) at a detection efficiency of 10% and a temperature of -60C. The afterpulse probability and the timing jitter are also studied. The results obtained are compared with those of other papers and applied to the simulation of a quantum key distribution system. An error rate of 10% would be obtained after 54 kilometers.

  10. Photon counting for quantum key distribution with Peltier cooled InGaAs/InP APD's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damien Stucki; Grégoire Ribordy; André Stefanov; Hugo Zbinden; John G. Rarity; Tom Wall

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of three types of InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes is investigated for photon counting at 1550 nm in the temperature range of thermoelectric cooling. The best one yields a dark count probability of $% 2.8\\cdot 10^{-5}$ per gate (2.4 ns) at a detection efficiency of 10% and a temperature of -60C. The afterpulse probability and the timing jitter are also studied. The results obtained are compared with those of other papers and applied to the simulation of a quantum key distribution system. An error rate of 10% would be obtained after 54 kilometers.

  11. ADONIS, high count-rate HP-Ge {gamma} spectrometry algorithm: Irradiated fuel assembly measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pin, P. [AREVA NC La Hague - Nuclear Measurement Team, 50444 Beaumont-Hague Cedex (France); Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T. [CEA - Saclay, LIST, Electronics and Signal Processing Laboratory, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Normand, S. [CEA - Saclay, LIST, Sensors and Electronic Architectures Laboratory, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADONIS is a digital system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by CEA. This system achieves high count-rate gamma-ray spectrometry with correct dynamic dead-time correction, up to, at least, more than an incoming count rate of 3.10{sup 6} events per second. An application of such a system at AREVA NC's La Hague plant is the irradiated fuel scanning facility before reprocessing. The ADONIS system is presented, then the measurement set-up and, last, the measurement results with reference measurements. (authors)

  12. Oil and Gas field code master list 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourteenth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1995 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the US. The Field Code Index, a listing of all field names and the States in which they occur, ordered by field code, has been removed from this year`s publications to reduce printing and postage costs. Complete copies (including the Field Code Index) will be available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA World-Wide Web Site. Future editions of the complete Master List will be available on CD-ROM and other electronic media. There are 57,400 field records in this year`s Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes the following: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (see definition of alias below); and fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. Taking into consideration the double-counting of fields under such circumstances, EIA identifies 46,312 distinct fields in the US as of October 1995. This count includes fields that no longer produce oil or gas, and 383 fields used in whole or in part for oil or gas Storage. 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study. Final report, 1 March, 1990--May 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. [New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine; Stark, A.; Ju, C. [New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to ``above-average`` radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject`s presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210.

  14. Fractal characterization of fracture networks: An improved box-counting technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    Fractal characterization of fracture networks: An improved box-counting technique Ankur Roy,1 fracture networks as fractals and estimating their fractal dimensions (D). If this analysis yields a power and r is the box size, then the network is considered to be fractal. However, researchers are divided

  15. How to count efficiently all affine roots of a polynomial system \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    on the lifting of the artificial origins exist and can be derived dynamically, as described in sections 4, 5How to count efficiently all affine roots of a polynomial system \\Lambda Ioannis Z. Emiris y Jan system; how­ ever, it has so far mostly dealt with roots having nonzero coordinates. We shift attention

  16. Submitted to the Annals of Applied Statistics ESTIMATING LIMITS FROM POISSON COUNTING DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chuanhai

    . In particle acceler- ator experiments, the counts are indirect measurements of the number of particles background noise, such as ambient particles. In many cases there is also multiplicative noise, caused for example by photon censoring or particle decay, which further complicates the process of estimating

  17. ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL BIAS WITH SNOWSHOE HARE FECAL PELLET-PLOT COUNTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    385 ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL BIAS WITH SNOWSHOE HARE FECAL PELLET-PLOT COUNTS DENNIS MURRAY, 1 National Forest, Coeur d'Alene, ID 83815, USA Abstract: The fecal pellet-plot method has been used biases associated with the technique have not been addressed ade- quately. We studied hare pellet

  18. PELLET COUNT INDICES COMPARED TO MARKRECAPTURE ESTIMATES FOR EVALUATING SNOWSHOE HARE DENSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PELLET COUNT INDICES COMPARED TO MARK­RECAPTURE ESTIMATES FOR EVALUATING SNOWSHOE HARE DENSITY L in the contiguous United States. Efforts to evalu- ate hare densities using pellets have traditionally been based there was concordance between pellet-based predictions and mark­recapture density estimates of hares. We developed local

  19. Estimating low-density snowshoe hare populations using fecal pellet counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimating low-density snowshoe hare populations using fecal pellet counts Dennis L. Murray, James americanus) populations found at high densities can be estimated using fecal pellet densities on rectangular of fecal pellet plots for estimating hare populations by correlating pellet densities with estimated hare

  20. Cosmology Constraints from the Weak Lensing Peak Counts and the Power Spectrum in CFHTLenS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Jia [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); May, Morgan [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, (United States); Petri, Andrea [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); Haiman, Zoltan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics (ISCAP), Columbia University, New York, (United States); Hui, Lam [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (United States); Institute for Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics (ISCAP), Columbia University, New York, (United States); Kratochvil, Jan M. [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, Durban, (South Africa)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensing peaks have been proposed as a useful statistic, containing cosmological information from non-Gaussianities that is inaccessible from traditional two-point statistics such as the power spectrum or two-point correlation functions. Here we examine constraints on cosmological parameters from weak lensing peak counts, using the publicly available data from the 154 deg2 CFHTLenS survey. We utilize a new suite of ray-tracing N-body simulations on a grid of 91 cosmological models, covering broad ranges of the three parameters ?m, ?8, and w, and replicating the galaxy sky positions, redshifts, and shape noise in the CFHTLenS observations. We then build an emulator that interpolates the power spectrum and the peak counts to an accuracy of ? 5%, and compute the likelihood in the three-dimensional parameter space (?m, ?8, w) from both observables. We find that constraints from peak counts are comparable to those from the power spectrum, and somewhat tighter when different smoothing scales are combined. Neither observable can constrain w without external data. When the power spectrum and peak counts are combined, the area of the error “banana” in the (?m, ?8) plane reduces by a factor of ? two, compared to using the power spectrum alone. For a flat ? cold dark matter model, combining both statistics, we obtain the constraint ?8(?m/0.27)0.63 = 0.85+0.03-0.03.

  1. solutions that count The Australian Technology Network of Universities (ATN) is a group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtin CASE STUdy Effective Tinnitus Treatment Improves Health Outcomes dISCIPlINE Clinical Health CREd examples of research outcomes generated by ATN member universities. They demonstrate the diversity. solutions that count 5050 #12;2 Effective Tinnitus Treatment Improves Health Outcomes 0101 ATN UNIVERSITy

  2. Cosmology Constraints from the Weak Lensing Peak Counts and the Power Spectrum in CFHTLenS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Jia; May, Morgan; Petri, Andrea; Haiman, Zoltan; Hui, Lam; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensing peaks have been proposed as a useful statistic, containing cosmological information from non-Gaussianities that is inaccessible from traditional two-point statistics such as the power spectrum or two-point correlation functions. Here we examine constraints on cosmological parameters from weak lensing peak counts, using the publicly available data from the 154 deg2 CFHTLenS survey. We utilize a new suite of ray-tracing N-body simulations on a grid of 91 cosmological models, covering broad ranges of the three parameters ?m, ?8, and w, and replicating the galaxy sky positions, redshifts, and shape noise in the CFHTLenS observations. We then build an emulator thatmore »interpolates the power spectrum and the peak counts to an accuracy of ? 5%, and compute the likelihood in the three-dimensional parameter space (?m, ?8, w) from both observables. We find that constraints from peak counts are comparable to those from the power spectrum, and somewhat tighter when different smoothing scales are combined. Neither observable can constrain w without external data. When the power spectrum and peak counts are combined, the area of the error “banana” in the (?m, ?8) plane reduces by a factor of ? two, compared to using the power spectrum alone. For a flat ? cold dark matter model, combining both statistics, we obtain the constraint ?8(?m/0.27)0.63 = 0.85+0.03-0.03.« less

  3. High counting rates of x-ray photon detection using APD detectors on synchrotron machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakuno, E. M.; Giacomolli, B. A.; Scorzato, C. R. [Universidade Federal do Pampa - UNIPAMPA-Bage, 96413-170 (Brazil); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron - LNLS, 13086-100 (Brazil)

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we show the results of 10 x 10 mm{sup 2} Si-APD detector's test with guard ring detecting x-rays. The result of mapping surface is also exhibited. We show and discuss the difficulty of single photon detection in high counting rate experiments in synchrotrons machines.

  4. A Study Of Texas Youth Livestock Exhibitors Knowledge Within The Constructs Of The Quality Counts Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragland, J. Derrick

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A Study Of Texas Youth Livestock Exhibitors Knowledge Within The Constructs Of The Quality Counts Assessment. (August 2013) J. D. Ragland, B.S., M. S. Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Steve Fraze. The purpose of this study was to examine...

  5. MA.KETODAY COUNT: A MUTUAL SUPPORT GROUP FOR THE DYING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradfield, Cecil D.; Myers, R. Ann

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of· this paper is to discuss the aspects of a local chapter of 1Vlake Today Count. MTCis a mutual support group for persons with terminal illnesses. Organized in 1974, it is part afwhat tome have' called the tlhappy death movement...

  6. ADtrees for Sequential Data and N-gram Counting Rob Van Dam and Dan Ventura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    ADtrees for Sequential Data and N-gram Counting Rob Van Dam and Dan Ventura Abstract-- We consider Ventura are with the Department of Com- puter Science, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (email: rvan- dam00@gmail.com, ventura@cs.byu.edu) the best smoothing techniques utilize some (often linear

  7. Full counting statistics in disordered graphene at the Dirac point: From ballistics to diffusion A. Schuessler,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    and noise in ballistic graphene flakes.9­11 Recent advances in preparation and transport stud- iesFull counting statistics in disordered graphene at the Dirac point: From ballistics to diffusion A; published 12 August 2010 The full counting statistics of the charge transport through an undoped graphene

  8. A New Technique for Studying the Fano Factor And the Mean Energy Per Ion Pair in Counting Gases

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Panksky, A.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method is presented for deriving the Fano factor and the mean energy per ion pair in the ultrasoft x-ray energy range. It is based on counting electrons deposited by a photon in a low-pressure gas, and is applicable for all counting gases. The energy dependence of these parameters for several hydrocarbons and gas mixtures is presented.

  9. Olive cultivars field-tested in super-high-density system in southern Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godini, Angelo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil output Cumulative oil production tons/acre 5.68b 5.83bsimilar cumulative oil production. Harvesting efficiency,and mean oil output and cumulative production Fruit

  10. Direct releases to the surface and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessments for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Direct brine release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STOELZEL,D.M.; O'BRIEN,D.G.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SCOTT,L.N.

    2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The following topics related to the treatment of direct brine releases to the surface environment in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty, and (4) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for CCDFs. The presented analyses indicate that direct brine releases do not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, the CCDFs for direct brine releases fall substantially to the left of the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (4O CFR 191.40 CFR 194).

  11. Time-integrated blood lead concentration is a valid surrogate for estimating the cumulative lead dose assessed by tibial lead measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roels, H.; Konings, J.; Lauwerys, R. [Medical School of the Catholic Univ. of Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)] [and others] [Medical School of the Catholic Univ. of Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concentration of lead in tibia (Pb-T) was measured in vivo by a {sup 109}Cd K-shell X-ray fluorescence technique in 123 workers from a primary lead smelter (age: mean, 45 years; range, 30-61; duration of employment: mean, 20 years; range, 7-45). Their cumulative blood lead index (CBLI) was also calculated on the basis of the blood lead (Pb-B) records available from the company`s medical files. Geometric mean for Pb-T was 49 {mu}g Pb/g bone mineral (range, 15-167). The company`s health surveillance programs, implemented since 1945, resulted in Pb-B values which rarely exceeded 70 {mu}g Pb/dl whole blood. Pb-B at the time of Pb-T measurement averaged 31 {mu}g Pb/dl (range, 6-62) and the geometric mean for CBLI amounted to 803 {mu}g Pb/dl x year (range, 220-2130). Despite various assumptions and uncertainties inherent in the assessment of the cumulative lead dose through Pb-T measurement or CBLI calculation, the relation between both variables in the present lead smelter population is very strong (r{sub pearson}= 0.80, P <0.0001; age explained at the most 9.5% of the variance). The slope of the regression equation of log Pb-T vs log CBLI showed that a doubling of CBLI also corresponds to a doubling of Pb-t. It may be concluded that a sound calculation of CBLI represents a valid surrogate for estimating the life time integrated dose of lead as assessed by the measurement of cortical bone lead (e.g., in tibia). 23 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in ?sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdelwahab, N. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance ??-dependent and ??-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a ??-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of ? within the measured range of pseudorapidity |?| T less than 2 GeV/c. The ??-dependent part, attributed to nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% ± 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at |??| > 0.7. (author)

  13. Planck 2015 results. XXIV. Cosmology from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roman, M; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Weller, J; White, S D M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present cluster counts and corresponding cosmological constraints from the Planck full mission data set. Our catalogue consists of 439 clusters detected via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal down to a signal-to-noise of six, and is more than a factor of two larger than the 2013 Planck cluster cosmology sample. The counts are consistent with those from 2013 and yield compatible constraints under the same modelling assumptions. Taking advantage of the larger catalogue, we extend our analysis to the two-dimensional distribution in redshift and signal-to-noise. We use mass estimates from two recent studies of gravitational lensing of background galaxies by Planck clusters to provide priors on the hydrostatic bias parameter, $1-b$. In addition, we use lensing of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuations by Planck clusters as a third independent constraint on this parameter. These various calibrations imply constraints on the present-day amplitude of matter fluctuations in varying degrees of t...

  14. Counts-in-Cylinders in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with Comparisons to N-Body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrier, Heather D.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; /UC, Irvine; Berrier, Joel C.; /Arkansas U.; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /Pittsburgh U.; Wechsler, Risa H. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental statistics provide a necessary means of comparing the properties of galaxies in different environments and a vital test of models of galaxy formation within the prevailing, hierarchical cosmological model. We explore counts-in-cylinders, a common statistic defined as the number of companions of a particular galaxy found within a given projected radius and redshift interval. Galaxy distributions with the same two-point correlation functions do not necessarily have the same companion count distributions. We use this statistic to examine the environments of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 4. We also make preliminary comparisons to four models for the spatial distributions of galaxies, based on N-body simulations, and data from SDSS DR4 to study the utility of the counts-in-cylinders statistic. There is a very large scatter between the number of companions a galaxy has and the mass of its parent dark matter halo and the halo occupation, limiting the utility of this statistic for certain kinds of environmental studies. We also show that prevalent, empirical models of galaxy clustering that match observed two- and three-point clustering statistics well fail to reproduce some aspects of the observed distribution of counts-in-cylinders on 1, 3 and 6-h{sup -1}Mpc scales. All models that we explore underpredict the fraction of galaxies with few or no companions in 3 and 6-h{sup -1} Mpc cylinders. Roughly 7% of galaxies in the real universe are significantly more isolated within a 6 h{sup -1} Mpc cylinder than the galaxies in any of the models we use. Simple, phenomenological models that map galaxies to dark matter halos fail to reproduce high-order clustering statistics in low-density environments.

  15. Stand Up and Be Counted: Race, Religion, and the Eisenhower Administration's Encounter with Arab Nationalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobal, Rian

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    STAND UP AND BE COUNTED: RACE, RELIGION, AND THE EISENHOWER ADMINISTRATION‘S ENCOUNTER WITH ARAB NATIONALISM A Dissertation by RIAN T. BOBAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... by RIAN T. BOBAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Terry H. Anderson Committee Members...

  16. Particle count monitoring of reverse osmosis water treatment for removal of low-level radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moritz, E.J.; Hoffman, C.R.; Hergert, T.R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser diode particle counting technology and analytical measurements were used to evaluate a pilot-scale reverse osmosis (RO) water treatment system for removal of particulate matter and sub-picocurie low-level radionuclides. Stormwater mixed with Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) effluent from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), formerly a Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons production facility, were treated. No chemical pretreatment of the water was utilized during this study. The treatment system was staged as follows: multimedia filtration, granular activated carbon adsorption, hollow tube ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis membrane filtration. Various recovery rates and two RO membrane models were tested. Analytical measurements included total suspended solids (TSS), total dissolved solids (TDS), gross alpha ({alpha}) and gross beta ({beta}) activity, uranium isotopes {sup 233/234}U and {sup 238}U, plutonium {sup 239/240}Pu, and americium {sup 241}Am. Particle measurement between 1--150 microns ({mu}) included differential particle counts (DPC), and total particle counts (TPC) before and after treatment at various sampling points throughout the test. Performance testing showed this treatment system produced a high quality effluent in clarity and purity. Compared to raw water levels, TSS was reduced to below detection of 5 milligrams per liter (mg/L) and TDS reduced by 98%. Gross {alpha} was essentially removed 100%, and gross {beta} was reduced an average of 94%. Uranium activity was reduced by 99%. TPC between 1-150{mu} were reduced by an average 99.8% to less than 1,000 counts per milliliter (mL), similar in purity to a good drinking water treatment plant. Raw water levels of {sup 239/240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were below reliable quantitation limits and thus no removal efficiencies could be determined for these species.

  17. Calibration of the Accuscan II In Vivo System for I-131 Thyroid Counting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orval R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the March 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for I-131 thyroid counting. The source used for the calibration was an Analytics mixed gamma source 82834-121 distributed in an epoxy matrix in a Wheaton Liquid Scintillation Vial with energies from 88.0 keV to 1836.1 keV. The center of the detectors was position 64-feet from the vault floor. This position places the approximate center line of the detectors at the center line of the source in the thyroid tube. The calibration was performed using an RMC II phantom (Appendix J). Validation testing was performed using a Ba-133 source and an ANSI N44.3 Phantom (Appendix I). This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibrations including verification counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for counting the thyroid for I-131 and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

  18. Central limit theorems, Lee-Yang zeros, and graph-counting polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Lebowitz; B. Pittel; D. Ruelle; E. R. Speer

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the asymptotic normalcy of families of random variables $X$ which count the number of occupied sites in some large set. We write $Prob(X=m)=p_mz_0^m/P(z_0)$, where $P(z)$ is the generating function $P(z)=\\sum_{j=0}^{N}p_jz^j$ and $z_0>0$. We give sufficient criteria, involving the location of the zeros of $P(z)$, for these families to satisfy a central limit theorem (CLT) and even a local CLT (LCLT); the theorems hold in the sense of estimates valid for large $N$ (we assume that $Var(X)$ is large when $N$ is). For example, if all the zeros lie in the closed left half plane then $X$ is asymptotically normal, and when the zeros satisfy some additional conditions then $X$ satisfies an LCLT. We apply these results to cases in which $X$ counts the number of edges in the (random) set of "occupied" edges in a graph, with constraints on the number of occupied edges attached to a given vertex. Our results also apply to systems of interacting particles, with $X$ counting the number of particles in a box $\\Lambda$ whose size approaches infinity; $P(z)$ is then the grand canonical partition function and its zeros are the Lee-Yang zeros.

  19. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13,Conservation BillingFieldField

  20. Tachyonic field interacting with Scalar (Phantom) Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  1. Characterization Methodology for Decommissioning Low and Intermediate Level Fissile Nuclide Contaminated Buried Soils and Process Piping Using Photon Counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Megan L

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Tellurium CFR Code of Federal Regulations Ci Curie cm Centimeter cpm Counts per Minute CZT Cadmium Zinc Telluride D&D Decontamination and Decommissioning DU Depleted Uranium EAF European Activation File ENDF Evaluated Nuclear Data... an abundance of depleted uranium ( ? 0.96 wt. % 235U in UO2), thorium, and radium. These nuclides emit gammas and produce high count rates in a windowed NaI. Detection of these nuclides is pertinent for waste management and radiological exposure purposes...

  2. Performance Evaluation of Whole Body Counting Facilities in the Marshall Islands (2002-2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehl, S R; Hamilton, T; Jue, T; Hickman, D

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands (https://eed.llnl.gov/mi/). Local atoll governments have been actively engaged in developing shared responsibilities for protecting the health and safety of resettled and resettling population at risk from exposure to elevated levels of residual fallout contamination in the environment. Under the program, whole body counting facilities have been established at three locations in the Marshall Islands. These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing technical support services including data quality assurance and performance testing. We have also established a mirror whole body counting facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a technician training center. The LLNL facility also allows program managers to develop quality assurance and operational procedures, and test equipment and corrective actions prior to deployment at remote stations in the Marshall Islands. This document summarizes the results of external performance evaluation exercises conducted at each of the facilities (2002-2005) under the umbrella of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP). The ISP was specifically designed to meet intercomparison requirements of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). In this way, the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program has attempted to establish quality assurance measures in whole body counting that are consistent with standard requirements used to monitor DOE workers in the United States. Based on ANSI N13.30, the acceptable performance criteria for relative measurement bias and precision for radiobioassay service laboratory quality control, performance evaluation, and accreditation is -25% to +50% and less than or equal to 40%, respectively.

  3. The European Large Area ISO Survey VIII: 90-micron final analysis and source counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ph. Heraudeau; S. Oliver; C. del Burgo; C. Kiss; M. Stickel; T. Mueller; M. Rowan-Robinson; A. Efstathiou; C. Surace; L. V. Toth; S. Serjeant; D. M. Alexander; A. Franceschini; D. Lemke; I. Perez-Fournon; T. Morel; J-L. Puget; D. Rigopoulou; B. Rocca-Volmerange; A. Verma

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a re--analysis of the European Large Area ISO Survey (ELAIS) 90mum observations carried out with ISOPHOT, an instrument on board the ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). With more than 12 sq. deg., the ELAIS survey is the largest area covered by ISO in a single program and is about one order of magnitude deeper than the IRAS 100mum survey. The data analysis is presented and was mainly performed with the Phot Interactive Analysis software but using the pairwise method of Stickel et al. (2003) for signal processing from ERD (Edited Raw Data) to SCP (Signal per Chopper Plateau). The ELAIS 90mum catalogue contains 229 reliable sources with fluxes larger than 70 mJy and is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com. Number counts are presented and show an excess above the no-evolution model prediction. This confirms the strong evolution detected at shorter(15mum) and longer (170mum) wavelengths in other ISO surveys. The ELAIS counts are in agreement with previous works at 90mum and in particular with the deeper counts extracted from the Lockman hole observations. Comparison with recent evolutionary models show that the models of Franceschini et al. and Guiderdoni et al. which includes a heavily-extinguished population of galaxies give the best fit to the data. Deeper observations are nevertheless required to better discriminate between the model predictions in the far-infrared and are scheduled with the Spitzer Space Telescope which already started operating and will also be performed by ASTRO-F.

  4. The impact of main belt asteroids on infrared--submillimetre photometry and source counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cs. Kiss; A. Pal; Th. G. Mueller; P. Abraham

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    > Among the components of the infrared and submillimetre sky background, the closest layer is the thermal emission of dust particles and minor bodies in the Solar System. This contribution is especially important for current and future infrared and submillimetre space instruments --like those of Spitzer, Akari and Herschel -- and must be characterised by a reliable statistical model. > We describe the impact of the thermal emission of main belt asteroids on the 5...1000um photometry and source counts, for the current and future spaceborne and ground-based instruments, in general, as well as for specific dates and sky positions. > We used the statistical asteroid model (SAM) to calculate the positions of main belt asteroids down to a size of 1km, and calculated their infrared and submillimetre brightness using the standard thermal model. Fluctuation powers, confusion noise values and number counts were derived from the fluxes of individual asteroids. > We have constructed a large database of infrared and submillimetre fluxes for SAM asteroids with a temporal resolution of 5 days, covering the time span January 1, 2000 -- December 31, 2012. Asteroid fluctuation powers and number counts derived from this database can be obtained for a specific observation setup via our public web-interface. > Current space instruments working in the mid-infrared regime (Akari and Spitzer Space Telescopes) are affected by asteroid confusion noise in some specific areas of the sky, while the photometry of space infrared and submillimetre instruments in the near future (e.g. Herschel and Planck Space Observatories) will not be affected by asteroids. Faint main belt asteroids might also be responsible for most of the zodiacal emission fluctuations near the ecliptic.

  5. Noise Equivalent Counts Based Emission Image Reconstruction Algorithm of Tomographic Gamma Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke Wang; Zheng Li; Wei Feng; Dong Han

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) is a technique used to assay the nuclide distribution and radioactivity in nuclear waste drums. Both transmission and emission scans are performed in TGS and the transmission image is used for the attenuation correction in emission reconstructions. The error of the transmission image, which is not considered by the existing reconstruction algorithms, negatively affects the final results. An emission reconstruction method based on Noise Equivalent Counts (NEC) is presented. Noises from the attenuation image are concentrated to the projection data to apply the NEC Maximum-Likelihood Expectation-Maximization algorithm. Experiments are performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Standard test method for determination of technetium-99 in uranium hexafluoride by liquid scintillation counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method is a quantitative method used to determine technetium-99 (99Tc) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) by liquid scintillation counting. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Effects, Determination, and Correction of Count Rate Nonlinearity in Multi-Channel Analog Electron Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reber, T J; Waugh, J A; Dessau, D S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detector counting rate nonlinearity, though a known problem, is commonly ignored in the analysis of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy where modern multichannel electron detection schemes using analog intensity scales are used. We focus on a nearly ubiquitous "inverse saturation" nonlinearity that makes the spectra falsely sharp and beautiful. These artificially enhanced spectra limit accurate quantitative analysis of the data, leading to mistaken spectral weights, Fermi energies, and peak widths. We present a method to rapidly detect and correct for this nonlinearity. This algorithm could be applicable for a wide range of nonlinear systems, beyond photoemission spectroscopy.

  8. Calibration of the JET neutron yield monitors using the delayed neutron counting technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Belle, P.; Jarvis, O.N.; Sadler, G. (JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3EA (Great Britain)); de Leeuw, S.; D'Hondt, P. (C.E.N./S.C.K., B-2400 Mol (Belgium)); Pillon, M. (Associazione EURATOM-ENEA, CRE Frascati (Italy))

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time-resolved neutron yield is routinely measured on the JET tokamak using a set of fission chambers. At present, the preferred technique is to employ activation reactions to determine the neutron fluence at a well-chosen position and to relate the measured fluence to the total neutron emission by means of neutron transport calculations. The delayed neutron counting method is a particularly convenient method of performing the activation measurement and the fission cross sections are accurately known. This paper outlines the measurement technique as used on JET.

  9. Longitudinal Bunch Pattern Measurements through Single Photon Counting at SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hongyi (Jack); /UC, San Diego

    2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), a division of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is a synchrotron light source that provides x-rays for experimental use. As electrons are bent in the storage ring, they emit electromagnetic radiation. There are 372 different buckets which electrons can be loaded into. Different filling patterns produce different types of x-rays. What is the bunch pattern at a given time? Which filling pattern is better? Are there any flaws to the current injection system? These questions can be answered with this single photon counting experiment.

  10. Statistical method for resolving the photon-photoelectron-counting inversion problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Jinlong [LMAM and School of Mathematical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li Tiejun, E-mail: tieli@pku.edu.c [LMAM and School of Mathematical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Peng, Xiang, E-mail: xiangpeng@pku.edu.c [CREAM Group, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks (Peking University) and Institute of Quantum Electronics, School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Guo Hong, E-mail: hongguo@pku.edu.c [CREAM Group, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks (Peking University) and Institute of Quantum Electronics, School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistical inversion method is proposed for the photon-photoelectron-counting statistics in quantum key distribution experiment. With the statistical viewpoint, this problem is equivalent to the parameter estimation for an infinite binomial mixture model. The coarse-graining idea and Bayesian methods are applied to deal with this ill-posed problem, which is a good simple example to show the successful application of the statistical methods to the inverse problem. Numerical results show the applicability of the proposed strategy. The coarse-graining idea for the infinite mixture models should be general to be used in the future.

  11. A system for the determination of uranium in meteorites by delayed -neutron counting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riley, John Edward

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Becquerel during his search for the newly discovered "x-rays" (found by Roentgen in 1895) in a variety of phosphorescent minerals. In his pro- cedure Becquerel exposed the minerals to light, wrapped them in black paper to exc!ude all additional light... tivity. 16. F[RHE 2, Side (I) and Top (II) Views of Counting Assenhly 17. Aluminum was chosen as the detector cathode material because of its lower neutron cross section as compared to the other avails'nle material which was brass (Al: 0. 23 b; Cu...

  12. Lindblad equation approach for the full counting statistics of work and heat in driven quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihail Silaev; Tero T. Heikkilä; Pauli Virtanen

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate the general approach based on the Lindblad equation to calculate the full counting statistics of work and heat produced by driven quantum systems weakly coupled with a Markovian thermal bath. The approach can be applied to a wide class of dissipative quantum systems driven by an arbitrary force protocol. We show the validity of general fluctuation relations and consider several generic examples. The possibilities of using calorimetric measurements to test the presence of coherence and entanglement in the open quantum systems are discussed.

  13. Let us count the ways. We've built programs that reflect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count the ways. We've built programs that

  14. Property:Geothermal/ProjectTypeTopic2Count | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:DocketFlowGpm Jump to:ProjectTypeTopic2Count

  15. Smooth Field Theories and Homotopy Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Alan Cameron

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 . . . . . . . . 4 Categories of Field Theories 4.1 Functorto super symmetric field theories. CRM Proceedings and0-dimensional super symmetric field theories. preprint 2008.

  16. Supernova remnant mass cumulated along the star formation history of the z=3.8 radiogalaxies 4C41.17 and TN J2007-1316

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte; De Breuck, Carlos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we show that the supernova remnant (SNR) masses cumulated from core-collapse supernovae along the star formation history of two powerful z=3.8 radio galaxies 4C41.17 and TN J2007-1316 reach up to > 10^9 Msun, comparable with supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses measured from the SDSS sample at similar redshifts. The SNR mass is measured from the already exploded supernova mass after subtraction of ejecta at the galaxy age where the mass of still luminous stars fits at best the observed spectral energy distribution (SED), continuously extended to the optical-Spitzer-Herschel-submm domains, with the help of the galaxy evolution model P\\'egase.3. For the recent and old stellar populations, SNR masses vary on 10^(9 to 10) Msun and the SNR-to-star mass ratio between 1 and 0.1 percent is comparable to the observed low-z SMBH-to-star mass ratio. For the template radio galaxy 4C41.17, SNR and stellar population masses estimated from large aperture (>4arcsec=30kpc) observations are compatible, within o...

  17. Radionuclide transport in the vicinity of the repository and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STOCKMAN,CHRISTINE T.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,JAY DEAN; SHINTA,A.; SMITH,L.N.

    2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The following topics related to radionuclide transport in the vicinity of the repository in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant are presented (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty, and (4) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for CCDFs. The presented results indicate that no releases to the accessible environment take place due to radionuclide movement through the anhydrite marker beds, through the Dewey Lake Red Beds or directly to the surface, and also that the releases to the Culebra Dolomite are small. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, the CCDFs for release to the Culebra Dolomite fall to the left of the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, 40 CFR 194).

  18. Seasonal and cumulative loblolly pine development under two stand density and fertility levels through four growing seasons. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, J.D.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantation was subjected to two cultural treatments to examine seasonal cumulative pine development in the 9th through 12th growing seasons: (1) pine stocking was either reduced by thinning to 303 trees per acre at a 12- by 12-ft spacing or the plots were left uncut with an original density of 1,210 trees per acre at a 6- by 6-ft spacing, and (2) either no fertilizer was applied or diammonium phosphate was broadcast at 134 lb of phosphorus and 120 lb of nitrogen per acre. Competing vegetation was controlled on all plots. Thinning resulted in less spring height growth in the 9th and 10th growing seasons that not cutting, but thinning increased diameter growth each year. Beginning in the 10th growing season, fertilization increased height, diameter, and basal area per acre growth, with the effect of fertilization on diameter growth being most pronounced on the thinned plots. Therefore, fertilization of thinned plots was more beneficial than thinning alone, and thinning alone resulted in less height and basal area per acre growth than the other treatment combinations for the 4-year period.

  19. Baseline Suppression of Vehicle Portal Monitor Gamma Count Profiles: A Characterization Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopresti, Charles A.; Weier, Dennis R.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitor (RPM) systems based upon polyvinyl toluene scintillator (PVT) gamma ray detectors have been deployed to detect illicit trafficking in radioactive materials at border crossings. This report sets forth a characterization of the baseline suppression effect in gross-count gamma ray profiles due to shadow shielding by vehicles entering radiation portal monitors. Shadow shielding is of interest because it reduces the alarm sensitivity of portal monitors. This observational study investigated three types of PVT based commercial RPM systems currently deployed at selected ports of entry in terms of spatial effects relative to detector panel orientation - driver versus passenger side, top versus bottom, and narrow lanes versus wide lanes - as observed for a large number of vehicles. Each portal site appears to have a distinctive baseline suppression signature, based on percent maximum suppression relative to measured background. Results suggest that alarm algorithms based on gross-counts may be further refined through attention to individual site characteristics. In addition, longer vehicle transit times were often correlated with stronger baseline suppression, suggesting that baseline suppression studies should take into account duration (length) of transit. (PIET-43741-TM-333-NIM)

  20. Standard test method for nondestructive assay of plutonium by passive neutron multiplicity counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method describes the nondestructive assay of plutonium in forms such as metal, oxide, scrap, residue, or waste using passive neutron multiplicity counting. This test method provides results that are usually more accurate than conventional neutron coincidence counting. The method can be applied to a large variety of plutonium items in various containers including cans, 208-L drums, or 1900-L Standard Waste Boxes. It has been used to assay items whose plutonium content ranges from 1 g to 1000s of g. 1.2 There are several electronics or mathematical approaches available for multiplicity analysis, including the multiplicity shift register, the Euratom Time Correlation Analyzer, and the List Mode Module, as described briefly in Ref. (1). 1.3 This test method is primarily intended to address the assay of 240Pu-effective by moments-based multiplicity analysis using shift register electronics (1, 2, 3) and high efficiency neutron counters specifically designed for multiplicity analysis. 1.4 This tes...

  1. Entomology 489 Field Entomology Field Project Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    with information, people, materials). Field Projects (your project should...) FEntomology 489 ­ Field Entomology Field Project Guide A small-group field project is required for ENTO 489 ­ Field Entomology. This guide provides general information about the field-project

  2. Direct, Indirect and Cumulative Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    during creation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Public evaluations and input from independent, variances and non-compliance of permit conditions after the EIS is completed prevents public comment on the natural and human environment from mining in the Peace River Watershed. Environmental Impacts from

  3. Cumulative Impacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact Us ContactPracticesWinterServices »2015

  4. Considering Cumulative Effects under NEPA

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg U.S. S p e c t i

  5. Association Between White Blood Cell Count Following Radiation Therapy With Radiation Pneumonitis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chad; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is an inflammatory response to radiation therapy (RT). We assessed the association between RP and white blood cell (WBC) count, an established metric of systemic inflammation, after RT for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 366 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received ?60 Gy as definitive therapy. The primary endpoint was whether WBC count after RT (defined as 2 weeks through 3 months after RT completion) was associated with grade ?3 or grade ?2 RP. Median lung volume receiving ?20 Gy (V{sub 20}) was 31%, and post-RT WBC counts ranged from 1.7 to 21.2 × 10{sup 3} WBCs/?L. Odds ratios (ORs) associating clinical variables and post-RT WBC counts with RP were calculated via logistic regression. A recursive-partitioning algorithm was used to define optimal post-RT WBC count cut points. Results: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly higher in patients with grade ?3 RP than without (P<.05). Optimal cut points for post-RT WBC count were found to be 7.4 and 8.0 × 10{sup 3}/?L for grade ?3 and ?2 RP, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed significant associations between post-RT WBC count and grade ?3 (n=46, OR=2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4?4.9, P=.003) and grade ?2 RP (n=164, OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01). This association held in a stepwise multivariate regression. Of note, V{sub 20} was found to be significantly associated with grade ?2 RP (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01) and trended toward significance for grade ?3 RP (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5, P=.06). Conclusions: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly and independently associated with RP and have potential utility as a diagnostic or predictive marker for this toxicity.

  6. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in ?sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdelwahab, N. M.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance ??-dependent and ??-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a ??-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of ? within the measured range of pseudorapidity |?| T less than 2 GeV/c. The ??-dependent part, attributed tomore »nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% ± 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at |??| > 0.7. (author)« less

  7. An active drop counting device using condenser microphone for superheated emulsion detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Mala; Marick, C.; Kanjilal, D.; Saha, S. [Nuclear and Atomic Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Arya, A S. [Department of Physics, VIT University, Vellore, Tamilnadu 632014 (India)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An active device for superheated emulsion detector is described. A capacitive diaphragm sensor or condenser microphone is used to convert the acoustic pulse of drop nucleation to electrical signal. An active peak detector is included in the circuit to avoid multiple triggering of the counter. The counts are finally recorded by a microprocessor based data acquisition system. Genuine triggers, missed by the sensor, were studied using a simulated clock pulse. The neutron energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source was measured using the device with R114 as the sensitive liquid and compared with the calculated fission neutron energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf. Frequency analysis of the detected signals was also carried out.

  8. Influence from cosmological uncertainties on galaxy number count at faint limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, K J; Meng, Xin-he

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Counting galaxy number density with wide range sky surveys has been well adopted in researches focusing on revealing evolution pattern of different types of galaxies. As understood intuitively the astrophysics environment physics is intimated affected by cosmology priors with theoretical estimation or vise versa, or simply stating that the astrophysics effect couples the corresponding cosmology observations or the way backwards. In this article we try to quantify the influence on galaxy number density prediction at faint luminosity limit from the uncertainties in cosmology, and how much the uncertainties blur the detection of galaxy evolution, with the hope that this trying may indeed help for precise and physical cosmology study in near future or vise versa

  9. Supermassive black holes or boson stars? Hair counting with gravitational wave detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuele Berti; Vitor Cardoso

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The evidence for supermassive Kerr black holes in galactic centers is strong and growing, but only the detection of gravitational waves will convincingly rule out other possibilities to explain the observations. The Kerr spacetime is completely specified by the first two multipole moments: mass and angular momentum. This is usually referred to as the ``no-hair theorem'', but it is really a ``two-hair'' theorem. If general relativity is the correct theory of gravity, the most plausible alternative to a supermassive Kerr black hole is a rotating boson star. Numerical calculations indicate that the spacetime of rotating boson stars is determined by the first three multipole moments (``three-hair theorem''). LISA could accurately measure the oscillation frequencies of these supermassive objects. We propose to use these measurements to ``count their hair'', unambiguously determining their nature and properties.

  10. Grid-free Plasma Simulations Based on Hierarchical Treecode Field Solvers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christlieb, A.J.; Krasny, R. [Department of Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Emhoff, J.; Boyd, I.D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we summarize recent efforts to develop a grid free field solver based on a hierarchical treecode algorithm for computing the electrostatic potential and electric field in a system of charged particles. The algorithm is grid-free and the operation count is O(NlogN). The treecode is combined here with a boundary integral method to simulate electron dynamics in a Penning-Malmberg trap. For more details we defer to our recent publications.

  11. On Field Constraint Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wies, Thomas

    2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce field constraint analysis, a new technique for verifying data structure invariants. A field constraint for a field is a formula specifying a set of objects to which the field can point. Field constraints ...

  12. The role of charged particles in the positive corona-generated photon count in a rod to plane air gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bian, X. M.; Wang, Y. J.; MacAlpine, J. M. K.; Chen, L.; Wang, L. M.; Guan, Z. C. [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China)] [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, 518055 Shenzhen (China); Wan, S. W. [State Grid Chongqing Nan'an Power Supply Company, 401336 Chongqing (China)] [State Grid Chongqing Nan'an Power Supply Company, 401336 Chongqing (China); Liu, L. [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China)] [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China)

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the calculated charged-particle densities in positive corona, the rate of streamer production, and the photon count from the corona were investigated and found to be closely related. Both the densities of electrons and positive ions peaked at 11.8 kV, near the corona inception voltage; they then fell rapidly before slowly rising again. This behavior was exactly matched by the measured photon count. The calculation of the charged-particle density in a positive corona was achieved by means of a fluid model.

  13. A large HPGe detector for the non-destructive radioassay of an ultra-low-background counting facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Fechner; C. Henson; J. Gaffiot; T. Lasserre; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; G. Mention; Th. A. Mueller; R. Quéval; R. Svoboda

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the use of a low background counting facility, equipped with a p-type 80% relative efficiency HPGe detector, protected by active and passive shielding, and large enough to count a 10" photo-multiplier tube (PMT). A GEANT4 Monte-Carlo of this detector was developed and tuned to 3% accuracy. We report the U, Th, and K contents in three different types of PMTs used in current neutrino experiments, with accuracies of $\\sim 10$ ppb for U and Th and of $\\sim 15$ ppm for K.

  14. Developments in Chiral effective Field Theory for Nuclear Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Oller

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review on a chiral power counting scheme for in-medium chiral perturbation theory with nucleons and pions as degrees of freedom \\cite{ref}. It allows for a systematic expansion taking into account local as well as pion-mediated inter-nucleon interactions. Based on this power counting, one can identify classes of non-perturbative diagrams that require a resummation. We then calculate the nuclear matter energy density for the symmetric and purely neutron matter cases up-to-and-including next-to-leading order (NLO), in good agreement with sophisticated many-body calculations. Next, the neutron matter equation of state is applied to calculate the upper limit for neutron stars, with an upper bound around 2.3 solar masses, large enough to accommodate the most massive neutron star observed until now. We also apply our equation state to constraint $G_N$ in exceptionally large gravitational fields.

  15. Smooth Field Theories and Homotopy Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Alan Cameron

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHAPTER 3. FIELD THEORIES Definition 3.2.1. A smooth fielda ’top down’ definition of field theories. Taking as ourin the following. Definition A field theory is a symmetric

  16. Review of miscible flood performance, intisar ''D'' field, socialist people's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Des Brisay, C.L.; Elghussein, B.F.; Holst, P.H.; Misellati, A.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the largest miscible gas injection projects in the world is in its 12th year in the Intisar ''D'' field in the Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya. As of March 31, 1981, cumulative oil production totaled 890 MMbbl (141.4 X 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/) of oil, or 56% recovery of the estimated stock-tank original oil in place (OOIP). This past performance and recent simulation studies indicate a final recovery efficiency on the order of 70%.

  17. Field measurements of ammonia volatilization from surface applications of nitrogen fertilizers to a calcareous soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, W. L

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to measure volatilized NH3 in the labora- tory. A) Vacuum pump, B) Boric acid trap to collect volatilized NH ~ C) NH3 volatilization chamber, D) Trkp to re- move NH3 from incoming air . . . . . . . . . . . 21 A schematic of the apparatus used to make... direct measurements of NH losses in the field. A) Vacuum pum), B) Boric acid trap, C) NH volatilization chamber, consisting of metal cylinder and plexi- glass top The cumulative NH losses over time for four rates of' a)plication of urea...

  18. MINING ENGINEERING You can count on our mining engineering co-op interns for anY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    MINING ENGINEERING You can count on our mining engineering co-op interns for anY projects involving mine development, major excavations or site rehabilitation. + our interns have much to offer You! internships allow students to become familiar with the day-to-day operations of a mine. co-op interns can work

  19. Evaluation of 4-H and FFA Members Scores on the 2011-2012 Texas Quality Counts Verification Exam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grube, Brittany C.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas and it strives to teach youth how to produce a safe and wholesome livestock product for the consumer. An analysis of youth scores between 2011 and 2012 was done to determine how well youth were scoring on the Texas Quality Counts Verification Exam...

  20. 5.4 Stirling Numbers When counting various types of functions from 2.1, we quickly discovered that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMaio, Joe

    5.4 Stirling Numbers When counting various types of functions from 2.1, we quickly discovered as the Stirling number of the second kind. There are two types of Stirling numbers. We will initially examine Stirling numbers of the second kind due to the fact that they occur more frequently. The Stirling number

  1. Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

  2. The Landauer Resistance and Band Spectra for the Counting Quantum Turing Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Benioff

    1997-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized counting quantum Turing machine (GCQTM) is a machine which, for any N, enumerates the first $2^{N}$ integers in succession as binary strings. The generalization consists of associating a potential with read-1 steps only. The Landauer Resistance (LR) and band spectra were determined for the tight binding Hamiltonians associated with the GCQTM for energies both above and below the potential height. For parameters and potentials in the electron region, the LR fluctuates rapidly between very high and very low values as a function of momentum. The rapidity and extent of the fluctuations increases rapidly with increasing N. For N=18, the largest value considered, the LR shows good transmission probability as a function of momentum with numerous holes of very high LR values present. This is true for energies above and below the potential height. It is suggested that the main features of the LR can be explained by coherent superposition of the component waves reflected from or transmitted through the $2^{N-1}$ potentials in the distribution. If this explanation is correct, it provides a dramatic illustration of the effects of quantum nonlocality.

  3. The Landauer resistance and band spectra for the counting quantum Turing machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, P.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In other work, the generalized counting quantum Turing machine (GCQTM) was studied. For any N this machine enumerates the first 2{sup N} integers in succession as binary strings. The generalization consists of associating a potential with read 1 steps only. The Landauer Resistance (LR) and band spectra were determined for the tight binding Hamiltonians associated with the GCQTM for energies below the potential height. Here these calculations are extended to energies both above and below the barrier height. For parameters and potentials in the electron region, the LR fluctuates rapidly between very high and very low values as a function of momentum. The rapidity and extent of the fluctuations increases rapidly with increasing N. For N = 18, the largest value considered, the LR shows good transmission probability as a function of momentum with numerous holes of very high LR values present. This is true for energies both above and below the potential height. It is suggested that the main features of the LR can be explained by coherent superposition of the component waves reflected from or transmitted through or across the 2{sup N-1} potentials present in the distribution. If this explanation is correct, it provides a dramatic illustration of the effects of quantum nonlocality.

  4. CLARO-CMOS, a very low power ASIC for fast photon counting with pixellated photodetectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carniti, Paolo; Giachero, Andrea; Gotti, Claudio; Maino, Matteo; Pessina, Gianluigi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLARO-CMOS is an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) designed for fast photon counting with pixellated photodetectors such as multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (Ma-PMT), micro-channel plates (MCP), and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). The first prototype has four channels, each with a charge sensitive amplifier with settable gain and a discriminator with settable threshold, providing fast hit information for each channel independently. The design was realized in a long-established, stable and inexpensive 0.35 um CMOS technology, and provides outstanding performance in terms of speed and power dissipation. The prototype consumes less than 1 mW per channel at low rate, and less than 2 mW at an event rate of 10 MHz per channel. The recovery time after each pulse is less than 25 ns for input signals within a factor of 10 above threshold. Input referred RMS noise is about 7.7 ke^- (1.2 fC) with an input capacitance of 3.3 pF. Thanks to the low noise and high speed, a timing resolution down to 10 ps ...

  5. Lifetime Prediction of IGBT in a STATCOM Using Modified-Graphical Rainflow Counting Algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopi Reddy, Lakshmi Reddy [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rainflow algorithms are one of the best counting methods used in fatigue and failure analysis [17]. There have been many approaches to the rainflow algorithm, some proposing modifications. Graphical Rainflow Method (GRM) was proposed recently with a claim of faster execution times [10]. However, the steps of the graphical method of rainflow algorithm, when implemented, do not generate the same output as the four-point or ASTM standard algorithm. A modified graphical method is presented and discussed in this paper to overcome the shortcomings of graphical rainflow algorithm. A fast rainflow algorithm based on four-point algorithm but considering point comparison than range comparison is also presented. A comparison between the performances of the common rainflow algorithms [6-10], including the proposed methods, in terms of execution time, memory used, and efficiency, complexity, and load sequences is presented. Finally, the rainflow algorithm is applied to temperature data of an IGBT in assessing the lifetime of a STATCOM operating for power factor correction of the load. From 5-minute data load profiles available, the lifetime is estimated to be at 3.4 years.

  6. Risk communication with Fukushima residents affected by the Fukushima Daiichi accident at whole-body counting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunji, I.; Furuno, A.; Yonezawa, R.; Sugiyama, K. [Risk Communication Study Office, Japan Atomic Energy Agency 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1194 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, the Tokai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have had direct dialogue as risk communication with Fukushima residents who underwent whole-body counting examination (WBC). The purpose of the risk communication was to exchange information and opinions about radiation in order to mitigate Fukushima residents' anxiety and stress. Two kinds of opinion surveys were performed: one survey evaluated residents' views of the nuclear accident itself and the second survey evaluated the management of WBC examination as well as the quality of JAEA's communication skills on risks. It appears that most Fukushima residents seem to have reduced their anxiety level after the direct dialogue. The results of the surveys show that Fukushima residents have the deepest anxiety and concern about their long-term health issues and that they harbor anger toward the government and TEPCO. On the other hand, many WBC patients and patients' relatives have expressed gratitude for help in reducing their feelings of anxiety.

  7. A Methodology to Characterize Ideal Short-term Counting Conditions and Improve AADT Estimation Accuracy Using a Regression-based Correcting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    -established and robust with clear guidelines to collect short-term count data, to analyze data and develop annual average a statewide system of non-motorized data. From a planning point of view, a key measure of traffic volumes continuous counts comes from the AASHTO Guidelines for Traffic Data Programs, prepared in 1992 (AASHTO, 1992

  8. Isolation of Flow and Nonflow Correlations by Two- and Four-Particle Cumulant Measurements of Azimuthal Harmonics in $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. M. Abdelwahab; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderóndela Barca Sánchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A data-driven method was applied to measurements of Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance $\\Delta\\eta$-dependent and $\\Delta\\eta$-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a component of the correlation that is $\\Delta\\eta$-independent, which is likely dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of $\\eta$ within the measured range of pseudorapidity $|\\eta| 0.7$.

  9. Recent Developments In Fast Neutron Detection And Multiplicity Counting With Verification With Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakae, L; Chapline, G; Glenn, A; Kerr, P; Kim, K; Ouedraogo, S; Prasad, M; Sheets, S; Snyderman, N; Verbeke, J; Wurtz, R

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    For many years at LLNL, we have been developing time-correlated neutron detection techniques and algorithms for applications such as Arms Control, Threat Detection and Nuclear Material Assay. Many of our techniques have been developed specifically for the relatively low efficiency (a few percent) attainable by detector systems limited to man-portability. Historically, we used thermal neutron detectors (mainly {sup 3}He), taking advantage of the high thermal neutron interaction cross-sections. More recently, we have been investigating the use of fast neutron detection with liquid scintillators, inorganic crystals, and in the near future, pulse-shape discriminating plastics which respond over 1000 times faster (nanoseconds versus tens of microseconds) than thermal neutron detectors. Fast neutron detection offers considerable advantages, since the inherent nanosecond production time-scales of spontaneous fission and neutron-induced fission are preserved and measured instead of being lost by thermalization required for thermal neutron detectors. We are now applying fast neutron technology to the safeguards regime in the form of fast portable digital electronics as well as faster and less hazardous scintillator formulations. Faster detector response times and sensitivity to neutron momentum show promise for measuring, differentiating, and assaying samples that have modest to very high count rates, as well as mixed fission sources like Cm and Pu. We report on measured results with our existing liquid scintillator array, and progress on the design of a nuclear material assay system that incorporates fast neutron detection, including the surprising result that fast liquid scintillator detectors become competitive and even surpass the precision of {sup 3}He-based counters measuring correlated pairs in modest (kg) samples of plutonium.

  10. A unified statistical framework for material decomposition using multienergy photon counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jiyoung; Kang, Dong-Goo; Kang, Sunghoon; Sung, Younghun [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), San 14, Nong-seo dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin, Kyunggi 446-712 (Korea, Republic of)] [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), San 14, Nong-seo dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin, Kyunggi 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Jong Chul [Bio-Imaging and Signal Processing Laboratory, Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Bio-Imaging and Signal Processing Laboratory, Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Material decomposition using multienergy photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXD) has been an active research area over the past few years. Even with some success, the problem of optimal energy selection and three material decomposition including malignant tissue is still on going research topic, and more systematic studies are required. This paper aims to address this in a unified statistical framework in a mammographic environment.Methods: A unified statistical framework for energy level optimization and decomposition of three materials is proposed. In particular, an energy level optimization algorithm is derived using the theory of the minimum variance unbiased estimator, and an iterative algorithm is proposed for material composition as well as system parameter estimation under the unified statistical estimation framework. To verify the performance of the proposed algorithm, the authors performed simulation studies as well as real experiments using physical breast phantom and ex vivo breast specimen. Quantitative comparisons using various performance measures were conducted, and qualitative performance evaluations for ex vivo breast specimen were also performed by comparing the ground-truth malignant tissue areas identified by radiologists.Results: Both simulation and real experiments confirmed that the optimized energy bins by the proposed method allow better material decomposition quality. Moreover, for the specimen thickness estimation errors up to 2 mm, the proposed method provides good reconstruction results in both simulation and real ex vivo breast phantom experiments compared to existing methods.Conclusions: The proposed statistical framework of PCXD has been successfully applied for the energy optimization and decomposition of three material in a mammographic environment. Experimental results using the physical breast phantom and ex vivo specimen support the practicality of the proposed algorithm.

  11. A new parameter in attractor single-field inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinn-Ouk Gong; Misao Sasaki

    2015-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the notion of slow-roll in the context of general single-field inflation. As a generalization of slow-roll dynamics, we consider an inflaton $\\phi$ in an attractor phase where the time derivative of $\\phi$ is determined by a function of $\\phi$, $\\dot\\phi=\\dot\\phi(\\phi)$. In other words, we consider the case when the number of $e$-folds $N$ counted backward in time from the end of inflation is solely a function of $\\phi$, $N=N(\\phi)$. In this case, it is found that we need a new independent parameter to properly describe the dynamics of the inflaton field in general, in addition to the standard parameters conventionally denoted by $\\epsilon$, $\\eta$, $c_s^2$ and $s$. Two illustrative examples are presented to discuss the non-slow-roll dynamics of the inflaton field consistent with observations.

  12. A new parameter in attractor single-field inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the notion of slow-roll in the context of general single-field inflation. As a generalization of slow-roll dynamics, we consider an inflaton $\\phi$ in an attractor phase where the time derivative of $\\phi$ is determined by a function of $\\phi$, $\\dot\\phi=\\dot\\phi(\\phi)$. In other words, we consider the case when the number of $e$-folds $N$ counted backward in time from the end of inflation is solely a function of $\\phi$, $N=N(\\phi)$. In this case, it is found that we need a new independent parameter to properly describe the dynamics of the inflaton field in general, in addition to the standard parameters conventionally denoted by $\\epsilon$, $\\eta$, $c_s^2$ and $s$. Two illustrative examples are presented to discuss the non-slow-roll dynamics of the inflaton field consistent with observations.

  13. Standard Test Method for Oxygen Content Using a 14-MeV Neutron Activation and Direct-Counting Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of oxygen concentration in almost any matrix by using a 14-MeV neutron activation and direct-counting technique. Essentially, the same system may be used to determine oxygen concentrations ranging from over 50 % to about 10 g/g, or less, depending on the sample size and available 14-MeV neutron fluence rates. Note 1 - The range of analysis may be extended by using higher neutron fluence rates, larger samples, and higher counting efficiency detectors. 1.2 This test method may be used on either solid or liquid samples, provided that they can be made to conform in size, shape, and macroscopic density during irradiation and counting to a standard sample of known oxygen content. Several variants of this method have been described in the technical literature. A monograph is available which provides a comprehensive description of the principles of activation analysis using a neutron generator (1). 1.3 The values stated in either SI or inch-pound units are to be regarded...

  14. Detection of Anomalous Reactor Activity Using Antineutrino Count Rate Evolution Over the Course of a Reactor Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera Bulaevskaya; Adam Bernstein

    2010-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes the sensitivity of antineutrino count rate measurements to changes in the fissile content of civil power reactors. Such measurements may be useful in IAEA reactor safeguards applications. We introduce a hypothesis testing procedure to identify statistically significant differences between the antineutrino count rate evolution of a standard 'baseline' fuel cycle and that of an anomalous cycle, in which plutonium is removed and replaced with an equivalent fissile worth of uranium. The test would allow an inspector to detect anomalous reactor activity, or to positively confirm that the reactor is operating in a manner consistent with its declared fuel inventory and power level. We show that with a reasonable choice of detector parameters, the test can detect replacement of 73 kg of plutonium in 90 days with 95% probability, while controlling the false positive rate at 5%. We show that some improvement on this level of sensitivity may be expected by various means, including use of the method in conjunction with existing reactor safeguards methods. We also identify a necessary and sufficient daily antineutrino count rate to achieve the quoted sensitivity, and list examples of detectors in which such rates have been attained.

  15. SU-E-I-20: Dead Time Count Loss Compensation in SPECT/CT: Projection Versus Global Correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siman, W; Kappadath, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare projection-based versus global correction that compensate for deadtime count loss in SPECT/CT images. Methods: SPECT/CT images of an IEC phantom (2.3GBq 99mTc) with ?10% deadtime loss containing the 37mm (uptake 3), 28 and 22mm (uptake 6) spheres were acquired using a 2 detector SPECT/CT system with 64 projections/detector and 15 s/projection. The deadtime, Ti and the true count rate, Ni at each projection, i was calculated using the monitor-source method. Deadtime corrected SPECT were reconstructed twice: (1) with projections that were individually-corrected for deadtime-losses; and (2) with original projections with losses and then correcting the reconstructed SPECT images using a scaling factor equal to the inverse of the average fractional loss for 5 projections/detector. For both cases, the SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with attenuation and scatter corrections. The two SPECT datasets were assessed by comparing line profiles in xyplane and z-axis, evaluating the count recoveries, and comparing ROI statistics. Higher deadtime losses (up to 50%) were also simulated to the individually corrected projections by multiplying each projection i by exp(-a*Ni*Ti), where a is a scalar. Additionally, deadtime corrections in phantoms with different geometries and deadtime losses were also explored. The same two correction methods were carried for all these data sets. Results: Averaging the deadtime losses in 5 projections/detector suffices to recover >99% of the loss counts in most clinical cases. The line profiles (xyplane and z-axis) and the statistics in the ROIs drawn in the SPECT images corrected using both methods showed agreement within the statistical noise. The count-loss recoveries in the two methods also agree within >99%. Conclusion: The projection-based and the global correction yield visually indistinguishable SPECT images. The global correction based on sparse sampling of projections losses allows for accurate SPECT deadtime loss correction while keeping the study duration reasonable.

  16. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tosi@polimi.it; Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)] [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 ?m active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  17. Quantum Field Theory & Gravity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664...

  18. K-MEANS BASED SEGMENTATION FOR REAL-TIME ZENITHAL PEOPLE COUNTING Borislav Antic, Dragan Letic, Dubravko Culibrk and Vladimir Crnojevic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    K-MEANS BASED SEGMENTATION FOR REAL-TIME ZENITHAL PEOPLE COUNTING Borislav Anti´c, Dragan Leti-wise background subtraction, k-means clustering is used to enable the segmentation of single per- sons

  19. Analysis of NWS/SPC Watch Counts by Partial Winter and Spring Astronomical Seasons (January 1 to March 19 & March 20 to June 6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of NWS/SPC Watch Counts by Partial Winter and Spring Astronomical Seasons (January 1 occurring around March 20), SPC has issued an average of about 70 watches over the past nine years (Fig. 1

  20. 0 1 2 3 4 5 Fig. S1. Core photograph combined with Ca, Mn, Fe counts and Mn/Fe ratio determined by XRF core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    1. Core photograph combined with Ca, Mn, Fe counts and Mn/Fe ratio determined by XRF core scanning determined by XRF core scanning on core ZH10-19 from Lake Zurich recovered in 135 m water depth (2 m above counts and Mn/Fe ratio determined by XRF core scanning on core ZH10-21 from Lake Zurich recovered in 123

  1. Introduction Classical Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Christian

    Introduction Classical Field Theory Locally Covariant Quantum Field Theory Renormalization Time evolution Conclusions and outlook Locality and Algebraic Structures in Field Theory Klaus Fredenhagen II¨utsch and Pedro Lauridsen Ribeiro) Klaus Fredenhagen Locality and Algebraic Structures in Field Theory #12

  2. Cloning Hubble Deep Fields II: Models for Evolution by Bright Galaxy Image Transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rychard J. Bouwens; Tom Broadhurst; Joseph Silk

    1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In a companion paper we outlined a methodology for generating parameter-free, model-independent ``no-evolution'' fields of faint galaxy images, demonstrating the need for significant evolution in the HDF at faint magnitudes. Here we incorporate evolution into our procedure, by transforming the input bright galaxy images with redshift, for comparison with the HDF at faint magnitudes. Pure luminosity evolution is explored assuming that galaxy surface brightness evolves uniformly, at a rate chosen to reproduce the I-band counts. This form of evolution exacerbates the size discrepancy identified by our no-evolution simulations, by increasing the area of a galaxy visible to a fixed isophote. Reasonable dwarf-augmented models are unable to generate the count excess invoking moderate rates of stellar evolution. A plausible fit to the counts and sizes is provided by `mass-conserving' density-evolution, consistent with small-scale hierarchical growth, where the product of disk area and space density is conserved with redshift. Here the increased surface brightness generated by stellar evolution is accomodated by the reduced average galaxy size, for a wide range of geometries. These models are useful for assessing the limitations of the HDF images, by calculating their rates of incompleteness and the degree of over-counting. Finally we demonstrate the potential for improvement in quantifying evolution at fainter magnitudes using the HST Advanced Camera, with its superior UV and optical performance.

  3. Stewart Morrow Field - DOE Class 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchardt, P.; Reynolds, R.R.; Watney, L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two demonstration cost-share projects are being conducted in Kansas under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Class 1 Oil Program for fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs. These projects are one of fourteen awards granted by DOE nationwide for projects in this reservoir classification. The projects are conducted in a cooperative manner, involving University of Kansas scientists, engineers, and geologists and independent oil operators. The Stewart Field project is located in Finney County, Kansas. This project involves a Morrow reservoir located in the southwestern part of the State. Morrow reservoirs of western Kansas are still actively being explored and constitute an important resource in Kansas. Cumulative oil production from the Marrow in Kansas is over 174,308,000 bbls. Much of the production from the Morrow is still in the primary stage and has not reached the mature declining stage. The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. The general topics addressed are (1) reservoir management and primary drive performance evaluation, and (2) the demonstration of a recovery process involving off-the-shelf technology which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery and increase reserves. Future plans consist of the design, construction and operation of a waterflood installation incorporated fieldwide utilizing state-of-the art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. Production and reservoir data will be analyzed using reservoir characterization techniques and by updating the existing reservoir simulation. The analysis of results will be utilized to optimize the waterflood plan and flooding techniques to maximize the secondary oil recovery.

  4. Nucleon Polarisabilities from Deuteron Compton Scattering, and Its Lessons for Chiral Power Counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harald W. Griesshammer

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of Compton scattering off the deuteron in Chiral Effective Field Theory, including gauge invariance and the correct Thomson limit. We model-independently determine the iso-scalar, spin-independent dipole polarisabilities of the nucleon at zero energy from all Compton data below 100 MeV as \\alpha_{E1}^s=11.3+-0.7_{stat}\\+-0.6_{Baldin}+-1_{theory}, \\beta_{M1}^s=3.2-+0.7_{stat}+-0.6_{Baldin}+-1_{theory}, each in 10^{-4} fm^3. Proton and neutron polarisabilities are therefore identical within (predominantly statistical) errors.

  5. U.S. Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb MarFields34 1,035DecadeDecade Year-0 Year-1

  6. U.S. Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb MarFields34 1,035DecadeDecade Year-0

  7. Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current Distributions of Infrared Optical Antennas: A Near-Field Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current...

  8. An interdisciplinary approach to reservoir management: The Malu Field, West Niger Delta, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, B.A.; Bluhm, C.T. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum, San Ramon, CA (United States); Adokpaye, E.U. [Chevron Nigeria Limited, Lekki (Nigeria)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Malu Field is 175 kilometers southeast of Lagos, offshore Nigeria. The field was discovered in 1967 and brought on stream in 1971. Peak production reached 31,300 barrels per day in 1972. Twenty-six wells have been drilled in the thirty-six square kilometer size field. In 1990 original-oil-in-place was estimated at 345 million barrels with cumulative production of 109 million barrels and an estimated 40 million barrels of remaining reserves. The Main Field review was initiated in 1994 to resolve structural and production inconsistencies and therefore improve reservoir performance. The tools used include reprocessed three-dimensional seismic, oil chemistry (primarily gas chromatography), and production data. The complexly faulted field is subdivided into seven different fault blocks. Growth faults generally trend northwest to southeast and are downthrown to the west. Twenty-five different hydrocarbon-bearing sands have been identified within the field. These sands are separated into sixty-three different reservoirs by the series of southeast trending growth faults. Most sands are laterally continuous within mapped fault blocks except in east Malu. Cross-fault communication of oils occurs among several of the shallow reservoirs in west Malu allowing wells to deplete unintended horizons. In addition, three of the dual string completions are producing oil only from only the upper sands. The integration of seismic, oil chemistry, and production data allows more efficient management of production by providing accurate structure maps, reserve estimates, drainage pathways, and justification for workovers and future development drilling.

  9. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  10. When Fields Collide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, David I.

    Particle cosmology is among the hottest of hot topics in physics today. The field investigates the smallest units of matter and their role in determining the shape and fate of the entire universe. In recent years the field ...

  11. Double field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Chris

    The zero modes of closed strings on a torus — the torus coordinates plus dual coordinates conjugate to winding number — parameterize a doubled torus. In closed string field theory, the string field depends on all zero-modes ...

  12. String Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor

    2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This elementary introduction to string field theory highlights the features and the limitations of this approach to quantum gravity as it is currently understood. String field theory is a formulation of string theory as a field theory in space-time with an infinite number of massive fields. Although existing constructions of string field theory require expanding around a fixed choice of space-time background, the theory is in principle background-independent, in the sense that different backgrounds can be realized as different field configurations in the theory. String field theory is the only string formalism developed so far which, in principle, has the potential to systematically address questions involving multiple asymptotically distinct string backgrounds. Thus, although it is not yet well defined as a quantum theory, string field theory may eventually be helpful for understanding questions related to cosmology in string theory.

  13. Covariant Noncommutative Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estrada-Jimenez, S. [Licenciaturas en Fisica y en Matematicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas Calle 4a Ote. Nte. 1428, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Garcia-Compean, H. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN P.O. Box 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F., Mexico and Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Monterrey Via del Conocimiento 201, Parque de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica (PIIT) Autopista nueva al Aeropuerto km 9.5, Lote 1, Manzana 29, cp. 66600 Apodaca Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Obregon, O. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato P.O. Box E-143, 37150 Leon Gto. (Mexico); Ramirez, C. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, P.O. Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The covariant approach to noncommutative field and gauge theories is revisited. In the process the formalism is applied to field theories invariant under diffeomorphisms. Local differentiable forms are defined in this context. The lagrangian and hamiltonian formalism is consistently introduced.

  14. Facilities Management Field Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Facilities Management Field Services FieldStationsAnnualReport2006 #12;Cover Photo by Dr Mark Jermy coast #12; Introduction A very wet Steve Weaver emerges from the river. Ah, field work! The Government broadband, at least there is now an alternative to the telephone line. Electrical power spikes (and outages

  15. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cammin, Jochen, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)] [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Xu, Jennifer [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors’ previous work [K. Taguchi et al., “Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects,” Med. Phys. 38(2), 1089–1102 (2011)]. The agreement between the x-ray spectra calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model and the measured spectra was evaluated for various levels of deadtime loss ratios (DLR) and incident spectral shapes, realized using different attenuators, in terms of the weighted coefficient of variation (COV{sub W}), i.e., the root mean square difference weighted by the statistical errors of the data and divided by the mean. Results: At low count rates, when DLR < 10%, the distorted spectra measured by the DXMCT-1 were in agreement with those calculated by SRE only, with COV{sub W}'s less than 4%. At higher count rates, the measured spectra were also in agreement with the ones calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model; with PMMA as attenuator, COV{sub W} was 5.6% at a DLR of 22% and as small as 6.7% for a DLR as high as 55%. Conclusions: The x-ray spectra calculated by the proposed model agreed with the measured spectra over a wide range of count rates and spectral shapes. The SRE model predicted the distorted, recorded spectra with low count rates over various types and thicknesses of attenuators. The study also validated the hypothesis that the complex spectral distortions in a PCD can be adequately modeled by cascading the count-rate independent SRE and the count-rate dependent PPE.

  16. ARM Research in the Equatorial Western Pacific: A Decade and Counting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Charles N.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Minnis, Patrick; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Mather, James H.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Jensen, Michael; Jakob, Christian

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The tropical western Pacific (TWP) is an important climatic region. Strong solar heating, warm sea surface temperatures and the annual progression of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) across this region generate abundant convective systems, which through their effects on the heat and water budgets have a profound impact on global climate and precipitation. To accurately represent tropical cloud systems in models, measurements of tropical clouds, the environment in which they reside, and their impact on the radiation and water budgets are needed. Because of the remote location, ground-based datasets of cloud, atmosphere, and radiation properties from the TWP region have traditionally come primarily from short-term field experiments. While providing extremely useful information on physical processes, these datasets are limited in statistical and climatological information because of their short duration. To provide long-term measurements of the surface radiation budget in the tropics, and the atmospheric properties that affect it, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program established a measurement site on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea in 1996 and on the island republic of Nauru in late 1998. These sites provide unique datasets available from more than 10 years of operation in the equatorial western Pacific on Manus and Nauru. We present examples of the scientific use of these datasets including characterization of cloud properties, analysis of cloud radiative forcing, model studies of tropical clouds and processes, and validation of satellite algorithms. We also note new instrumentation recently installed at the Manus site that will expand opportunities for tropical atmospheric science.

  17. Covariant Hamiltonian Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jürgen Struckmeier; Andreas Redelbach

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A consistent, local coordinate formulation of covariant Hamiltonian field theory is presented. Whereas the covariant canonical field equations are equivalent to the Euler-Lagrange field equations, the covariant canonical transformation theory offers more general means for defining mappings that preserve the form of the field equations than the usual Lagrangian description. It is proved that Poisson brackets, Lagrange brackets, and canonical 2-forms exist that are invariant under canonical transformations of the fields. The technique to derive transformation rules for the fields from generating functions is demonstrated by means of various examples. In particular, it is shown that the infinitesimal canonical transformation furnishes the most general form of Noether's theorem. We furthermore specify the generating function of an infinitesimal space-time step that conforms to the field equations.

  18. Luminosity Functions And Evolution Of Blue Galaxies In A Deep Multicolor CCD Field Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles T. Liu; Richard F. Green; Patrick B. Hall; Patrick S. Osmer

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete sample of 659 field galaxies with 17.0$Green 1998). Total number counts of the galaxies in the U-band give a count slope d(logN)/dM = 0.55 $\\pm$ 0.05, consistent with previous studies. The 545 galaxies in the sample classified as spectral type Sbc or bluer are analyzed for signs of evolution with redshift, and for unusual star formation histories. The U-band luminosity function of these blue galaxies at 0.02$energy distributions indicating strong starburst activity, is observed at z$\\gtrsim$0.3 but not at z$<$0.3. This population is confirmed via spectroscopy of part of the sample. These may be galaxies temporarily brightened by global starbursts, which subsequently fade and redden at lower redshifts.

  19. Free-running InGaAs single photon detector with 1 dark count per second at 10% efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris Korzh; Nino Walenta; Tommaso Lunghi; Nicolas Gisin; Hugo Zbinden

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a free-running single photon detector for telecom wavelengths based on a negative feedback avalanche photodiode (NFAD). A dark count rate as low as 1 cps was obtained at a detection efficiency of 10%, with an afterpulse probability of 2.2% for 20 {\\mu}s of deadtime. This was achieved by using an active hold-off circuit and cooling the NFAD with a free-piston stirling cooler down to temperatures of -110${^o}$C. We integrated two detectors into a practical, 625 MHz clocked quantum key distribution system. Stable, real-time key distribution in presence of 30 dB channel loss was possible, yielding a secret key rate of 350 bps.

  20. Free-running InGaAs single photon detector with 1 cps dark count rate at 10% efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korzh, Boris; Lunghi, Tommaso; Gisin, Nicolas; Zbinden, Hugo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a free-running single photon detector for telecom wavelengths based on a negative feedback avalanche photodiode (NFAD). A dark count rate as low as 1 cps was obtained at a detection efficiency of 10%, with an afterpulse probability of 2.2% for 20 {\\mu}s of deadtime. This was achieved by using an active hold-off circuit and cooling the NFAD with a free-piston stirling cooler down to temperatures of -110${^o}$C. We integrated two detectors into a practical, 625 MHz clocked quantum key distribution system. Stable, real-time key distribution in presence of 30 dB channel loss was possible, yielding a secret key rate of 350 bps.

  1. Free-running InGaAs single photon detector with 1 dark count per second at 10% efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korzh, B., E-mail: Boris.Korzh@unige.ch; Walenta, N.; Lunghi, T.; Gisin, N.; Zbinden, H. [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, Chemin de Pinchat 22, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a free-running single photon detector for telecom wavelengths based on a negative feedback avalanche photodiode (NFAD). A dark count rate as low as 1?cps was obtained at a detection efficiency of 10%, with an afterpulse probability of 2.2% for 20??s of deadtime. This was achieved by using an active hold-off circuit and cooling the NFAD with a free-piston stirling cooler down to temperatures of ?110?°C. We integrated two detectors into a practical, 625?MHz clocked quantum key distribution system. Stable, real-time key distribution in the presence of 30?dB channel loss was possible, yielding a secret key rate of 350?bps.

  2. 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 kCounts RIC all trae4.ms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O CH2OH O CHO 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 minutes 0 50 100 150 200 250 kCounts RIC all trae4.ms O CH2OH O CHO 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 minutes 0 50 100 150 200 250 kCounts RIC all trae4.ms 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 minutes 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 minutes 0 50 100 150 200 250 kCounts RIC all trae4.ms

  3. Standard Test Method for Size-Differentiated Counting of Particles and Fibers Released from Cleanroom Wipers Using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers testing all wipers used in cleanrooms and other controlled environments for characteristics related to particulate cleanliness. 1.2 This test method includes the use of computer-based image analysis and counting hardware and software for the counting of densely particle-laden filters (see ). While the use of this equipment is not absolutely necessary, it is strongly recommended to enhance the accuracy, speed, and consistency of counting. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Evaluation of two-stage system for neutron measurement aiming at increase in count rate at Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Fusion Neutronics Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinohara, K., E-mail: shinohara.koji@jaea.go.jp; Ochiai, K.; Sukegawa, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ishii, K.; Kitajima, S. [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Baba, M. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Sasao, M. [Organization for Research Initiatives and Development, Doshisha University, Kyoto 602-8580 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to increase the count rate capability of a neutron detection system as a whole, we propose a multi-stage neutron detection system. Experiments to test the effectiveness of this concept were carried out on Fusion Neutronics Source. Comparing four configurations of alignment, it was found that the influence of an anterior stage on a posterior stage was negligible for the pulse height distribution. The two-stage system using 25 mm thickness scintillator was about 1.65 times the count rate capability of a single detector system for d-D neutrons and was about 1.8 times the count rate capability for d-T neutrons. The results suggested that the concept of a multi-stage detection system will work in practice.

  5. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zihua Weng

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in the interplanetary space between the sun and the earth.

  6. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  7. Theory of electromagnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the theory of electromagnetic fields, with an emphasis on aspects relevant to radiofrequency systems in particle accelerators. We begin by reviewing Maxwell's equations and their physical significance. We show that in free space, there are solutions to Maxwell's equations representing the propagation of electromagnetic fields as waves. We introduce electromagnetic potentials, and show how they can be used to simplify the calculation of the fields in the presence of sources. We derive Poynting's theorem, which leads to expressions for the energy density and energy flux in an electromagnetic field. We discuss the properties of electromagnetic waves in cavities, waveguides and transmission lines.

  8. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  9. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  10. Hot Pot Field Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  11. Constructive Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Gallavotti

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the renormalization group approach to the proof of non perturbative ultraviolet stability in scalar field theories in dimension d=2,3.

  12. Electromagnetic Lorenz Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Potter

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge transformations are potential transformations that leave only specific Maxwell fields invariant. To reveal more, I develop Lorenz field equations with full Maxwell form for nongauge, sans gauge function, transformations yielding mixed, superposed retarded and outgoing, potentials. The form invariant Lorenz condition is then a charge conservation equivalent. This allows me to define three transformation classes that screen for Lorenz relevance. The nongauge Lorentz conditions add polarization fields which support emergent, light-like rays that convey energy on charge conserving phase points. These localized rays escape discovery in modern Maxwell fields where the polarizations are suppressed by gauge transformations.

  13. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schr¨odinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  14. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schr¨odinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  15. Reservoir analysis study, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 2 report, Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) is located in Kern County, California, and is jointly owned by the US Department of Energy and Chevron USA Inc. The Elk Hills Field is presently producing oil and gas from five geologic zones. These zones contain a number of separate and geologically complex reservoirs. Considerable field development and production of oil and gas have occurred since initial estimates of reserves were made. Total cumulative field production through December 1987 is 850 MMBbls of oil, 1.2 Tcf of gas and 648.2 MMBbls of water. In December 1987, field producing rates expressed on a calendar day basis amounted to 110,364 BOPD, 350,946 Mcfd and 230,179 BWPD from 1157 producers. In addition, a total of two reservoirs have gas injection in progress and four reservoirs have water injection in progress and four reservoirs have water injection in progress. Cumulative gas and water injection amounted to 586 Bcf of gas and 330 MMB of water. December 1987 gas and water injection rates amounted to 174 MMcfd and 234 MBWPD, into 129 injectors. In addition, a steamflood pilot program is currently active in the Eastern Shallow Oil Zone. Jerry R. Bergeson and Associates, Inc. (Bergeson) has completed Phase II of the Reservoir Analysis, Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1, Elk Hills Oilfield, California. The objectives for this phase of the study included the establishment of revised estimates of the original oil and gas-in-place for each of the zones/reservoirs, estimation of the remaining proved developed, proved undeveloped, probable and possible reserves, and assessment of the effects of historical development and production operations and practices on recoverable reserves. 28 figs., 37 tabs.

  16. Travel demand can be elegantly represented using an Origin-Destination (OD) matrix. The link counts observed on the network are produced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Travel demand can be elegantly represented using an Origin-Destination (OD) matrix. The link counts to reconstruct the OD matrix. An offline approach to estimate a static OD matrix over the peak period for freeway optimization routine, MINOS, interfaced to estimate an OD matrix. This approach is an application

  17. Neutron detection and multiplicity counting using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.C.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron detection and multiplicity counting has been investigated using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array. Boron-loaded plastic combines neutron moderation (H) and detection ({sup 10}B) at the molecular level, thereby physically coupling increasing detection efficiency and decreasing die-away time with detector volume. Both of these characteristics address a fundamental limitation of thermal-neutron multiplicity counters, where {sup 3}He proportional counters are embedded in a polyethylene matrix. Separation of the phoswich response into its plastic scintillator and bismuth germanate components was accomplished on a pulse-by-pulse basis using custom integrator and timing circuits. In addition, a custom time-tag module was used to provide a time for each detector event. Analysis of the combined energy and time event stream was performed by calibrating each detector`s response and filtering based on the presence of a simultaneous energy deposition corresponding to the {sup 10}B(n,alpha) reaction products in the plastic scintillator (93 keV{sub ee}) and the accompanying neutron-capture gamma ray in the bismuth germanate (478 keV). Time-correlation analysis was subsequently performed on the filtered event stream to obtain shift-register-type singles and doubles count rates. Proof-of-principle measurements were conducted with a variety of gamma-ray and neutron sources including {sup 137}Cs, {sup 54}Mn, AmLi, and {sup 252}Cf. Results of this study indicate that a neutron-capture probability of {approximately}10% and a die-away time of {approximately}10 {micro}s are possible with a 4-detector array with a detector volume of 1600 cm{sup 3}. Simulations were performed that indicate neutron-capture probabilities on the order of 50% and die-away times of less than 4 {micro}s are realistically achievable. While further study will be required for practical application of such a detection system, the results obtained in this investigation are encouraging and may lead to a new class of high-efficiency, short die-away time neutron multiplicity counters capable of extending current nondestructive assay methods for special nuclear materials.

  18. Radiation Field on Superspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    1994-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

  19. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar [Advanced Design Consulting USA, 126 Ridge Road, P.O. Box 187, Lansing, NY 14882 (United States); Dunn, Jonathan Hunter [MAX-lab, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  20. SMOOTH INTERPOLATION WITH CUMULATIVE CHORD CUBICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozera, Ryszard

    and Software Engineering The University Western Australia 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009 WA, Perth Australia ryszard@csse.uwa.edu.au Lyle Noakes School of Mathematics and Statistics The University of Western Australia 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009 WA, Perth Australia lyle@maths.uwa.edu.au Abstract Smooth

  1. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Cumulative (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  2. Hoe Creek 1990 quarterly sampling cumulative report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crader, S.E.; Huntington, G.S.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for benzene and for total phenols three times during 1990. This report summarizes the results of these sampling events and compares the results with those obtained in previous years. Possible further options for remediation of the Hoe Creek site was addressed. Three underground coal gasification (UCG) burns were performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy in 1976, 1977, and 1979 at the Hoe Creek site, which is about 20 miles south of Gillette, Wyoming. As a result of these burns, there has been considerable contamination of groundwater by various organic compounds. There have been three efforts at remediating this situation. In 1986 and again in 1987, contaminated water was pumped out, treated, and reinjected. In 1989, the water was pumped, treated, and sprayed into the atmosphere. Benzene and total phenols have been monitored at various monitoring wells as the site during 1990. The highest detected benzene concentration in 1990 was 220 {mu}g/L, and the highest total phenols concentration was 430 {mu}g/L. It is apparent that contamination is still above baseline levels, although the concentration of total phenols is far less than immediately after the burns. The burned coal seams are still releasing organic compounds into the groundwater that passes through them.

  3. RESEARCH and RELATED BUDGET - Cumulative Budget

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |D I S P U REPORT15, 2015

  4. Report - Considering Cumulative Effects Under NEPA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptemberAssessments | Department ofSouthern CompanyAsConsidering

  5. Digital Pulse-Shape Discrimination Applied to an Ultra-Low-Background Gas-Proportional Counting System: First Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, Cory T.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Williams, Richard M.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract A new ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) design was recently developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This design, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS) which provides passive and active shielding with radon exclusion, has been developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (~30 meters water-equivalent) constructed at PNNL. After these steps to mitigate dominant backgrounds (cosmic rays, external gamma-rays, radioactivity in materials), remaining background events do not exclusively arise from ionization of the proportional counter gas. Digital pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) is thus employed to further improve measurement sensitivity. In this work, a template shape is generated for each individual sample measurement of interest, a "self-calibrating" template. Differences in event topology can also cause differences in pulse shape. In this work, the temporal region analyzed for each event is refined to maximize background discrimination while avoiding unwanted sensitivity to event topology. This digital PSD method is applied to sample and background data, and initial measurement results from a biofuel methane sample are presented in the context of low-background measurements currently being developed.

  6. Consistency between renormalization group running of chiral operator and counting rule -- Case of chiral pion production operator --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi X. Nakamura; Anders Gardestig

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear chiral perturbation theory (ChPT), an operator is defined in a space with a cutoff which may be varied within a certain range. The operator runs as a result of the variation of the cutoff [renormalization group (RG) running]. In order for ChPT to be useful, the operator should run in a way consistent with the counting rule; that is, the running of chiral counter terms have to be of natural size. We vary the cutoff using the Wilsonian renormalization group (WRG) equation, and examine this consistency. As an example, we study the s-wave pion production operator for NN\\to d pi, derived in ChPT. We demonstrate that the WRG running does not generate any chiral-symmetry-violating (CSV) interaction, provided that we start with an operator which does not contain a CSV term. We analytically show how the counter terms are generated in the WRG running in case of the infinitesimal cutoff reduction. Based on the analytic result, we argue a range of the cutoff variation for which the running of the counter terms is of natural size. Then, we numerically confirm this.

  7. Low-Intrusion Techniques and Sensitive Information Management for Warhead Counting and Verification: FY2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Gilbert, Andrew J.; Misner, Alex C.; Pitts, W. Karl; White, Timothy A.; Seifert, Allen; Miller, Erin A.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future arms control treaties may push nuclear weapons limits to unprecedented low levels and may entail precise counting of warheads as well as distinguishing between strategic and tactical nuclear weapons. Such advances will require assessment of form and function to confidently verify the presence or absence of nuclear warheads and/or their components. Imaging with penetrating radiation can provide such an assessment and could thus play a unique role in inspection scenarios. Yet many imaging capabilities have been viewed as too intrusive from the perspective of revealing weapon design details, and the potential for the release of sensitive information poses challenges in verification settings. A widely held perception is that verification through radiography requires images of sufficient quality that an expert (e.g., a trained inspector or an image-matching algorithm) can verify the presence or absence of components of a device. The concept of information barriers (IBs) has been established to prevent access to relevant weapon-design information by inspectors (or algorithms), and has, to date, limited the usefulness of radiographic inspection. The challenge of this project is to demonstrate that radiographic information can be used behind an IB to improve the capabilities of treaty-verification weapons-inspection systems.

  8. field_equipment.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIELD EQUIPMENT INVENTORY Trucks * Five vacpressure trucks, 60-90 bbl, up to 5 bpm at 5,000 lb. * Waterfi re truck, 110 bbl * Two dump trucks: 5-yard and 12-yard * Belly dump...

  9. Manager, Carlsbad Field Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is seeking a highly experienced and motivated executive-minded individual to fill its...

  10. Three Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    viii Contents. Three Field Theory. 87—89. 90—95. 96—97. 98—107. 108—114. 115—121. De?nition and examples of ?eld structure 67. Vector spaces, bases ...

  11. HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlapentokh, Alexandra

    HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields Alexandra Shlapentokh East Carolina University AMS-ASL-MAA Panel on Hilberts Tenth Problem San Francisco January 14, 2010 #12;HTP over Function's known about HTP over Function Fields. Field Results for Characteristic 0 Field Results for Positive

  12. Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wornell, Gregory W.

    Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation Anthony Accardi1,2 and Gregory light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of coherent image formation that strikes a balance between the utility of the light field

  13. The Hot and Energetic Universe: The Wide Field Imager (WFI) for Athena+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, A; Nandra, K; Porro, M; Barret, D; Santangelo, A; Schmid, C; Struder, L; Tenzer, C; Wilms, J; Amoros, C; Andritschke, R; Aschauer, F; Bahr, A; Gunther, B; Furmetz, M; Ott, B; Perinati, E; Rambaud, D; Reiffers, J; Treis, J; von Kienlin, A; Weidenspointner, G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wide Field Imager (WFI) is one of the two scientific instruments proposed for the Athena+ X-ray observatory. It will provide imaging in the 0.1-15 keV band over a wide field, simultaneously with spectrally and time-resolved photon counting. The instrument is designed to make optimal use of the grasp (collecting area times solid angle product) provided by the optical design of the Athena+ mirror system (Willingale et al. 2013), by combining a sensitive approx. 40' diameter field of view (baseline; 50' goal) DEPFET detector with a pixel size properly sampling the angular resolution of 5 arc sec on-axis (half energy width).This synthesis makes the WFI a very powerful survey instrument, significantly surpassing currently existing capabilities (Nandra et al. 2013; Aird et al. 2013). In addition, the WFI will provide unprecedented simultaneous high-time resolution and high count rate capabilities for the observation of bright sources with low pile-up and high efficiency. In this paper, we summarize the instrume...

  14. Extending PIC schemes for the study of physics in ultra-strong laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonoskov, A; Efimenko, E; Ilderton, A; Marklund, M; Meyerov, I; Muraviev, A; Surmin, I; Wallin, E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in laser technology has opened up possibilities using intense light to probe fundamental physics of ultra-strong electromagnetic fields. A commensurate interest has arisen in large-scale numerical simulations of laser-matter interactions, and here we describe the extension of particle-in-cell (PIC) schemes to account for strong field phenomena. We describe here the numerical implementation of strong-field processes such as quantized emission and electron-positron pair production, and provide solutions for related methodological and algorithmic problems of radiation double counting, low-energy cutoffs in particle emission, memory overload due to cascades of particle production, control of computational costs for statistical routines, and the limitations on time steps due to the quantized nature of emission. We also present a unified technical interface for including the processes of interest in different PIC implementations. The PIC codes PICADOR and ELMIS, which support this interface, are briefly re...

  15. Neutron Coincidence Counting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Jeremy L.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency comparison for measured and simulated responses of a 10B-lined proportional counter and a 3He proportional counter in a close, symmetrical geometry are presented. The measurement geometry was modeled in MCNPX to validate the methods used for simulating the response of both the 3He and 10B-lined tubes. The MCNPX models agree within 1% with the 3He tube measurements and within 3% for the 10B-lined tubes when a 0.75-µm boron-metal lining is used.

  16. Job Counting Guidelines

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approvedof EnergyWorldJason ArmstrongJennifer

  17. Field error lottery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Quimby, D.C. (Spectra Technology, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of {plus minus}25{mu}m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  19. Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF{sub 6} spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing {sup 238}U from those containing the lighter {sup 235}U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF{sub 6} gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

  20. STATISTICAL MECHANICS AND FIELD THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel, S.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    York. K. Bardakci, Field Theory for Solitons, II, BerkeleyFart I Applications of Field Theory Methods to StatisticalStatistical Mechanics to Field Theory Chapter IV The Grand

  1. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  2. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  3. Anomalies for Galilean fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristan Jensen

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We initiate a systematic study of `t Hooft anomalies in Galilean field theories, focusing on two questions therein. In the first, we consider the non-relativistic theories obtained from a discrete light-cone quantization (DLCQ) of a relativistic theory with flavor or gravitational anomalies. We find that these anomalies survive the DLCQ, becoming mixed flavor/boost or gravitational/boost anomalies. We also classify the pure Weyl anomalies of Schr\\"odinger theories, which are Galilean conformal field theories (CFTs) with $z=2$. There are no pure Weyl anomalies in even spacetime dimension, and the lowest-derivative anomalies in odd dimension are in one-to-one correspondence with those of a relativistic CFT in one dimension higher. These results classify many of the anomalies that arise in the field theories dual to string theory on Schr\\"odinger spacetimes.

  4. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  5. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were performed enhanced oil recovery field pilot was performed in Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Studies were performed to determine a nutrient system to encourage growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria an inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient material were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor an additional production well in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicated the additional production well monitored during the field trial was also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels of tertiary oil was recovered. Microbial activity increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulphide concentration was experienced. These observations indicate that an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. The three production wells monitored in the pilot area demonstrated significant permeability reduction indicated by interwell pressure interference tests. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform (15 md maximum difference between post-treatment permeability values) indicating that preferential plugging had occurred.

  6. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

  7. Noncommutative Quantum Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. O. Girotti

    2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We start by reviewing the formulation of noncommutative quantum mechanics as a constrained system. Then, we address to the problem of field theories defined on a noncommutative space-time manifold. The Moyal product is introduced and the appearance of the UV/IR mechanism is exemplified. The emphasis is on finding and analyzing noncommutative quantum field theories which are renormalizable and free of nonintegrable infrared singularities. In this last connection we give a detailed discussion of the quantization of the noncommutative Wess-Zumino model as well as of its low energy behavior.

  8. Comparison of electrical CD measurements and cross-section lattice-plane counts of sub-micrometer features replicated in Silicon-on-Insulator materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRESSWELL,MICHAEL W.; BONEVICH,JOHN E.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; ALLEN,RICHARD A.; GIANNUZZI,LUCILLE A.; EVERIST,SARAH C.; GHOSHTAGORE,RATHINDRA, N.; SHEA,PATRICK J.

    2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical test structures of the type known as cross-bridge resistors have been patterned in (100) epitaxial silicon material that was grown on Bonded and Etched-Back Silicon-on-Insulator (BESOI) substrates. The CDs (Critical Dimensions) of a selection of their reference segments have been measured electrically, by SEM (Scanning-Electron Microscopy) cross-section imaging, and by lattice-plane counting. The lattice-plane counting is performed on phase-contrast images made by High-Resolution Transmission-Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The reference-segment features were aligned with <110> directions in the BESOI surface material. They were defined by a silicon micromachining process which results in their sidewalls being atomically-planar and smooth and inclined at 54.737{degree} to the surface (100) plane of the substrate. This (100) implementation may usefully complement the attributes of the previously-reported vertical-sidewall one for selected reference-material applications. The SEM, HRTEM, and electrical CD (ECD) linewidth measurements that are made on BESOI features of various drawn dimensions on the same substrate is being investigated to determine the feasibility of a CD traceability path that combines the low cost, robustness, and repeatability of the ECD technique and the absolute measurement of the HRTEM lattice-plane counting technique. Other novel aspects of the (100) SOI implementation that are reported here are the ECD test-structure architecture and the making of HRTEM lattice-plane counts from both cross-sectional, as well as top-down, imaging of the reference features. This paper describes the design details and the fabrication of the cross-bridge resistor test structure. The long-term goal is to develop a technique for the determination of the absolute dimensions of the trapezoidal cross-sections of the cross-bridge resistors reference segments, as a prelude to making them available for dimensional reference applications.

  9. Experimental quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, J S

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented here, is, in the opinion of the author, the essential minimum of quantum field theory that should be known to cultivated experimental particle physicists. The word experimental describes not only the audience aimed at but also the level of mathematical rigour aspired to. (0 refs).

  10. Matthew Knight Hammer Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    MILLER THEATRE COMPLEX Beall Concert Outdoor Program Barn MRI Bean East Bean West Riverfront Fields Mc Military Science Moss Street Children's Center Knight Law Museum of Natural and Cultural History Bean East Innovation Center Rainier Romania Warehouse Chilled Water Plant Alder PeaceHealth University District

  11. Matthew Knight Hammer Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Outdoor Program Barn MRI Bean East Bean West Riverfront Fields McClure Morton Sheldon Stafford Young Law Museum of Natural and Cultural History Bean East Campus Graduate Village Ford Alumni Center Chilled Water Plant Alder PeaceHealth University District Northwest Christian University Pioneer Cemetery

  12. Single-field $?$-attractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Linde

    2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe a simple class of $\\alpha$-attractors, generalizing the single-field GL model of inflation in supergravity. The new class of models is defined for $0<\\alpha \\lesssim 1$, providing a good match to the present cosmological data. I also present a generalized version of these models which can describe not only inflation but also dark energy and supersymmetry breaking.

  13. Algebraic Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans Halvorson; Michael Mueger

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Algebraic quantum field theory provides a general, mathematically precise description of the structure of quantum field theories, and then draws out consequences of this structure by means of various mathematical tools -- the theory of operator algebras, category theory, etc.. Given the rigor and generality of AQFT, it is a particularly apt tool for studying the foundations of QFT. This paper is a survey of AQFT, with an orientation towards foundational topics. In addition to covering the basics of the theory, we discuss issues related to nonlocality, the particle concept, the field concept, and inequivalent representations. We also provide a detailed account of the analysis of superselection rules by S. Doplicher, R. Haag, and J. E. Roberts (DHR); and we give an alternative proof of Doplicher and Roberts' reconstruction of fields and gauge group from the category of physical representations of the observable algebra. The latter is based on unpublished ideas due to Roberts and the abstract duality theorem for symmetric tensor *-categories, a self-contained proof of which is given in the appendix.

  14. Field/source duality in topological field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Delphenich

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the sources of physical fields and the fields themselves is investigated with regard to the coupling of topological information between them. A class of field theories that we call topological field theories is defined such that both the field and its source represent de Rham cocycles in varying dimensions over complementary subspaces and the coupling of one to the other is by way of an isomorphism of the those cohomology spaces, which we refer to as field/source duality. The deeper basis for such an isomorphism is investigated and the process is described for various elementary physical examples of topological field theories.

  15. Characterization Methodology for Decommissioning Low and Intermediate Level Fissile Nuclide Contaminated Buried Soils and Process Piping Using Photon Counting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Megan L

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon GEANT4 GEometry ANd Tracking Monte Carlo Code GWD Giga-Watt Days HDP Hematite Decommissioning Project HEU Highly Enriched Uranium IAEA International Atomic Energy Agency ILW Intermediate Level Waste ISOCs In-Situ Object... Field Measured LaBr Overlay on MCNP Spectra for HEU ................................. 44 3 Code System and Software Summary .................................................................. 52 4 Dimensions of the Canberra Industries Model IPROL-1...

  16. HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOK GEOLOGY 143A ­ Field Geology of Northern Arizona 27 March University Geology 143A Northern Arizona Field Course, 27 March ­ 03 April 2010 Field Trip Guidebook by: Prof. Charles Merguerian 2010 Arizona ­ a Macro View Physically, he was not what you would call an imposing

  17. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  18. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S., E-mail: shishirk@gmail.com; Raghavan, S. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Duesberg, G. S. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) and School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, D2 (Ireland); Pratap, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ?10?nA ?m{sup ?1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  19. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  20. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  1. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  3. Polymer Parametrised Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok Laddha; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Free scalar field theory on 2 dimensional flat spacetime, cast in diffeomorphism invariant guise by treating the inertial coordinates of the spacetime as dynamical variables, is quantized using LQG type `polymer' representations for the matter field and the inertial variables. The quantum constraints are solved via group averaging techniques and, analogous to the case of spatial geometry in LQG, the smooth (flat) spacetime geometry is replaced by a discrete quantum structure. An overcomplete set of Dirac observables, consisting of (a) (exponentials of) the standard free scalar field creation- annihilation modes and (b) canonical transformations corresponding to conformal isometries, are represented as operators on the physical Hilbert space. None of these constructions suffer from any of the `triangulation' dependent choices which arise in treatments of LQG. In contrast to the standard Fock quantization, the non- Fock nature of the representation ensures that the algebra of conformal isometries as well as that of spacetime diffeomorphisms are represented in an anomaly free manner. Semiclassical states can be analysed at the gauge invariant level. It is shown that `physical weaves' necessarily underly such states and that such states display semiclassicality with respect to, at most, a countable subset of the (uncountably large) set of observables of type (a). The model thus offers a fertile testing ground for proposed definitions of quantum dynamics as well as semiclassical states in LQG.

  4. Noncommutative Dipole Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Dasgupta; M. M. Sheikh-Jabbari

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Assigning an intrinsic constant dipole moment to any field, we present a new kind of associative star product, the dipole star product, which was first introduced in [hep-th/0008030]. We develop the mathematics necessary to study the corresponding noncommutative dipole field theories. These theories are sensible non-local field theories with no IR/UV mixing. In addition we discuss that the Lorentz symmetry in these theories is ``softly'' broken and in some particular cases the CP (and even CPT) violation in these theories may become observable. We show that a non-trivial dipole extension of N=4, D=4 gauge theories can only be obtained if we break the SU(4) R (and hence super)-symmetry. Such noncommutative dipole extensions, which in the maximal supersymmetric cases are N=2 gauge theories with matter, can be embedded in string theory as the theories on D3-branes probing a smooth Taub-NUT space with three form fluxes turned on or alternatively by probing a space with R-symmetry twists. We show the equivalences between the two approaches and also discuss the M-theory realization.

  5. Generalized Gravitational Entropy of Interacting Scalar Field and Maxwell Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized gravitational entropy proposed by Lewkowycz and Maldacena in recent is extended to the interacting real scalar field and Maxwell field system. Using the BTZ geometry we first investigate the case of free real scalar field and then show a possible way to calculate the entropy of the interacting scalar field. Next, we investigate the Maxwell field system. We exactly solve the wave equation and calculate the analytic value of the generalized gravitational entropy. We also use the Einstein equation to find the effect of backreaction of the Maxwell field on the area of horizon. The associated modified area law is consistent with the generalized gravitational entropy.

  6. The nucleon and Delta-resonance masses in relativistic chiral effective-field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the chiral behavior of the nucleon and De-isobar masses within a manifestly covariant chiral effective-field theory, consistent with the analyticity principle. We compute the {pi} N and {pi}{Delta} one-loop contributions to the mass and field-normalization constant, and find that they can be described in terms of universal relativistic loop functions, multiplied by appropriate spin, isospin and coupling constants. We show that these relativistic one-loop corrections, when properly renormalized, obey the chiral power-counting and vanish in the chiral limit. The results including only the {pi} N-loop corrections compare favorably with the lattice QCD data for the pion-mass dependence of the nucleon and De masses, while inclusion of the {pi}/De loops tends to spoil this agreement.

  7. Hamiltonian Vector Fields on Multiphase Spaces of Classical Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Forger; Mário Otávio Salles

    2010-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a classification of hamiltonian vector fields on multisymplectic and polysymplectic fiber bundles closely analogous to the one known for the corresponding dual jet bundles that appear in the multisymplectic and polysymplectic approach to first order classical field theories.

  8. Quasi light fields: Extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi, Anthony J.

    Imaging technologies such as dynamic viewpoint generation are engineered for incoherent radiation using the traditional light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of ...

  9. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Results are reported on the isolation/characterization of anaerobic bacteria; bacterial mobility and the importance of chemotaxis; careflood experiments; microbial modeling; and surface facilities design. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Progress is reported on growth/activity in porous media; coreflooding; and microbial modeling. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  11. ARM - Field Participants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature StoriesgovCampaignsSurface HeatField

  12. The Effective Field Theory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big*The Effective Field Theory

  13. Field Office, Osk Ridge

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7 s % @ {rField ,_

  14. Particle decay in Ising field theory with magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesualdo Delfino

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling limit of the two-dimensional Ising model in the plane of temperature and magnetic field defines a field theory which provides the simplest illustration of non-trivial phenomena such as spontaneous symmetry breaking and confinement. Here we discuss how Ising field theory also gives the simplest model for particle decay. The decay widths computed in this theory provide the obvious test ground for the numerical methods designed to study unstable particles in quantum field theories discretized on a lattice.

  15. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fifth quarter of Budget Period I.

  16. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the third quarter of Budget Period II.

  17. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re- injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fourth quarter of Budget Period II.

  18. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful redevelopment and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the seventh quarter of Budget Period I.

  19. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the second quarter of Budget Period II.

  20. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the twelfth quarter of Budget Period I.

  1. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fifth quarter of Budget Period II.

  2. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the final quarter of Budget Period I.

  3. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the tenth quarter of Budget Period I.

  4. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the seventh quarter of Budget Period II.

  5. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the eleventh quarter of Budget Period I.

  6. An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the ninth quarter of Budget Period II.

  7. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response of the Columbia River Response of the Columbia River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Implemented by a Collaboration of CREST,and Implemented by a Collaboration of CREST, NMFS, PNNL, UWNMFS, PNNL in the Columbia River estuary. #12;8 Gary Johnson, PNNL Management Curtis Roegner, NOAA Mikah Russell, CREST Fish StudiesHeida Diefenderfer, PNNL Modeling Ron Thom, PNNL Scaling Catherine Corbett, LCREP Meta Analysis

  8. 217 km long distance photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry based on ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo-Liang Shentu; Qi-Chao Sun; Xiao Jiang; Xiao-Dong Wang; Jason S. Pelc; M. M. Fejer; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a photon-counting optical time-domain reflectometry with 42.19 dB dynamic range using an ultra-low noise up-conversion single photon detector. By employing the long wave pump technique and a volume Bragg grating, we reduce the noise of our up-conversion single photon detector, and achieve a noise equivalent power of -139.7 dBm/sqrt(Hz). We perform the OTDR experiments using a fiber of length 216.95 km, and show that our system can identify defects along the entire fiber length with a distance resolution better than 10 cm in a measurement time of 13 minutes.

  9. A comparison of scent-station surveys and track counts for surveying furbearer populations in the Big Thicket National Preserve, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapper, Reginald John

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    counts and scent-station surveys on all study units of BITH. 31 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Mean daily visitation (%) to scent stations by furbearers during 5 quarters (Jan 1987, Apr 1987, Jul 1987, Oct 1987, and Jan 1988) on Beech Creek Unit, BITH.... Furbearer categories are dog-like canid, fox-like canid, raccoon, opossum, and bobcat. 18 Mean daily visitation (%) to scent stations by furbearers during 5 quarters (Jan 1987, Apr 1987, Jul 1987, Oct 1987, and Jan 1988) on Big Sandy Unit, BITH...

  10. BOUNDLESSLEARNING EXPLORERS FIELD EDUCATION FUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    FOR FIELD EDUCATION The Department of Earth Sciences is expanding the field study components of our programs account. · Claim charitable donations up to 75 per cent of your net income (a five-year carry forward

  11. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  12. Fermions in spherical field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the spherical field formalism for fermions. We find that the spherical field method is free from certain difficulties which complicate lattice calculations, such as fermion doubling, missing axial anomalies, and computational problems regarding internal fermion loops.

  13. RCPRCP Objectives Phase XIIObjectives Phase XII Weyburn Field LayoutWeyburn Field Layout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the efficiency of the CO2 Project for EOR. ­ Necessary to use the 4-D seismic data for history matching Vertical Well Horizontal CO2 Injector Horizontal Producer 4D 9C Seismic Survey Area N #12;Cumulative and that is best done with the pressure side #12;Value atValue at WeyburnWeyburn · 16 million dollars spent on CO2

  14. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  15. Diamond-graphite field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

  16. Introduction to spherical field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical field theory is a new non-perturbative method for studying quantum field theories. It uses the spherical partial wave expansion to reduce a general d-dimensional Euclidean field theory into a set of coupled one-dimensional systems. The coupled one-dimensional systems are then converted to partial differential equations and solved numerically. We demonstrate the methods of spherical field theory by analyzing Euclidean phi^4 theory in two dimensions.

  17. Field Theory and Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Buchmüller; C. Lüdeling

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a short introduction to the Standard Model and the underlying concepts of quantum field theory.

  18. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: We have audited

  19. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31 Auditors' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 Expenditures 22­23 #12;INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History

  20. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  1. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  2. Oil field management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  3. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

  4. Field practice internship final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, T.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

  5. Visual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumoulin, Serge O.

    of processing in human motion-selective cortex. I N T R O D U C T I O N Neuroimaging experiments localize human by additional experiments. Defining human MT based on stimulus selectivity means that the identificationVisual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT

  6. Noncommutative Field Theories and Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor O. Rivelles

    2003-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that after the Seiberg-Witten map is performed the action for noncommutative field theories can be regarded as a coupling to a field dependent gravitational background. This gravitational background depends only on the gauge field. Charged and uncharged fields couple to different backgrounds and we find that uncharged fields couple more strongly than the charged ones. We also show that the background is that of a gravitational plane wave. A massless particle in this background has a velocity which differs from the velocity of light and we find that the deviation is larger in the uncharged case. This shows that noncommutative field theories can be seen as ordinary theories in a gravitational background produced by the gauge field with a charge dependent gravitational coupling.

  7. D-brane effective field theory from string field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor

    2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Open string field theory is considered as a tool for deriving the effective action for the massless or tachyonic fields living on D-branes. Some simple calculations are performed in open bosonic string field theory which validate this approach. The level truncation method is used to calculate successive approximations to the quartic terms \\phi^4, (A^\\mu A_\\mu)^2 and [A_\\mu, A_\

  8. Nonlinear Theory of Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriy Palatnik

    2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Suggested modification of the Einstein-Maxwell system, such that Maxwell equations become non-gauge and nonlinear. The theory is based on assumption that observable (i.e., felt by particles) metric is $ {\\tilde{g}}_{ab} = g_{ab} - l^2{A}_a{A}_b$, where $g_{ab}$ is metric (found from Einstein equations), $A_a$ is electromagnetic potential, and $l$ is fundamental constant of the theory. Specific model of the mass and charge densities of a fundamental particle is considered. As a result, one obtains solutions corresponding to quantized electrical charge with spectrum $q_{n} = {{2n}\\over3}e$ and $q'_{n} = -{(2n+1)\\over3}e$, where $n = 0, 1, 2, ...$ Theory predicts Coulomb interaction between electrical charges and masses. Namely, if ($m, e$) and ($m',e'$) describe masses and electrical charges of two particles respectively, then energy of interaction (in non-relativistic limit) is $V(r) = [ee' - kmm' - \\sqrt k(em' + e'm)]/r$. It follows, then, that the Earth's mass, $M_E$, contributes negative electrical charge, $Q_E = - \\sqrt k M_E$, which explains why primary cosmic rays consist mainly of positively charged particles. One may attribute the fairweather electric field at the Earth's surface to the charge $Q_E$.

  9. Electronic field permeameter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Mark A. (Madison, WI); Goggin, David J. (Austin, TX); Horne, Patrick J. (Austin, TX); Kocurek, Gary G. (Roundrock, TX); Lake, Larry W. (Austin, TX)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For making rapid, non-destructive permeability measurements in the field, a portable minipermeameter of the kind having a manually-operated gas injection tip is provided with a microcomputer system which operates a flow controller to precisely regulate gas flow rate to a test sample, and reads a pressure sensor which senses the pressure across the test sample. The microcomputer system automatically turns on the gas supply at the start of each measurement, senses when a steady-state is reached, collects and records pressure and flow rate data, and shuts off the gas supply immediately after the measurement is completed. Preferably temperature is also sensed to correct for changes in gas viscosity. The microcomputer system may also provide automatic zero-point adjustment, sensor calibration, over-range sensing, and may select controllers, sensors, and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements. Electronic sensors may provide increased accuracy and precision. Preferably one microcomputer is used for sensing instrument control and data collection, and a second microcomputer is used which is dedicated to recording and processing the data, selecting the sensors and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements, and instructing the user how to set-up and operate the minipermeameter. To provide mass data collection and user-friendly operation, the second microcomputer is preferably a lap-type portable microcomputer having a non-volatile or battery-backed CMOS memory.

  10. RESULTS OF FIELD TESTING DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIELD TESTING AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER May through September of 2011 RMOTC is an energy testing center that partners with industry to...

  11. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  12. Continuous Profiling of Magnetotelluric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdin, C.T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    those employed in seismic data interpretation under the nameseismic nature, these techniques power implicit in the at least two decades of continued field and interpretation

  13. Radiocolloids in leachate from the NRC field lysimeter investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brey, R.R.; Butikofer, T. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)] [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); McConnell, J.W.; Rogers, R.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of colloidal particles has been completed on leachate samples collected from sand and soil-filled lysimeters (of the Field Lysimeter Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program) in which low-level radioactive waste forms were buried. An array of analytical techniques including: gamma spectroscopy, liquid scintillation spectrometry, gross alpha and beta particle proportional counting, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), neutron activation analysis (NAA), X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), proton induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE), gravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were performed on samples thought to contain colloidal particles to determine particle composition and the nature of their association with radioactive material. Several different types of particles ranging in size from 0.02 to 20 {micro}m were identified within the leachate including crystalline calcium hydroxide particles, rounded siliceous grains, angular weathered soil, and spherical particles apparently composed of an organic polymer. The primary radioactive material associated with these particles was Sr-90. About 2% of the total Sr-90 activity in the leachate is associated with colloidal particles. This information indicates that colloidal particles play a role in radioactive material transport through lysimeter soils.

  14. Fusion proton diagnostic for the C-2 field reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, R. M., E-mail: rmagee@trialphaenergy.com; Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Garate, E.; Knapp, K. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Tkachev, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the flux of fusion products from high temperature plasmas provide valuable insights into the ion energy distribution, as the fusion reaction rate is a very sensitive function of ion energy. In C-2, where field reversed configuration plasmas are formed by the collision of two compact toroids and partially sustained by high power neutral beam injection [M. Binderbauer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 045003 (2010); M. Tuszewski et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)], measurements of DD fusion neutron flux are used to diagnose ion temperature and study fast ion confinement and dynamics. In this paper, we will describe the development of a new 3 MeV proton detector that will complement existing neutron detectors. The detector is a large area (50?cm{sup 2}), partially depleted, ion implanted silicon diode operated in a pulse counting regime. While the scintillator-based neutron detectors allow for high time resolution measurements (?100 kHz), they have no spatial or energy resolution. The proton detector will provide 10 cm spatial resolution, allowing us to determine if the axial distribution of fast ions is consistent with classical fast ion theory or whether anomalous scattering mechanisms are active. We will describe in detail the diagnostic design and present initial data from a neutral beam test chamber.

  15. Kerr black holes and time profiles of gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. McBreen; B. McBreen; L. Hanlon; F. Quilligan

    2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The cumulative light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) smooth the spiky nature of the running light curve. The cumulative count increases in an approximately linear way with time t for most bursts. In 19 out of 398 GRBs with T90 > 2s, the cumulative light curve was found to increase with time as \\~t^2 implying a linear increase in the running light curve. The non-linear sections last for a substantial fraction of the GRB duration, have a large proportion of the cumulative count and many resolved pulses that usually end with the highest pulse in the burst. The reverse behaviour was found in 11 GRBs where the running light curve decreased with time and some bursts are good mirror images of the increases. These GRBs are among the spectrally hardest bursts observed by BATSE. The most likely interpretation is that these effects are signatures of black holes that are either being spun up or down in the accretion process. In the spin up case, the increasing Kerr parameter of the black hole allows additional rotational and accretion energy to become available for extraction. The process is reversed if the black hole is spun down by magnetic field torques. The luminosity changes in GRBs are consistent with the predictions of the BZ process and neutrino annihilation and thus provide the link to spinning black holes. GRBs provide a new window for studying the general relativistic effects of Kerr black holes.

  16. Cosmic Electromagnetic Fields due to Perturbations in the Gravitational Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop Mongwane; Peter K. S. Dunsby; Bob Osano

    2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use non-linear gauge-invariant perturbation theory to study the interaction of an inflation produced seed magnetic field with density and gravitational wave perturbations in an almost Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime. We compare the effects of this coupling under the assumptions of poor conductivity, infinite conductivity and the case where the electric field is sourced via the coupling of velocity perturbations to the seed field in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regime, thus generalizing, improving on and correcting previous results. We solve our equations for long wavelength limits and numerically integrate the resulting equations to generate power spectra for the electromagnetic field variables, showing where the modes cross the horizon. We find that the rotation of the electric field dominates the power spectrum on small scales, in agreement with previous arguments.

  17. A discussion of the results of the rainflow counting of a wide range of dynamics associated with the simultaneous operation of adjacent wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.; Desrochers, G.; Tangler, J.; Smith, B.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to provide a fatigue load comparison between two identical wind turbines employing different rotor designs. One turbine was fitted with a rotor consisting of a set of NREL (SERI) thin-airfoil blades while the other rotor included the original-equipment AeroStar blades. The data discussed are based on sample load populations derived from the rainflow cycle counting of 405, 10-minute records specifically collected over a wide range of inflow turbulence conditions. The results have shown that the statistical structure of the alternating load cycles on both turbines can be described as a mixture of three stochastic processes. We noted a high degree of load distribution similarity between the two turbines, with the differences attributable to either rotor weight or swept area.

  18. Photon-counting Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry based on up-conversion detector and fiber Fabry-Perot scanning interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haiyun Xia; Mingjia Shangguan; Guoliang Shentu; Chong Wang; Jiawei Qiu; Xiuxiu Xia; Chao Chen; Mingyang Zheng; Xiuping Xie; Qiang Zhang; Xiankang Dou; Jianwei Pan

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct-detection Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry (BOTDR) is proposed and demonstrated by using an up-conversion single-photon detector and a fiber Fabry-Perot scanning interferometer (FFP-SI). Taking advantage of high signal-to-noise ratio of the detector and high spectrum resolution of the FFP-SI, the Brillouin spectrum along a polarization maintaining fiber (PMF) is recorded on a multiscaler with a small data size directly. In contrast with conventional BOTDR adopting coherent detection, photon-counting BOTDR is simpler in structure and easier in data processing. In the demonstration experiment, characteristic parameters of the Brillouin spectrum including its power, spectral width and frequency center are analyzed simultaneously along a 10 km PMF at different temperature and stain conditions.

  19. Photon-counting Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry based on up-conversion detector and fiber Fabry-Perot scanning interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Haiyun; Shentu, Guoliang; Wang, Chong; Qiu, Jiawei; Xia, Xiuxiu; Chen, Chao; Zheng, Mingyang; Xie, Xiuping; Zhang, Qiang; Dou, Xiankang; Pan, Jianwei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct-detection Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry (BOTDR) is proposed and demonstrated by using an up-conversion single-photon detector and a fiber Fabry-Perot scanning interferometer (FFP-SI). Taking advantage of high signal-to-noise ratio of the detector and high spectrum resolution of the FFP-SI, the Brillouin spectrum along a polarization maintaining fiber (PMF) is recorded on a multiscaler with a small data size directly. In contrast with conventional BOTDR adopting coherent detection, photon-counting BOTDR is simpler in structure and easier in data processing. In the demonstration experiment, characteristic parameters of the Brillouin spectrum including its power, spectral width and frequency center are analyzed simultaneously along a 10 km PMF at different temperature and stain conditions.

  20. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfn; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of December 2004, 11.39 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 242 MCFD. Vent losses were excessive during June as ambient temperatures increased. Installation of smaller plungers in the carbon dioxide injection pump reduced the recycle and vent loss substantially. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May and in the second production well in August. No channeling of carbon dioxide was observed. The GOR has remained within the range of 3000-4000 for most the last six months. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.35 B/D for the six month period between July 1 and December 31. Cumulative oil production was 814 bbls. Neither well has experienced increased oil production rates expected from the arrival of the oil bank generated by carbon dioxide injection.

  1. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  2. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  3. Fermion measure and axion fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitra, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known from path integral studies of the chiral anomaly that the fermion measure has to depend on gauge fields interacting with the fermion. It is argued here that in the presence of axion fields interacting with the fermion, they too may be involved in the measure, with unexpected consequences.

  4. Unified Field Theories Hitoshi Murayama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    Unified Field Theories Hitoshi Murayama Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley This article explains the idea of unified field theories in particle physics. It starts with a historical review of two successful theories which unified two apparently distinct forces: Maxwell's theory

  5. Gerbes and quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jouko Mickelsson

    2006-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic mechanism how gerbes arise in quantum field theory is explained; in particular the case of chiral fermions in background fields is treated. The role of of various gauge group extensions (central extensions of loop groups and their generalizations) is also explained, in relation to index theory computation of the Dixmier-Douady class of a gerbe.

  6. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  7. Are Cluster Magnetic Fields Primordial ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robi Banerjee; Karsten Jedamzik

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of a detailed and fully non-linear numerical and analytical investigation of magnetic field evolution from the very earliest cosmic epochs to the present. We find that, under reasonable assumptions concerning the efficiency of a putative magnetogenesis era during cosmic phase transitions, surprisingly strong magnetic fields 10^{-13} - 10^{-11} Gauss, on comparatively small scales 100 pc - 10 kpc may survive to the present. Building on prior work on the evolution of magnetic fields during the course of gravitational collapse of a cluster, which indicates that pre-collapse fields of 4\\times 10^{-12} Gauss extant on small scales may suffice to produce clusters with acceptable Faraday rotation measures, we question the widely hold view that cluster magnetic fields may not be entirely of primordial origin.

  8. Plasma Production via Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  9. Field Demonstraton of Existing Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Perry; Samih Batarseh; Sheriff Gowelly; Thomas Hayes

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of an advanced Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) has been measured in the field during the drilling of 25 test wells in the Niobrara formation of Western Kansas and Eastern Colorado. The coiled tubing (CT) rig designed, built and operated by Advanced Drilling Technologies (ADT), was documented in its performance by GTI staff in the course of drilling wells ranging in depth from 500 to nearly 3,000 feet. Access to well sites in the Niobrara for documenting CT rig performance was provided by Rosewood Resources of Arlington, VA. The ADT CT rig was selected for field performance evaluation because it is one of the most advanced commercial CT rig designs that demonstrate a high degree of process integration and ease of set-up and operation. Employing an information collection protocol, data was collected from the ADT CT rig during 25 drilling events that encompassed a wide range of depths and drilling conditions in the Niobrara. Information collected included time-function data, selected parametric information indicating CT rig operational conditions, staffing levels, and field observations of the CT rig in each phase of operation, from rig up to rig down. The data obtained in this field evaluation indicates that the ADT CT rig exhibited excellent performance in the drilling and completion of more than 25 wells in the Niobrara under varied drilling depths and formation conditions. In the majority of the 25 project well drilling events, ROP values ranged between 300 and 620 feet per hour. For all but the lowest 2 wells, ROP values averaged approximately 400 feet per hour, representing an excellent drilling capability. Most wells of depths between 500 and 2,000 feet were drilled at a total functional rig time of less than 16 hours; for wells as deep at 2,500 to 3,000 feet, the total rig time for the CT unit is usually well under one day. About 40-55 percent of the functional rig time is divided evenly between drilling and casing/cementing. The balance of time is divided among the remaining four functions of rig up/rig down, logging, lay down bottomhole assembly, and pick up bottomhole assembly. Observations made during all phases of CT rig operation at each of the project well installations have verified a number of characteristics of the technology that represent advantages that can produce significant savings of 25-35 percent per well. Attributes of the CT rig performance include: (1) Excellent hole quality with hole deviation amounting to 1-2 degrees; (2) Reduced need for auxiliary equipment; (3) Efficient rig mobilization requiring only four trailers; (4) Capability of ''Zero Discharge'' operation; (5) Improved safety; and, (6) Measurement while drilling capability. In addition, commercial cost data indicates that the CT rig reduces drilling costs by 25 to 35% compared to conventional drilling technology. Widespread commercial use of the Microhole Coiled Tubing technology in the United States for onshore Lower-48 drilling has the potential of achieving substantially positive impacts in terms of savings to the industry and resource expansion. Successfully commercialized Microhole CT Rig Technology is projected to achieve cumulative savings in Lower-48 onshore drilling expenditures of approximately 6.8 billion dollars by 2025. The reduced cost of CT microhole drilling is projected to enable the development of gas resources that would not have been economic with conventional methods. Because of the reduced cost of drilling achieved with CT rig technology, it is estimated that an additional 22 Tcf of gas resource will become economic to develop. In the future, the Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig represents an important platform for the continued improvement of drilling that draws on a new generation of various technologies to achieve goals of improved drilling cost and reduced impact to the environment.

  10. Confluent primary fields in the conformal field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajime Nagoya; Juanjuan Sun

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    For any complex simple Lie algebra, we generalize primary fileds in the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten conformal field theory with respect to the case of irregular singularities and we construct integral representations of hypergeometric functions of confluent type, as expectation values of products of generalized primary fields. In the case of sl(2), these integral representations coincide with solutions to confluent KZ equations. Computing the operator product expansion of the energy-momentum tensor and the generalized primary field, new differential operators appear in the result. In the case of sl(2), these differential operators are the same as those of the confluent KZ equations.

  11. Reversed field pinch current drive with oscillating helical fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farengo, Ricardo; Clemente, Roberto Antonio [Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, S.C. de Bariloche (8400), RN (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of oscillating helical magnetic fields to produce and sustain the toroidal and poloidal currents in a reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated. A simple physical model that assumes fixed ions, massless electrons, and uniform density and resistivity is employed. Thermal effects are neglected in Ohm's law and helical coordinates are introduced to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear equations that must be advanced in time. The results show that it is possible to produce RFP-like magnetic field profiles with pinch parameters close to the experimental values. The efficiencies obtained for moderate resistivity, and the observed scaling, indicate that this could be a very attractive method for high temperature plasmas.

  12. fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM #12;The Field Museum | Field Trip Planning Guide for Educators 2 Welcome to The Field Museum! The Field Museum is an exciting place to explore and learn time. Taking a field trip to the Museum o ers students and teachers an opportunity to interact

  13. fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM #12;The Field Museum | Field Trip Planning Guide for Educators 2 Welcome to The Field Museum! The Field Museum is an exciting place to explore and learn. Taking a field trip to the Museum o ers students and teachers an opportunity to interact with real

  14. Quantum Field and Cosmic Field-Finite Geometrical Field Theory of Matter Motion Part Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianhua Xiao

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This research establishes an operational measurement way to express the quantum field theory in a geometrical form. In four-dimensional spacetime continuum, the orthogonal rotation is defined. It forms two sets of equations: one set is geometrical equations, another set is the motion equations. The Lorentz transformation can be directly derived from the geometrical equations, and the proper time of general relativity is well expressed by time displacement field. By the motion equations, the typical time displacement field of matter motion is discussed. The research shows that the quantum field theory can be established based on the concept of orthogonal rotation. On this sense, the quantum matter motion in physics is viewed as the orthogonal rotation of spacetime continuum. In this paper, it shows that there are three typical quantum solutions. One is particle-like solution, one is generation-type solution, and one is pure wave type solution. For each typical solution, the force fields are different. Many features of quantum field can be well explained by this theoretic form. Finally, the general matter motion is discussed, the main conclusions are: (1). Geometrically, cosmic vacuum field can be described by the curvature spacetime; (2). The spatial deformation of planet is related with a planet electromagnetic field; (3). For electric charge less matter, the volume of matter will be expanding infinitely; (4).For strong electric charge matter, it shows that the volume of matter will be contracting infinitely.

  15. Nonequilibrium transport through quantum-wire junctions and boundary defects for free massless bosonic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaw?dzki, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model of quantum-wire junctions where the latter are described by conformal-invariant boundary conditions of the simplest type in the multicomponent compactified massless scalar free field theory representing the bosonized Luttinger liquids in the bulk of wires. The boundary conditions result in the scattering of charges across the junction with nontrivial reflection and transmission amplitudes. The equilibrium state of such a system, corresponding to inverse temperature $\\beta$ and electric potential $V$, is explicitly constructed both for finite and for semi-infinite wires. In the latter case, a stationary nonequilibrium state describing the wires kept at different temperatures and potentials may be also constructed. The main result of the present paper is the calculation of the full counting statistics (FCS) of the charge and energy transfers through the junction in a nonequilibrium situation. Explicit expressions are worked out for the generating function of FCS and its large-deviations asym...

  16. Calibration of a gated flat field spectrometer as a function of x-ray intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Gang; Yang, Guohong; Li, Hang; Zhang, Jiyan, E-mail: zhangjiyanzjy@sina.com; Zhao, Yang; Hu, Zhimin; Wei, Minxi; Qing, Bo; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimental determination of the response of a gated flat-field spectrometer at the Shenguang-II laser facility. X-rays were emitted from a target that was heated by laser beams and then were divided into different intensities with a step aluminum filter and collected by a spectrometer. The transmission of the filter was calibrated using the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The response characteristics of the spectrometer were determined by comparing the counts recorded by the spectrometer with the relative intensities of the x-rays transmitted through the step aluminum filter. The response characteristics were used to correct the transmission from two shots of an opacity experiment using the same samples. The transmissions from the two shots are consistent with corrections, but discrepant without corrections.

  17. An overview of craniospinal axis fields and field matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Robin L., E-mail: robinscott631@gmail.com

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many methods are implemented for craniospinal axis (CSA) radiation treatment (RT). This paper’s goal is to define correctly matched CSA RT fields. Overlap or a space between matched RT fields can create variances of dose and the possibility of negative side effects or disease recurrence, respectively. An accurate CSA RT match procedure is created with localization markers, immobilization devices, equations, feathered matches, safety gap, and portal imaging. A CS match angle is predetermined to optimize patient position before immobilization device fabrication. Various central axis (CA) placements within the brain and spine fields that effect gantry, table, and collimator rotation are described. An overview of the methods used to create CSA RT fields and matches is presented for optimal CSA RT implementation. In addition, to the author’s knowledge, this is the first time that a prone CSA RT with anesthesia has been described.

  18. Noncommutative field with constant background fields and neutral fermion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui-bai Luo; Feng-yao Hou; Zhu-fang Cui; Xiao-jun Liu; Hong-shi Zong

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Introducing constant background fields into the noncommutative gauge theory, we first obtain a Hermitian fermion Lagrangian which involves a Lorentz violation term, then we generalize it to a new deformed canonical noncommutation relations for fermion field. Massless neutrino oscillation in the deformed canonical noncommutation relations is analyzed. The restriction of the noncommutative coefficients is also discussed. By comparing with the existing experimental data of conventional neutrino oscillations, the order of noncommutative deformed coefficients is given from different ways.

  19. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weislogel, Amy

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  20. Implementation of a DOD ELAP Conforming Quality System at a FUSRAP Site Field Temporary Radiological Screening Laboratory - 13500

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, M.S.; McElheny, G. [Cabrera Services Inc. 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT (United States)] [Cabrera Services Inc. 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT (United States); Houston, L.M.; Masset, M.R.; Spector, H.L. [United States Army Corps of Engineers -1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers -1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A case study is presented on specific program elements that supported the transition of a temporary field radiological screening lab to an accredited operation capable of meeting client quality objectives for definitive results data. The temporary field lab is located at the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Linde Site in Tonawanda, NY. The site is undergoing remediation under the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, with Cabrera Services Inc. as the remediation contractor and operator of the on-site lab. Analysis methods employed in the on-site lab include gross counting of alpha and beta particle activity on swipes and air filters and gamma spectroscopy of soils and other solid samples. A discussion of key program elements and lessons learned may help other organizations considering pursuit of accreditation for on-site screening laboratories. (authors)

  1. Generation of Gaussian Density Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugo Martel

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes analytical and numerical techniques for the generation of Gaussian density fields, which represent cosmological density perturbations. The mathematical techniques involved in the generation of density harmonics in k-space, the filtering of the density fields, and the normalization of the power spectrum to the measured temperature fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background, are presented in details. These techniques are well-known amongst experts, but the current literature lacks a formal description. I hope that this technical report will prove useful to new researchers moving into this field, sparing them the task of reinventing the wheel.

  2. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  3. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  4. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, John A. (Ithaca, NY); Greenwald, Shlomo (Haifa, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  5. Fsusy and Field Theoretical Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Sedra; J. Zerouaoui

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Following our previous work on fractional spin symmetries (FSS) \\cite{6, 7}, we consider here the construction of field theoretical models that are invariant under the $D=2(1/3,1/3)$ supersymmetric algebra.

  6. Field emission from organic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kymissis, Ioannis, 1977-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field emission displays (FEDs) show great promise as high performance flat panel displays. The light emission process is efficient, long lifetimes are possible with high brightness, and bright passive matrix displays can ...

  7. Improvements in Low Field MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogier, Stephen E

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presently dominated by multi-million dollar machines that use large superconducting magnets to generate very high quality images. It is possible to perform MRI at lower magnetic field...

  8. Topics in double field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Seung Ki

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of momentum and winding modes of closed string on a torus leads to a natural idea that the field theoretical approach of string theory should involve winding type coordinates as well as the usual space-time ...

  9. Scalar Field Theory on Supermanifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Hameeda

    2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we will analyse a scalar field theory on a spacetime with noncommutative and non-anticommutative coordinates. This will be done using supermanifold formalism. We will also analyse its quantization in path integral formalism.

  10. Double field theory at order ??

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohm, Olaf

    We investigate ?? corrections of bosonic strings in the framework of double field theory. The previously introduced “doubled ??-geometry” gives ??-deformed gauge transformations arising in the Green-Schwarz anomaly ...

  11. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahn, Robert N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Flows of Dark Energy Robert N. Cahn, Roland de Putter,July 8, 2008) Scalar ?eld dark energy evolving from a longthe key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of

  12. Field ionization from carbon nanofibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeoti, Bosun J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Micro Gas Analyzer project aims to develop power-efficient, high resolution, high sensitivity, portable and real-time gas sensors. We developed a field ionizer array based on gated CNTs. Arrays of CNTs are used because ...

  13. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  14. Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria East Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambusso, Willis J.

    1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of a six month Injection and Tracer test done in Olkaria East Geothermal Field The Injection tests show that commencement of injection prior to onset of large drawdown in the reservoir leads to greater sustenance of well production and can reduce well cycling which is a common feature of wells in Olkaria East Field. For cases where injection is started after some drawdown has occurred in the reservoir, injection while leading to improvement of well output can also lead to increase in well cycling which is a non desirable side effect. Tracer tests reveal slow rate of fluid migration (< 5 m/hr). However estimates of the cumulative tracer returns over the period of injection is at least 31% which is large and reveals the danger of late time thermal drawdown and possible loss of production. It is shown in the discussion that the two sets of results are consistent with a reservoir where high permeability occurs along contact surfaces which act as horizontal "fractures" while the formations between the "fractures" have low permeability. This type of fracture system will lead to channeled flow of injected fluid and therefore greater thermal depletion along the fractures while formations further from the fracture would still be at higher temperature. In an attempt to try and achieve a more uniform thermal depletion in the reservoir, it is proposed that continuous injection be done for short periods (~2 years) and this be followed by recovery periods of the nearly the same length of time before resumption of injection again.

  15. Field testing results for the strategic petroleum reserve pipeline corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; Hinkebein, T.E.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of two studies conducted as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Pipeline Corrosion Control Program are reported. These studies focused on evaluation of rotary-applied concrete materials for internal pipeline protection against the erosive and corrosive effects of flowing brine. The study also included evaluation of liners applied by hand on pipe pieces that cannot be lined by rotary methods. Such pipe pieces include tees, elbows and flanged pipe sections. Results are reported from a corrosion survey of 17 different liner formulations tested at the-Big-Rill SPR Site. Testing consisted of electrochemical corrosion rate measurements made on lined pipe sections exposed, in a test manifold, to flowing SPR generated fluids. Testing also involved cumulative immersion exposure where samples were exposed to static site-generated brine for increasing periods of time. Samples were returned to the laboratory for various diagnostic analyses. Results of this study showed that standard calcium silicate concrete (API RP10E) and a rotary calcium aluminate concrete formulation were excellent performers. Hand-lined pipe pieces did not provide as much corrosion protection. The focus of the second part of the study was on further evaluation of the calcium silicate, calcium aluminate and hand-applied liners in actual SPR equipment and service. It was a further objective to assess the practicality of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for field corrosion monitoring of concrete lined pipe compared to the more well-known linear polarization technique. This study showed that concrete linings reduced the corrosion rate for bare steel from 10 to 15 mils per year to 1 mil per year or less. Again, the hand-applied liners did not provide as much corrosion protection as the rotary-applied liners. The EIS technique was found to be robust for field corrosion measurements. Mechanistic and kinetic corrosion rate data were reliably obtained.

  16. An Open System Transportation Security Sensor Network: Field Trial Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 III Experiments 8 III-A Road Test with Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 III-B Short-haul Rail Trial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 V-B Short-haul Trial: Message Counts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 V

  17. Physical fields and Clifford algebras II. Neutrino field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim V. Varlamov

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino field is considered in the framework of a complex Clifford algebra $\\C_3\\cong\\C_2\\oplus\\stackrel{\\ast}{\\C}_2$. The factor-algebras ${}^{\\epsilon}\\C_2$ and ${}^{\\epsilon}\\stackrel{\\ast}{\\C}_2$, which are obtained by means of homomorphic mappings $\\C_3\\to\\C_2$ and $\\C_3\\to\\stackrel{\\ast}{\\C}_2$, are identified with the neutrino and antineutrino fields, respectively. In this framework we have natural explanation for absence of right-handed neutrino and left-handed antineutrino.

  18. Noncommutative field gas driven inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciano Barosi; Francisco A. Brito; Amilcar R. Queiroz

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate early time inflationary scenarios in an Universe filled with a dilute noncommutative bosonic gas at high temperature. A noncommutative bosonic gas is a gas composed of bosonic scalar field with noncommutative field space on a commutative spacetime. Such noncommutative field theories was recently introduced as a generalization of quantum mechanics on a noncommutative spacetime. As key features of these theories are Lorentz invariance violation and CPT violation. In the present study we use a noncommutative bosonic field theory that besides the noncommutative parameter $\\theta$ shows up a further parameter $\\sigma$. This parameter $\\sigma$ controls the range of the noncommutativity and acts as a regulator for the theory. Both parameters play a key role in the modified dispersion relations of the noncommutative bosonic field, leading to possible striking consequences for phenomenology. In this work we obtain an equation of state $p=\\omega(\\sigma,\\theta;\\beta)\\rho$ for the noncommutative bosonic gas relating pressure $p$ and energy density $\\rho$, in the limit of high temperature. We analyse possible behaviours for this gas parameters $\\sigma$, $\\theta$ and $\\beta$, so that $-1\\leq\\omega<-1/3$, which is the region where the Universe enters an accelerated phase.

  19. Noncommutative field gas driven inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barosi, Luciano; Brito, Francisco A [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraiba (Brazil); Queiroz, Amilcar R, E-mail: lbarosi@ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: fabrito@df.ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: amilcarq@gmail.com [Centro Internacional de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Brasilia, Caixa Postal 04667, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate early time inflationary scenarios in a Universe filled with a dilute noncommutative bosonic gas at high temperature. A noncommutative bosonic gas is a gas composed of a bosonic scalar field with noncommutative field space on a commutative spacetime. Such noncommutative field theories were recently introduced as a generalization of quantum mechanics on a noncommutative spacetime. Key features of these theories are Lorentz invariance violation and CPT violation. In the present study we use a noncommutative bosonic field theory that, besides the noncommutative parameter {theta}, shows up a further parameter {sigma}. This parameter {sigma} controls the range of the noncommutativity and acts as a regulator for the theory. Both parameters play a key role in the modified dispersion relations of the noncommutative bosonic field, leading to possible striking consequences for phenomenology. In this work we obtain an equation of state p = {omega}({sigma},{theta};{beta}){rho} for the noncommutative bosonic gas relating pressure p and energy density {rho}, in the limit of high temperature. We analyse possible behaviours for these gas parameters {sigma}, {theta} and {beta}, so that -1{<=}{omega}<-1/3, which is the region where the Universe enters an accelerated phase.

  20. RELATIVISTIC QUANTUM FIELD THEORY OF A HYPERNUCLEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boguta, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 Nuclei in Relativistic Field Theory of Nuclear Matter, LBLRelativistic Quantum Field Theory of Finite Nuclei, LBL prein a Relativistic Mean-Field Theory, Stanford preprint F.E.

  1. CLASSICAL FIELD THEORY WITH Z (3) SYMMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruck, H.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and H.M. Ruck, Quantum field theory Potts model, J. Math.in cyclic symmetry field theories, Nucl. Phys. B167 M.J.waves in nonlinear field theories, Phys. Rev. Lett. 32. R.

  2. Split string field theory I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Gross; Washington Taylor

    2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe projection operators in the matter sector of Witten's cubic string field theory using modes on the right and left halves of the string. These projection operators represent a step towards an analytic solution of the equations of motion of the full string field theory, and can be used to construct Dp-brane solutions of the string field theory when the BRST operator Q is taken to be pure ghost, as suggested in the recent conjecture by Rastelli, Sen and Zwiebach. We show that a family of solutions related to the sliver state are rank one projection operators on the appropriate space of half-string functionals, and we construct higher rank projection operators corresponding to configurations of multiple D-branes.

  3. Thermalization in External Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali-Akbari, Mohammad

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the AdS/CFT framework meson thermalization in the presence of a constant external magnetic field in a strongly coupled gauge theory has been studied. In the gravitational description the thermalization of mesons corresponds to the horizon formation on the flavour D7-brane which is embedded in the AdS_5 x S^5 background in the probe limit. The apparent horizon forms due to the time-dependent change in the baryon number chemical potential, the injection of baryons in the gauge theory. We will numerically show that the thermalization happens even faster in the presence of the magnetic field on the probe brane. We observe that this reduction in the thermalization time sustains up to a specific value of the magnetic field.

  4. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A0/%2A en6/%2A

  5. Variational methods for field theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Menahem, S.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four field theory models are studied: Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics (PQED) in (2 + 1) dimensions, free scalar field theory in (1 + 1) dimensions, the Quantum XY model in (1 + 1) dimensions, and the (1 + 1) dimensional Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. The last three parts deal exclusively with variational methods; the PQED part involves mainly the path-integral approach. The PQED calculation results in a better understanding of the connection between electric confinement through monopole screening, and confinement through tunneling between degenerate vacua. This includes a better quantitative agreement for the string tensions in the two approaches. Free field theory is used as a laboratory for a new variational blocking-truncation approximation, in which the high-frequency modes in a block are truncated to wave functions that depend on the slower background modes (Boron-Oppenheimer approximation). This ''adiabatic truncation'' method gives very accurate results for ground-state energy density and correlation functions. Various adiabatic schemes, with one variable kept per site and then two variables per site, are used. For the XY model, several trial wave functions for the ground state are explored, with an emphasis on the periodic Gaussian. A connection is established with the vortex Coulomb gas of the Euclidean path integral approach. The approximations used are taken from the realms of statistical mechanics (mean field approximation, transfer-matrix methods) and of quantum mechanics (iterative blocking schemes). In developing blocking schemes based on continuous variables, problems due to the periodicity of the model were solved. Our results exhibit an order-disorder phase transition. The transfer-matrix method is used to find a good (non-blocking) trial ground state for the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field in (1 + 1) dimensions.

  6. Scully field - Marion County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salgat, B.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Scully field is a multipay new-field discovery located in the southern end of Salina basin, Marion County, Kansas. The Scully field was discovered using a combination of satellite imagery and subsurface control. The overall trapping mechanism at the Scully field is anticlinal closure. Infield drilling has demonstrated, however, that significant stratigraphic variations do exist within the productive area. The Simpson sands have been subdivided in five separate units which range from 4 to 12 ft (1 to 4 m) in thickness. Three of these are of economic importance in the field. In general, the sands with the most economic potential are distributed within relative Ordovician paleolows. The Viola has four main lithologic divisions. The uppermost of these is a relatively thin dolomite cap which ranges from 2 to 15 ft (1 to 5 m). This upper dolomite is the primary Viola pay zone. The Mississippian section is eroded deeply over the Scully structure and demonstrates about 70 ft (20 m) of thinning. The potential pay interval is chert which has 25 to 30% porosity based on log analysis. The trapping mechanism is a combination of erosional truncation and structural closure. In addition to the structural information obtained from satellite imagery, R.J. Walker Oil Co., Inc., evaluated the hydrocarbon potential of T18S, R1E, Marion County, Kansas, which contains the Scully field, using remote sensing technology developed by Earth Reference Systems of Long Beach, California. The technology involves direct detection of hydrocarbons in place, using satellite data, nonlinear mathematics, and the fundamental principles of molecular structure and electromagnetic wave propagation.

  7. Dynamics of generalized tachyon field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong-Jia Yang; Jingzhao Qi

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the dynamics of generalized tachyon field in FRW spacetime. We obtain the autonomous dynamical system for the general case. Because the general autonomous dynamical system cannot be solved analytically, we discuss two cases in detail: $\\beta=1$ and $\\beta=2$. We find the critical points and study their stability. At these critical points, we also consider the stability of the generalized tachyon field, which is as important as the stability of critical points. The possible final states of the universe are discussed.

  8. Wide field of view telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  9. Solid phase microextraction field kit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A field kit for the collection, isolation and concentration of trace amounts of high explosives (HE), biological weapons (BW) and chemical weapons (CW) residues in air, soil, vegetation, swipe, and liquid samples. The field kit includes a number of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) fiber and syringe assemblies in a hermetically sealed transportation container or tubes which includes a sampling port, a number of extra SPME fiber and syringe assemblies, the fiber and syringe assemblies including a protective cap for the fiber, and an extractor for the protective cap, along with other items including spare parts, protective glove, and an instruction manual, all located in an airtight container.

  10. String-Organized Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. S. Lam

    1994-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A low energy string theory should reduce to an ordinary quantum field theory, but in reality the structures of the two are so different as to make the equivalence obscure. The string formalism is more symmetrical between the spacetime and the internal degrees of freedom, thus resulting in considerable simplification in practical calculations and novel insights in theoretical understandings. We review here how tree or multiloop field-theoretical diagrams can be organized in a string-like manner to take advantage of this computational and conceptual simplicity.

  11. Spherically symmetric scalar field collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koyel Ganguly; Narayan Banerjee

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a scalar field, minimally coupled to gravity may have collapsing modes even when the energy condition is violated, that is, for $(\\rho+3p)<0$. This result may be useful in the investigation of the possible clustering of dark energy. All the examples dealt with have apparent horizons which form before the formation of the singularity. The singularities formed are shell focusing in nature. The density of the scalar field distribution is seen to diverge at singularity. The Ricci scalar also diverges at the singularity. The interior spherically symmetric metric is matched with exterior Vaidya metric at the hypersurface and the appropriate junction conditions are obtained.

  12. Negative Energies and Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption that the vacuum is the minimum energy state, invariant under unitary transformations, is fundamental to quantum field theory. However, the assertion that the conservation of charge implies that the equal time commutator of the charge density and its time derivative vanish for two spatially separated points is inconsistent with the requirement that the vacuum be the lowest energy state. Yet, for quantum field theory to be gauge invariant, this commutator must vanish. This essay explores how this conundrum is resolved in quantum electrodynamics.

  13. Phenomenology of Noncommutative Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Carone

    2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental limits on the violation of four-dimensional Lorentz invariance imply that noncommutativity among ordinary spacetime dimensions must be small. In this talk, I review the most stringent bounds on noncommutative field theories and suggest a possible means of evading them: noncommutativity may be restricted to extra, compactified spatial dimensions. Such theories have a number of interesting features, including Abelian gauge fields whose Kaluza-Klein excitations have self couplings. We consider six-dimensional QED in a noncommutative bulk, and discuss the collider signatures of the model.

  14. Renormalization and quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. E. Borcherds

    2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to describe how to use regularization and renormalization to construct a perturbative quantum field theory from a Lagrangian. We first define renormalizations and Feynman measures, and show that although there need not exist a canonical Feynman measure, there is a canonical orbit of Feynman measures under renormalization. We then construct a perturbative quantum field theory from a Lagrangian and a Feynman measure, and show that it satisfies perturbative analogues of the Wightman axioms, extended to allow time-ordered composite operators over curved spacetimes.

  15. Livermore Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Livermore Field Office Livermore Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year...

  16. Sandia Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Sandia Field Office Sandia Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  17. Pantex Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Pantex Field Office Pantex Field Office FY12 Semi Annual Report FY11 Year End...

  18. Nevada Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Nevada Field Office Nevada Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  19. Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

  20. A new magnetic field integral measurement system

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements. b. Second field integral (horizontal and vertical) measurements. c. Multipole components of first field integral measurements. 2. Translation Coil a. Multipole...