Sample records for fiber optic sensor

  1. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  2. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  3. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  4. Optical and mechanical behavior of the optical fiber infrasound sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWolf, Scott

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 The Optical Fiber Infrasound Sensor . . . . . . .Fiber Infrasound Sensor Optical fibers are well known forSchnidrig. An optical fiber infrasound sensor: A new lower

  5. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  6. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  7. Fiber optic moisture sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  8. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  9. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed fiber optic intrusion sensor capable of detecting intruders from the pressure of their weight on the earth's surface was investigated in the laboratory and in field tests. The presence of an intruder above or in proximity...

  10. Silicon fiber optic sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

  11. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to the buried sensor induces a phase shift in light propagating along the fiber which allows for the detection and localization of intrusions. Through the use of an ultra-stable erbium-doped fiber laser and phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry...

  12. TRS-Fiber Optic Classifier Sensor Installation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    TRS-Fiber Optic Classifier Sensor Installation The sensor that the Traffic Recording System (TRS) uses is the Flexsense Portable Fiberoptic Sensor System by Optical Sensor Systems. This includes two is undetected by the TRS. The user must make sure that the sensors do not get bent or twisted or the fiber optic

  13. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  14. Buried fiber optic sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jaehee

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and TMom modes. Otherwise vm gives the HEv hm and EHv-hm modest20] 18 Table I. Parameters of the laser source and the fused silica fiber which are used in this experiment. n=n1=1. 4527 n2= 1. 4483 D (core diameter )= 8 um Cladding Diameter = 125 um... Interferometer . B. Frequency Chirping of Laser Diode C. Pressure Sensitivity to Uniform Pressure . . . . . . . . . . D. Pressure Sensitivity to Transverse Pressure . . . . E. Pressure Sensitivity to Longitudinal Pressure . . . . . . . . . . I 3 . . . . 20...

  15. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farah, J.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 23 figs.

  16. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farah, John (M.I.T. P.O. Box 397301, Cambridge, MA 02139)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  17. Optical fiber sensors for harsh environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Juncheng; Wang, Anbo

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A diaphragm optic sensor comprises a ferrule including a bore having an optical fiber disposed therein and a diaphragm attached to the ferrule, the diaphragm being spaced apart from the ferrule to form a Fabry-Perot cavity. The cavity is formed by creating a pit in the ferrule or in the diaphragm. The components of the sensor are preferably welded together, preferably by laser welding. In some embodiments, the entire ferrule is bonded to the fiber along the entire length of the fiber within the ferrule; in other embodiments, only a portion of the ferrule is welded to the fiber. A partial vacuum is preferably formed in the pit. A small piece of optical fiber with a coefficient of thermal expansion chosen to compensate for mismatches between the main fiber and ferrule may be spliced to the end of the fiber.

  18. Fiber-optic displacement sensor system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cava, Norayda Nora

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 54 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The implementation of fiber optics in sensor systems is not a new idea; its popularity has steadily increased through the years. Although technological advances have much to do with this, certain characteristic.... The microbending scheme for displacement measurements [10], [11] takes advantage of the fact that when optical fibers are bent at sharp angles, energy will escape through the bent fiber walls. Maximum sensitivity for this scheme is achieved by minimizing...

  19. Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

  20. NONNEGATIVE UNMIXING METHODOLOGY APPLIED ON BRILLOUIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    NONNEGATIVE UNMIXING METHODOLOGY APPLIED ON BRILLOUIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR Edouard Buchoud1 As a complement to conventional sensors, Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors (DOFS) have gradually played. In complementary to traditional sensors, distributed fiber optic sensors (DOFS) are an attractive tool for SHM [1

  1. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  2. Microbend fiber-optic temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature sensor is made of optical fiber into which quasi-sinusoidal microbends have been permanently introduced. In particular, the present invention includes a graded-index optical fiber directing steady light through a section of the optical fiber containing a plurality of permanent microbends. The microbend section of the optical fiber is contained in a thermally expansive sheath, attached to a thermally expansive structure, or attached to a bimetallic element undergoing temperature changes and being monitored. The microbend section is secured to the thermally expansive sheath which allows the amplitude of the microbends to decrease with temperature. The resultant increase in the optical fiber`s transmission thus allows temperature to be measured. The plural microbend section of the optical fiber is secured to the thermally expansive structure only at its ends and the microbends themselves are completely unconstrained laterally by any bonding agent to obtain maximum longitudinal temperature sensitivity. Although the permanent microbends reduce the transmission capabilities of fiber optics, the present invention utilizes this phenomenon as a transduction mechanism which is optimized to measure temperature. 5 figs.

  3. Microbend fiber-optic temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature sensor is made of optical fiber into which quasi-sinusoidal microbends have been permanently introduced. In particular, the present invention includes a graded-index optical fiber directing steady light through a section of the optical fiber containing a plurality of permanent microbends. The microbend section of the optical fiber is contained in a thermally expansive sheath, attached to a thermally expansive structure, or attached to a bimetallic element undergoing temperature changes and being monitored. The microbend section is secured to the thermally expansive sheath which allows the amplitude of the microbends to decrease with temperature. The resultant increase in the optical fiber's transmission thus allows temperature to be measured. The plural microbend section of the optical fiber is secured to the thermally expansive structure only at its ends and the microbends themselves are completely unconstrained laterally by any bonding agent to obtain maximum longitudinal temperature sensitivity. Although the permanent microbends reduce the transmission capabilities of fiber optics, the present invention utilizes this phenomenon as a transduction mechanism which is optimized to measure temperature.

  4. Novel fiber optic polarimetric torsion sensor based on polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wai, Ping-kong Alexander

    Novel fiber optic polarimetric torsion sensor based on polarization- maintaining photonic crystal other engineering applications. Compared with conventional torsion sensors, the fiber optic torsion sensors have the distinct advantages of all-fiber-optical sensing. The fiber optic torsion sensors based

  5. Fiber-optic oxygen sensor using molybdenum chloride cluster luminescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Ruby N.

    Fiber-optic oxygen sensor using molybdenum chloride cluster luminescence Ruby N. Ghosh,a) Gregory L on a reflection-mode fiber-optic oxygen sensor based on the 3 O2 quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear, and medical applications. In these en- vironments the advantages of fiber-optic chemical sensors are that they

  6. ADHESIVE DISBOND MONITORING WITH MICROSTRUCTURED OPTICAL FIBER BRAGG GRATING SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ADHESIVE DISBOND MONITORING WITH MICROSTRUCTURED OPTICAL FIBER BRAGG GRATING SENSORS Sanne a sensing system that is based on a combination of 3 optical fiber sensors which are non optical fiber and feature an enhanced response to shear stress. The change in response of the sensors

  7. Analogic fiber optic position sensor with nanometric resolution Frdric Lamarque

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Analogic fiber optic position sensor with nanometric resolution Frédéric Lamarque Université de of the sensor is presented as well as experimentation results. Keywords Fiber optic sensor, nanometric size is approximately 1.5x2.0x0.6 mm3 and the measurement resolution is 0.1 µm [4]. An optical sensor

  8. Interferometric fiber-optic bending/nano-displacement sensor using plastic dual-core fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    Interferometric fiber-optic bending/nano-displacement sensor using plastic dual-core fiber H. Qu,1); published August 13, 2014 We demonstrate an interferometric fiber-optic bending/nano-displacement sensor for sensing the displacement. © 2014 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (060.2370) Fiber optics sensors

  9. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor for PEM Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor for PEM Fuel Cells S.W. Allison, T.J. McIntyre, L.C. Maxey, M a Waveguide Temperature Sensor? · Reliability - fiber optic sensors are immune to oxidizing or reducing Objectives · Develop a low cost, robust temperature sensor for monitoring fuel cell condition and performance

  10. Fiber Optic Sensors for PEM Fuel Cells Nigel David

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Fiber Optic Sensors for PEM Fuel Cells by Nigel David B.Sc., Simon Fraser University, 2004 M or other means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Fiber Optic Sensors for PEM Fuel Cells) and air- water two-phase flow sensors are developed and demonstrated based on optical fibre Bragg gratings

  11. MICROSTRUCTURED OPTICAL FIBER BRAGG GRATING SENSORS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MICROSTRUCTURED OPTICAL FIBER BRAGG GRATING SENSORS FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING APPLICATIONS optical fiber Bragg grating (MOFBG) sensors for structural health monitoring applications. We then focus, optical fiber sensor, fiber Bragg grating, structural health monitoring INTRODUCTION Microstructured

  12. Evaluations of fiber optic sensors for interior applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandoval, M.W.; Malone, T.P.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the testing and evaluation of commercial fiber optic intrusion detection systems in interior applications. The applications include laying optical fiber cable above suspended ceilings to detect removal of ceiling tiles, embedding optical fibers inside a tamper or item monitoring blanket that could be placed over an asset, and installing optical fibers on a door to detect movement or penetration. Detection capability of the fiber optic sensors as well as nuisance and false alarm information were focused on during the evaluation. Fiber optic sensor processing, system components, and system setup are described.

  13. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, J.W.; Olsen, K.B.

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species. The method uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having an electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has an optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited in the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis. Optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis. 18 figs.

  14. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA); Olsen, Khris B. (West Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis and optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis.

  15. Distributed fiber optic intrusion sensor system for monitoring long perimeters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juarez, Juan C.

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed sensor using an optical fiber for detecting and locating intruders over long perimeters (>10 km) is described. Phase changes resulting from either the pressure of the intruder on the ground immediately above the buried fiber or from...

  16. Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors and their multiplexing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Anbo (Blacksburg, VA)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical sensor includes a thin film sandwiched between two fiber ends. When light is launched into the fiber, two reflections are generated at the two fiber/thin film interfaces due to a difference in refractive indices between the fibers and the film, giving rise to the sensor output. In another embodiment, a portion of the cladding of a fiber is removed, creating two parallel surfaces. Part of the evanescent fields of light propagating in the fiber is reflected at each of the surfaces, giving rise to the sensor output. In a third embodiment, the refractive index of a small portion of a fiber is changed through exposure to a laser beam or other radiation. Interference between reflections at the ends of the small portion give rise to the sensor output. Multiple sensors along a single fiber are multiplexed using an optical time domain reflectometry method.

  17. Fiber optic hydrophone sensor arrays using low reflectance internal mirrors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong-Seo

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new design of fiber optic hydrophone sensor arrays phics. using low reflectance internal mirrors in optical fibers is investigated. The mirrors are produced by fusion arc splicing of two fibers, one of which has a thin film of TiO2 on the end. A...

  18. Mechanical and optical behavior of a novel optical fiber crack sensor and an interferometric strain sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Noah Gale, 1969-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proper interpretation of measurements from an optical fiber sensor requires a full understanding of its mechanical response to external action and the corresponding change in optical output. To quantify the mechanical ...

  19. Signal processing for fiber optic acoustic sensor system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Juhong

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pulses from a single mode laser. Signals from multiple sensors in the array are separated and demultiplexed. The acoustic pressure information is determined by processing the returned optical pulses using a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer as an optical...

  20. INTERFACIAL STABILITY OF THIN FILM FIBER-OPTIC HYDROGEN SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERFACIAL STABILITY OF THIN FILM FIBER-OPTIC HYDROGEN SENSORS R. Davis Smith, Ping Liu, Se and utility of these sensors, especially in the configuration that is based upon the optical response hydrogen sensors for use as safety monitors wherever hydrogen is used, stored, or produced. Prior work has

  1. Modeling and validation of performance limitations for the optimal design of interferometric and intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moro, Erik Allan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    317 (1996). B. Culshaw, “Optical fiber sensor technologies:Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors,” Opt. Lett. 16 ( 4), 273-and implementation of optical sensors for use in such

  2. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, K.A.; Gunther, M.F.; Vengsarkar, A.M.; Claus, R.O.

    1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer. 14 figures.

  3. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Kent A. (Roanoke, VA); Gunther, Michael F. (Blacksburg, VA); Vengsarkar, Ashish M. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Claus, Richard O. (Christiansburg, VA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

  4. Optical fiber sensor having a sol-gel fiber core and a method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Shiquan; Jindal, Rajeev; Winstead, Christopher; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, economic wet chemical procedure is described for making sol-gel fibers. The sol-gel fibers made from this process are transparent to ultraviolet, visible and near infrared light. Light can be guided in these fibers by using an organic polymer as a fiber cladding. Alternatively, air can be used as a low refractive index medium. The sol-gel fibers have a micro pore structure which allows molecules to diffuse into the fiber core from the surrounding environment. Chemical and biochemical reagents can be doped into the fiber core. The sol-gel fiber can be used as a transducer for constructing an optical fiber sensor. The optical fiber sensor having an active sol-gel fiber core is more sensitive than conventional evanescent wave absorption based optical fiber sensors.

  5. Fabry-Perot fiber optic sensor using multimode laser diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Siu Yi Andrew

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FABRY-PEROT FIBER OPTIC SENSOR USING MULTIMODE LASER DIODE A Thesis SIU YI ANDREW CHU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1993 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering FABRY-PEROT FIBER OPTIC SENSOR USING MULTIMODE LASER DIODE A Thesis SIU YI ANDREW CHU Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  6. Sensors and Actuators B 123 (2007) 594605 Fiber optic sensing of liquid refractive index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors and Actuators B 123 (2007) 594­605 Fiber optic sensing of liquid refractive index Argha rights reserved. Keywords: Liquid refractive index sensor; Fiber optic refractive index sensor; Refractive index sensitivity of uncladded fiber; Uncladded optical fiber as sensor 1. Introduction

  7. Modeling and evaluating the performance of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    Modeling and evaluating the performance of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors Marcelo A analysis of the key factors impacting on the performance of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors of America OCIS codes: (060.2310) Fiber optics; (060.2370) Fiber optics sensors; (290.5900) Scattering

  8. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress over the fourth year of the ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'' program, funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. During the reporting period, research efforts under the program were focused on the development and evaluation of the fiber optic flow sensor system, and field testing in Tulsa, OK and the second field test of the pressure and temperature sensors in Coalinga, CA. The feasibility of a self-compensating fiber optic flow sensor based on a cantilever beam and interferometer for real-time flow rate measurements in the fluid filled pipes of oil field was clearly demonstrated. In addition, field testing of the pressure and temperature sensors deployed downhole continued. These accomplishments are summarized here: (1) Theoretical analysis and simulations were performed to ensure performance of the design. (2) The sensor fabrication and packaging techniques were investigated and improved. (3) Prototype flow sensors were fabricated based on the fabrication experience of hundreds of test sensors. (4) A lab-scale flow testing system was constructed and used for sensor evaluation. (5) Field-testing was performed in both the indoor and outdoor flow testing facility at the University of Tulsa, OK. (6) Testing of a multimode white light pressure and temperature sensor system continued at the oil site of Chevron/Texaco Company (Coalinga CA).

  9. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, S.E.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiber optic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences. 3 figs.

  10. Fiber optic micromirror sensor for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.; Buss, R. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (US))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the growing concern over environmental pollution, there is a need for sensors to locate and measure the distribution of a wide range of pollutants. In this paper the authors report a fiber optic sensor, based on a thin film micromirror, which responds to a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This generic class of sensor will be useful for monitoring applications where the pollutant has already been identified.

  11. Simulation, implementation, and analysis of an optical fiber bundle distance sensor with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    Simulation, implementation, and analysis of an optical fiber bundle distance sensor with single Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 060.2370, 120.2830. 1. Introduction Optical fiber distance sensors. In general, optical fiber distance sensors can be divided into two categories: intensity

  12. Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 ?m) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

  13. Optical fiber pressure and acceleration sensor fabricated on a fiber endface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yizheng; Wang, Xingwei; Xu, Juncheng; Wang, Anbo

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic sensor has a hollow tube bonded to the endface of an optical fiber, and a diaphragm bonded to the hollow tube. The fiber endface and diaphragm comprise an etalon cavity. The length of the etalon cavity changes when applied pressure or acceleration flexes the diaphragm. The entire structure can be made of fused silica. The fiber, tube, and diaphragm can be bonded with a fusion splice. The present sensor is particularly well suited for measuring pressure or acceleration in high temperature, high pressure and corrosive environments (e.g., oil well downholes and jet engines). The present sensors are also suitable for use in biological and medical applications.

  14. Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Slagging Coal Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anbo Wang; Kristie Cooper

    2008-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal gasifier is one of the most promising solutions for clean fossil energy. Refractory thickness monitoring and online real-time temperature measurement is needed for improved reliability and advanced process control for current and future generation power plants. The objective of this program is to design and implement an optical fiber based sensing system that could potentially be used to monitor refractory wall thickness and temperature inside a coal gasifier. For the thickness monitoring, the system should be able to operate at temperatures up to 1000 C. For this temperature range, silica fiber can still work so it is chosen for the sensor design. The measurement is based on a photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. A narrow light pulse is launched into a silica fiber which could be embedded into the gasifier refractory wall, and is partially reflected by the far end of the fiber. The time of flight of the light pulse in the fiber then gives an indication of the position of the fiber end, which is a function of the wall thickness when the fiber is embedded. Results obtained show a measurement accuracy of {+-}2cm in environment of 1000 C with a saw cut fiber end. When the fiber end is corroded by sodium carbide at 900 C, the accuracy is {+-}3cm. For the temperature measurement, a single crystal sapphire fiber sensor is designed. The sapphire fiber guides the broadband light from a light emitting diode to a sapphire wafer functioning as a Fabry-Perot interferometer and the wafer optical thickness is a function of temperature. The returned optical signal is then demodulated by multimode fiber based whitelight interferometry. The system was tested up to 1500 C with a measurement accuracy of {+-}10 C for the entire measurement range.

  15. Optical fiber-based fluorescent viscosity sensor Mark A. Haidekker and Walter J. Akers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    Optical fiber-based fluorescent viscosity sensor Mark A. Haidekker and Walter J. Akers Department to molecular rotors in solution. An optical fiber-based fluorescent vis- cosity sensor may be used in real, we sought to develop an optical fiber-based sensor that could re- port changes in fluid viscosity

  16. 123BLPCn272october/november 2008 Optical fiber strain sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    123BLPC·n°272·october/november 2008 Optical fiber strain sensors for use in civil engineering: State-of-the-art, industrial applications and outlook ABSTRACT Optical fiber sensors prove-of-the-art assessment of optical fiber strain sensor use in civil engineering, nearly 20 years after their initial

  17. Fiber optics sensor for sub-nanometric displacement and wide bandwidth systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Fiber optics sensor for sub-nanometric displacement and wide bandwidth systems L. Perret, L. Ruaux, B. Cagneau, Y. Alayli, Fiber optics sensor for sub-nanometric displacement and wide bandwidth systems, Sensors and Actuators A Abstract , 165, 189-193 (2011). In this paper, we report fiber optics

  18. USE OF DISTRIBUTED FIBER OPTIC SENSORS TO DETECT DAMAGE IN A Xavier Chapeleau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    USE OF DISTRIBUTED FIBER OPTIC SENSORS TO DETECT DAMAGE IN A PAVEMENT Xavier Chapeleau 1 , Juliette strains and crack initiation. These first tests demonstrate that distributed fiber optic sensor based, by monitoring strain profiles in the bituminous layers. KEYWORDS: Distributed fiber optic sensor, asphalt

  19. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiberoptic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences.

  20. Fiber-optic displacement sensor system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cava, Norayda Nora

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Light pulses from a light emitting diode (LED) were coupled into a multimode fiber. The displacement of a mirror positioned near the end of the fiber was measured by monitoring the amplitude of the reflected pulses. A reference reflection from a... emitting diode (LED) were coupled into a multimode fiber. The displacement of a mirror positioned near the end of the fiber was measured by monitoring the amplitude...

  1. Proceedings of IEEE Sensors 2003 Fiber Optic Oxygen Sensor for Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Ruby N.

    807 Proceedings of IEEE Sensors 2003 Paper 22-2 Fiber Optic Oxygen Sensor for Power Plant for power plant applications. The sensor utilizes quenching of the bright red fluorescence from inorganic. Motivation Combustion processes in power plants require the correct mix of fuel and oxygen to maximize

  2. Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, a.; Pickrell, G.; Xiao, H.; May, r.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reliable cost effective sensors for application in the down-hole environment. The physical parameters measured by these sensors were temperature, pressure, flow and acoustic signals. Sensor head configurations for each of the physical measurands were optimized to increase the sensitivity to the particular measurand of interest while decreasing the cross-sensitivity to the other physical measurands and to environmental influences. In addition, the optical signal demodulation electronics was designed to be insensitive to environmental influences while maintaining the required resolution, precision and accuracy of the parameter being sensed. The influence of potentially detrimental agents such as water in the down-hole environment was investigated as well as methods to protect both the optical fiber and the sensor from these detrimental effects.

  3. Bipolar pulse coding for enhanced performance in Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Bipolar pulse coding for enhanced performance in Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors-sideband suppressed-carrier (SSB-SC) modulation in Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) sensors. The SSB conventional unipolar sequences. Keywords: Stimulated Brillouin scattering, distributed optical fiber sensor

  4. Double-pulse Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors: analytical model and experimental validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Double-pulse Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensors: analytical model and experimental-pulse Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (DP-BOTDA) sensors. The proposed model is a tool that provides a full. Keywords: Stimulated Brillouin scattering, distributed optical fiber sensor, temperature sensing, strain

  5. Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, C.B.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities. 3 figs.

  6. Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Charles B. (Lakewood, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

  7. Dynamic Fiber Optic Sensors Under Intense Radioactive Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, S.W.; Earl, D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Tsai, C.C.

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid mercury target will be used as the neutron source for the proposed Spallation Neutron Source facility. This target is subjected to bombardment by short-pulse, high-energy proton beams. The intense thermal loads caused by interaction of the pulsed proton beam with the mercury create an enormous rate of temperature rise ({approximately}10{sup 7} K/s) during a very brief beam pulse ({approximately } 0.5 {micro}s). The resulting pressure waves in the mercury will interact with the walls of the mercury target and may lead to large stresses. To gain confidence in the mercury target design concept and to benchmark the computer design codes, we tested various electrical and optical sensors for measuring the transient strains on the walls of a mercury container and the pressures in the mercury. The sensors were attached on several sample mercury targets that were tested at various beam facilities: Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, Los Alamos Neutron Science Center-Weapons Neutron Research, and Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. The effects of intense background radiation on measured signals for each sensor are described and discussed. Preliminary results of limited tests at these facilities indicate that the fiber optic sensors function well in this intense radiation environment, whereas conventional electrical sensors are dysfunctional.

  8. Distributed fiber optic intrusion sensor system for monitoring long perimeters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juarez, Juan C.

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Perturbation ........................ 17 G. Frequency Drift Measurement................................................................... 19 III ERBIUM DOPED FIBER LASER CHARACTERIZATION........................ 22 A. Er:Fiber Laser... .................................................................................................... 22 12. Experimental setup for fiber laser used in the intrusion sensor system ............. 24 13. Spectral linewidth scan of Erbium doped fiber laser ......................................... 24 14. Delayed self-heterodyne test setup...

  9. > REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) optical fiber sensors (DOFS) have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    --Distributed optical fiber sensors (DOFS) have gained an increasingly prominent role in structural-health monitoring of electronic equipment at the site. Complementary to these sensors, distributed optical fiber sensors (DOFS optical fiber, and a large number of sensors can be multiplexed to enhance their economic viability. Due

  10. NONLINEAR EFFECTS OF A MODAL DOMAIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR IN A VIBRATION SUPPRESSION CONTROL LOOP FOR A FLEXIBLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindner, Douglas K.

    NONLINEAR EFFECTS OF A MODAL DOMAIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR IN A VIBRATION SUPPRESSION CONTROL LOOP Recently, a modal domain optical fiber sensor has been demonstrated as a sensor in a control system the region of linear operation in terms of the optical fiber sensor parameters. #12;2 1. INTRODUCTION

  11. Fiber optic sensor: Feedback control design and implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tung, D.; Bertram, L.; Hillaire, R.; Anderson, S.; Leonard, S.; Marburger, S.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital feedback control of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) has been demonstrated on a tube sample of stainless steel and titanium alloy. A fiber optic sensor returns a signal proportional to backside radiance from the workpiece; that signal is used by the controller to compute a compensation weld current. The controller executes 10 times a second on an Intel 486 chip. For travel speeds of 3 to 6 inches per minute and thicknesses between 0.025 and 0.10 inches, constant backside bead width was maintained within 0.02 inches, from startup to tie-in.

  12. Downhole geothermal well sensors comprising a hydrogen-resistant optical fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of optical fiber based thermal sensors has been invented. The new sensors comprise hydrogen-resistant optical fibers which are able to withstand a hot, hydrogen-containing environment as is often found in the downhole well environment.

  13. Performance characterization of an internsity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, Erik Allan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Puckett, Santhony D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A testbed simulating an intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensor is experimentally characterized, and the implications regarding sensor design are discussed. Of interest are the intensity distribution of the transmitted optical signal and the relationships between sensor architecture and performance. Particularly, an intensity-modulated sensor's sensitivity, linearity, displacement range, and resolution are functions of the relative positioning of its transmitting and receiving fibers. In this paper, sensor architectures with various combinations of these performance metrics are discussed. A sensor capable of micrometer resolution is reported, and it is concluded that this work could lead to an improved methodology for sensor design.

  14. Spatially distributed temperatures at the base of two mountain snowpacks measured with fiber-optic sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selker, John

    Spatially distributed temperatures at the base of two mountain snowpacks measured with fiber-optic sensors Scott W. TYLER,1 Susan A. BURAK,2 James P. MCNAMARA,3 Aurele LAMONTAGNE,3 John S. SELKER,4 Jeff, which use the scattered light in a standard telecommunications fiber-optic cable to infer absolute

  15. Fiber-optic sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in PEM fuel cells Juan F. Botero-Cadavid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Fiber-optic sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in PEM fuel cells by Juan F. Botero of an optical fiber and its small size (125 µm diameter), make the sensors here developed an ideal solution, by photocopy or other means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Supervisory Committee Fiber-optic

  16. A two-mode fiber optic-bending sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Covington, Charles Eric

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a small slope in the refractive index profile of an optical fiber causes the two lowest order spatial modes to travel different distances from the geometrical center of the fiber. This effect increases by orders of magnitude...

  17. The application of fiber optic sensors to the monitoring of roller element bearing systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juarez, Juan Carlos

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating machinery test rig was instrumented with fiber optic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FFPI) strain sensors for condition monitoring of rolling element bearings. Wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) was utilized to simultaneously monitor...

  18. A planar lightwave circuit based micro interrogator and its applications to the interrogation of multiplexed optical fiber Bragg grating sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Jianping

    of multiplexed optical fiber Bragg grating sensors Gaozhi Xiao a,*, Nezih Mrad b , Honglei Guo c , Zhiyi Zhang Accepted 20 August 2008 Keywords: Micro interrogator Fiber Bragg grating sensors a b s t r a c t Optical have developed a micro optical sensor interrogator using a monolithically integrated planar lightwave

  19. Processing of transient signals from damage in CFRP composite materials monitored with embedded intensity-modulated fiber optic sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    intensity-modulated fiber optic sensors M. Weversa , L. Ripperta , J.-M. Papyb , S. Van Huffelb a Department-modulated fiber optic sensors, whose working principle is based on the microbending concept, are used to monitor. In this approach fibre optic sensors may offer an alternative for the robust piezoelectric transducers used

  20. The application of fiber optic sensors to the monitoring of roller element bearing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juarez, Juan Carlos

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE APPLICATION OF FIBER OPTIC SENSORS TO THE MONITORING OF ROLLER ELEMENT BEARING SYSTEMS A Thesis by JUAN CARLOS JUAREZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE APPLICATION OF FIBER OPTIC SENSORS TO THE MONITORING OF ROLLER ELEMENT BEARING SVSTEMS A Thesis by . IIJAN CARLOS JUAREZ Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  1. FLUORESCENCE AND FIBER-OPTICS BASED REAL-TIME THICKNESS SENSOR FOR DYNAMIC LIQUID FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narain, Amitabh

    /analyzed the incident reflected waves to identify and measure the total transit time of the sound wave (of known wave-speed1 FLUORESCENCE AND FIBER-OPTICS BASED REAL-TIME THICKNESS SENSOR FOR DYNAMIC LIQUID FILMS T. W. Ng/disadvantages of many known liquid film thickness sensing devices (viz. conductivity probes, reflectance based fiber

  2. Fiber optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy sensor for molten material analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hansheng; Rai, Awadesh K.; Singh, Jagdish P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) sensor, including a laser light source, a harmonic separator for directing the laser light, a dichroic mirror for reflecting the laser light, a coupling lens for coupling the laser light at an input of a multimode optical fiber, a connector for coupling the laser light from an output of the multimode optical fiber to an input of a high temperature holder, such as a holder made of stainless steel, and a detector portion for receiving emission signal and analyzing LIBS intensities. In one variation, the multimode optical fiber has silica core and silica cladding. The holder includes optical lenses for collimating and focusing the laser light in a molten alloy to produce a plasma, and for collecting and transmitting an emission signal to the multimode optical fiber.

  3. A loss-based, magnetic field sensor implemented in a ferrofluid infiltrated microstructured polymer optical fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candiani, A. [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Heraklion 70013 Greece (Greece); Department of Information Engineering (DII), University of Parma, Parma 43124 (Italy); Argyros, A.; Leon-Saval, S. G.; Lwin, R. [Institute of Photonics and Optical Science (IPOS), School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Selleri, S. [Department of Information Engineering (DII), University of Parma, Parma 43124 (Italy); Pissadakis, S., E-mail: pissas@iesl.forth.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Heraklion 70013 Greece (Greece)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an in-fiber magnetic field sensor based on magneto-driven optical loss effects, while being implemented in a ferrofluid infiltrated microstructured polymer optical fiber. We demonstrate that magnetic field flux changes up to 2000 gauss can be detected when the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the fiber axis. In addition, the sensor exhibits high polarization sensitivity for the interrogated wavelengths, providing the possibility of both field flux and direction measurements. The underlying physical and guidance mechanisms of this sensing transduction are further investigated using spectrophotometric, light scattering measurements, and numerical simulations, suggesting photonic Hall effect as the dominant physical, transducing mechanism.

  4. An experimental investigation of the sensitivity of a buried fiber optic intrusion sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuppuswamy, Harini

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed fiber optic sensor with the ability of detecting and locating intruders on foot and vehicles over long perimeters (>10 km) was studied. The response of the sensor to people walking over or near it and to vehicles driving nearby...

  5. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Wang; H. Xiao; R. May

    1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient and complete recovery of petroleum reserves from existing oil wells has proven difficult due to a lack of robust instrumentation that can monitor processes in the downhole environment. Commercially available sensors for measurement of pressure, temperature, and fluid flow exhibit shortened lifetimes in the harsh downhole conditions, which are characterized by high pressures (up to 20 kpsi), temperatures up to 250 C, and exposure to chemically reactive fluids. Development of robust sensors that deliver continuous, real-time data on reservoir performance and petroleum flow pathways will facilitate application of advanced recovery technologies, including horizontal and multi-lateral wells. The main objective of the research program is to develop cost-effective, reliable fiber sensor instrumentation for real-time monitoring and /or control of various key parameters crucial to efficient and economical oil production. This report presents the detailed research work and technical progress from October 1, 1998 to September 30, 1999. The research performed over the first year of the program has followed the schedule as proposed, and solid research progress has been made in specification of the technical requirements, design and fabrication of the SCIIB sensor probes, development of the sensor systems, development of DSP-based signal processing techniques, and construction of the test systems. These technical achievements will significantly help to advance continued research on sensor tests and evaluation during the second year of the program.

  6. MRI-compatible Haptics: Feasibility of using optical fiber Bragg grating strain-sensors to detect deflection of needles in an MRI environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Yong-Lae

    MRI-compatible Haptics: Feasibility of using optical fiber Bragg grating strain-sensors to detect fiber-optic-based force and deflection sensors based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology have been was developed using a single optical fiber and an MRI compatible biopsy needle (22ga x 15cm). The FBG sensor

  7. Fiber-optic Fabry-Perot ultrasound sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcoz, Jorge Jose

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Perot interferometer. A mirror is produced by joining a fiber coated on the end with a T;02 film to an uncoated fiber by electric arc splicing. The acoustic field changes the index of refraction inside the interferometer cavity through the strain optic effect, thus... displays of-the response of S2 to a 150 KHz wave, for the static phase shift changing x/2. A second harmonic is ge~ when the interferometer is in quadrature . 10. Oscilloscope displays of detected signal for the same 350 KHz acoustic wave a...

  8. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival "points" constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the "points" of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

  9. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

  10. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ames, IA); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor (50). An optical fiber micro-light source (50) is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors (22) in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material (60). This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source (50). Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material (60) enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  11. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 10 figs.

  12. Elastomeric optical fiber sensors and method for detecting and measuring events occurring in elastic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Capps, Gary J. (Knoxville, TN); Smith, David B. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Clifford P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber optic sensing means for the detection and measurement of events such as dynamic loadings imposed upon elastic materials including cementitious materials, elastomers, and animal body components and/or the attrition of such elastic materials are provided. One or more optical fibers each having a deformable core and cladding formed of an elastomeric material such as silicone rubber are embedded in the elastic material. Changes in light transmission through any of the optical fibers due the deformation of the optical fiber by the application of dynamic loads such as compression, tension, or bending loadings imposed on the elastic material or by the attrition of the elastic material such as by cracking, deterioration, aggregate break-up, and muscle, tendon, or organ atrophy provide a measurement of the dynamic loadings and attrition. The fiber optic sensors can be embedded in elastomers subject to dynamic loadings and attrition such as commonly used automobiles and in shoes for determining the amount and frequency of the dynamic loadings and the extent of attrition. The fiber optic sensors are also useable in cementitious material for determining the maturation thereof.

  13. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ann Arbor, MI); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  14. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 4 figs.

  15. Structural and environmental monitoring of tracker and vertex systems using Fiber Optic Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moya, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibre optic sensors (FOS) are an established technique for environmental and deformation monitoring in several areas like civil engineering, aerospace, and energy. Their immunity to electromagnetic and magnetic fields and nuclear environments, its small size, multiplexing capability and the possibility to be embedded make them an attractive technology for the structural and environmental monitoring of collider particle physics experiments. Between all the possible Fibre Optic sensors FBGs (Fiber Bragg Grating) seems to be the best solution for HEP applications. The first step was to characterize FBG sensors for it use in High Energy Physics environment. During last two years we have checked the resistance of the Fibre Bragg Grating sensors to radiation. Two irradiation campaigns with protons have been done at CNA (Centro Nacional de Aceleradores). In the near future these sensors are being planned to be used in detectors (the closest one Belle II.). Several work on integration issues in Belle II PXD-SVD, and ...

  16. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Mechanical Shock Sensors for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. E. Klingsporn

    2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document lists the requirements for the fiber optic mechanical shock sensor for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) project and provides detailed process steps for fabricating, testing, and assembling the fiber shock sensors for delivery to Los Alamos.

  17. Distributed optical fiber vibration sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hui

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a distributed optical fiber vibration sensor. The purpose of this sensing system is to monitor, in real time, the status of railcars by burying an optical fiber underground beside the rails. Using a coherent homodyne technique...

  18. Method and apparatus for packaging optical fiber sensors for harsh environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pickrell, Gary; Duan, Yuhong; Wang, Anbo

    2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A package for an optical fiber sensor having a metal jacket surrounding the sensor, and heat-shrink tubing surrounding the metal jacket. The metal jacket is made of a low melting point metal (e.g. lead, tin). The sensor can be disposed in a rigid tube (e.g. stainless steel or glass) that is surrounded by the metal jacket. The metal jacket provides a hermetic, or nearly hermetic seal for the sensor. The package is made by melting the metal jacket and heating the heat shrink tubing at the same time. As the heat-shrink tubing shrinks, it presses the low melting point metal against the sensor, and squeezes out the excess metal.

  19. Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anbo Wang; Gary Pickrell

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress on the program â??Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systemsâ?ť funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed jointly by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech. This three-year project started on October 1, 2008. In the project, a fiber optical sensing system based on intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (IFPI) was developed for strain and temperature measurements for Ultra Supercritical boiler condition assessment. Investigations were focused on sensor design, fabrication, attachment techniques and novel materials for high temperature and strain measurements. At the start of the project, the technical requirements for the sensing technology were determined together with our industrial partner Alstom Power. As is demonstrated in Chapter 4, all the technical requirements are successfully met. The success of the technology extended beyond laboratory test; its capability was further validated through the field test at DOE NETL, in which the sensors yielded distributed temperature mapping of a testing coupon installed in the turbine test rig. The measurement results agreed well with prior results generated with thermocouples. In this project, significant improvements were made to the IFPI sensor technology by splicing condition optimization, transmission loss reduction, sensor signal demodulation and sensor system design.

  20. Spark-plug-mounted fiber optic sensor for measuring in-cylinder pressure in engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Taehan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new design for an in-cylinder fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) pressure sensor suitable for automotive engines has been investigated experimentally. The FFPI sensor consists of a single mode fiber containing two internal mirrors which form...

  1. Development of a 1 x N Fiber Optic Sensor Array for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Repasky, Kevin

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber sensor array for sub-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations measurements was developed for monitoring geologic carbon sequestration sites. The fiber sensor array uses a single temperature tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating with a nominal wavelength of 2.004 􀁐m. Light from this DFB laser is direct to one of the 4 probes via an in-line 1 x 4 fiber optic switch. Each of the 4 probes are buried and allow the sub-surface CO{sub 2} to enter the probe through Millipore filters that allow the soil gas to enter the probe but keeps out the soil and water. Light from the DFB laser interacts with the CO{sub 2} before it is directed back through the in-line fiber optic switch. The DFB laser is tuned across two CO{sub 2} absorption features where a transmission measurement is made allowing the CO{sub 2} concentration to be retrieved. The fiber optic switch then directs the light to the next probe where this process is repeated allowing sub-surface CO{sub 2} concentration measurements at each of the probes to be made as a function of time. The fiber sensor array was deployed for fifty-eight days beginning June 19, 2012 at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site where sub-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations were monitored. Background measurements indicate the fiber sensor array can monitor background levels as low as 1,000 parts per million (ppm). A thirty four day sub-surface release of 0.15 tones CO{sub 2}/day began on July 10, 2012. The elevated subsurface CO{sub 2} concentration was easily detected by each of the four probes with values ranging to over 60,000 ppm, a factor of greater than 6 higher than background measurements. The fiber sensor array was also deploy at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) site in north-central Montana between July 9th and August 7th, 2013 where background measurements were made in a remote sequestration site with minimal infrastructure. The project provided opportunities for two graduate students to participate in research directly related to geologic carbon sequestration. Furthermore, commercialization of the technology developed is being pursued with five different companies via the Department of energy SBIR/STTR program

  2. Analysis of a distributed fiber-optic temperature sensor using single-photon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shellee D. Dyer; Michael G. Tanner; Burm Baek; Robert H. Hadfield; Sae Woo Nam

    2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a high-accuracy distributed fiber-optic temperature sensor using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors and single-photon counting techniques. Our demonstration uses inexpensive single-mode fiber at standard telecommunications wavelengths as the sensing fiber, which enables extremely low-loss experiments and compatibility with existing fiber networks. We show that the uncertainty of the temperature measurement decreases with longer integration periods, but is ultimately limited by the calibration uncertainty. Temperature uncertainty on the order of 3 K is possible with spatial resolution of the order of 1 cm and integration period as small as 60 seconds. Also, we show that the measurement is subject to systematic uncertainties, such as polarization fading, which can be reduced with a polarization diversity receiver.

  3. Fiber Optic Cryogenic Sensors for Superconducting Magnets and Superconducting Power Transmission lines at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiuchiolo, A; Cusano, A; Bajko, M; Perez, J C; Bajas, H; Giordano, M; Breglio, G; Palmieri, L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, fabrication and tests of a new generation of superconducting magnets for the upgrade of the LHC require the support of an adequate, robust and reliable sensing technology. The use of Fiber Optic Sensors is becoming particularly challenging for applications in extreme harsh environments such as ultra-low temperatures, high electromagnetic fields and strong mechanical stresses offering perspectives for the development of technological innovations in several applied disciplines.

  4. Self-compensating fiber optic flow sensor having an end of a fiber optics element and a reflective surface within a tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Wei; Qi, Bing; Wang, Anbo

    2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow rate fiber optic transducer is made self-compensating for both temperature and pressure by using preferably well-matched integral Fabry-Perot sensors symmetrically located around a cantilever-like structure. Common mode rejection signal processing of the outputs allows substantially all effects of both temperature and pressure to be compensated. Additionally, the integral sensors can individually be made insensitive to temperature.

  5. Structure, Mechanism and Applications of Sol-Gel Clad Fiber-Optic Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fellows Olteanu, Marta Sarah

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a reversible optical sensor for ammonia and acidity [17],well suited to novel optical sensor applications [15][20][of chemical sensors which utilize optical waveguides and or/

  6. A two-mode fiber optic-bending sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Covington, Charles Eric

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relating the bending sensitivity to the shape of the profile's asymmetry are discussed. A temperature and strain compensated bending sensor for bending over arbitrary paths is demonstrated as an application of this technology. Some alternate two...

  7. Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickrell, Gary; Scott, Brian

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the technical progress on the program “Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems”, funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering Departments at Virginia Tech, and summarizes technical progress from July 1st, 2005 –June 30th, 2014. The objective of this program was to develop novel fiber materials for high temperature gas sensors based on evanescent wave absorption in optical fibers. This project focused on two primary areas: the study of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber (SPCF) for operation at high temperature and long wavelengths, and a porous glass based fiber optic sensor for gas detection. The sapphire component of the project focused on the development of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber, modeling of the new structures, fabrication of the optimal structure, development of a long wavelength interrogation system, testing of the optical properties, and gas and temperature testing of the final sensor. The fabrication of the 6 rod SPCF gap bundle (diameter of 70?m) with a hollow core was successfully constructed with lead-in and lead-out 50?m diameter fiber along with transmission and gas detection testing. Testing of the sapphire photonic crystal fiber sensor capabilities with the developed long wavelength optical system showed the ability to detect CO2 at or below 1000ppm at temperatures up to 1000°C. Work on the porous glass sensor focused on the development of a porous clad solid core optical fiber, a hollow core waveguide, gas detection capabilities at room and high temperature, simultaneous gas species detection, suitable joining technologies for the lead-in and lead-out fibers and the porous sensor, sensor system sensitivity improvement, signal processing improvement, relationship between pore structure and fiber geometry to optical properties, and the development of a sensor packaging prototype for laboratory testing. Analysis and experiments determined that a bonding technique using a CO2 laser is the most suitable joining technique. Pore morphology alteration showed that transmission improved with increasing annealing temperature (producing smaller pores), while the sensor response time increased and the mechanical strength decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Software was developed for data acquisition and signal processing to collect and interpret spectral gas absorption data. Gas detection on porous glass sensors was completed and the detection limit was evaluated using acetylene and was found to be around 1- 200ppm. A complete materials package for porous glass sensors was manufactured for testing.

  8. Spark-plug-mounted fiber optic sensor for measuring in-cylinder pressure in engines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Taehan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , with an optoelectronic signal conditioning unit containing a chirped distributed feedback laser used to interrogate the sensor. The response of the fiber sensor was compared with that of a piezoelectric pressure sensor used as a reference transducer. Tests were carried...

  9. Fiber optic hydrophone sensor arrays using low reflectance internal mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong-Seo

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Perot Interferometer 4 The Quadrature Point Page 5 Phase Fading in a 2x2 Coupler 6 Phase Fading a 3x3 Coupler 7 The Configuration of Electric Arc Fusion Splicer 8 The Theoretical Calculation of the Thin Film Thickness 10 15 17 9 Thin Film Thickness... film of Ti02 is used for making a mirror on a cleaved end surface of a fiber [3, 4], because this material has a high refractive index over visible and infrared ranges and strong molecular bonding on glass-based materials [5]. In addition, it has low...

  10. Performance of miniaturized optical fiber interconnects between sensor-embedded composite panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ethan L.

    the performance of low-profile multi-fiber connectors between sensor- embedded composite panels and Sensor Technologies P.O. Box 11704 Blacksburg, VA 24061-1704, (703) 231-4224 ABSTRACT This paper reports to locally weaken the material and to expose the fiber sensor channel to the external environment. We report

  11. Structural and environmental monitoring of tracker and vertex systems using Fiber Optic Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Moya; Iván Vila

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibre optic sensors (FOS) are an established technique for environmental and deformation monitoring in several areas like civil engineering, aerospace, and energy. Their immunity to electromagnetic and magnetic fields and nuclear environments, its small size, multiplexing capability and the possibility to be embedded make them an attractive technology for the structural and environmental monitoring of collider particle physics experiments. Between all the possible Fibre Optic sensors FBGs (Fiber Bragg Grating) seems to be the best solution for HEP applications. The first step was to characterize FBG sensors for it use in High Energy Physics environment. During last two years we have checked the resistance of the Fibre Bragg Grating sensors to radiation. Two irradiation campaigns with protons have been done at CNA (Centro Nacional de Aceleradores). In the near future these sensors are being planned to be used in detectors (the closest one Belle II.). Several work on integration issues in Belle II PXD-SVD, and checking for environmental and deformation monitoring in the detectors inner part has been done.

  12. Optical Fibers Optics and Photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    Optical Fibers Optics and Photonics Dr. Palffy-Muhoray Ines Busuladzic Department of Theoretical and Applied Mathematics The University of Akron April 21, 2008 #12;Outline · History of optical fibers · What are optical fibers? · How are optical fibers made? · Light propagation through optical fibers · Application

  13. Modeling and Validation of Performance Limitations for the Optimal Design of Interferometric and Intensity-Modulated Fiber Optic Displacement Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, Erik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical fiber sensors offer advantages over traditional electromechanical sensors, making them particularly well-suited for certain measurement applications. Generally speaking, optical fiber sensors respond to a desired measurand through modulation of an optical signal's intensity, phase, or wavelength. Practically, non-contacting fiber optic displacement sensors are limited to intensity-modulated and interferometric (or phase-modulated) methodologies. Intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensors relate target displacement to a power measurement. The simplest intensity-modulated sensor architectures are not robust to environmental and hardware fluctuations, since such variability may cause changes in the measured power level that falsely indicate target displacement. Differential intensity-modulated sensors have been implemented, offering robustness to such intensity fluctuations, and the speed of these sensors is limited only by the combined speed of the photodetection hardware and the data acquisition system (kHz-MHz). The primary disadvantages of intensity-modulated sensing are the relatively low accuracy (?m-mm for low-power sensors) and the lack of robustness, which consequently must be designed, often with great difficulty, into the sensor's architecture. White light interferometric displacement sensors, on the other hand, offer increased accuracy and robustness. Unlike their monochromatic-interferometer counterparts, white light interferometric sensors offer absolute, unambiguous displacement measurements over large displacement ranges (cm for low-power, 5 mW, sources), necessitating no initial calibration, and requiring no environmental or feedback control. The primary disadvantage of white light interferometric displacement sensors is that their utility in dynamic testing scenarios is limited, both by hardware bandwidth and by their inherent high-sensitivity to Doppler-effects. The decision of whether to use either an intensity-modulated interferometric sensor depends on an appropriate performance function (e.g., desired displacement range, accuracy, robustness, etc.). In this dissertation, the performance limitations of a bundled differential intensity-modulated displacement sensor are analyzed, where the bundling configuration has been designed to optimize performance. The performance limitations of a white light Fabry-Perot displacement sensor are also analyzed. Both these sensors are non-contacting, but they have access to different regions of the performance-space. Further, both these sensors have different degrees of sensitivity to experimental uncertainty. Made in conjunction with careful analysis, the decision of which sensor to deploy need not be an uninformed one.

  14. Fiber optic temperature sensor using a grating on an angled fiber tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadarajan, Harini

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHAPTER Page 2. Spinning the Photo Resist. 20 3. Laser Exposure 21 4. Photo Resist Developing. . . . 25 5. Etching the Fiber. 26 B. Testing 29 1. Test Setup. 2. Test Results 29 30 V CONCLUSIONS. . 40 VI RECOMMENDED FUTURE RESEARCH . . 41.... Reusable Polishing Puck. . 14 . 17 11. Fibers in the Polishing Puck. 12. Polish Pad Surfaces. 13. Profile of Polished Fibers. 14. Photograph of Polished Fibers on Metal Puck 18 19 . 19 . 20 15. Argon Laser Setup. 22 16. Laser Setup Details. 23...

  15. Fiber optic spectroscopic digital imaging sensor and method for flame properties monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zelepouga, Serguei A. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Rue, David M. (Chicago, IL); Saveliev, Alexei V. (Chicago, IL)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for real-time monitoring of flame properties in combustors and gasifiers which includes an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end and a spectroscopic imaging system operably connected with the light output end of the imaging fiber optic bundle. Focusing of the light received by the light receiving end of the imaging fiber optic bundle by a wall disposed between the light receiving end of the fiber optic bundle and a light source, which wall forms a pinhole opening aligned with the light receiving end.

  16. The monitoring and multiplexing of fiber optic sensors using chirped laser sources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Xiaoke

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Linearization of the chirp rate has been achieved using feedback from a fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) to adjust the voltage ramp which drives the rotating mirror. In a demonstration of monitoring an array of two fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, a...

  17. Fiber optic temperature sensor using a grating on an angled fiber tip 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadarajan, Harini

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    up to observe the response of the sensor to changes in temperature in a furnace was built and the test results are in general agreement with prediction. The reflected power is observed to vary approximately as a sinusoidal function as expected...

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL CERAMIC NANOFILM-FIBER INTEGRATED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR RAPID DETECTION OF COAL DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Junhang Dong; Hai Xiao; Xiling Tang; Hongmin Jiang; Kurtis Remmel; Amardeep Kaur

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to conduct fundamental studies on advanced ceramic materials and fiber optic devices for developing new types of high temperature (>500{degree}C) fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCS) for monitoring fossil (mainly coal) and biomass derived gases in power plants. The primary technical objective is to investigate and demonstrate the nanocrystalline doped-ceramic thin film enabled FOCS that possess desired stability, sensitivity and selectivity for in-situ, rapid gas detection in the syngas streams from gasification and combustion flue gases. This report summarizes research works of two integrated parts: (1) development of metal oxide solid thin films as sensing materials for detection and measurement of important gas components relevant to the coal- and biomass-derived syngas and combustion gas streams at high temperatures; and (2) development of fiber optic devices that are potentially useful for constructing FOCS in combination with the solid oxide thin films identified in this program.

  19. Optical fiber sensor technique for strain measurement during materials deposition, chemical reaction, and relaxation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser light from a common source is split and conveyed through two similar optical fibers and emitted at their respective ends to form an interference pattern, one of the optical fibers having a portion thereof subjected to a strain. Changes in the strain cause changes in the optical path length of the strain fiber, and generate corresponding changes in the interference pattern. The interference pattern is received and transduced into signals representative of fringe shifts corresponding to changes in the strain experienced by the strained one of the optical fibers. These signals are then processed to evaluate strain as a function of time, typical examples of the application of the apparatus including electrodeposition of a metallic film on a conductive surface provided on the outside of the optical fiber being strained, so that strains generated in the optical fiber during the course of the electrodeposition are measurable as a function of time. In one aspect of the invention, signals relating to the fringe shift are stored for subsequent processing and analysis, whereas in another aspect of the invention the signals are processed for real-time display of the strain changes under study. 9 figs.

  20. Optical Fiber Chemical Sensor with Sol-Gel Derived Refractive Material as Transducer for High Temperature Gas Sensing in Clean Coal Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiquan Tao

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemistry of sol-gel derived silica and refractive metal oxide has been systematically studied. Sol-gel processes have been developed for preparing porous silica and semiconductor metal oxide materials. Micelle/reversed micelle techniques have been developed for preparing nanometer sized semiconductor metal oxides and noble metal particles. Techniques for doping metal ions, metal oxides and nanosized metal particles into porous sol-gel material have also been developed. Optical properties of sol-gel derived materials in ambient and high temperature gases have been studied by using fiber optic spectroscopic techniques, such as fiber optic ultraviolet/visible absorption spectrometry, fiber optic near infrared absorption spectrometry and fiber optic fluorescence spectrometry. Fiber optic spectrometric techniques have been developed for investigating the optical properties of these sol-gel derived materials prepared as porous optical fibers or as coatings on the surface of silica optical fibers. Optical and electron microscopic techniques have been used to observe the microstructure, such as pore size, pore shape, sensing agent distribution, of sol-gel derived material, as well as the size and morphology of nanometer metal particle doped in sol-gel derived porous silica, the nature of coating of sol-gel derived materials on silica optical fiber surface. In addition, the chemical reactions of metal ion, nanostructured semiconductor metal oxides and nanometer sized metal particles with gas components at room temperature and high temperatures have also been investigated with fiber optic spectrometric methods. Three classes of fiber optic sensors have been developed based on the thorough investigation of sol-gel chemistry and sol-gel derived materials. The first group of fiber optic sensors uses porous silica optical fibers doped with metal ions or metal oxide as transducers for sensing trace NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S in high temperature gas samples. The second group of fiber optic sensors uses sol-gel derived porous silica materials doped with nanometer particles of noble metals in the form of fiber or coating for sensing trace H{sub 2}, NH{sub 3} and HCl in gas samples at for applications ambient temperature. The third classes of fiber optic sensors use sol-gel derived semiconductor metal oxide coating on the surface of silica optical fiber as transducers for selectively sensing H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and CO at high temperature. In addition, optical fiber temperature sensors use the fluorescence signal of rare-earth metal ions doped porous silica optical fiber or the optical absorption signal of thermochromic metal oxide materials coated on the surface of silica optical fibers have also been developed for monitoring gas temperature of corrosive gas. Based on the results obtained from this project, the principle of fiber optic sensor techniques for monitoring matrix gas components as well as trace components of coal gasification derived syngas has been established. Prototype sensors for sensing trace ammonia and hydrogen sulfide in gasification derived syngas have been built up in our laboratory and have been tested using gas samples with matrix gas composition similar to that of gasification derived fuel gas. Test results illustrated the feasibility of these sensors for applications in IGCC processes.

  1. ON THE GAGE FACTOR FOR OPTICAL FIBER GRATING STRAIN GAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Yong-Lae

    ON THE GAGE FACTOR FOR OPTICAL FIBER GRATING STRAIN GAGES Richard J. Black1 , David Zare1 , Levy Oblea1 , Yong-Lae Park1 , Behzad Moslehi1 , and Craig Neslen2 1 Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems of grating and fiber types. KEY WORDS: Fiber-Optic Gratings, Fiber-Optic Sensors, Strain Gage Factor 1

  2. Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors for Measuring Transient Detonation/Shock Behavior;Time-of-Arrival Detection and Waveform Determination.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, Marcus Alexander; Willis, Michael David; Covert, Timothy T.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The miniaturization of explosive components has driven the need for a corresponding miniaturization of the current diagnostic techniques available to measure the explosive phenomena. Laser interferometry and the use of spectrally coated optical windows have proven to be an essential interrogation technique to acquire particle velocity time history data in one- dimensional gas gun and relatively large-scale explosive experiments. A new diagnostic technique described herein allows for experimental measurement of apparent particle velocity time histories in microscale explosive configurations and can be applied to shocks/non-shocks in inert materials. The diagnostic, Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors (EFOS), has been tested in challenging microscopic experimental configurations that give confidence in the technique's ability to measure the apparent particle velocity time histories of an explosive with pressure outputs in the tenths of kilobars to several kilobars. Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors also allow for several measurements to be acquired in a single experiment because they are microscopic, thus reducing the number of experiments necessary. The future of EFOS technology will focus on further miniaturization, material selection appropriate for the operating pressure regime, and extensive hydrocode and optical analysis to transform apparent particle velocity time histories into true particle velocity time histories as well as the more meaningful pressure time histories.

  3. Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

    1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

  4. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  5. Voltage sensor with fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wann, Been-Huey

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCTION. Page II RESEARCH DESCRIPTION. . . A. Optical Fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometer. . . . . B. Piezoelectricity. . C. Modulating Point in 60 Hz Voltage Measurement. . . . . . D. Temperature Control Circuit . . . . 18 . . . 26 III EXPERIMENTAL... PROCEDURES AND RESULTS. . . . . . A. Fabrication of the Optical Fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometer B. Selection of Piezoelectric Materials. C. Implementation of Temperature Control Circuit. . . . D. Experiments of Optical Fiber Voltage Sensor...

  6. A study of semiconductor laser noise and its effect on fiber optic sensor performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wanku

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF SEMICONDUCTOR LASER NOISE AND ITS EFFECT ON FISER OPTIC SENSOR PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WANKU LEE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved... as to style and content by: F. aylor (Chair o Committee) D, c 0. Eknoyan (Member) Li ngs ( ember G. Cote (Member) A. , Patton (Head o Department) August 1994 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ABSTRACT A Study of Semiconductor Laser Noise...

  7. A study of semiconductor laser noise and its effect on fiber optic sensor performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wanku

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF SEMICONDUCTOR LASER NOISE AND ITS EFFECT ON FISER OPTIC SENSOR PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WANKU LEE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved... as to style and content by: F. aylor (Chair o Committee) D, c 0. Eknoyan (Member) Li ngs ( ember G. Cote (Member) A. , Patton (Head o Department) August 1994 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ABSTRACT A Study of Semiconductor Laser Noise...

  8. An optical fiber Faraday effect current sensor for power system applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Shayne Xavier

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensing applications, the magnetic field that is employed is that which is induced by a current passing through a conductor. The Faraday efi'ect has been under continual study for over thirty years for mag- netic field sensing, with emphasis in recent... the conductor. For these applications, the Verdet constant is commonly given in terms of the current passing through the conductor. The most common Verdet constant value used for single-mode optical fiber is shown below. This is the value used...

  9. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  10. Optical Sensor Technology Development and Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. G. Parker

    2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this ESP (Enhanced Surveillance) project are to evaluate sensor performance for future aging studies of materials, components and weapon systems. The goal of this project is to provide analysis capability to experimentally identify and characterize the aging mechanisms and kinetics of Core Stack Assembly (CSA) materials. The work on fiber optic light sources, hermetic sealing of fiber optics, fiber optic hydrogen sensors, and detection systems will be discussed.

  11. Multimode optical fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bigot-Astruc, Marianne; Molin, Denis; Sillard, Pierre

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A depressed graded-index multimode optical fiber includes a central core, an inner depressed cladding, a depressed trench, an outer depressed cladding, and an outer cladding. The central core has an alpha-index profile. The depressed claddings limit the impact of leaky modes on optical-fiber performance characteristics (e.g., bandwidth, core size, and/or numerical aperture).

  12. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  13. An experimental investigation of the sensitivity of a buried fiber optic intrusion sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuppuswamy, Harini

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    laser emitting single longitudinal mode light and exhibiting low frequency drift are passed through one end of the buried fiber. The backscattered light emerging from the same fiber end was monitored using a photodetector. The phase changes produced...

  14. SU-E-T-111: Development of Proton Dosimetry System Using Fiber-Optic Cerenkov Radiation Sensor Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, J [National Cancer Center, Ilsan, Gyeonggi-do, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M; Shin, D; Lim, Y; Lee, S; Kim, J; Kim, J [National Cancer Center, Goyangsi, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, U [National Medical Center in Korea, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We had developed and evaluated a new dosimetric system for proton therapy using array of fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) which can measure a percent depth dose (PDD) instantly. In this study, the Bragg peaks and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the proton beams measured by FOCRS array were compared with those measured by an ion chamber. Methods and Method: We fabricated an optical fiber array of FOCRS in a handmade phantom which is composed of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). There are 75 holes of 1mm diameter inside the phantom which is designed to be exposed in direction of beam when it is emerged in water phantom. The proton beam irradiation was carried out using IBA cyclotron PROTEUS 235 at national cancer center in Korea and a commercial data acquisition system was used to digitize the analog signal. Results: The measured Bragg peak and SOBP for the proton ranges of 7? 20 cm were well matched with the result from ion chamber. The comparison results show that the depth of proton beam ranges and the width of SOBP measured by array of FOCRS are comparable with the measurement from multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) although there are some uncertainty in the measurement of FOCRS array for some specific beam ranges. Conclusion: The newly developed FOCRS array based dosimetric system for proton therapy can efficiently reduce the time and effort needed for proton beam range measurement compared to the conventional method and has the potential to be used for the proton pencil beam application.

  15. The monitoring and multiplexing of fiber optic sensors using chirped laser sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Xiaoke

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide band linearly chirped erbium-doped fiber laser has been developed. The erbium-doped fiber laser using a rotating mirror/grating combination as one of the reflectors in a Fabry-Perot laser cavity has been tuned over a 46 nm spectral range...

  16. An optical fiber Faraday effect current sensor for power system applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Shayne Xavier

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is compared to a high performance, commercially available, instrumentation current transducer. Specifically, the responses of the two sensors are compared in real time during various operating conditions. Concurrently, a theoretical analysis of the test...

  17. Optical sensing elements for nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) gas detection, a sol-gel method for making the sensing elements and fiber optic sensors incorporating nitrogen dioxide gas optical sensing elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mechery, Shelly John (Mississippi State, MS); Singh, Jagdish P. (Starkville, MS)

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensing element, a method of making a sensing element, and a fiber optic sensor incorporating the sensing element are described. The sensor can be used for the quantitative detection of NO.sub.2 in a mixture of gases. The sensing element can be made by incorporating a diazotizing reagent which reacts with nitrous ions to produce a diazo compound and a coupling reagent which couples with the diazo compound to produce an azo dye into a sol and allowing the sol to form an optically transparent gel. The sensing element changes color in the presence of NO.sub.2 gas. The temporal response of the absorption spectrum at various NO.sub.2 concentrations has also been recorded and analyzed. Sensors having different design configurations are described. The sensing element can detect NO.sub.2 gas at levels of parts per billion.

  18. Fiber optic compass development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Kyongtae

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is illustrated schematically in Fig. 3-1. The light source is an erbium doped fiber (EDF) laser in the ring configuration [11-12]. Total amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) power is 7 mW at 45 mW pump power. The laser is spectrally scanned in the 1525 ~ 1565... optic modulator and amplified by a commercial erbium- doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). The spectrum of the laser after amplification at 6 different wavelengths is shown in Fig. 3-3. After amplification, the light passes through a fiber coupler...

  19. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  20. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM); Looney, Larry D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  1. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  2. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  3. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, J.M.

    1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 {micro}m. 30 figs.

  4. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John M. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  5. A microcomputer control system for a fiber optic spectrophotometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spar, Steven Matthew

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SENSOR LICH'I SOURCE OPTICAL F I BER ~SAMPLE PHOTODE'IECTOR o r D o o n o 0 ~ o r Figure lb. Block Diagram of a Fiber Optic Spectrophotometer Fiber optic spectrophotometry uses the light conducting properties of tiny optical fibers... to carry the light to and from a remote sensor, as shown in Figure lb, page 2. At the tip of the fibers, a small chamber contains either the sample itself or an indicator for the sample, whose spectrophotometric properties change with the concentration...

  6. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.; Grant, S.A.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy. 4 figs.

  7. Lensless Magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, Lynn R. (Los Alamos, NM); Forman, Peter R. (Los Alamos, NM); Rodriguez, Patrick J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 .mu.m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation.

  8. Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, L.R.; Forman, P.R.; Rodriguez, P.J.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor is disclosed. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 {micro}m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation. 5 figs.

  9. Optical and optoelectronic fiber devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Ofer, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to integrate materials with disparate electrical, thermal, and optical properties into a single fiber structure enabled the realization of fiber devices with diverse and complex functionalities. Amongst those, ...

  10. System for testing optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golob, John E. [Olathe, KS; Looney, Larry D. [Los Alamos, NM; Lyons, Peter B. [Los Alamos, NM; Nelson, Melvin A. [Santa Barbara, CA; Davies, Terence J. [Santa Barbara, CA

    1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector.

  11. Fibratus tactile sensor using reflection on an optical lever Satoshi Saga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    Fibratus tactile sensor using reflection on an optical lever Satoshi Saga Tohoku University Shinobu this fibratus tactile sensor. Keywords: tactile sensor, fiber, image sensor, optical measure- ment, optical measure- ments; further, the wiring assembly is complicated. Some optical sensors [Yamada et al. 2002

  12. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

  13. A fiber optic probe for oxygen partial pressure sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlain, Leslie Ariel

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the electronic circuitry, and Steve Spar for software development. TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION Purpose Current Status of Conventional Oxygen Sensors Optical Sensors Technical Obj ect ives 1 5 10 MATERIAL AND METHODS 14 Transducer Design... the partial pressure of oxygen (p02) in solutions. The research effort was specifically aimed at the development of an oxygen sensor suitable for physiological applications. The sensor described in this thesis is an application of a generic fiber optic...

  14. Fibre-optic interferometric pressure sensor based on droplet-shaped PDMS elastomer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlachos, Kyriakos G.

    Fibre-optic interferometric pressure sensor based on droplet-shaped PDMS elastomer C. Markos1 , K *gkakaran@eie.gr Keywords: white-light interferometer, fibre-optic pressure sensor, PDMS-based Fabry progress in fiber-optic extrinsic Fabry­Perot interferometric sensors ", Optical Fiber Technology, 23, p

  15. Fiber optic sensing technology for measuring in-cylinder pressure in automotive engines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Taehan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Field tests were carried out in a 3-cylinder automotive engine with a piezoelectric pressure sensor as a reference transducer up to about 3500 rpm. The fiber optic sensor data generally matched those measured by the piezoelectric reference sensor...

  16. Optical displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Dustin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  17. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, F.W.

    1985-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

  18. Design of the Microstructured Optical Fiber-based Surface Plasmon Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    Design of the Microstructured Optical Fiber-based Surface Plasmon Resonance sensors with enhanced of a Microstructured Optical Fiber-based Surface Plasmon Resonance sensor with optimized microfluidics is proposed. In such a sensor plasmons on the inner surface of large metallized channels containing analyte can be excited

  19. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  20. SYNTACTIC AND COMPOSITE FOAMS Whispering gallery mode-based micro-optical sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ötügen, Volkan

    SYNTACTIC AND COMPOSITE FOAMS Whispering gallery mode-based micro-optical sensors for structural used in materials include piezoelectric particles, acoustic emission sensors, and optical fibers. Each. Use of fiber-optic sensors is advantageous in composite materials because they can become an integral

  1. BetaScint{trademark} fiber-optic sensor for detecting strontium-90 and uranium-238 in soil. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate measurements of radioactivity in soils contaminated with Strontium-90 (Sr-90) or Uranium-238 (U-238) are essential for many DOE site remediation programs. These crucial measurements determine if excavation and soil removal is necessary, where remediation efforts should be focused, and/or if a site has reached closure. Measuring soil contamination by standard EPA laboratory methods typically takes a week (accelerated analytical test turnaround) or a month (standard analytical test turnaround). The time delay extends to operations involving heavy excavation equipment and associated personnel which are the main costs of remediation. This report describes an application of the BetaScint{trademark} fiber-optic sensor that measures Sr-90 or U-238 contamination in soil samples on site in about 20 minutes, at a much lower cost than time-consuming laboratory methods, to greatly facilitate remediation. This report describes the technology, its performance, its uses, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  2. Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste - 13532

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job [EIC Laboratories, Inc., 111 Downey St., Norwood, MA, 02062 (United States)] [EIC Laboratories, Inc., 111 Downey St., Norwood, MA, 02062 (United States); Bryan, Samuel; Lines, Amanda; Levitskaia, Tatiana [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source. (authors)

  3. Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Lines, Amanda M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source.

  4. Infrared Fiber Optics James A. Harrington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Infrared Fiber Optics James A. Harrington Ceramic & Materials Engineering Rutgers University Piscataway, NJ 08854-8065 1. Introduction Infrared (IR) optical fibers may be defined as fiber optics IR fiber optics may logically be divided into three broad categories: glass, crystalline, and hollow

  5. Optical fiber reliability models M. John Matthewson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    3 Optical fiber reliability models M. John Matthewson Fiber Optic Materials Research Program Systems containing optical fiber have design lives on the order of decades so that models for assessing and promising areas for future work are proposed. 1. INTRODUCTION Mechanical failure of optical fiber must

  6. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  7. Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

  8. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  9. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  10. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  11. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  12. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe (San Francisco, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  13. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe (San Francisco, CA); Albertson, Donna G. (Lafayette, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  14. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.

    1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its ``sensor end`` biological ``binding partners`` (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor. 9 figs.

  15. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe (San Francisco, CA); Albertson, Donna G. (Lafayette, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  16. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually or by utilizing an optical fiber and an electrical sensing circuit.

  17. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually or by utilizing an optical fiber and an electrical sensing circuit. 7 figs.

  18. JW2A.3.pdf Imaging and Applied Optics Technical Digest 2012 OSA Optical Microfiber Sensors for the Detection of Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JW2A.3.pdf Imaging and Applied Optics Technical Digest © 2012 OSA Optical Microfiber Sensors microfibers for current sensing are discussed. OCIS codes: (060.2370) Fiber optics sensors; (230.2240) Faraday effect. 1. Introduction Current sensors exploiting the Faraday Effect in optical fibers [1] have

  19. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.] [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  20. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Woods, Gregory K. (Cornelius, OR)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

  1. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

  2. Applications of fiber optics in physical protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckle, T.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this NUREG is to provide technical information useful for the development of fiber-optic communications and intrusion detection subsystems relevant to physical protection. There are major sections on fiber-optic technology and applications. Other topics include fiber-optic system components and systems engineering. This document also contains a glossary, a list of standards and specifications, and a list of fiber-optic equipment vendors.

  3. Fiber Optic Hydrogen Sensor Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-05-00158

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ringer, M.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL and Nuclear Filter Technology collaborated to develop a prototype product for a hydrogen threshold sensor that was used to monitor hydrogen production in the transport of nuclear waste transport containers.

  4. Assessing Deterioration of ADSS Fiber Optic Cables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing Deterioration of ADSS Fiber Optic Cables Due to Corona Discharge Final Project Report of ADSS Fiber Optic Cables Due to Corona Discharge Final Project Report George G. Karady, Project Leader-Supporting) fiber optic cables installed on high voltage lines. The high electric field on those lines generates

  5. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) sensor using vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyung-Woo

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research represents the first effort to apply vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) to the monitoring of interferometric fiber optic sensors. Modulation of the drive current causes thermal tuning of the laser light frequency...

  6. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  7. Multiparameter fiber optic sensing system for monitoring enhanced geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William A. Challener

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to design, fabricate and test an optical fiber cable which supports multiple sensing modalities for measurements in the harsh environment of enhanced geothermal systems. To accomplish this task, optical fiber was tested at both high temperatures and strains for mechanical integrity, and in the presence of hydrogen for resistance to darkening. Both single mode (SM) and multimode (MM) commercially available optical fiber were identified and selected for the cable based on the results of these tests. The cable was designed and fabricated using a tube-within-tube construction containing two MM fibers and one SM fiber, and without supporting gel that is not suitable for high temperature environments. Commercial fiber optic sensing instruments using Raman DTS (distributed temperature sensing), Brillouin DTSS (distributed temperature and strain sensing), and Raleigh COTDR (coherent optical time domain reflectometry) were selected for field testing. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor was designed, fabricated, packaged, and calibrated for high pressure measurements at high temperatures and spliced to the cable. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor was also spliced to the cable. A geothermal well was selected and its temperature and pressure were logged. The cable was then deployed in the well in two separate field tests and measurements were made on these different sensing modalities. Raman DTS measurements were found to be accurate to ���±5���°C, even with some residual hydrogen darkening. Brillouin DTSS measurements were in good agreement with the Raman results. The Rayleigh COTDR instrument was able to detect some acoustic signatures, but was generally disappointing. The FBG sensor was used to determine the effects of hydrogen darkening, but drift over time made it unreliable as a temperature or pressure sensor. The MEMS sensor was found to be highly stable and accurate to better than its 0.1% calibration.

  8. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA); Larsen, Greg J. (Brentwood, CA); Sanchez, Roberto J. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  9. Ico-photonics-delphi2009.org Fibre-optic interferometric pressure sensor based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlachos, Kyriakos G.

    Ico-photonics-delphi2009.org Fibre-optic interferometric pressure sensor based on droplet pressure sensor, PDMS-based Fabry-Perot cavity A range of single-mode fibre-optic based on reflective Fabry­Perot interferometric sensors ", Optical Fiber Technology, 23, p.227- 237, 2006. [2] Florian Schneider , Jan Draheim

  10. An investigation of the polarization dependence of a temperature sensor based on an optical microfiber coupler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An investigation of the polarization dependence of a temperature sensor based on an optical is experimentally investigated. The optical microfiber coupler based temperature sensor has a diameter circa 2 m for the development of a range of fiber optic sensors with high sensitivity and microscale dimensions [1

  11. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

  12. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

  13. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  14. Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juntao Wu

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work to develop a novel distributed fiber-optic micro-sensor that is capable of detecting common fossil fuel gases in harsh environments. During the 32-month research and development (R&D) program, GE Global Research successfully synthesized sensing materials using two techniques: sol-gel based fiber surface coating and magnetron sputtering based fiber micro-sensor integration. Palladium nanocrystalline embedded silica matrix material (nc-Pd/Silica), nanocrystalline palladium oxides (nc-PdO{sub x}) and palladium alloy (nc-PdAuN{sub 1}), and nanocrystalline tungsten (nc-WO{sub x}) sensing materials were identified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen; while the palladium doped and un-doped nanocrystalline tin oxide (nc-PdSnO{sub 2} and nc-SnO{sub 2}) materials were verified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to carbon monoxide. The fiber micro-sensor comprises an apodized long-period grating in a single-mode fiber, and the fiber grating cladding surface was functionalized by above sensing materials with a typical thickness ranging from a few tens of nanometers to a few hundred nanometers. GE found that the morphologies of such sensing nanomaterials are either nanoparticle film or nanoporous film with a typical size distribution from 5-10 nanometers. nc-PdO{sub x} and alloy sensing materials were found to be highly sensitive to hydrogen gas within the temperature range from ambient to 150 C, while nc-Pd/Silica and nc-WO{sub x} sensing materials were found to be suitable to be operated from 150 C to 500 C for hydrogen gas detection. The palladium doped and un-doped nc-SnO{sub 2} materials also demonstrated sensitivity to carbon monoxide gas at approximately 500 C. The prototyped fiber gas sensing system developed in this R&D program is based on wavelength-division-multiplexing technology in which each fiber sensor is identified according to its transmission spectra features within the guiding mode and cladding modes. The interaction between the sensing material and fossil fuel gas results in a refractive index change and optical absorption in the sensing layer. This induces mode coupling strength and boundary conditions changes and thereby shifts the central wavelengths of the guiding mode and cladding modes propagation. GE's experiments demonstrated that such an interaction between the fossil fuel gas and sensing material not only shifts the central wavelengths of the guide mode and cladding modes propagation, but also alters their power loss characteristics. The integrated fiber gas sensing system includes multiple fiber gas sensors, fiber Bragg grating-based temperature sensors, fiber optical interrogator, and signal processing software.

  15. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Garrett, Steven L. (Pebble Beach, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  16. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, A.; Swift, G.W.; Garrett, S.L.

    1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  17. Moisture Penetration Through Optical Fiber Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Moisture Penetration Through Optical Fiber Coatings J. L. Armstrong, M. J. Matthewson and C. R for measuring the diffusion coefficients of water vapor through optical fiber polymer coatings has been. Kurkjian #12;732 International Wire & Cable Symposium Proceedings 1998 Moisture Penetration Through Optical

  18. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

  19. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, J.D.

    1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments. 14 figs.

  20. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan David (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  1. Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.

    1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosynthetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosynthetic monitoring system. 6 figs.

  2. Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staller, George E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wemple, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosythetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosythetic monitoring system.

  3. Method for optical and mechanically coupling optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, John S. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for splicing optical fibers. A fluorescing solder glass frit having a melting point lower than the melting point of first and second optical fibers is prepared. The solder glass frit is then attached to the end of the first optical fiber and/or the end of the second optical fiber. The ends of the optical fibers are aligned and placed in close proximity to each other. The solder glass frit is then heated to a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the first and second optical fibers, but which is high enough to melt the solder glass frit. A force is applied to the first and second optical fibers pushing the ends of the fibers towards each other. As the solder glass flit becomes molten, the layer of molten solder glass is compressed into a thin layer between the first and second optical fibers. The thin compressed layer of molten solder glass is allowed to cool such that the first and second optical fibers are bonded to each other by the hardened layer of solder glass.

  4. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accomplishments during the first six months of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers.

  5. Rugged fiber optic probe for raman measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA); Toole, Jr., William R. (Aiken, SC); Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical probe for conducting light scattering analysis is disclosed. The probe comprises a hollow housing and a probe tip. A fiber assembly made up of a transmitting fiber and a receiving bundle is inserted in the tip. A filter assembly is inserted in the housing and connected to the fiber assembly. A signal line from the light source and to the spectrometer also is connected to the filter assembly and communicates with the fiber assembly. By using a spring-loaded assembly to hold the fiber connectors together with the in-line filters, complex and sensitive alignment procedures are avoided. The close proximity of the filter assembly to the probe tip eliminates or minimizes self-scattering generated by the optical fiber. Also, because the probe can contact the sample directly, sensitive optics can be eliminated.

  6. Optical fiber based ultrashort pulse multispectral nonlinear optical microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Adam Michael

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) utilizing femtosecond laser pulses is well suited for imaging living tissues. This work reports on the design and development of an optical fiber based multispectral NLOM developed around a laser generating...

  7. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Our approach towards immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the far end of an optical fiber is to embed the cluster in a thermally cured sol-gel matrix particle. This particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties, as compared to previous approaches. The sensor was characterized in 2-21% gas phase oxygen at 40, 70 and 100 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  8. PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Femtosecond Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    as new pulse sequence processing functionalities. #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY CLEO 2002 One Guide ­ One PulsePURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY CLEO 2002

  9. PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Photonic RF Waveform Synthesis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORY Photonic RF Waveform, Shijun Xiao Funding from ARO, DARPA, and NSF #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER performance (spectral engineering, dispersion compensation) #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL

  10. ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORYLEOS 2003 Multiple Output Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    DSTAWG DST Pulse Shaper Fiber ports Imaging optics U.S. Quarter #12;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORYLEOS 2003 One Guide ­ One Pulse Pulses slab Loss-engineering to control relative pulse amplitude. #12;ULTRAFAST OPTICS AND OPTICAL FIBER

  11. Characterization of Fiber Optic CMM Probe System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.W.Swallow

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a study completed on the fiber optic probe system that is a part of the Werth optical CMM. This study was necessary due to a lack of documentation from the vendor for the proper use and calibration of the fiber probe, and was performed in support of the Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung (LIGA) development program at the FM&T. As a result of this study, a better understanding of the fiber optic probe has been developed, including guidelines for its proper use and calibration.

  12. Solar light transmission of polymer optical fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tekelioglu, Murat [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Wood, Byard D. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Light transfer (10 m) has been shown in recent experiments that used large-core optical fibers. Theoretical models are not extensive, however, and a further correlation between the theory and experiments has not been given. In this paper, straight and bent fiber subsystem models are introduced with skew and meridional rays to predict the light transmission of POFs (plastic optical fibers). Such fibers have been realized, for example, in HSL (hybrid solar lighting) systems. The purpose of this paper is to combine the straight and bent fiber subsystems to estimate the light transmission of HSL systems. It is shown that meridional rays, for which the optical-loss parameters were estimated, better represent the experimental results compared to skew rays ({+-}5.3% vs {+-}24.7% of %-difference). Model predictions were compared with the results of a commercial software. Sensitivity analysis on the subsystems indicated the most-to-least significant parameters in light transmission. (author)

  13. Optical position sensor for determining the interface between a clear and an opaque fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An inexpensive, optical position sensor for measuring a position or length, x, along a one-dimensional curvilinear, coordinate system. The sensor can be used, for example, to determine the position of an interface between a clear and an opaque fluid (such as crude oil and water). In one embodiment, the sensor utilizes the principle of dual-fluorescence, where a primary fiber emits primary fluorescent light and a parallel secondary fiber collects a portion of the primary fluorescent light that is not blocked by the opaque fluid. This, in turn, excites secondary fluorescence in the secondary fiber at a longer wavelength. A light detector measures the intensity of secondary fluorescence emitted from an end of the secondary fiber, which is used to calculate the unknown position or length, x. Side-emitting fibers can be used in place of, or in addition to, fluorescent fibers. The all-optical sensor is attractive for applications involving flammable liquids.

  14. Programmable optic-fiber delay line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Shin-Puu

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Motion of coupled pendula . 4. Circuit schematic of temperature control 5. Basic configuration of electric arc fusion splicer . . . 6. The arrangement of heater 7. The output optical power from one port versus the temperature of the heater 8... ( stripping tool ) and chemical stripping ( acetone or methylene chloride ) technique can be used to remove the protective polymer fiber coating. A commercial Fujikura ct-40 fiber cleaver used skillfully can produce an end surface suitable for fiber fusion...

  15. Optic Flow Sensor Objective: Using optic flow sensors, detect and track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Michael J.

    Optic Flow Sensor Objective: Using optic flow sensors, detect and track the walls of a rural or urban terrain. Principle Investigators: Tim McLain, Randy Beard Optic Flow Sensor · Computationally factor ­ 1" x 1" x 1.5" · Inexpensive ­ $80 including optics · Fast ­ computes optic flow at 2300 fps2006

  16. Fiber optics welder having movable aligning mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Higgins, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Robichaud, Roger E. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45.degree. angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  17. Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http://purcell.ecn.purdue.edu/~fsoptics/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http, A. M. Weiner Purdue University C. Lin Avanex Corporation Conference on Lasers and Electro Optics;Ultrafast Optics and Optical Fiber Communications Laboratory http://purcell.ecn.purdue.edu/~fsoptics/ 2

  18. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Our approach towards immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the far end of an optical fiber is to embed the cluster in a thermally cured sol-gel matrix particle. Due to the improved mechanical properties of this approach high temperature sensor measurements were performed up to 100 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  19. auxiliary optical fiber: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Fiber receptacle Collection optics Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Fiber receptacle ...

  20. acontinuous fiber optic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Fiber receptacle Collection optics Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Fiber receptacle ...

  1. absolute fiber optic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R S; Neto, P A Maia; Nussenzveig, H M 2014-01-01 2 Fiber receptacle Collection optics Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Fiber receptacle ...

  2. Abstract--A low noise optical sensor and biocompatible microscale optical filters for integrated fluorescence sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Abstract--A low noise optical sensor and biocompatible microscale optical filters for integrated sensors. The transmission ratio in the pass-band and suppression ratio in the stop-band of the optical and of the optical filter. Test results comparing sensor and filter performance with competing technologies

  3. Vibration sensors utilizing fiber fabry-perot interferometers and permanent magnets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conkey, Andrew P.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , the effect of the non-linearity can be removed by signal processing. The fiber optic gap sensor (FOGS) developed has a sensitivity of 250 mV/mil for a 30 mil gap to 50 mV/mil for a 65 mil gap and a dynamic range up to 820 Hz. An advantage of the FOGS over...

  4. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. High temperature measurements of the emission of clusters in sol gel films show that the luminescence intensity from the films follow a 1/T relationship from room temperature to 150 C, and then declines at a slower rate at higher temperatures. The large number of photons available at 230 C is consistent with simple low cost optics for fiber optic probes based on the emission from clusters in sol gel films.

  5. Journal of Materials Science, 2009. 44(6): p. 1560-1571 Whispering Gallery Mode-Based Micro-Optical Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    used in materials include piezoelectric particles, acoustic emission sensors and optical fibers. Each. Use of fiber-optic sensors is advantageous in composite materials because they can become an integral1560 Journal of Materials Science, 2009. 44(6): p. 1560-1571 Whispering Gallery Mode-Based Micro-Optical

  6. Fiber-based combined optical coherence and multiphoton endomicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhongping

    Fiber-based combined optical coherence and multiphoton endomicroscopy Gangjun Liu Zhongping Chen #12;Journal of Biomedical Optics 16(3), 036010 (March 2011) Fiber-based combined optical coherence. The efficiency can be further increased by fusing more multimode fibers with the DCF. Simultaneous optical

  7. Design guidelines for optical resonator biochemical sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimerling, Lionel C.

    In this paper, we propose a design tool for dielectric optical resonator-based biochemical refractometry sensors. Analogous to the widely accepted photodetector figure of merit, the detectivity D*, we introduce a new sensor ...

  8. Fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, M.A.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission systems described wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source. The transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber. 3 figs.

  9. Fiber coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yalin, Azer (Fort Collins, CO); Willson, Bryan (Fort Collins, CO); Defoort, Morgan (Fort Collins, CO)

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, the spark delivery system including a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. In addition, the laser delivery assembly includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. In accordance with embodiments of the present invention, the assembly may be used to create a spark in a combustion engine. In accordance with other embodiments of the present invention, a method of using the spark delivery system is provided. In addition, a method of choosing an appropriate fiber for creating a spark using a laser beam is also presented.

  10. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yalin, Azer (Fort Collins, CO); Willson, Bryan (Fort Collins, CO); Defoort, Morgan (Fort Collins, CO); Joshi, Sachin (Fort Collins, CO); Reynolds, Adam (Fort Collins, CO)

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  11. Real-time MRI-Guided Needle Placement Robot with Integrated Fiber Optic Force Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camesano, Terri

    the robot mechanism, controller design, optical modeling and opto-mechanical design of the force sensor. MRI Control Box Needle Driver Module Cartesian Stage Module Piezoelectric Actuators Robot Fig. 1. (LeftReal-time MRI-Guided Needle Placement Robot with Integrated Fiber Optic Force Sensing Hao Su

  12. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  13. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carson, Richard F. (Albuquerque, NM); Casalnuovo, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  14. Multiplexed Neural Recording Down a Single Optical Fiber via Optical Reflectometry with Capacitive Signal Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriques, Samuel G; Mankin, Max; Wood, Lowell; Boyden, Edward S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a fiber-optic architecture for neural recording without contrast agents, and study its properties theoretically. Our sensor design is inspired by electrooptic modulators, which modulate the refractive index of a waveguide by applying an electric field across an electrooptic core material, and allows recording of the activities of individual neurons located at points along a 10 cm length of optical fiber with 20 um axial resolution, sensitivity down to 100 uV and a dynamic range of up to 1V using commercially available optical reflectometers as readout devices. A key concept of the design is the ability to create an "intensified" electric field inside an optical waveguide by applying the extracellular voltage from a neural spike over a nanoscopic distance. Implementing this concept requires the use of ultrathin high-dielectric capacitor layers. If suitable materials can be found -- possessing favorable properties with respect to toxicity, ohmic junctions, and surface capacitance -- then such sensi...

  15. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  16. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Sensors & Optical Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimizing Engines for Alternative Fuels On September 10, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Research & Capabilities, Sensors & Optical Diagnostics,...

  18. Angular characteristics of a multimode fiber surface plasmon resonance sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Zhixin; Li, Xuejin; Chen, Yuzhi; Hong, Xueming; Fan, Ping

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the angular characteristics of a multimode fiber SPR sensor are investigated theoretically. By separating the contributions of beams incident at different angles, a compact model is presented to predict the shift of the resonance wavelength with respect to the angle and the environmental refractive index. The result suggests that the performance of conventional fiber SPR sensors can be substantially improved by optimizing the incident angle.

  19. Cluster state quantum computing in optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasaman Soudagar; Felix Bussieres; Guido Berlin; Suzanne Lacroix; Jose M. Fernandez; Nicolas Godbout

    2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A scheme for the implementation of the cluster state model of quantum computing in optical fibers, which enables the feedforward feature, is proposed. This scheme uses the time-bin encoding of qubits. Following previously suggested methods of applying arbitrary one-qubit gates in optical fibers, two different ways for the realization of fusion gate types I and II for cluster production are proposed: a fully time-bin based encoding scheme and a combination of time-bin and polarization based encoding scheme. Also the methods of measurement in any desired bases for the purpose of the processing of cluster state computing for both these encodings are explained.

  20. Fiber optic mounted laser driven flyer plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paisley, Dennis L. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser driven flyer plate where the flyer plate is deposited directly onto the squared end of an optical fiber. The plasma generated by a laser pulse drives the flyer plate toward a target. In another embodiment, a first metal layer is deposited onto the squared end of an optical fiber, followed by a layer of a dielectric material and a second metal layer. The laser pulse generates a plasma in the first metal layer, but the plasma is kept away from the second metal layer by the dielectric layer until the pressure reaches the point where shearing occurs.

  1. Advanced Optical Modulation Formats and Their Comparison in Fiber-Optic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Advanced Optical Modulation Formats and Their Comparison in Fiber-Optic Systems R Hui, S. Zhang, B crosstalks in SCM/WDM optical systems and the impact due to fiber characteristics. We also demonstrated decisions on the fiber plant investments and fiber-optic equipment purchasing. Our comparative study

  2. Fiber-optical analogue of the event horizon: Appendices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Philbin; Chris Kuklewicz; Scott Robertson; Stephen Hill; Friedrich Konig; Ulf Leonhardt

    2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We explain the theory behind our fiber-optical analogue of the event horizon and present the experiment in detail.

  3. Spectral background and transmission characteristics of fiber optic imaging bundles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gmitro, Arthur F.

    Spectral background and transmission characteristics of fiber optic imaging bundles Joshua Anthony August 2008 The emission and transmission properties of three commercially produced coherent fiber optic optical fibers are used in many imaging applications to allow the flexible relay of image planes over

  4. OSE 4470L Fiber-Optic Communications Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    OSE 4470L Fiber-Optic Communications Laboratory Instructor: Guifang Li, CREOL 278, Phone 823 in classroom to what you can see in the lab of a variety topics related to fiber-optic communications. 2. Take course on the same topic (OSE 4470). The experiments are cover three topics: 1. The optical fiber

  5. COURSE SYLLABUS OSE 4470 FALL 2014 `FIBER-OPTIC COMMUNICATIONS'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    COURSE SYLLABUS OSE 4470 FALL 2014 `FIBER-OPTIC COMMUNICATIONS' INSTRUCTOR: SASAN FATHPOUR CLASS of optical fiber communication systems including the optoelectronic devices used in transmitters and receivers. COURSE DESCRIPTION This course is an introduction to the principles of optical fiber

  6. STABILITY PROPERTIES OF LIGHT PROPAGATING IN FIBER OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    STABILITY PROPERTIES OF LIGHT PROPAGATING IN FIBER OPTICS ST´EPHANE LAFORTUNE Summary The study is crucial in applications such as lasers and optical fibers. In this proposal I will focus on a model of fiber optics: the Manakov system. This system consists of two differential equations, that is two

  7. Development of Metal Oxide Nanostructure-based Optical Sensors for Fossil Fuel Derived Gases Measurement at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Kevin

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report details research works performed supported by a Department of Energy grant (DE-FE0003859), which was awarded under the University Coal Research Program administrated by National Energy Technology Laboratory. This research program studied high temperature fiber sensor for harsh environment applications. It developed two fiber optical sensor platform technology including regenerative fiber Bragg grating sensors and distributed fiber optical sensing based on Rayleigh backscattering optical frequency domain reflectometry. Through the studies of chemical and thermal regenerative techniques for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) fabrication, high-temperature stable FBG sensors were successfully developed and fabricated in air-hole microstructured fibers, high-attenuation fibers, rare-earth doped fibers, and standard telecommunication fibers. By optimizing the laser processing and thermal annealing procedures, fiber grating sensors with stable performance up to 1100oC have been developed. Using these temperature-stable FBG gratings as sensor platform, fiber optical flow, temperature, pressure, and chemical sensors have been developed to operate at high temperatures up to 800oC. Through the integration of on-fiber functional coating, the use of application-specific air-hole microstructural fiber, and application of active fiber sensing scheme, distributed fiber sensor for temperature, pressure, flow, liquid level, and chemical sensing have been demonstrated with high spatial resolution (1-cm or better) with wide temperature ranges. These include the demonstration of 1) liquid level sensing from 77K to the room temperature, pressure/temperature sensing from the room temperature to 800C and from the 15psi to 2000 psi, and hydrogen concentration measurement from 0.2% to 10% with temperature ranges from the room temperature to 700C. Optical sensors developed by this program has broken several technical records including flow sensors with the highest operation temperature up to 750oC, first distributed chemical measurements at the record high temperature up to 700oC, first distributed pressure measurement at the record high temperature up to 800oC, and the fiber laser sensors with the record high operation temperature up to 700oC. The research performed by this program dramatically expand the functionality, adaptability, and applicability of distributed fiber optical sensors with potential applications in a number of high-temperature energy systems such as fossil-fuel power generation, high-temperature fuel cell applications, and potential for nuclear energy systems.

  8. Imaging techniques utilizing optical fibers and tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilke, M.; King, N.S.P.; Gray, N.; Johnson, D.; Esquibel, D.; Nedrow, P.; Ishiwata, S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional, time-dependent images generated by neutrons, gamma rays, and x-rays incident on fast scintillators are relayed to streak and video cameras over optical fibers. Three dimensions, two spatial and one temporal, have been reduced to two, one in space and time utilizing sampling methods permitting reconstruction of a time-dependent, two-dimensional image subsequent to data recording. The manner in which the sampling is done optimized the ability to reconstruct the image via a maximization of entropy algorithm. This method uses four linear fiber optic arrays typically 30 meters long and up to 35 elements each. A further refinement of this technique collapses the linear array information into four single fibers by wavelength multiplexing. This permits economical transmission of the data over kilometer distances to the recording equipment.

  9. Design and implementation of a fiber optic doppler optical coherence microscopy system for cochlear imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Logan P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the design and implementation of a fiber optic Doppler optical coherence microscopy (FO-DOCM) system for cochlear imaging applications is presented. The use of a fiber optic design significantly reduces ...

  10. 1206 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 14 / July 15, 2003 Optical-fiber-based Mueller optical coherence tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    1206 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 14 / July 15, 2003 Optical-fiber-based Mueller optical coherence-3120 Received January 8, 2003 An optical-fiber-based multichannel polarization-sensitive Mueller optical was dynamically calibrated to eliminate the polarization distortion caused by the single-mode optical fiber

  11. Optical fiber smart structures applied to secure containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sliva, P.; Gordon, N.R.; Stahl, K.A.; Simmon, K.L.; Anheier, N.C.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype secure container was prepared that uses continually monitored optical fiber as the smart structure. A small ({approx}7.6 cm {times} 10.2 cm {times} 12.7 cm), matchbox-shaped container consisting of an inner drawer within an outer shell was fabricated from polymer resin. The optical fiber was sandwiched between additional non-optical, strength-promoting fibers and embedded into the polymer. The additional non-optical fiber provides strength to the container, protects the optical fiber from damage, hides the fiber and acts as a decoy. The optical fiber was wound with a winding density such that a high probability of fiber damage would be expected if the container was penetrated.

  12. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worstell, William A. (Framingham, MA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions.

  13. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worstell, W.A.

    1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions. 11 figs.

  14. Photon pair generation in birefringent optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian J. Smith; P. Mahou; Offir Cohen; J. S. Lundeen; I. A. Walmsley

    2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study both experimentally and theoretically the generation of photon pairs by spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) in standard birefringent optical fibers. The ability to produce a range of two-photon spectral states, from highly correlated (entangled) to completely factorable, by means of cross-polarized birefringent phase matching, is explored. A simple model is developed to predict the spectral state of the photon pair which shows how this can be adjusted by choosing the appropriate pump bandwidth, fiber length and birefringence. Spontaneous Raman scattering is modeled to determine the tradeoff between SFWM and background Raman noise, and the predicted results are shown to agree with experimental data.

  15. Optical transmittance degradation in tapered fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masazumi Fujiwara; Kiyota Toubaru; Shigeki Takeuchi

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the cause of optical transmittance degradation in tapered fibers. Degradation commences immediately after fabrication and it eventually reduces the transmittance to almost zero. It is a major problem that limits applications of tapered fibers. We systematically investigated the effect of the dust-particle density and the humidity on the degradation dynamics. The results clearly show that the degradation is mostly due to dust particles and that it is not related to the humidity. In a dust free environment it is possible to preserve the transmittance with a degradation of less than the noise (+/- ?0.02) over 1 week.

  16. Fiber optic synchronisation architecture for high precision GPS applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santerre, Rock

    Fiber optic synchronisation architecture for high precision GPS applications Daniel Macias and the receiver is monitored at the millimetre level [2]. These issues can be solved using optical fiber links), Université Laval, Québec, QC, G1V 0A6, Canada sophie.larochelle@gel.ulaval.ca Abstract: We propose a GPS-over-fiber

  17. Application of fiber optic temperature and strain sensing technology to gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, Shannon M [ORNL; Madden, Megan Elwood [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Szymcek, Phillip [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates may have a significant influence on global carbon cycles due to their large carbon storage capacity in the form of greenhouse gases and their sensitivity to small perturbations in local conditions. Characterizing existing gas hydrate and the formation of new hydrate within sediment systems and their response to small changes in temperature and pressure is imperative to understanding how this dynamic system functions. Fiber optic sensing technology offers a way to measure precisely temperature and strain in harsh environments such as the seafloor. Recent large-scale experiments using Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Seafloor Process Simulator were designed to evaluate the potential of fiber optic sensors to study the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in 4-D within natural sediments. Results indicate that the fiber optic sensors are so sensitive to experimental perturbations (e.g. refrigeration cycles) that small changes due to hydrate formation or dissociation can be overshadowed.

  18. Ternary liquid scintillator for optical fiber applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 5-amino-9-diethylaminobenz (a) phenoxazonium nitrate (Nile Blue Nitrate) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol. The use of PPD as an additional solute is also disclosed. The system is controllable by addition of a suitable quenching agent, such as phenol.

  19. Tests of Complete Positivity in Fiber Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Benatti; R. Floreanini

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the propagation of polarized photons in optical fibers under the action of randomly generated noise. In such situation, the change in time of the photon polarization can be described by a quantum dynamical semigroup. We show that the hierarchy among the decay constants of the polarization density matrix elements as prescribed by complete positivity can be experimentally probed using standard laboratory set-ups.

  20. Combined raman and IR fiber-based sensor for gas detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, Jerry C; Chan, James W; Trebes, James E; Angel, Stanley M; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A double-pass fiber-optic based spectroscopic gas sensor delivers Raman excitation light and infrared light to a hollow structure, such as a hollow fiber waveguide, that contains a gas sample of interest. A retro-reflector is placed at the end of this hollow structure to send the light back through the waveguide where the light is detected at the same end as the light source. This double pass retro reflector design increases the interaction path length of the light and the gas sample, and also reduces the form factor of the hollow structure.

  1. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Alkali salts of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} were synthesized and heated to 280 C for one hour in air. Optical measurements of the thermally treated material confirm the potential of the salts as lumophores in high temperature fiber optic sensors. In addition sol-gel films containing Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} were dip coated on quartz substrates and heated at 200 C for one hour. Conditions were developed for successfully immobilizing monomeric complexes that are compatible with sol-gel processing.

  2. QUALIFICATION OF A TRULY DISTRIBUTED FIBER OPTIC TECHNIQUE FOR STRAIN AND TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN CONCRETE STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) and insensitive to electromagnetic fields. Thanks to the low attenuation of the transmitted light signal monitoring is a key factor in life cycle management of infrastructures. Truly distributed fiber optic sensors experiments seem very promising since measurements performed with distributed sensing systems are found

  3. Reactive Grasping Using Optical Proximity Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nangeroni, Paul

    We propose a system for improving grasping using fingertip optical proximity sensors that allows us to perform online grasp adjustments to an initial grasp point without requiring premature object contact or regrasping ...

  4. JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 12, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2003 907 Digitally Tunable Microfluidic Optical Fiber Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Microfluidic Optical Fiber Devices Francesco Cattaneo, Kirk Baldwin, Shu Yang, Tom Krupenkine, Siddharth microfluidic optical fiber devices. In these systems, mul- tiple, independently controlled microfluidic plugs, optical de- vice fabrication, optical fiber applications, optical fiber devices. I. INTRODUCTION TUNABLE

  5. Fiber optics interface for a dye laser oscillator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Steve A. (Tracy, CA); Seppala, Lynn G. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dye laser oscillator in which one light beam is used to pump a continuous tream of dye within a cooperating dye chamber for producing a second, different beam is generally disclosed herein along with a specific arrangement including an optical fiber and a fiber optics interface for directing the pumping beam into the dye chamber. The specific fiber optics interface illustrated includes three cooperating lenses which together image one particular dimension of the pumping beam into the dye chamber from the output end of the optical fiber in order to insure that the dye chamber is properly illuminated by the pumping beam.

  6. Characterization of commercial fiber optic connectors - Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Larry A.; Williams, Randy J.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several types of commercial fiber optic connectors were characterized for potential use in a Sandia designed Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) system. The characterization included optical performance while the connectors were subjected to the more dynamic environmental conditions experienced in weapons applications. The environmental testing included temperature cycling, random vibration, and mechanical shock. This report presents a performance assessment of the fiber optic connectors and fiber included in the characterization. The desirable design features are described for a fiber optic connector that must survive the dynamic environment of weapon systems. The more detailed performance of each connector type will be included as resources permit.

  7. Multiparameter Fiber Optic Sensing System for Monitoring Enhanced...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sensing (DTSS), distributed pressure fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and coherent Rayleigh optical time domain reflectometry (COTDR) for distributed vibration sensing will be...

  8. Fiber optics interface for a dye laser oscillator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, S.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1984-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A dye laser oscillator in which one light beam is used to pump a continuous stream of dye within a cooperating dye chamber for producing a second, different beam is generally disclosed herein along with a specific arrangement including an optical fiber and a fiber optics interface for directing the pumping beam into the dye chamber. The specific fiber optics interface illustrated includes three cooperating lenses which together image one particular dimension of the pumping beam into the dye chamber from the output end of the optical fiber in order to insure that the dye chamber is properly illuminated by the pumping beam.

  9. advanced fiber-optic monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Photonic Crystal Fibers Advances in Fiber Optics Physics Websites Summary: Photonic Crystal Fibers Advances in Fiber Optics Elliott L....

  10. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  11. Vibration sensors utilizing fiber fabry-perot interferometers and permanent magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conkey, Andrew P.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique set of vibration sensors was designed that incorporate the fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) and permanent magnets. Feasibility of the design and its advantages over traditional sensors were verified by experiments. The new sensors...

  12. Preliminary photovoltaic arc-fault prognostic tests using sacrificial fiber optic cabling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jay; Blemel, Kenneth D. [Sentient Business Systems, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Peter, Francis [Sentient Business Systems, Inc., Albuquerque, NM

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program, Sandia National Laboratories worked with Sentient Business Systems, Inc. to develop and test a novel photovoltaic (PV) arc-fault detection system. The system operates by pairing translucent polymeric fiber optic sensors with electrical circuitry so that any external abrasion to the system or internal heating causes the fiber optic connection to fail or detectably degrade. A periodic pulse of light is sent through the optical path using a transmitter-receiver pair. If the receiver does not detect the pulse, an alarm is sounded and the PV system can be de-energized. This technology has the unique ability to prognostically determine impending failures to the electrical system in two ways: (a) the optical connection is severed prior to physical abrasion or cutting of PV DC electrical conductors, and (b) the polymeric fiber optic cable melts via Joule heating before an arc-fault is established through corrosion. Three arc-faults were created in different configurations found in PV systems with the integrated fiber optic system to determine the feasibility of the technology. In each case, the fiber optic cable was broken and the system annunciated the fault.

  13. Method for the continuous processing of hermetic fiber optic components and the resultant fiber optic-to-metal components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kramer, D.P.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components and method for making hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components by assembling and fixturing elements comprising a metal shell, a glass preform, and a metal-coated fiber optic into desired relative positions and then sealing said fixtured elements preferably using a continuous heating process is disclosed. The resultant hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components exhibit high hermeticity and durability despite the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion among the various elements. 3 figs.

  14. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. One of the critical materials issues is to demonstrate that the luminescent cluster immobilized in the sol-gel porous support can withstand high temperature. At the same time the sol-gel matrix must have a high permeability to oxygen. Using a potassium salt of the molybdenum clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, we have established the conditions necessary for deposition of optical quality sol-gel films. From spectroscopic measurements of the film we have shown that the cluster luminescence is stable following heat cycling of 54 hours at 200 C. Quenching of a factor of 1.5X between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen was observed from in-situ measurements of films heated directly at 200 C. An automated system for characterizing fiber optic oxygen sensors up to 220 C with a temporal resolution better than 10 s is under construction. We estimate a signal of 6 x 10{sup 8} photons/s after complete quenching in 21% oxygen. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  15. Measurement of large strains in ropes using plastic optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Jerry Gene; Smith, David Barton; Muhs, Jeffrey David

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the direct measurement of large strains in ropes in situ using a plastic optical fiber, for example, perfluorocarbon or polymethyl methacrylate and Optical Time-Domain Reflectometer or other light time-of-flight measurement instrumentation. Protective sheaths and guides are incorporated to protect the plastic optical fiber. In one embodiment, a small rope is braided around the plastic optical fiber to impose lateral compressive forces to restrain the plastic optical fiber from slipping and thus experience the same strain as the rope. Methods are described for making reflective interfaces along the length of the plastic optical fiber and to provide the capability to measure strain within discrete segments of the rope. Interpretation of the data allows one to calculate the accumulated strain at any point in time and to determine if the rope has experienced local damage.

  16. PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORYA.M. Weiner Andrew M. Weiner, Jason McKinney*, and Shijun Xiao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORYA.M. Weiner Andrew M affiliation: Naval Research Labs #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS bandwidth #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY ULTRAFAST OPTICS & OPTICAL FIBER COMMUNICATIONS LABORATORYA.M. Weiner

  17. Ph.D. Thesis Optical Sensors Based on Dedicated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ph.D. Thesis Optical Sensors Based on Dedicated Diffractive Optical Elements STEVEN RICHARD KITCHEN;Abstract This thesis deals with the development of optical sensors based on laser diodes and dedicated part of the project deals with development of optical flow sensor systems. Firstly, a new beam splitter

  18. Introduction The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Introduction ® The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy use. When used with specialty fiber optic cables the MI-150 illuminator can also Illuminator from the carton and retain the manual and any additional documents. ! Remove the fiber optic cable

  19. Fiber optic-based regenerable biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sepaniak, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic-based regenerable biosensor. The biosensor is particularly suitable for use in microscale work in situ. In one embodiment, the biosensor comprises a reaction chamber disposed adjacent the distal end of a waveguide and adapted to receive therein a quantity of a sample containing an analyte. Leading into the chamber is a plurality of capillary conduits suitable for introducing into the chamber antibodies or other reagents suitable for selective interaction with a predetermined analyte. Following such interaction, the contents of the chamber may be subjected to an incident energy signal for developing fluorescence within the chamber that is detectable via the optical fiber and which is representative of the presence, i.e. concentration, of the selected analyte. Regeneration of the biosensor is accomplished by replacement of the reagents and/or the analyte, or a combination of these, at least in part via one or more of the capillary conduits. The capillary conduits extend from their respective terminal ends that are in fluid communication with the chamber, away from the chamber to respective location(s) remote from the chamber thereby permitting in situ location of the chamber and remote manipulation and/or analysis of the activity with the chamber.

  20. Grizzly Substation Fiber Optics : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This notice announces BPA`s decision to construct, operate, and maintain the Grizzly Substation Fiber Optic Project (Project). This Project is part of a continuing effort by BPA to complete a regionwide upgrade of its existing telecommunications system. The US Forest Service and BPA jointly prepared the Grizzly Substation Fiber Optic Project Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1241) evaluating the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action, the Underground Installation Alternative, and the No Action Alternative. Based on the analysis in the EA, the US Forest Service and BPA have determined that the Proposed Action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI. The US Forest Service has separately issued a FONSI and Decision Notice authorizing BPA to construct, operate, and maintain the Project within the Crooked River National Grassland (Grassland).

  1. Magneto-optic current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lanagan, Michael T.; Valsko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Fisher, Brandon L.; Welp, Ulrich

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical current transducer configured to sense current in the conductor is disclosed. The optical current transducer includes a light source and a polarizer that generates linearly polarized light received from a the light source. The light is communicated to a magneto-optic garnet that includes, among other elements, bismuth, iron and oxygen and is coupled to the conductor. The magneto-optic garnet is configured to rotate the polarization of the linearly polarized light received from the polarizer. The optical current transducer also includes an analyzer in optical communication with the magneto-optic garnet. The analyzer detects the rotation of the linearly polarized light caused by the magneto-optic garnet.

  2. Fiber coupling with adaptive optics for free-space optical communication Thomas Weyraucha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiber coupling with adaptive optics for free-space optical communication Thomas Weyraucha , Mikhail, Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Brookline, MA 02446 ABSTRACT We describe an adaptive optical fiber coupling system for free-space optical communication comprising a micro- electromechanical deformable

  3. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually using a sensor chip and an accompanying color card.

  4. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually using a sensor chip and an accompanying color card. 8 figs.

  5. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we immobilized the potassium salt of a molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}M{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, in a sol-gel matrix and showed that the luminescence is stable after 54 hours at 200 C, but the quenching ratios were low and the films delaminated after thermal cycling due to densification of the matrix. Three new approaches to solve decreased quenching over time and delamination of films off fiber tips were investigated. In the first approach K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} embedded in cured sol-gel particles were incorporated into a TEOS based sol-gel. These gave enhanced quenching (6x), but delaminated. Our second approach was to use a commercial cyanoacrylate glue to immobilize the particles onto the tip of an optical fiber. This gave better adhesion and good quenching initially, but eventually the glue degraded upon heating. Our third approach was to use a 55% OtMOS/ TEOS sol-gel binder. Films based on this new sol-gel binder show high quenching ({approx}6x) and superior mechanical stability even after thermal cycling. Sensor measurements on an optical fiber containing K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} embedded in cured sol-gel particles were obtained from 100 to 25 C. The signal intensity in nitrogen was stable at 2.8 {+-} 0.2 nW, and the quenching ratio (ratio of signal in N{sub 2} vs. 21 % O{sub 2}) varied from 4.4 to 6.9X. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  6. All-optical interferometric switches for data regeneration in fiber optic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Shelby Jay, 1978-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the thirty years since the installation of the first fiber optic data link, data rates in installed fiber links have risen from a few Mb/s to tens of Gb/s. In the laboratory, data rates in a single optical fiber have ...

  7. Biocompatible Force Sensor with Optical Readout and Dimensions of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    Biocompatible Force Sensor with Optical Readout and Dimensions of 6 nm3 Hari Shroff,,§ Bjo1rn M Received June 6, 2005 ABSTRACT We have developed a nanoscopic force sensor with optical readout. The sensor energy transfer. The sensor was calibrated between 0 and 20 pN using a combined magnetic tweezers

  8. Personnel Grounding and Safety: Issues and Solutions Related to Servicing Optical Fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Personnel Grounding and Safety: Issues and Solutions Related to Servicing Optical Fiber Telecommunication Circuits in Optical Ground Wire (OPGW) Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research to Servicing Optical Fiber Telecommunication Circuits in Optical Ground Wire (OPGW) Final Project Report

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN OPTICAL COLLISION AVOIDANCE SENSOR Kyle Watters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornsey, Richard

    CHARACTERIZATION OF AN OPTICAL COLLISION AVOIDANCE SENSOR Kyle Watters , Cyrus Minwalla , Michael, unmanned aerial vehicles, sensor ar- ray 1. INTRODUCTION A prototype optical instrument is described detection' should be at a distance on the order of 5 km [2]. An optical sensor may have advantages in mass

  10. INTRODUCTION Optical sensors have long been used in the Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Optical sensors have long been used in the Great Lakes to track changes Concentrations Measured by Acoustic and Optical Sensors Nathan Hawley* Great Lakes Environmental Research sensitive to particles of different sizes, the simultaneous deployment of acoustic and optical sensors may

  11. Single-crystal YAG fiber optics for the transmission of high energy laser energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Single-crystal YAG fiber optics for the transmission of high energy laser energy X.S. Zhua , James. Thus, it is reasonable to assume that YAG fibers will have high laser damage thresholds. The optical of YAG fiber grown has been about 60 cm. Keywords: Infrared fiber optics, single-crystal fibers, oxide

  12. Photon production by charged particles in narrow optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Artru; C. Ray

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle passing through or by an optical fiber induces emission of light guided by the fiber. The formula giving the spontaneous emission amplitude are given in the general case when the particle trajectory is not parallel to the fiber axis. At small angle, the photon yield grows like the inverse power of the angle and in the parallel limiting case the fiber Cherenkov effect studied by Bogdankevich and Bolotovskii is recovered. Possible application to beam diagnostics are discussed, as well as resonance effects when the particle trajectory or the fiber is bent periodically.

  13. The use of optical fiber in safety-system design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, B.A.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the design, installation, and performance of an optical-fiber safety system installed for testing purposes on a production platform in the Gulf of Mexico. This system was installed on a chemelectric treater to monitor five end devices and to determine the feasibility of using fiber optics rather than pneumatics or an electrical system in a harsh environment. Included with a performance summary is a brief history of optical fiber and the potential for these types of safety systems in oilfield applications.

  14. Quantum networking of microwave photons using optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. D. Clader

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an adiabatic state transfer mechanism that allows for high-fidelity transfer of a microwave quantum state from one cavity to another through an optical fiber. The conversion from microwave frequency to optical frequency is enabled by an optomechanical transducer. The transfer process utilizes a combined dark state of the mechanical oscillator and fiber modes, making it robust against both mechanical and fiber loss. We anticipate this scheme being an enabling component of a hybrid quantum computing architecture consisting of superconducting qubits with optical interconnects.

  15. Sensors and Actuators A xxx (2004) xxxxxx Micromachined silicon force sensor based on diffractive optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that is designed to only be sensitive to axial deflections of the probe. The optical-encoder force sensor exhibits­membrane interactions under various physiological conditions. The force sensor is an optical encoder based on transSensors and Actuators A xxx (2004) xxx­xxx Micromachined silicon force sensor based on diffractive

  16. Raman fiber optic probe assembly for use in hostile environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmucker, John E. (Hurt, VA); Falk, Jon C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Archer, William B. (Bethel Park, PA); Blasi, Raymond J. (Harrison City, PA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a device for Raman spectroscopic measurement of composition and concentrations in a hostile environment by the use of a first fiber optic as a means of directing high intensity monochromatic light from a laser to the hostile environment and a second fiber optic to receive the lower intensity scattered light for transmittal to a monochromator for analysis. To avoid damage to the fiber optics, they are protected from the hostile environment. A preferred embodiment of the Raman fiber optic probe is able to obtain Raman spectra of corrosive gases and solutions at temperatures up to 600.degree. F. and pressures up to 2000 psi. The incident exciting fiber optic cable makes an angle of substantially 90.degree. with the collecting fiber optic cable. This 90.degree. geometry minimizes the Rayleigh scattering signal picked up by the collecting fiber, because the intensity of Rayleigh scattering is lowest in the direction perpendicular to the beam path of the exciting light and therefore a 90.degree. scattering geometry optimizes the signal to noise ratio.

  17. Next Generation Optical Fiber for IR Applications: Novel Materials and NanoScale Textures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Next Generation Optical Fiber for IR Applications: Novel Materials and NanoScale Textures Axel, Orlando, FL 32816, USA #12;Outline · Impact of fiber optics · What are next generation optical fibers achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication" Charles K. Kao Brief

  18. Development of a 1319-nm Laser Radar Using Fiber Optics and RF Pulse Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Development of a 1319-nm Laser Radar Using Fiber Optics and RF Pulse Compression Christopher T of this concept. Our laboratory breadboard uses standard, single-mode optical fiber, off-the-shelf fiber-optic IMPLEMENTATION 3.1 Transmitter--Single-mode laser 3.2 Transmitter--Single-mode fiber 3.3 Transmitter--Optical

  19. Fiber optic in vivo imaging in the mammalian nervous system Amit D Mehta1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzer, Mark

    Fiber optic in vivo imaging in the mammalian nervous system Amit D Mehta1,2 , Juergen C Jung1 functionality of optical fiber and fiber optic devices are enabling several new modalities for imaging that uses assemblies of fiber optic emitters and detectors on the cranium for volumetric imaging of brain

  20. Electro-optical voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woods, Gregory K. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature electro-optic voltage sensor system capable of accurate operation at high voltages. The system employs a transmitter, a sensor disposed adjacent to but out of direct electrical contact with a conductor on which the voltage is to be measured, a detector, and a signal processor. The transmitter produces a beam of electromagnetic radiation which is routed into the sensor where the beam undergoes the Pockels electro-optic effect. The electro-optic effect causes phase shifting in the beam, which is in turn converted to a pair of independent beams, from which the voltage of a system based on its E-field is determined when the two beams are normalized by the signal processor. The sensor converts the beam by splitting the beam in accordance with the axes of the beam's polarization state (an ellipse whose ellipticity varies between -1 and +1 in proportion to voltage) into at least two AM signals. These AM signals are fed into a signal processor and processed to determine the voltage between a ground conductor and the conductor on which voltage is being measured.

  1. Method and apparatus for monitoring and measuring the surface tension of a fluid using fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, Bernard M. (Oak Park, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL); Bohanon, Thomas M. (Evanston, IL); Mikrut, John M. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-contact method and apparatus for measuring and monitoring the surface of a fluid using fiber optics and interferometric detection to permit measurement mechanical characteristics' fluid surfaces. The apparatus employs an alternating electric field gradient for generating a capillary wave on the surface of the fluid. A fiber optic coupler and optical fiber directs a portion of a laser beam onto the surface of the fluid, another portion of the laser beam onto the photo sensor, and directs light reflected from the surface of the fluid onto the photo sensor. The output of the photo sensor is processed and coupled to a phase sensitive detector to permit measurement of phase shift between the drive signal creating the capillary wave and the detected signal. This phase shift information is then used to determine mechanical properties of the fluid surface such as surface tension, surface elasticity, and surface inhomogeneity. The resulting test structure is easily made compact, portable, and easy to align and use.

  2. Method and apparatus for monitoring and measuring the surface tension of a fluid using fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, B.M.; Ketterson, J.B.; Bohanon, T.M.; Mikrut, J.M.

    1994-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-contact method and apparatus are described for measuring and monitoring the surface of a fluid using fiber optics and interferometric detection to permit measurement of mechanical characteristics of fluid surfaces. The apparatus employs an alternating electric field gradient for generating a capillary wave on the surface of the fluid. A fiber optic coupler and optical fiber directs a portion of a laser beam onto the surface of the fluid, another portion of the laser beam onto the photo sensor, and directs light reflected from the surface of the fluid onto the photo sensor. The output of the photo sensor is processed and coupled to a phase sensitive detector to permit measurement of phase shift between the drive signal creating the capillary wave and the detected signal. This phase shift information is then used to determine mechanical properties of the fluid surface such as surface tension, surface elasticity, and surface inhomogeneity. The resulting test structure is easily made compact, portable, and easy to align and use. 4 figures.

  3. Hybrid glass coatings for optical fibers: effect of coating thickness on strength and dynamic fatigue characteristics of silica fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Hybrid glass coatings for optical fibers: effect of coating thickness on strength and dynamic, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA c Laboratory of Optical Fiber Technology, UMCS, Lublin, 20031, Poland, ABSTRACT Specialty optical fibers operating in harsh aerospace environments

  4. All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication is to use an all optical based fog sensor to study the atmospheric visibility of fog and its constituents on the optical wireless communication (OWC) links in a controlled laboratory test-bid. The fog sensor measures

  5. Manipulating time-bin qubits with fiber optics components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Bussieres; Yasaman Soudagar; Guido Berlin; Suzanne Lacroix; Nicolas Godbout

    2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose two experimental schemes to implement arbitrary unitary single qubit operations on single photons encoded in time-bin qubits. Both schemes require fiber optics components that are available with current technology.

  6. Demonstrating LED and Fiber Optic Lighting in Commissary Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—covers goals of the project and applications for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and fiber optic lighting.

  7. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  8. Cloaking a sensor via transformation optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan Greenleaf; Yaroslav Kurylev; Matti Lassas; Gunther Uhlmann

    2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally believed that transformation optics based cloaking, besides rendering the cloaked region invisible to detection by scattering of incident waves, also shields the region from those same waves. We demonstrate a coupling between the cloaked and uncloaked regions, exposing a difference between cloaking for rays and waves. Interior resonances allow this coupling to be amplified, and careful choice of parameters leads to effective cloaks with degraded shielding. As one application, we describe how to use transformation optics to hide sensors in the cloaked region and yet enable the sensors to efficiently measure waves incident on the exterior of the cloak, an effect similar to the plasmon based approach of Alu' and Engheta.

  9. Fiber optic quality assurance at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, J.; Baumgart, S.; Malone, R.; Thayer, D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of fiber optic cables were used in support of a neutron imaging experiment at the Nevada Test Site. This paper describes the quality control testing of fiber components used on this experiment. The principal reason for quality control testing was to ensure reliable, high transmission fibers; a secondary reason was to gain data on a large sample of fiber cables in the field. Also described is the instrumentation developed for carrying out these field measurements. The design of the quality control instrumentation was a compromise between accuracy and simplicity of use.

  10. Generation of a permanent linear electro-optic effect in an optical fiber by poling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Xiaochao

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was carried out. The maximum poling efficiency has been achieved at the applied poling temperature well be- low the fiber melting point. The linear electro- optic coefficient was measured to be 6X10 M/V at room temperature after application of an electric... Before Poling. . . . Fig. 9 Linear-Optic Coefficient vs Poling Temperature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Fig. 10 Linear-Optic Coefficient vs Poling Field. . . . . INTRODUCTION Fast switches and modulators are key elements in fiber optical signal...

  11. Fiber optic probe having fibers with endfaces formed for improved coupling efficiency and method using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O`Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.

    1995-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic probe is disclosed for detecting scattered light, with transmitting and receiving fibers having slanted ends and bundled together to form a bevel within the tip of the probe. The probe comprises a housing with a transparent window across its tip for protecting the transmitting and receiving fibers held therein. The endfaces of the fibers are slanted, by cutting, polishing and the like, so that they lie in a plane that is not perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the respective fiber. The fibers are held in the tip of the probe using an epoxy and oriented so that lines normal to the slanted endfaces are divergent with respect to one another. The epoxy, which is positioned substantially between the transmitting and receiving fibers, is tapered so that the transmitting fiber, the epoxy and the receiving fiber form a bevel of not more than 20 degrees. The angled fiber endfaces cause directing of the light cones toward each other, resulting in improved light coupling efficiency. A light absorber, such as carbon black, is contained in the epoxy to reduce crosstalk between the transmitting and receiving fibers. 3 figures.

  12. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

  13. April 15, 1993 / Vol. 18, No. 8 / OPTICS LETTERS 565 Confocal microscopy through a fiber-optic imaging bundle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gmitro, Arthur F.

    April 15, 1993 / Vol. 18, No. 8 / OPTICS LETTERS 565 Confocal microscopy through a fiber-optic microscope with a fiber-optic imaging bundle is presented, and experimental results are shown todemonstrate. Through use of a fiber-optic imaging bundle, the confocal microscope can be ex- tended to image samples

  14. Fiber-optical switch controlled by a single atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danny O'Shea; Christian Junge; Jürgen Volz; Arno Rauschenbeutel

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate highly efficient switching of optical signals between two optical fibers controlled by a single atom. The key element of our experiment is a whispering-gallery mode bottle microresonator, which is coupled to a single atom and interfaced by two tapered fiber couplers. Even in the presence of the coupling fibers, the atom--resonator system reaches the strong coupling regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED), leading to a vacuum Rabi splitting in the excitation spectrum. We systematically investigate the switching efficiency of our system, i.e., the probability that the CQED fiber-optical switch redirects the light into the desired output. We obtain a large redirection efficiency reaching a raw fidelity of more than 60% without post-selection.

  15. Hermetic fiber optic-to-metal connection technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kramer, Daniel P. (Centerville, OH)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass-to-glass hermetic sealing technique is disclosed which can be used to splice lengths of glass fibers together. A solid glass preform is inserted into the cavity of a metal component which is then heated to melt the glass. An end of an optical fiber is then advanced into the molten glass and the entire structure cooled to solidify the glass in sealing engagement with the optical fiber end and the metal cavity. The surface of the re-solidified glass may be machined for mating engagement with another component to make a spliced fiber optic connection. The resultant structure has a helium leak rate of less than 1.times.10.sup.-8 cm.sup.3 /sec.

  16. ROOM TEMPERATURE STRENGTH DEGRADATION OF OPTICAL FIBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    temperatures. 6 :4 Aging Time (s) Fig. 2. Residual strength of fiber B after aging in deionized water. Aging Time (s) Fig. 4. Data of Griffioen3 for residual strength (strain to failure) of fiber aged in water. 1) Fig. 1 . Residual strength of fiber A after aging in distilled water. io 10 i0 106 io 108 1.0 0.9 0 (0

  17. Progress in the development of scintillating optical fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borenstein, S.R.; Strand, R.C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting with 1 inch diameter PVT scintillator as a preform, the authors have drawn fibers of several diameters ranging from 1 to 4 mm. These fibers have been coated in line with the draw to form optical fibers. Several cladding materials whose index of refraction ranges from 1.35 to 1.55 have been used. The most successful fiber has been obtained with an extra thick (200 micron) cladding of silicone in combination with a linear draw, as opposed to a spool draw. This fiber is acceptable, but it is extremely fragile and its quality is difficult to control. The authors are currently constructing a 12 channel hodoscope with 1 mm spatial resolution using 4 mm diameter fibers. An account is also given of the progress made in using the Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) operated in the Geiger mode as the photo detector.

  18. Mechanical reliability of silica optical fiber: a case study for a biomedical application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Mechanical reliability of silica optical fiber: a case study for a biomedical application Yunn, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8065 ABSTRACT The mechanical reliability of optical fiber used in certain biomedical the fiber can be safely used. In this paper we study two commercially available optical fibers designed

  19. Optical properties of single-crystal sapphire fibers Rick K. Nubling and James A. Harrington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical properties of single-crystal sapphire fibers Rick K. Nubling and James A. Harrington Single.4­0.3 dB m at 2.94 m. These fibers delivered 4.7 W at 10 Hz of Er:YAG laser power. © 1997 Optical Society of America Key words: Infrared fibers, sapphire fibers, Er:YAG lasers, optical properties. 1. Introduction

  20. Description and performance of a highly versatile, low-cost fiber-optic confocal Raman microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    Description and performance of a highly versatile, low-cost fiber-optic confocal Raman microscope C for publication 29 September 1995 A versatile fiber-optic confocal Raman microscope has been developed. Fiber and disadvantages.11,12 We report here the development of an automated highly versatile fiber-optic confocal Raman

  1. Environmental effects on fatigue and lifetime predictions for silica optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Environmental effects on fatigue and lifetime predictions for silica optical fibers M. John optical fiber on the environmental parameters temperature, humidity and pH. It is shown that the stress used by the fiber optics industry provides a good fit to fatigue data for high strength fiber

  2. Microfabricated Optical Sensor Probe for the Detection of Esophageal Cancer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinna Balareddy, Karthik Reddy

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    spectrometry. The sensor probe consists of a lithographically patterned polymer waveguides chip and three micromachined positioning substrates and source/collection fibers to achieve 45 degree light incidence and collection of spatially resolved diffuse...

  3. Cloaking a Sensor via Transformation Optics Allan Greenleaf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    LM11852 REV IEW CO PY N O T FO R D ISTRIBU TIO N Cloaking a Sensor via Transformation Optics Allan. As one application, we describe how to use transformation optics to hide sensors in the cloaked region optics cloaking at positive frequency, besides rendering the cloaked region invisible to detection

  4. Intensity Histogram CMOS Image Sensor for Adaptive Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cauwenberghs, Gert

    Intensity Histogram CMOS Image Sensor for Adaptive Optics Yu M. Chi, Gary Carhart , Mikhail AAODisturbanceSource Update/Optimize Fig. 1. Intended real-time optical control application. The sensor computes histogram of Bioengineering University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093 Intelligent Optics Lab U.S. Army Research

  5. Multiparameter Fiber Optic Sensing System for Monitoring Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Demonstrate reliability of fiber and distributed temperature; strain and vibration sensing sub-systems for EGS at 374şC and 220 bar in the presence of hydrogen. Develop a high accuracy point pressure gauge and distributed pressure sensor to meet EGS requirements.

  6. Electro-optic high voltage sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, James R.; Seifert, Gary D.

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A small sized electro-optic voltage sensor capable of accurate measurement of high voltages without contact with a conductor or voltage source is provided. When placed in the presence of an electric field, the sensor receives an input beam of electromagnetic radiation. A polarization beam displacer separates the input beam into two beams with orthogonal linear polarizations and causes one linearly polarized beam to impinge a crystal at a desired angle independent of temperature. The Pockels effect elliptically polarizes the beam as it travels through the crystal. A reflector redirects the beam back through the crystal and the beam displacer. On the return path, the polarization beam displacer separates the elliptically polarized beam into two output beams of orthogonal linear polarization. The system may include a detector for converting the output beams into electrical signals and a signal processor for determining the voltage based on an analysis of the output beams.

  7. Effects of silica nanoparticle addition to the secondary coating of dual-coated optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Effects of silica nanoparticle addition to the secondary coating of dual-coated optical fibers J Available online 30 March 2006 Abstract The mechanical and optical properties of dual-coated optical fibers of silica nanoparticles in the secondary coating is shown to enhance the resistance of optical fibers

  8. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications has been developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. We report on a fiber optic technique for detection of gas phase oxygen up to 100 C based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the luminescence from molybdenum chloride clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}. The inorganic sensing film is a composite of sol-gel particles embedded in a thin, oxygen permeable sol-gel binder. The particles are comprised of thermally stable, luminescent K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} clusters dispersed in a fully equilibrated sol-gel matrix. From 40 to 100 C, the fiber sensor switches {approx}6x in intensity in response to alternating pulses of <0.001% O2 and 21% O{sub 2} between two well defined levels with a response time of 10 s. The sensor signal is a few nW for an input pump power of 250 {micro}W. The normalized sensor signal is linear with molar oxygen concentration and fits the theoretical Stern-Volmer relationship. Although the sensitivity decreases with temperature, sensitivity at 100 C is 160 [O{sub 2}]{sup -1}. These parameters are well suited for in-situ, real-time monitoring of oxygen for industrial process control applications.

  9. Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

  10. Multipoint Pressure and Temperature Sensing Fiber Optic Cable for Monitoring CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Challener, William

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work completed on contract DE-FE0010116. The goal of this two year project was to develop and demonstrate in the laboratory a highly accurate multi-point pressure measurement fiber optic cable based on MEMS pressure sensors suitable for downhole deployment in a CO2 sequestration well. The sensor interrogator was also to be demonstrated in a remote monitoring system and environmental testing was to be completed to indicate its downhole survivability over a lengthy period of time (e.g., 20 years). An interrogator system based on a pulsed laser excitation was shown to be capable of multiple (potentially 100+) simultaneous sensor measurements. Two sensors packages were completed and spliced in a cable onto the same fiber and measured. One sensor package was subsequently measured at high temperatures and pressures in supercritical CO2, while the other package was measured prior and after being subjected to high torque stresses to mimic downhole deployment. The environmental and stress tests indicated areas in which the package design should be further improved.

  11. Fiber-Optic Sources of Quantum Entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kumar; X. Li; M. Fiorentino; P. L. Voss; J. E. Sharping; G. A. Barbosa

    2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fiber-based source of polarization-entangled photon pairs that is well suited for quantum communication applications in the 1.5$\\mu$m band of standard telecommunication fiber. Quantum-correlated signal and idler photon pairs are produced when a nonlinear-fiber Sagnac interferometer is pumped in the anomalous-dispersion region of the fiber. Recently, we have demonstrated nonclassical properties of such photon pairs by using Geiger-mode InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes. Polarization entanglement in the photon pairs can be created by pumping the Sagnac interferometer with two orthogonally polarized pulses. In this case the parametrically scattered signal-idler photons yield biphoton interference with $>$90% visibility in coincidence detection, while no interference is observed in direct detection of either the signal or the idler photons.

  12. Pendulum Sensor using an Optical Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall D. Peters; Sheng-Chiang "John" Lee

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical mouse that is in common use with personal computers is employed to measure the motion of a pendulum. The pendulum can be monitored (i) realtime only, or (ii) also with data storage for later detailed analysis using Excel. The software developed for this purpose is a LabView executable algorithm. It allows the user to select among several modes that include filtering operations. The limiting resolution of this position sensor, which is in the neighborhood of 50 micrometers, is determined by the 'dpi' specification of the mouse.

  13. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grace, Karen M. (Ranchos de Taos, NM); Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Honkanen, Seppo (Tucson, AZ)

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  14. In situ, subsurface monitoring of vapor-phase TCE using fiber optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossabi, J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Colston, B. Jr.; Brown, S.; Milanovich, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lee, L.T. Jr. [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Geotechnical Lab.

    1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor-phase, reagent-based, fiber optic trichloroethylene (TCE) sensor developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in two configurations. The first incorporated the sensor into a down-well instrument bounded by two inflatable packers capable of sealing an area for discrete depth analysis. The second involved an integration of the sensor into the probe tip of the Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) cone penetrometry system. Discrete depth measurements of vapor-phase concentrations of TCE in the vadose zone were successfully made using both configurations. These measurements demonstrate the first successful in situ sensing (as opposed to sampling) of TCE at a field site.

  15. Sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  16. Excess optical quantum noise in atomic sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Novikova; Eugeniy E. Mikhailov; Yanhong Xiao

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced nonlinear optical response of a coherent atomic medium is the basis for many atomic sensors, and their performance is ultimately limited by the quantum fluctuations of the optical read-out. Here we demonstrate that off-resonant interactions can significantly modify the quantum noise of the optical field, even when their effect on the mean signal is negligible. We illustrate this concept by using an atomic magnetometer based on the nonlinear Faraday effect: the rotation of the light polarization is mainly determined by the resonant light-induced spin alignment, which alone does not change the photon statistics of the optical probe. Yet, we found that the minimum noise of output polarization rotation measurements is above the expected shot noise limit. This excess quantum noise is due to off-resonant coupling and grows with atomic density. We also show that the detection scheme can be modified to reduce the measured quantum noise (even below the shot-noise limit) but only at the expense of the reduced rotational sensitivity. These results show the existence of previously unnoticed factors in fundamental limitations in atomic magnetometry and could have impacts in many other atom-light based precision measurements.

  17. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  18. Raman-induced limits to efficient squeezing in optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruifang Dong; Joel Heersink; Joel F. Corney; Peter D. Drummond; Ulrik L. Andersen; Gerd Leuchs

    2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new experiments on polarization squeezing using ultrashort photonic pulses in a single pass of a birefringent fiber. We measure what is to our knowledge a record squeezing of -6.8 +/- 0.3 dB in optical fibers which when corrected for linear losses is -10.4 +/- 0.8 dB. The measured polarization squeezing as a function of optical pulse energy, which spans a wide range from 3.5-178.8 pJ, shows a very good agreement with the quantum simulations and for the first time we see the experimental proof that Raman effects limit and reduce squeezing at high pulse energy.

  19. Electro-optic high voltage sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seifert, Gary D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A small sized electro-optic voltage sensor capable of accurate measurement of high levels of voltages without contact with a conductor or voltage source is provided. When placed in the presence of an electric field, the sensor receives an input beam of electromagnetic radiation into the sensor. A polarization beam displacer serves as a filter to separate the input beam into two beams with orthogonal linear polarizations. The beam displacer is oriented in such a way as to rotate the linearly polarized beams such that they enter a Pockels crystal having at a preferred angle of 45 degrees. The beam displacer is therefore capable of causing a linearly polarized beam to impinge a crystal at a desired angle independent of temperature. The Pockels electro-optic effect induces a differential phase shift on the major and minor axes of the input beam as it travels through the Pockels crystal, which causes the input beam to be elliptically polarized. A reflecting prism redirects the beam back through the crystal and the beam displacer. On the return path, the polarization beam displacer separates the elliptically polarized beam into two output beams of orthogonal linear polarization representing the major and minor axes. The system may include a detector for converting the output beams into electrical signals, and a signal processor for determining the voltage based on an analysis of the output beams. The output beams are amplitude modulated by the frequency of the electric field and the amplitude of the output beams is proportional to the magnitude of the electric field, which is related to the voltage being measured.

  20. Tunable micro-cavities in photonic band-gap yarns and optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit, Gilles, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vision behind this work is the fabrication of high performance innovative fiber-based optical components over kilometer length-scales. The optical properties of these fibers derive from their multilayer dielectric ...

  1. Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the Westminster, Colorado, Office Amendment to LM-07-12 for Fiber Optic Cable Trenching at the Westminster, Colorado,...

  2. Proceedings: 3rd EPRI Optical Sensor Systems Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are the proceedings of the third Optical Sensor System Workshop, part of an ongoing effort by EPRI to support development of optical sensor technology, to identify benefits for utility users, and to position EPRI members as more ''informed buyers'' and users.

  3. Development of Nano-crystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hai Xiao; Junhang Dong; Jerry Lin; Van Romero

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a final technical report for the first project year from July 1, 2005 to Jan 31, 2012 for DoE/NETL funded project â??DE-FC26-05NT42439: Development of Nanocrystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases.â?ť This report summarizes the technical progresses and achievements towards the development of novel nanocrystalline doped ceramic material-enabled optical fiber sensors for in situ and real time monitoring the gas composition of flue or hot gas streams involved in fossil-fuel based power generation and hydrogen production.

  4. Cone penetrometer fiber optic raman spectroscopy probe assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kyle, Kevin R. (Brentwood, CA); Brown, Steven B. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemically and mechanically robust optical Raman spectroscopy probe assembly that can be incorporated in a cone penetrometer (CPT) for subsurface deployment. This assembly consists of an optical Raman probe and a penetrometer compatible optical probe housing. The probe is intended for in-situ chemical analysis of chemical constituents in the surrounding environment. The probe is optically linked via fiber optics to the light source and the detection system at the surface. A built-in broadband light source provides a strobe method for direct measurement of sample optical density. A mechanically stable sapphire window is sealed directly into the side-wall of the housing using a metallic, chemically resistant, hermetic seal design. This window permits transmission of the interrogation light beam and the resultant signal. The spectroscopy probe assembly is capable of accepting Raman, Laser induced Fluorescence, reflectance, and other optical probes with collimated output for CPT deployment.

  5. Hectospec, the MMT's 300 Optical Fiber-Fed Spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Fabricant; Robert Fata; John Roll; Edward Hertz; Nelson Caldwell; Thomas Gauron; John Geary; Brian McLeod; Andrew Szentgyorgyi

    2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hectospec is a 300 optical fiber fed spectrograph commissioned at the MMT in the spring of 2004. A pair of high-speed six-axis robots move the 300 fiber buttons between observing configurations within ~300 s and to an accuracy ~25 microns. The optical fibers run for 26 m between the MMT's focal surface and the bench spectrograph operating at R~1000-2000. Another high dispersion bench spectrograph offering R~5,000, Hectochelle, is also available. The system throughput, including all losses in the telescope optics, fibers, and spectrograph peaks at ~10% at the grating blaze in 1" FWHM seeing. Correcting for aperture losses at the 1.5" diameter fiber entrance aperture, the system throughput peaks at $\\sim$17%. Hectospec has proven to be a workhorse instrument at the MMT. Hectospec and Hectochelle together were scheduled for 1/3 of the available nights since its commissioning. Hectospec has returned \\~60,000 reduced spectra for 16 scientific programs during its first year of operation.

  6. TESLA Report No. 2000-26 September 2000 Fiber Optic Radiation Sensing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA Report No. 2000-26 September 2000 Fiber Optic Radiation Sensing Systems for TESLA by H, Germany F. Wulf Hahn-Meitner-Institut HMI, Germany #12;Fiber Optic Radiation Sensing Systems for TESLA of refractive index at high radiation doses 4 3. Fiber optic dosimeter types for different TESLA sections 4 3

  7. Nanomechanical displacement detection using fiber-optic interferometry N. O. Azak, M. Y. Shagam,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanomechanical displacement detection using fiber-optic interferometry N. O. Azak, M. Y. Shagam,a D describe a fiber-optic interferometer to detect the motion of nanomechanical resonators. In this system, the primary technical challenge of aligning the fiber-optic probe to nanometer-scale resonators is overcome

  8. Environmental temperature sensing using Raman spectra DTS fiber-optic methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selker, John

    Environmental temperature sensing using Raman spectra DTS fiber-optic methods Scott W. Tyler,1 John January 2009. [1] Raman spectra distributed temperature sensing (DTS) by fiber-optic cables has recently sensing using Raman spectra DTS fiber-optic methods, Water Resour. Res., 45, W00D23, doi:10.1029/2008WR

  9. Distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing for hydrologic systems John S. Selker,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selker, John

    Distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing for hydrologic systems John S. Selker,1,2 Luc The; accepted 27 October 2006; published 6 December 2006. [1] Instruments for distributed fiber-optic m with temporal resolution of fractions of a minute along standard fiber-optic cables used

  10. Ionic effects on silica optical fiber strength and models for fatigue V. V. Rondinella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Ionic effects on silica optical fiber strength and models for fatigue V. V. Rondinella M. J. Matthewson Rutgers University, Fiber Optic Materials Research Program P. 0. Box 909, Piscataway, NJ 08855, flaw free silica optical fiber shows significant differences from the bulk material for poorly

  11. Seismic-frequency attenuation and moduli estimates using a fiber-optic strainmeter Ludmila Adam 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic-frequency attenuation and moduli estimates using a fiber-optic strainmeter Ludmila Adam 1 Summary We have developed a fiber-optic strainmeter to estimate velocities and attenuation at seismic only part of the core sample, the fiber-optic strainmeter would analyze the rock sample response

  12. Integrated Optoelectronics in an Optical Fiber J. V. Badding*a,d

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Venkatraman

    Integrated Optoelectronics in an Optical Fiber J. V. Badding*a,d , P. J. Saziob , V. Gopalanc.d , A Integration of semiconductor and metal structures into optical fibers to enable fusion of semiconductor optoelectronic function with glass optical fibers is discussed. A chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-like process

  13. The Fiber Optic Multiplexed Thomson Scattering Diagnostic for the ETE Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Fiber Optic Multiplexed Thomson Scattering Diagnostic for the ETE Tokamak M. P. Alonso1 , L. A system and the details of the proposed multiplexed Thomson scattering diagnostic based on a fiber optic-lengths optical fibers to relay the light signals to the same polychromator [4]. The proposed system uses large

  14. Optical fiber reliability implications of uncertainty in the fatigue crack growth model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Optical fiber reliability implications of uncertainty in the fatigue crack growth model G. M. Bubel University Fiber Optic Materials Research Program Ceramic Science and Engineering P.O. Box 909 Piscataway, furthermore, that such flaws can grow in time so that an initially intact silica optical fiber may undergo

  15. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) Using Au Nanohole Arrays on Optical Fiber Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brolo, Alexandre G.

    Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) Using Au Nanohole Arrays on Optical Fiber Tips nanoholes arrays were fabricated on gold films deposited on the tips of single- mode optical fibers. The optical fiber devices were used for surface- enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) measurements

  16. CONTRIBUTED ARTICLE 117. Use of in situ Fiber-Optic Raman Spectroscopy to Replace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    CONTRIBUTED ARTICLE 117. Use of in situ Fiber-Optic Raman Spectroscopy to Replace Calorimetry. Abstract A method for real time determination of the percent cure of epoxies via in-situ fiber-optic Raman to be reliable to +/- 0.82% in the 40-90% cure range. Key words: Process monitoring, fiber optic, Raman

  17. Photoluminescence measurements of quantum-dot-containing semiconductor microdisk resonators using optical fiber taper waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    optical fiber taper waveguides Kartik Srinivasan,1, * Andreas Stintz,2 Sanjay Krishna,2 and Oskar Painter1 November 2005 Optical fiber taper waveguides are used to improve the efficiency of room temperature. As a near-field collection optic, the fiber taper improves the collection efficiency from microdisk lasers

  18. Chemical concentration measurement in blood serum and urine samples using liquid-core optical fiber Raman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Andrew J.

    Chemical concentration measurement in blood serum and urine samples using liquid-core optical fiber in clinical blood serum and urine samples using liquid-core optical fiber (LCOF) Raman spectroscopy-core optical fiber (LCOF) geome- try can enhance the collected Raman signal from nonturbid aqueous samples by 1

  19. Fiber-Optic Stethoscope: A Cardiac Monitoring and Gating System for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiber-Optic Stethoscope: A Cardiac Monitoring and Gating System for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy monitoring and gating purposes. The fiber-optic stethoscope system offers a novel approach to measuring cardiac activity that, unlike the ECG, is immune to electromagnetic effects. The fiber-optic stethoscope

  20. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 82, 023820 (2010) Autoresonant four-wave mixing in optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedland, Lazar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 82, 023820 (2010) Autoresonant four-wave mixing in optical fibers O. Yaakobi in optics, particularly in fiber optics [3,4]. Satisfaction of a resonance (phase matching) condition May 2010; published 30 August 2010) A theory of autoresonant four-wave mixing in tapered fibers

  1. Correction method for absorption-dependent signal enhancement by a liquid-core optical fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Andrew J.

    Correction method for absorption-dependent signal enhancement by a liquid-core optical fiber Dahu-core optical fiber (LCOF) geometry is absorption dependent. This dependence leads to a disruption of the usual refractive index, a liquid-core optical fiber (LCOF) is formed. Light rays within the critical angle can

  2. Encoded Fiber-Optic Microsphere Arrays for Probing ProteinCarbohydrate Interactions**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratner, Daniel M.

    Biosensors Encoded Fiber-Optic Microsphere Arrays for Probing Protein­Carbohydrate Interactions detection). Herein we describe the use of fiber-optic microsphere arrays equipped with covalently immobilized synthetic oligosaccharides for the rapid analysis of protein­carbohydrate interactions. Fiber-optic

  3. Effect of chemical stripping on the strength and surface morphology of fused silica optical fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Effect of chemical stripping on the strength and surface morphology of fused silica optical fiber V. V. Rondinella M. J. Matthewson Fiber Optic Materials Research Program Department of Ceramics Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08855-0909 ABSTRACT Examination of the surface profile of silica optical fiber

  4. The Fiber Optic Multiplexed Upgraded Thomson Scattering Diagnostic for the ISTTOK Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Fiber Optic Multiplexed Upgraded Thomson Scattering Diagnostic for the ISTTOK Tokamak M. P by different length optical fibers used to relay the scattered light to a single spectrometer. 2. Thomson vessel and opposite to the collection lenses. Figure 1 shows the present two fiber optic Thomson

  5. IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 15, NO. 1, JANUARY 2003 81 Tunable Microfluidic Optical-Fiber Devices Based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 15, NO. 1, JANUARY 2003 81 Tunable Microfluidic Optical-Fiber, micropumps, optical-fiber de- vices, optical waveguide components. I. INTRODUCTION TUNABLE optical-fiber the transmission characteristics of optical fiber are more recent [1]­[3]. These techniques increase the range

  6. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, M.M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communication, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of material resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

  7. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Mark M. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

  8. Robust transmission of non-Gaussian entanglement over optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asoka Biswas; Daniel A. Lidar

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the entanglement in a wide range of continuous variable non-Gaussian states can be preserved against decoherence for long-range quantum communication through an optical fiber. We apply protection via decoherence-free subspaces and quantum dynamical decoupling to this end. The latter is implemented by inserting phase shifters at regular intervals $\\Delta $ inside the fiber, where $\\Delta $ is roughly the ratio of the speed of light in the fiber to the bath high-frequency cutoff. Detailed estimates of relevant parameters are provided using the boson-boson model of system-bath interaction for silica fibers, and $\\Delta $ is found to be on the order of a millimeter.

  9. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, M.M.

    1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications. 2 figs.

  10. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic probe is described for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe`s distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device. 5 figs.

  11. Expanded beam non-imaging fiber optic connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jannson, T.; Jannson, J.; Yeung, P.

    1990-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed an expanded beam fiber to fiber connector, based on non-imaging optic principles for coupling light beams from one optical fiber to another. The system consists of two identical connector parts, referred to herein as a collimating part and a concentrating part, each having a preferred partially curved reflective boundary surface for minimizing power loss and surrounding either a hollow space or a space filled with a uniform transparent medium. In one embodiment the boundary is metallic while in a second embodiment the boundary is in the form of an interface allowing total internal reflection. In both the hollow and filled case a lens may be located at the expanded end of both the collimator part and the concentrator part forming the connector. The connector is preferably located in a housing in order to protect and preserve the mechanical stability of the coupler. 13 figs.

  12. Expanded beam non-imaging fiber optic connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jannson, Tommasz (Redondo Beach, CA); Jannson, Joanna (Redondo Beach, CA); Yeung, Peter (Redondo Beach, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed an expanded beam fiber to fiber connector, based on non-imaging optic principles for coupling light beams from one optical fiber to another. The system consists of two identical connector parts, referred to herein as a collimating part and a concentrating part, each having a preferred partially curved reflective boundary surface for minimizing power loss and surrounding either a hollow space or a space filled with a uniform transparent medium. In one embodiment the boundary is metallic while in a second embodiment the boundary is in the form of an interface allowing total internal reflection. In both the hollow and filled case a lens may be located at the expanded end of both the collimater part and the concentrator part forming the connector. The connector is preferably located in a housing in order to protect and preserve the mechanical stability of the coupler.

  13. Organically modified silicate coatings for optical fibers A. B. Wojcik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Organically modified silicate coatings for optical fibers A. B. Wojcik L. C. Klein V. V. Rondinella 909 Piscataway, NJ 08855-0909 ABSTRACT Three kinds of UV-curable organically modified silicates have linked to inorganics. In particular, organically modified silicates were investigated. In the search

  14. Degenerate band edges in optical fiber with multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the forward energy fluxes S of the two media defines the coupling efficiency Ľ S2=S1. For PBG materialsDegenerate band edges in optical fiber with multiple grating: efficient coupling to slow light), School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia 2 CUDOS, School

  15. Optical Fibers: History, Structure and the Weakly Guided Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    towers. In the 1840's, two physicists, Daniel Collodon and Jacques Babinet demonstrated the transmission. Introduction In today's world, the transmission of information over both short and long distances is vital. Optical fibers play a key role in these transmissions, and will continue to do so as we move forward

  16. Force measurements in magnetic bearings using fiber optic strain gauges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymer, Stephen Geoffrey

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented here develops a new method for measuring forces in magnetic bearings. Fiber-optic strain gauges (FOSGs) mounted to the side of the magnet poles are used to detect the small levels of strain that the metal experiences...

  17. Fiber-optical analogue of the event horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Philbin; Chris Kuklewicz; Scott Robertson; Stephen Hill; Friedrich Konig; Ulf Leonhardt

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics at the event horizon resembles the behavior of waves in moving media. Horizons are formed where the local speed of the medium exceeds the wave velocity. We use ultrashort pulses in microstructured optical fibers to demonstrate the formation of an artificial event horizon in optics. We observed a classical optical effect, the blue-shifting of light at a white-hole horizon. We also show by theoretical calculations that such a system is capable of probing the quantum effects of horizons, in particular Hawking radiation.

  18. A New Generation of Sensors Based on Extraordinary Optical Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brolo, Alexandre G.

    A New Generation of Sensors Based on Extraordinary Optical Transmission REUVEN GORDON, DAVID SINTON advances in the optical and spectroscopic properties of nanohole arrays in thin gold films optical transmission" (EOT), that is, they are more transparent at certain wavelengths than expected

  19. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Richard P. (Livermore, CA); Paris, Robert D. (San Ramon, CA); Feldman, Mark (Pleasanton, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  20. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.; Paris, R.D.; Feldman, M.

    1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  1. Hybrid Solar Lighting - Fiber Optics Brings Sunlight Inside

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxey, L Curt [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid solar lighting systems focus highly concentrated sunlight into a fiber optic bundle to provide sunlight in rooms without windows or conventional skylights. The flexible sunlight bundles are easily routed through small openings and around obstacles to carry the light to where it is needed. The optical fibers terminate in hybrid luminaires where the sunlight is combined with electric light that is automatically adjusted to keep the overall light level constant within the lighted area. The hybrid solar lighting concept was originally proposed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee in the mid-1990s, but funding hurdles prevented the idea from seeing daylight for more than five years. Hybrid solar lighting was touted as a means for using solar energy directly without any conversion losses and for increasing the visual quality of interior lighting. As such, it promised to be both energy-efficient and aesthetically appealing, but its technical complexity made potential sponsors wary. They had to be convinced that the lighting concept could be accepted into the marketplace and that the systems could be manufactured at an acceptable cost. An earlier fiber-coupled daylighting system marketed in the early 1990s used expensive quartz optical fibers to distribute the light and served only a niche market that was willing to pay a premium for the novelty. By contrast, the hybrid solar lighting system proposed using inexpensive plastic optical fibers to distribute the light to hybrid (sunlight/electric) luminaires that would be visually and functionally identical to conventional luminaires. In this way, the lighting could be integrated seamlessly into existing design concepts and thus easily embraced by architects and lighting designers as a means for offering daylight as a lighting option.

  2. Semiconductor sensor for optically measuring polarization rotation of optical wavefronts using rare earth iron garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Paul G. (8544 Electric Ave., Vienna, VA 22182)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described are the design of a rare earth iron garnet sensor element, optical methods of interrogating the sensor element, methods of coupling the optical sensor element to a waveguide, and an optical and electrical processing system for monitoring the polarization rotation of a linearly polarized wavefront undergoing external modulation due to magnetic field or electrical current fluctuation. The sensor element uses the Faraday effect, an intrinsic property of certain rare-earth iron garnet materials, to rotate the polarization state of light in the presence of a magnetic field. The sensor element may be coated with a thin-film mirror to effectively double the optical path length, providing twice the sensitivity for a given field strength or temperature change. A semiconductor sensor system using a rare earth iron garnet sensor element is described.

  3. 12/22/2000 State of Art Fiber Optic 1 UTILITY APPLICATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on high voltage transmission lines. Three basic designs employed are: · 1) OPGW (optical ground wire) · 2 OPTIC CABLES #12;12/22/2000 State of Art Fiber Optic 4 UTILITY APPLICATION OF FIBER OPTIC CABLES OPGW is difficult · Cost more than ADSS, but less than OPGW · Need a shield wire · No operation problem is observed

  4. Journal of Neuroscience Methods 169 (2008) 7683 Visual stimulus presentation using fiber optics in the MRI scanner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Martin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Neuroscience Methods 169 (2008) 76­83 Visual stimulus presentation using fiber optics-face space using fiber optics in the MRI scanner. The feasibility of fiber-optic based displays-encoded paradigms in both experiments. The results suggest that fiber-optic based displays can be a complementary

  5. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. The luminescence of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} immobilized in a sol-gel matrix was measured as a function of heater temperature up to 200 C, in an inert environment. While the luminescence decreased with temperature, the integrated intensity at 200 C should be sufficient to enable detection of the luminescence in a fiber geometry. Previously we found that aging Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} at temperatures above 250 C converts the canary yellow Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} to a non-luminescent gray solid. Optical and thermal aging experiments show that the alkali metal salts of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} have higher thermal stabilities and remain luminescent after aging at 280 C.

  6. Distributed fiber optic moisture intrusion sensing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and system for monitoring and identifying moisture intrusion in soil such as is contained in landfills housing radioactive and/or hazardous waste. The invention utilizes the principle that moist or wet soil has a higher thermal conductance than dry soil. The invention employs optical time delay reflectometry in connection with a distributed temperature sensing system together with heating means in order to identify discrete areas within a volume of soil wherein temperature is lower. According to the invention an optical element and, optionally, a heating element may be included in a cable or other similar structure and arranged in a serpentine fashion within a volume of soil to achieve efficient temperature detection across a large area or three dimensional volume of soil. Remediation, moisture countermeasures, or other responsive action may then be coordinated based on the assumption that cooler regions within a soil volume may signal moisture intrusion where those regions are located.

  7. 516 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 7 / April 1, 2003 Optical bistability in axially modulated OmniGuide fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    demonstrate the feasibility of optical bistability in an axially modulated nonlinear OmniGuide fiber through516 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 7 / April 1, 2003 Optical bistability in axially modulated OmniGuide fibers Marin Soljacic´, Mihai Ibanescu, Steven G. Johnson, and J. D. Joannopoulos Department of Physics

  8. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  9. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, P.

    1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip is described. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts. 10 figs.

  10. Optical sensors and multisensor arrays containing thin film electroluminescent devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aylott, Jonathan W. (Ann Arbor, MI); Chen-Esterlit, Zoe (Ann Arbor, MI); Friedl, Jon H. (Ames, IA); Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Savvateev, Vadim N. (Ames, IA); Shinar, Joseph (Ames, IA)

    2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical sensor, probe and array devices for detecting chemical biological, and physical analytes. The devices include an analyte-sensitive layer optically coupled to a thin film electroluminescent layer which activates the analyte-sensitive layer to provide an optical response. The optical response varies depending upon the presence of an analyte and is detected by a photodetector and analyzed to determine the properties of the analyte.

  11. Tapered optical fibers as tools for probing magneto-optical trap characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Morrissey; K. Deasy; Y. Wu; S. Chakrabarti; S. Nic Chormaic

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel technique for measuring the characteristics of a magneto-optical trap for cold atoms by monitoring the spontaneous emission from trapped atoms coupled into the guided mode of a tapered optical nanofiber. We show that the nanofiber is highly sensitive to very small numbers of atoms close to its surface. The size and shape of the MOT, determined by translating the cold atom cloud across the tapered fiber, is in excellent agreement with measurements obtained using the conventional method of fluorescence imaging using a CCD camera. The coupling of atomic fluorescence into the tapered fiber also allows us to monitor the loading and lifetime of the trap. The results are compared to those achieved by focusing the MOT fluorescence onto a photodiode and it was seen that the tapered fiber gives slightly longer loading and lifetime measurements due to the sensitivity of the fiber, even when very few atoms are present.

  12. Cloaking a sensor for three-dimensional Maxwell's equations: transformation optics approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xudong; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. Sheng, “Transformation optics and metamaterials,” Nat.sensor via transformation optics,” Phys. Rev. E 83, 016603 (October 2011 / Vol. 19, No. 21 / OPTICS EXPRESS 20518 13. G.

  13. Realization of an Economical Polymer Optical Fiber Demultiplexer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich H. P. Fischer; Matthias Haupt; Christian Reinboth

    2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer Optical Fiber (POF) can be and are being used in various fields of applications. Two of the main fields are the automotive and the home entertainment sector. The POF can be applied in several different optical communication systems as automotive multi-media busses or in-house Ethernet systems. The requirements of bandwidth are increasing very fast in these sectors and therefore solutions that satisfy these demands are of high actuality. One solution is to use the wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technique. Here, several different wavelengths can carry information over one POF fiber. All wavelengths that are transmitted over the fiber, must be separated at the receiver to regain and redirect the information channels. These separators are so-called Demultiplexers. There are several systems available on the market, which are all afflicted with certain disadvantages. But all these solutions have one main disadvantage, they are all too expensive for most of the applications mentioned above. So the goal of this study is to develop an economical Demultiplexer for WDM transmission over POF. The main idea is to separate the chromatic light in its monochromatic components with the help of a prism with low reciprocal dispersive power. The prism and the other assemblies, which are needed to adjust the optical path, should be manufactured in injection molding technique. This manufacturing technique is a very simple and economical way to produce a mass production applicable Demultiplexer for POF.

  14. Solids Fraction Measurement with a Reflective Fiber Optic Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seachman, S.M.; Yue, P.C.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method has been developed to extract solids fraction information from a reflective fiber optic probe. The commercially available reflective fiber optic probe was designed to measure axial particle velocity (both up and down directions). However, the reflected light intensity measured is related to particle size and particle concentration. A light reflection model is used to relate the reflected light intensity to solids fraction. In this model we assume that the reflected light intensity is a fixed fraction, K1, of the total light intensity lost in penetration of a solid layer. Also, the solids fraction is related to particle concentration, N, in the light path, by N = K2 (1- ?), where (1-?) is the solids fraction. The parameters K1 and K2 are determined through a calibration and curve fitting procedure. This paper describes this procedure and the steps taken to derive the values of K1 and K2. It is proposed that the reflective fiber optic can be used for real time measurement of solids fraction in a circulating fluid bed.

  15. Universal signal processing method for multimode reflective sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Robert Eugene

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensitivity, but the sensor configuration is complicated and requires the use of expensive lasers and single mode fibers. Amplitude modulation trades sensitivity for low cost and ease of configuration by using light emitting diodes and multimode fibers. A... fiber optic based sensor using amplitude modulation would provide a simple, low cost solution to the interference problem inherent in the use of composite materials. CHAPTER II BACKGROUND Development of optical fiber sensors started around 1977 [1...

  16. Development and application of composite overhead ground wire with optical fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Kato, T.; Okazato, A.; Sakurada, H.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A overhead ground wire composed with optical fibers has been developed, as well as the accessories and the joints. The overhead ground wire is provided with an aluminum pipe at the core thereof in which the optical fibers are inserted. The composite overhead ground wire with optical fibers was installed for the Kaga-Reinan 500 kV overhead transmission line in autumn, 1981 for the purposes of observing lightning and using as telecommunication line, as well. After the successful performance of the optical fiber, especially in view of transmission loss after installation, has been proved, the composite overhead ground wire is now being checked for the purposes as stated above. The ground wire was also installed for the Tsuruga Test Line at about the same time and investigations were started to confirm the reliability of the optical fiber to be over a long period of time under severe meteorological conditions such as strong winds and icing. The construction of the composite ground wire with optical fibers is such that the optical fibers contained therein are not restrained by the ground wire itself. This enables insertion and pulling out of optical fiber cables. Tests were conducted at certain sections of the Kaga-Reinan Line to confirm that there was no change in the performance of the optical fibers due to such operations of insertion and pulling out. This report briefly discusses the development of the composite ground wire with optical fibers, its installation and the test results.

  17. Experimental stress–strain analysis of tapered silica optical fibers with nanofiber waist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holleis, S.; Hoinkes, T.; Wuttke, C.; Schneeweiss, P.; Rauschenbeutel, A. [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, TU Wien—Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally determine tensile force–elongation diagrams of tapered optical fibers with a nanofiber waist. The tapered optical fibers are produced from standard silica optical fibers using a heat and pull process. Both, the force–elongation data and scanning electron microscope images of the rupture points indicate a brittle material. Despite the small waist radii of only a few hundred nanometers, our experimental data can be fully explained by a nonlinear stress–strain model that relies on material properties of macroscopic silica optical fibers. This is an important asset when it comes to designing miniaturized optical elements as one can rely on the well-founded material characteristics of standard optical fibers. Based on this understanding, we demonstrate a simple and non-destructive technique that allows us to determine the waist radius of the tapered optical fiber. We find excellent agreement with independent scanning electron microscope measurements of the waist radius.

  18. Fiber-optic apparatus and method for measurement of luminescence and raman scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael L. (Livermore, CA); Angel, Stanley M. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual fiber forward scattering optrode for Raman spectroscopy with the remote ends of the fibers in opposed, spaced relationship to each other to form a analyte sampling space therebetween and the method of measuring Raman spectra utilizing same. One optical fiber is for sending an exciting signal to the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter for filtering out background emissions generated in the fiber. The other optical fiber is for collecting the Raman scattering signal at the remote sampling space and, at its remote end, has a collimating microlens and an optical filter to prevent the exciting signal from the exciting fiber from entering the collection fiber and to thereby prevent the generation of background emissions in the collecting fiber.

  19. Optical fiber configurations for transmission of laser energy over great distances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There are provided optical fiber configurations that provide for the delivery of laser energy, and in particular, the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy over great distances. These configurations further are hardened to protect the optical fibers from the stresses and conditions of an intended application. The configurations provide means for determining the additional fiber length (AFL) need to obtain the benefits of such additional fiber, while avoiding bending losses.

  20. Optical fiber configurations for transmission of laser energy over great distances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    There are provided optical fiber configurations that provide for the delivery of laser energy, and in particular, the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy over great distances. These configurations further are hardened to protect the optical fibers from the stresses and conditions of an intended application. The configurations provide means for determining the additional fiber length (AFL) need to obtain the benefits of such additional fiber, while avoiding bending losses.

  1. Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blue, Thomas; Windl, Wolfgang; Dickerson, Bryan

    2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica�s optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and the interplay of rate effects with the effects of annealing, to accurately predict the fibers� reliability and expected lifetime

  2. Scanner-Free and Wide-Field Endoscopic Imaging by Using a Single Multimode Optical Fiber Youngwoon Choi,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yen, Christopher

    Scanner-Free and Wide-Field Endoscopic Imaging by Using a Single Multimode Optical Fiber Youngwoon November 2012) A single multimode fiber is considered an ideal optical element for endoscopic imaging due fiber has been an important turning point. Especially, a multimode optical fiber has drawn interest

  3. Enhanced two-photon excitation through optical fiber by single-mode propagation in a large core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tank, David

    Enhanced two-photon excitation through optical fiber by single-mode propagation in a large core Fritjof Helmchen, David W. Tank, and Winfried Denk Multiphoton excitation through optical fibers of applications efficient MPE through optical fibers is desirable. For example, single-mode fibers SMFs can

  4. Methods and optical fibers that decrease pulse degradation resulting from random chromatic dispersion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chertkov, Michael; Gabitov, Ildar

    2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and optical fibers for periodically pinning an actual (random) accumulated chromatic dispersion of an optical fiber to a predicted accumulated dispersion of the fiber through relatively simple modifications of fiber-optic manufacturing methods or retrofitting of existing fibers. If the pinning occurs with sufficient frequency (at a distance less than or are equal to a correlation scale), pulse degradation resulting from random chromatic dispersion is minimized. Alternatively, pinning may occur quasi-periodically, i.e., the pinning distance is distributed between approximately zero and approximately two to three times the correlation scale.

  5. GFOC Project results: High Temperature / High Pressure, Hydrogen Tolerant Optical Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Burov; A. Pastouret; E. Aldea; B. Overton; F. Gooijer; A. Bergonzo

    2012-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests results are given for exposure of multimode optical fiber to high temperatures (300 deg. C) and high partial pressure (15 bar) hydrogen. These results demonstrate that fluorine down doped optical fibers are much more hydrogen tolerant than traditional germanium doped multimode optical fibers. Also demonstrated is the similar hydrogen tolerance of carbon coated and non-carbon coated fibers. Model for reversible H2 impact in fiber versus T{sup o}C and H2 pressure is given. These results have significant impact for the longevity of use for distributed temperature sensing applications in harsh environments such as geothermal wells.

  6. Part-Per-Trillion Level SF6 Detection Using a Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy-Based Sensor with Single-Mode Fiber-Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser Excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spagnolo, V.; Patimisco, P.; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, G.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kriesel, J.M.

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive spectroscopic sensor based on a hollow-core fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 10.54 µm and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) technique is reported. The design and realization of mid-infrared fiber and coupler optics has ensured single-mode QCL beam delivery to the QEPAS sensor . The collimation optics was designed to produce a laser beam of significantly reduced beam size and waist so as to prevent illumination of the quartz tuning fork and micro-resonator tubes. SF6 was selected as the target gas. A minimum detection sensitivity of 50 parts per trillion in 1 s was achieved with a QCL power of 18 mW, corresponding to a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2.7x10-10 W•cm-1/Hz1/2.

  7. Fiber optic assembly and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kramer, D.P.; Beckman, T.M.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided an assembly having a light guiding medium sealed to a holder. Preferably the holder is a metal shell and a light guiding medium is an optical fiber of glass or sapphire whisker. The assembly includes a sealing medium which sealingly engages the metal holder to the fiber. In the formation of the assembly, the seal is essentially hermetic having a capability of minimizing leakage having a helium leak rate of less than 1{times}10{sup {minus}8} cubic centimeters per second and high strength having a capability of withstanding pressures of 100,000 psi or greater. The features of the assembly are obtained by a specific preparation method and by selection of specific starting materials. The fiber is selected to have a sufficiently high coefficient of thermal expansion which minimizes strains in the component during fabrication, as a result of fabrication, and during use. The other components are selected to be of a material having compatible coefficients of thermal expansion (TEC) where the TEC of the holder is greater than or equal to the TEC of the sealing material. The TEC of the sealing material is in turn greater than or equal to the TEC of the fiber. It is preferred that the materials be selected so that their respective coefficients of thermal expansion are as close as possible to one another and they may all be equal. 4 figs.

  8. Fiber optic assembly and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kramer, Daniel P. (Centerville, OH); Beckman, Thomas M. (Barkhamstead, CT)

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided an assembly having a light guiding medium sealed to a her. Preferably the holder is a metal shell and a light guiding medium is an optical fiber of glass or sapphire whisker. The assembly includes a sealing medium which sealingly engages the metal holder to the fiber. In the formation of the assembly, the seal is essentially hermetic having a capability of minimizing leakage having a helium leak rate of less than 1.times.10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second and high strength having a capability of withstanding pressures of 100,000 psi or greater. The features of the assembly are obtained by a specific preparation method and by selection of specific starting materials. The fiber is selected to have a sufficiently high coefficient of thermal expansion which minimizes strains in the component during fabrication, as a result of fabrication, and during use. The other components are selected to be of a material having compatible coefficients of thermal expansion (TEC) where the TEC of the holder is greater than or equal to the TEC of the sealing material. The TEC of the sealing material is in turn greater than or equal to the TEC of the fiber. It is preferred that the materials be selected so that their respective coefficients of thermal expansion are as close as possible to one another and they may all be equal.

  9. High sensitivity bulk electro-optic modulator field sensor for high voltage environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shy,Jow-Tsong

    High sensitivity bulk electro-optic modulator field sensor for high voltage environments Mao December 2004) An optical electric field sensor is an effective instrument for surveying the electric attacked by unexpected electrical shocks through the metal cable of the sensor. Sensing by optical sensors

  10. Fig. 1 Teleoperated slave robot Development of Distributed Optical Torque Sensors for Realization of Local Impedance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    Fig. 1 Teleoperated slave robot Development of Distributed Optical Torque Sensors for Realization the recent development of optical torque sensor in order to replace expensive strain gauge sensor attached shapes of mechanical structure of sensor as well as optical measurement approaches are given. The results

  11. Informed peg-in-hole insertion using optical sensors Eric Paulos John Canny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    Informed peg-in-hole insertion using optical sensors Eric Paulos John Canny Department several very simple, inexpensive, and accurate optical sensors. The self-calibrating feature allows us operations using simple optical sensors. A key to the method is the use of one sensor to compute the position

  12. alloy fiber reinforced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of FRPs Conditioned FRP-RC Beams Using FiberOptic Sensors, Slenderness Efle 3 Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) as Reinforcement for Concrete Beam CiteSeer Summary:...

  13. advanced dti fiber: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L, Baley C. Influence of the sampling area of the stem on the mechanical properties of hemp fibers Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 27 Fiber Optic Sensor Interrogation Advancements...

  14. Light propagation through a coiled optical fiber and Pancharatnam phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajendra Bhandari

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of changes in the interference pattern caused by the presence of polarization-changing elements in one or both beams of an interferometer, in particular those caused by an effective optical activity due to passage of a polarized beam through a coiled optical fiber are clarified. It is pointed out that for an incident state that is not circularly polarized so that the two interfering beams go to different polarization states, there is an observable nonzero Pancharatnam phase shift between them which depends on the incident polarization state and on the solid angle subtended by the track of the $\\vec{k}$-vector at the centre of the sphere of k-vectors. The behaviour of this phase shift is singular when the two interfering states are nearly orthogonal. It is shown that for zero path difference between the two beams, the amplitude of intensity modulation as a function of optical activity is independent of the incident polarization state.

  15. Fiber optic probe of free electron evanescent fields in the optical frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    So, Jin-Kyu, E-mail: js1m10@orc.soton.ac.uk; MacDonald, Kevin F. [Optoelectronics Research Centre and Centre for Photonic Metamaterials, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Zheludev, Nikolay I. [Optoelectronics Research Centre and Centre for Photonic Metamaterials, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce an optical fiber platform which can be used to interrogate proximity interactions between free-electron evanescent fields and photonic nanostructures at optical frequencies in a manner similar to that in which optical evanescent fields are sampled using nanoscale aperture probes in scanning near-field microscopy. Conically profiled optical fiber tips functionalized with nano-gratings are employed to couple electron evanescent fields to light via the Smith-Purcell effect. We demonstrate the interrogation of medium energy (30–50?keV) electron fields with a lateral resolution of a few micrometers via the generation and detection of visible/UV radiation in the 700–300?nm (free-space) wavelength range.

  16. Optics-less Sensors for Localization of Radiation Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Caulfield; L. P. Yaroslavsky; Ch. Goerzen; S. Umansky

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A new family of radiation sensors is introduced which do not require any optics. The sensors consist of arrays of elementary sub-sensors with natural cosine-law or similar angular sensitivity supplemented with a signal processing unit that computes optimal statistical estimations of source parameters. We show, both theoretically and by computer simulation, that such sensors are capable of accurate localization and intensity estimation of a given number of radiation sources and of imaging of a given number of sources in known positions. The accuracy is found to be dependent only on the sub-sensors noise level, on the number of sub-sensors and on the spacing between radiation sources.

  17. Hardware authentication using transmission spectra modified optical fiber.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grubbs, Robert K.; Romero, Juan A.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to authenticate the source and integrity of data is critical to the monitoring and inspection of special nuclear materials, including hardware related to weapons production. Current methods rely on electronic encryption/authentication codes housed in monitoring devices. This always invites the question of implementation and protection of authentication information in an electronic component necessitating EMI shielding, possibly an on board power source to maintain the information in memory. By using atomic layer deposition techniques (ALD) on photonic band gap (PBG) optical fibers we will explore the potential to randomly manipulate the output spectrum and intensity of an input light source. This randomization could produce unique signatures authenticating devices with the potential to authenticate data. An external light source projected through the fiber with a spectrometer at the exit would 'read' the unique signature. No internal power or computational resources would be required.

  18. Fiber-optic strain gauge with attached ends and unattached microbend section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1992-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A strain gauge is made of an optical fiber into which quasi-sinusoidal microbends have been permanently introduced. The permanent microbends cause a reduction in the fiber's optical transmission, but, when the gauge is attached to a substrate that is subsequently strained, the amplitude of the deformations will diminish and the optical transmission through the fiber will increase. An apparatus and process for manufacturing these microbends into the optical fiber through a heat-set process is employed; this apparatus and process includes a testing and calibration system. 5 figs.

  19. analog fiber-optic links: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meter to kilometer scales. Laboratory results demonstrate the feasibility of the heat pulse method implemented with fiber optic temperature sensing to obtain accurate distributed...

  20. Implementation of an integrated confocal sensor using planar optics S. Sinzinger, J. Jahns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Implementation of an integrated confocal sensor using planar optics S. Sinzinger, J. Jahns We demonstrate an optical sensor head integrated in planar optics. The sensor is based on the confocal principle which is widely used in microscopy, sensing, and optical data storage. In order to achieve enhanced

  1. Currently, there is a substantial research and development effort directed toward optical signal processing and electronic signal processing for fiber-optic communications. Much of the work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    signal processing and electronic signal processing for fiber-optic communications. Much of the work fiber-optic transmitters and receivers, and has lead to a renewed interest in coherent optical detection and Electronic Signal Processing for Fiber-Optic Communications IEEE Photonics Societ y Distinguished Lecture B y

  2. Fiber optic probe of free electron evanescent fields in the optical frequency range Jin-Kyu So, Kevin F. MacDonald, and Nikolay I. Zheludev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Fiber optic probe of free electron evanescent fields in the optical frequency range Jin-Kyu So fabrication of bent near-field optical fiber probes by electric arc heating Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 3843 (1998 of thermal evaporation conditions used in coating aluminum on near-field fiber-optic probes Rev. Sci. Instrum

  3. Fabrication and optical properties of single-crystal YAG fiber optics Brian.T. Laustsen and James A. Harrington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In this method a CO2 laser is used to melt the tip of a crystalline source rod and a fiber is pulled upward from reservoir. In one method a high temperature crucible usually made of tungsten is used to contain the meltFabrication and optical properties of single-crystal YAG fiber optics Brian.T. Laustsen and James A

  4. 2010 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 27, No. 22 / November 15, 2002 Study of an ultrahigh-numerical-aperture fiber continuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Amy

    -numerical-aperture fiber continuum generation source for optical coherence tomography Daniel L. Marks, Amy L. Oldenburg and a practical enhancement to a fiber-optic optical coherence tomography system. © 2002 Op- tical Society custom-made optical components or specialized fibers that are not mass produced or readily available

  5. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, V; Solberg, J; Ferriera, T; Tully, L; Stephan, P

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed and tested a compact collimated sixteen channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with {approx}mm spatial and sub-{micro}s temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore Fixed Hybrid Armature experiment are presented and compared with 1-D simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  6. Measured Quantum Fourier Transform of 1024 Qubits on Fiber Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihisa Tomita; Kazuo Nakamura

    2004-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Fourier transform (QFT) is a key function to realize quantum computers. A QFT followed by measurement was demonstrated on a simple circuit based on fiber-optics. The QFT was shown to be robust against imperfections in the rotation gate. Error probability was estimated to be 0.01 per qubit, which corresponded to error-free operation on 100 qubits. The error probability can be further reduced by taking the majority of the accumulated results. The reduction of error probability resulted in a successful QFT demonstration on 1024 qubits.

  7. Remote generation of entanglement for individual atoms via optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Q. Guo; H. Y. Zhong; Y. H. Zhang; H. S. Song

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of atomic entanglement is discussed in a system that atoms are trapped in separate cavities which are connected via optical fibers. Two distant atoms can be projected to Bell-state by synchronized turning off the local laser fields and then performing a single quantum measurement by a distant controller. The distinct advantage of this scheme is that it works in a regime that $\\Delta\\approx\\kappa\\gg g$, which makes the scheme insensitive to cavity strong leakage. Moreover, the fidelity is not affected by atomic spontaneous emission.

  8. Ultra-low-loss tapered optical fibers with minimal lengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryutaro Nagai; Takao Aoki

    2014-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We design and fabricate ultra-low-loss tapered optical fibers (TOFs) with minimal lengths. We first optimize variations of the torch scan length using the flame-brush method for fabricating TOFs with taper angles that satisfy the adiabaticity criteria. We accordingly fabricate TOFs with optimal shapes and compare their transmission to TOFs with a constant taper angle and TOFs with an exponential shape. The highest transmission measured for TOFs with an optimal shape is in excess of 99.7 % with a total TOF length of only 23 mm, whereas TOFs with a constant taper angle of 2 mrad reach 99.6 % transmission for a 63 mm TOF length.

  9. Optical Fiber Technique for In-Reactor Mechanical Properties Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Schley; Zilong Hua; David H. Hurley; Heng Ban

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the natural frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  10. Fiber Grating Environmental Sensing System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schulz, Whitten L. (Fairview, OR); Udd, Eric (Fairview, OR)

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber grating environmental measurement systems are comprised of sensors that are configured to respond to changes in moisture or chemical content of the surrounding medium through the action of coatings and plates inducing strain that is measured. These sensors can also be used to monitor the interior of bonds for degradation due to aging, cracking, or chemical attack. Means to multiplex these sensors at high speed and with high sensitivity can be accomplished by using spectral filters placed to correspond to each fiber grating environmental sensor. By forming networks of spectral elements and using wavelength division multiplexing arrays of fiber grating sensors may be processed in a single fiber line allowing distributed high sensitivity, high bandwidth fiber optic grating environmental sensor systems to be realized.

  11. Fiber optic device for sensing the presence of a gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Bechinger, C.S.; Tracy, C.E.

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber-optic device for sensing the presence of a gas in an environment is provided. The device comprises a light source for directing a light beam to a layer system having a first surface and a second surface opposite the first surface. The first surface is exposable to the light beam and the second surface is exposable to the environment. A first light portion encounters and reflects from the first surface at an angle of incidence free from optical wave guide resonance phenomenon and the second light portion encounters and reflects from the first surface at an angle of incidence enabling an optical wave guide resonance phenomenon. The layer system is selected to reversibly react with the gas to be detected. The reaction between the gas and the material changes the material`s optical properties and the wavelength at which the optical wave guide resonance occurs. Furthermore, a mechanism for measuring the intensity of the reflected first light portion relative to the reflected second light portion is provided with the ratio of the first and second light portions indicating the concentration of the gas presence in the environment. 5 figs.

  12. SBIR Final Report. Liquid Core Optical Scintillating Fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beetz, C.P.; Steinbeck, J.; Buerstler, R.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase I SBIR project focused on developing flexible scintillating liquid core optical fibers, with potential uses in high-energy calorimetry, tracking, preradiators, active targets or other fast detectors. Progress on the six tasks of the project is summarized. The technical developments involve three technology components: (1) highly flexible capillaries or tubes of relatively low n (index of refraction) to serve as cladding and liquid core containment; (2) scintillator (and clear) fluids of relatively high n to serve as a core-- these fluids must have a high light transmission and, for some applications, radiation hardness; (3) optical end plugs, plug insertion, and plug-cladding tube sealing technology to contain the core fluids in the tubes, and to transmit the light.

  13. McCullough to Liberty fiber optics project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to replace an existing overhead static wire with a shield wire that contains optical fibers (OPGW) on transmission lines from McCullough Substation, south of Las Vegas, Nevada, to Liberty Substation near Phoenix, Arizona. The replacement will occur on the McCullough-Davis, Davis-Parker No. 2, and Parker-Liberty No. 1 230-kV transmission lines. Western is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the lines. Western prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) entitled ``McCullough to Liberty Fiber Optics Project`` (DOE/EA-1202). The EA contains the analysis of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the OPGW. Based on the analysis in the EA, Western finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. The preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and therefore, Western is issuing this Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  14. Optical microscope and tapered fiber coupling apparatus for a dilution refrigerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. R. MacDonald; G. G. Popowich; B. D. Hauer; P. H. Kim; A. Fredrick; X. Rojas; P. Doolin; J. P. Davis

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a system for tapered fiber measurements of optomechanical resonators inside a dilution refrigerator, which is compatible with both on- and off-chip devices. Our apparatus features full three-dimensional control of the taper-resonator coupling conditions enabling critical coupling, with an overall fiber transmission efficiency of up to 70%. Notably, our design incorporates an optical microscope system consisting of a coherent bundle of 37,000 optical fibers for real-time imaging of the experiment at a resolution of $\\sim$1 $\\mu$m. We present cryogenic optical and optomechanical measurements of resonators coupled to tapered fibers at temperatures as low as 9 mK.

  15. Mid-Infrared Fiber-Coupled QCl-QEPAS Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spagnolo, V.; Patimisco, P.; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, G.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kriesel, J.M.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative spectroscopic system based on an external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) coupled with a mid-infrared (mid-IR) fiber and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is described. SF6 has been selected as a target gas in demonstration of the system for trace gas sensing. Single mode laser delivery through the prongs of the quartz tuning fork has been obtained employing a hollow waveguide fiber with inner silver–silver iodine (Ag–AgI) coatings and internal core diameter of 300 lm. A detailed design and realization of the QCL fiber coupling and output collimator system allowed almost practically all (99.4 %) of the laser beam to be transmitted through the spectrophone module. The achieved sensitivity of the system is 50 parts per trillion in 1 s, corresponding to a record for QEPAS normalized noise-equivalent absorption 2.7 9 10-10 W cm-1 Hz-1/2.

  16. SINGLE SILVER NANOPARTICLES AS REAL-TIME OPTICAL SENSORS WITH ZEPTOMOLE SENSITIVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    SINGLE SILVER NANOPARTICLES AS REAL-TIME OPTICAL SENSORS WITH ZEPTOMOLE SENSITIVITY Adam D. Mc-time sensor technologies. (A) A dark-field optical image of Ag nanoparticles immobilized on a glass substrate

  17. Fiber optic sensing technology for measuring in-cylinder pressure in automotive engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Taehan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fiber optic sensing technology for measuring in-cylinder pressure in automotive engines was investigated. The optic sensing element consists of two mirrors in an in-line single mode fiber that are separated by some distance. To withstand...

  18. Thermal Monitoring of Embankment Dams by Fiber Optics Y. L. Beck1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Thermal Monitoring of Embankment Dams by Fiber Optics Y. L. Beck1 , A. A. Khan1 , P. Cunat1 , C an embankment dam changes its temperature field. In this regard, fiber optics buried in the structures can of embankment dams. Introduction Erosion of hydraulic embankments like dams and dikes, specially the internal

  19. Computational Light Routing: 3D Printed Optical Fibers For Sensing and Display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Light Routing: 3D Printed Optical Fibers For Sensing and Display THIAGO PEREIRA or restrict themselves to light dif- fusion in volumes. We use multi-material 3D printing to fabricate objects Additional Key Words and Phrases: 3D printing, optical fibers ACM Reference Format: Pereira, T, Rusinkiewicz

  20. Theoretical analysis of actively mode-locked fiber ring laser with semiconductor optical amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Qianfan

    -locking; Fiber laser; Semiconductor optical amplifier 1. Introduction Ultra-short pulse sources are key devices for generating ultra-short pulse series. Various mode-locked lasers with higher than 10 GHz repetition have beenTheoretical analysis of actively mode-locked fiber ring laser with semiconductor optical amplifier

  1. Measurement of Coupling PDC photon sources with single-mode and multimode optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Measurement of Coupling PDC photon sources with single-mode and multimode optical fibers Stefania the coupling efficiency of parametric downconversion light (PDC) into single and multi-mode optical fibers models for the preparation and collection of either single-mode or multi-mode PDC light (defined by

  2. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical thermometry is a growing technological field which exploits the ability of certain materials to change their optical properties with temperature. A subclass of such materials are those which change their color as a reversible and reproducible function of temperature. These materials are thermochromic. This invention is a composition to measure temperature utilizing thermochromic semiconductors.

  3. Calibration-free optical chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGrandpre, Michael D.

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for taking absorbance-based chemical measurements are described. In a specific embodiment, an indicator-based pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) sensor displays sensor-to-sensor reproducibility and measurement stability. These qualities are achieved by: 1) renewing the sensing solution, 2) allowing the sensing solution to reach equilibrium with the analyte, and 3) calculating the response from a ratio of the indicator solution absorbances which are determined relative to a blank solution. Careful solution preparation, wavelength calibration, and stray light rejection also contribute to this calibration-free system. Three pCO2 sensors were calibrated and each had response curves which were essentially identical within the uncertainty of the calibration. Long-term laboratory and field studies showed the response had no drift over extended periods (months). The theoretical response, determined from thermodynamic characterization of the indicator solution, also predicted the observed calibration-free performance.

  4. Electro-optic voltage sensor with beam splitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woods, Gregory K. (Cornelius, OR); Renak, Todd W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Crawford, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a miniature electro-optic voltage sensor system capable of accurate operation at high voltages without use of the dedicated voltage dividing hardware typically found in the prior art. The invention achieves voltage measurement without significant error contributions from neighboring conductors or environmental perturbations. The invention employs a transmitter, a sensor, a detector, and a signal processor. The transmitter produces a beam of electromagnetic radiation which is routed into the sensor. Within the sensor the beam undergoes the Pockels electro-optic effect. The electro-optic effect produces a modulation of the beam's polarization, which is in turn converted to a pair of independent conversely-amplitude-modulated signals, from which the voltage of the E-field is determined by the signal processor. The use of converse AM signals enables the signal processor to better distinguish signal from noise. The sensor converts the beam by splitting the beam in accordance with the axes of the beam's polarization state (an ellipse) into at least two AM signals. These AM signals are fed into a signal processor and processed to determine the voltage between a ground conductor and the conductor on which voltage is being measured.

  5. Electro-optic voltage sensor with Multiple Beam Splitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woods, Gregory K. (Cornelius, OR); Renak, Todd W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Crawford, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature electro-optic voltage sensor system capable of accurate operation at high voltages without use of the dedicated voltage dividing hardware. The invention achieves voltage measurement without significant error contributions from neighboring conductors or environmental perturbations. The invention employs a transmitter, a sensor, a detector, and a signal processor. The transmitter produces a beam of electromagnetic radiation which is routed into the sensor. Within the sensor the beam undergoes the Pockels electro-optic effect. The electro-optic effect produces a modulation of the beam's polarization, which is in turn converted to a pair of independent conversely-amplitude-modulated signals, from which the voltage of the E-field is determined by the signal processor. The use of converse AM signals enables the signal processor to better distinguish signal from noise. The sensor converts the beam by splitting the beam in accordance with the axes of the beam's polarization state (an ellipse) into at least two AM signals. These AM signals are fed into a signal processor and processed to determine the voltage between a ground conductor and the conductor on which voltage is being measured.

  6. STRAIN MONITORING IN STIFFENED COMPOSITE PANELS USING EMBEDDED FIBRE OPTICAL AND STRAIN GAUGE SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (SHM) system based on Fibre Optic Bragg Grating (FOBG) sensors and standard resistance strain gauges for CFRP fuselage stiffened panels based on fibre optic Bragg grating sensors for the Green Regional. Among these approaches, methods based on optical [1]-[6] sensors are among the most rapidly developing

  7. Comparison of fingerprint quality measures using an optical and a capacitive sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    Comparison of fingerprint quality measures using an optical and a capacitive sensor Fernando Alonso of Cagliari images are expected to be different for optical and capacitive sensors. For example, the effect measure computation. In our opinion, some measures could be suitable for the optical sensor

  8. Planar Integrated Free Space Optic Plasmonic Sensor Christopher A. Jones, Stefan F. Helfert and Jurgen Jahns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Planar Integrated Free Space Optic Plasmonic Sensor Christopher A. Jones, Stefan F. Helfert and J sensor. This sensor could be easily connected to a conventional optical system. The orthogonal interfaces complex operations on the transmitted information. One simple way of achieving this on optical signals

  9. Optical efficiency of image sensor pixels Peter B. Catrysse and Brian A. Wandell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wandell, Brian A.

    Optical efficiency of image sensor pixels Peter B. Catrysse and Brian A. Wandell Department sensor pixel by using a geometrical-optics phase-space approach. We compare the theoretical predictions, we show how to use these optical efficiency calculations to trade off image sensor pixel sensitivity

  10. Fig. 1. Teleoperated slave robot. Optical Torque Sensors for Local Impedance Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    Fig. 1. Teleoperated slave robot. Optical Torque Sensors for Local Impedance Control Realization_teterukov@ipc.i.u-tokyo.ac.jp We recently developed an optical torque sensor to replace expensive strain-gauge-based sensor on the anthropomorphic robot arm and realize local impedance control in individual joints. Keywords: Optical torque

  11. 6189-47, Session 10 Optical spatial filtering velocimetry sensor for real-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6189-47, Session 10 Optical spatial filtering velocimetry sensor for real-time in-plane vibration-contact, low-cost optical sensor for real time detection and active vibration control of mechanical devices sensitivity to any translational vibration. The calibration of the sensor is independent of the optical

  12. Fibre optic sensor for continuous health monitoring in CFRP composite materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fibre optic sensor for continuous health monitoring in CFRP composite materials Laurent Rippert on this material. In this research study, fibre optic sensors will be proven to offer an alternative for the robust a quite simple microbend optical sensor contains information on the elastic energy released whenever

  13. Low-speed optic-flow sensor onboard an unmanned helicopter flying outside over fields*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Low-speed optic-flow sensor onboard an unmanned helicopter flying outside over fields* Guillaume.Fabiani}@onera.fr weight or were not very well characterized, except for the optical mouse sensors [21], with which] in that of 2-D optic flow sensors). It therefore seemed to be worth testing the reliability of the present 1-D

  14. REQUIREMENTS TO ESTABLISH FIBRE-OPTIC SENSORS FOR MONITORING OF STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    REQUIREMENTS TO ESTABLISH FIBRE-OPTIC SENSORS FOR MONITORING OF STRUCTURES Wolfgang Habel, Vivien-12205 Berlin wolfgang.habel@bam.de ABSTRACT Fibre-optic sensors need to be more established examples where fibre-optic sensors provide outstanding knowledge about the structure's behaviour

  15. Accurate Insertion Strategies Using Simple Optical Sensors Eric Paulos John Canny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    Accurate Insertion Strategies Using Simple Optical Sensors Eric Paulos John Canny paulos-calibrating peg-in-hole in- sertion strategy using several very simple, inexpensive, and accurate optical sensors describe a method for performing accurate in- sertion operations using simple optical sensors. A key

  16. Embedded calibration system for the DIII-D Langmuir probe analog fiber optic links

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, J. G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California (United States); Rajpal, R.; Mandaliya, H. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Watkins, M.; Boivin, R. L. [General Atomics, San Diego, California (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a generally applicable technique for simultaneously measuring offset and gain of 64 analog fiber optic data links used for the DIII-D fixed Langmuir probes by embedding a reference voltage waveform in the optical transmitted signal before every tokamak shot. The calibrated data channels allow calibration of the power supply control fiber optic links as well. The array of fiber optic links and the embedded calibration system described here makes possible the use of superior modern data acquisition electronics in the control room.

  17. Vision based navigation using novel optical sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wazni, Karim Patrick

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical position measurement system based on Position Sensing Diode technology is tested in its planar version. The system features active target intensity control and signal light modulation. Preliminary calibration procedures are researched...

  18. Vision based navigation using novel optical sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wazni, Karim Patrick

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical position measurement system based on Position Sensing Diode technology is tested in its planar version. The system features active target intensity control and signal light modulation. Preliminary calibration procedures are researched...

  19. A Fiber-Optic-Based 1550-nm Laser Radar Altimeter with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen, Sivaprasad Gogineni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    A Fiber-Optic-Based 1550-nm Laser Radar Altimeter with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen-the-shelf fiber-optic components and traditional RF and digital signal processing techniques to achieve fine erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) could be used to provide optical gain. The transmitted signal

  20. Enhanced fatigue and aging resistance using reactive powders in the optical fiber buffer coating V. V. Rondinella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Enhanced fatigue and aging resistance using reactive powders in the optical fiber buffer coating V. V. Rondinella M. J. Matthewson P. R. Foy Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Department of small quantities of colloidal silica to the UV- curable polymer coating of fused silica optical fiber

  1. Effect of Loading Mode and Coating on Dynamic Fatigue of Optical Fiber in Two-Point Bending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Effect of Loading Mode and Coating on Dynamic Fatigue of Optical Fiber in Two-Point Bending Vincenzo V Rondinella*and M. John Matthewson* Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Department of Ceramic is a useful method for investigating the mechanical properties of optical fiber and has several advantages

  2. 988 JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 19, NO. 7, JULY 2001 Diffusion of Moisture Through Optical Fiber Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Optical Fiber Coatings Janet L. (Armstrong) Mrotek, Member, OSA, M. John Matthewson, and Charles R. Kurkjian Abstract--The strength of polymer-coated fused silica optical fiber is dependent on the ambient. INTRODUCTION THE STRENGTH of fused silica optical fiber depends on the activity of water at its surface due

  3. The University of Texas at Austin September 30, 2011 Communications Optical Fiber Backbone Cabling 27 13 23-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Clint N.

    The University of Texas at Austin September 30, 2011 Communications Optical Fiber Backbone Cabling 27 13 23-1 SECTION 27 13 23 COMMUNICATIONS OPTICAL FIBER BACKBONE CABLING PART 1 - GENERAL 1.1 SUMMARY A. This section shall govern the products and installation of optical fiber (single

  4. Development of a 1319 nm Laser Radar using Fiber-Optics and RF Pulse Compression: Receiver Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Development of a 1319 nm Laser Radar using Fiber-Optics and RF Pulse Compression: Receiver and commercially available fiber-optic technologies. We use radio frequency (RF) pulse compression and digital commensurate with the desired range accuracy. With today's off-the-shelf fiber-optic components, multi

  5. 2208 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 42, NO. 6, JUNE 1994 CoherentSubcarrier Fiber-optic Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teich, Malvin C.

    2208 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 42, NO. 6, JUNE 1994 CoherentSubcarrier Fiber-optic- A phase-noise-cancelled coherent subcarrier fiber- opticcommunicationsystem that uses integrated-optic practical to employ in fiber-optic systems than the "two- polarization" encoding scheme [lo] because

  6. Fiber-optic fluorescence imaging Benjamin A Flusberg, Eric D Cocker,Wibool Piyawattanametha, Juergen C Jung,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Fiber-optic fluorescence imaging Benjamin A Flusberg, Eric D Cocker,Wibool Piyawattanametha, Juergen C Jung, Eunice L M Cheung & Mark J Schnitzer Optical fibers guide light between separate locations and enable new types of fluorescence imaging. Fiber-optic fluorescence imaging systems include portable

  7. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  8. EXPERIMENT #3 REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY We will use the reflectance attachment and fiber optics OceanOptics spectrophotometer to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    EXPERIMENT #3 REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY We will use the reflectance attachment and fiber optics OceanOptics spectrophotometer to measure the reflectance spectrum of several paint samples in the special optically flat-bottomed cell so that the bottom is completely covered. Scan the reflectance

  9. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

  10. Fiber optic coupling of a microlens conditioned, stacked semiconductor laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, R.J.; Benett, W.J.; Mills, S.T.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The output radiation from the two-dimensional aperture of a semiconductor laser diode array is efficiently coupled into an optical fiber. The two-dimensional aperture is formed by stacking individual laser diode bars on top of another in a ``rack and stack`` configuration. Coupling into the fiber is then accomplished using individual microlenses to condition the output radiation of the laser diode bars. A lens that matches the divergence properties and wavefront characteristics of the laser light to the fiber optic is used to focus this conditioned radiation into the fiber. 3 figs.

  11. Sandia Energy - Sensors & Optical Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocumentsInstitute of AdvancedSecuritySensors &

  12. Medical devices utilizing optical fibers for simultaneous power, communications and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitch, Joseph P.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Hagans, Karla G.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter; Benett, William J.; Clough, Robert E.; DaSilva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical device is constructed in the basic form of a catheter having a distal end for insertion into and manipulation within a body and a proximal end providing for a user to control the manipulation of the distal end within the body. A fiberoptic cable is disposed within the catheter and having a distal end proximate to the distal end of the catheter and a proximal end for external coupling of laser light energy. A laser-light-to-mechanical-power converter is connected to receive light from the distal end of the fiber optic cable and may include a photo-voltaic cell and an electromechanical motor or a heat-sensitive photo-thermal material. An electronic sensor is connected to receive electrical power from said distal end of the fiberoptic cable and is connected to provide signal information about a particular physical environment and communicated externally through the fiberoptic cable to the proximal end thereof. A mechanical sensor is attached to the distal end of the fiberoptic cable and connected to provide light signal information about a particular physical environment and communicated externally through the fiberoptic cable.

  13. Loss of polarization entanglement in a fiber-optic system with polarization mode dispersion in one optical path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misha Brodsky; Elizabeth C. George; Cristian Antonelli; Mark Shtaif

    2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We characterize theoretically and experimentally the degradation of polarization entanglement in a fiber-optic entanglement distribution system where one of the optical fibers is exposed to the effects of polarization mode dispersion (PMD). We show gradual reduction of entanglement with increasing PMD and find that the highest PMD tolerance is achieved when the bandwidth of the pump used to generate the entangled photons in a $\\chi^{(3)}$ process is approximately half the bandwidth of the quantum channels.

  14. Experimental observation of disorder induced self-focusing in optical fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonetti, Marco, E-mail: marco.leonetti@roma1.infn.it [Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Viale Regina Elena, 291 00161 Roma (Italy); Karbasi, Salman [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Mafi, Arash [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Conti, Claudio [ISC-CNR and Department of Physics, University Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185, Roma (Italy)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed disorder induced focusing nonlinearity activated by a monochromatic light beam in optical fibers composed by two kinds of plastics. The two materials, arranged in disordered fashion, support modes with a degree of localization which increases with the intensity of the optical beam. The temporal response of the optical fiber demonstrates the thermal origin of this nonlinearity. Measurements of the localization length as a function of the input power with broadband and monochromatic inputs show the effectiveness of focusing action with respect to the case of homogeneous fibers.

  15. A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio [Center for Integrated Research, Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min{sup -1}, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min{sup -1}, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l{sup -1}), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l{sup -1} up to 4 l min{sup -1} and 98 mV min l{sup -1} from 4 l min{sup -1} up to 10 l min{sup -1}). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

  16. Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Essien, Marcelino (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

  17. Transmittance and near-field characterization of sub-wavelength tapered optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedja Orucevic; Valérie Lefčvre-Seguin; Jean Hare

    2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have produced high transmission sub-wavelength tapered optical fibers for the purpose of whispering gallery mode coupling in fused silica microcavities at 780 nm. A detailed analysis of the fiber transmittance evolution during tapering is demonstrated to reflect precisely the mode coupling and cutoff in the fiber. This allows to control the final size, the number of guided modes and their effective index. These results are checked by evanescent wave mapping measurements on the resulting taper.

  18. Modeling a Prototype Optical Collision Avoidance Sensor For Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornsey, Richard

    Modeling a Prototype Optical Collision Avoidance Sensor For Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Cyrus Minwalla) are essential in controlled airspace under visual flight rules (VFR). A prototype optical sensor accomplishes and evaluation of the prototype sensor are presented here, as are preliminary measurements to clarify the roles

  19. Optical Fiber and Fiber Component Mechanical Reliability and Testing, M. John Matthewson, Editor, Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 4215 (2001) 2001 SPIE 0277-786X/01/$15.00 53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical Fiber and Fiber Component Mechanical Reliability and Testing, M. John Matthewson, Editor optical fibers in bending M. John Matthewsona and Vishal Padiyarb Rutgers, The State University of New and Computer Engineering ABSTRACT Optical fiber may experience cyclic stresses at frequencies ranging from

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography Scan Circle Location and Mean Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    Optical Coherence Tomography Scan Circle Location and Mean Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Measurement) retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness mea- surements of varying the standard 3.4-mm-diameter circle of the variable circle placement effect. RNFL thickness was measured on this three-dimensional dataset by using

  1. Quantum noise in optical fibers. II. Raman jitter in soliton communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    Quantum noise in optical fibers. II. Raman jitter in soliton communications J. F. Corney Department source of jitter and other perturbations than the gain-related Gordon­Haus noise for short pulses ( 1 ps), assuming typical fiber pa- rameters. The size of the Raman timing jitter is evaluated for both bright

  2. All-optical fiber-based devices for ultrafast amplitude jitter magnification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    All-optical fiber-based devices for ultrafast amplitude jitter magnification Charles-Henri Hage-intercept PC with 0 jitter will increase [3]. We first jitter of a 10-GHz picosecond pulse train delivered by an actively mode-locked erbium doped fiber laser

  3. Scanner-Free and Wide-Field Endoscopic Imaging by Using a Single Multimode Optical Fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Youngwoon

    A single multimode fiber is considered an ideal optical element for endoscopic imaging due to the possibility of direct image transmission via multiple spatial modes. However, the wave distortion induced by the mode ...

  4. Ultra-Widely Tunable, Narrow Linewidth Picosecond Fiber-Optical Parametric Oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yue

    We demonstrate a picosecond fiber-optical parametric oscillator with an ultrawide tuning range pumped by a relatively low-cost intensity-modulated pump. The tuning range of the oscillator is from 1320 to 1520 nm and from ...

  5. Novel fabrication and enhanced photosensitivity of selenium filament arrays by optical-fiber thermal drawing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, D. S.

    We report break-up of cylindrical shell into well-ordered filament arrays by optical-fiber thermal drawing. Enhanced photosensitivity of centimeter-long crystalline-Se nano-filaments is observed and the mechanism is ...

  6. Single-Polarization Cladding-Pumped Optical Amplifier Without Polarization-Maintaining Gain Fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarnall, Timothy M.

    We demonstrate a single-polarization cladding-pumped Er : Yb optical amplifier using a dual-pass design with a Faraday rotator mirror and nonpolarization-maintaining gain fiber. Over a 25-nm range centered at 1562 nm, the ...

  7. Fiber Optic Picosecond Laser Pulse Transmission Line for Hydrogen Ion Beam Profile Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yun [ORNL; Huang, Chunning [ORNL; Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line for non-intrusive longitudinal profile measurement of the hydrogen ion (H-) beam at the front-end of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator. The 80.5 MHz, 2.5 ps, multi-killowatt optical pulses are delivered to the accelerator beam line through a large mode area polarization maintaining optical fiber to ensure a high measurement stability. The transmission efficiency, output laser beam quality, pulse jitter and pulse width broadening over a 100-ft fiber line are experimentally investigated. A successful measurement of the H- beam microbunch (~130 ps) profile is obtained. Our experiment is the first demonstration of particle beam profile diagnostics using fiber optic laser pulse transmission line.

  8. DOE, City of Richland and Benton PUD Increase Fiber Optic Telecommunic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    said Todd Eckman, vice president of Information Management for MSA. "This new fiber optics will benefit DOE, Benton PUD and NoaNet (Northwest Open Access Network) users. This,...

  9. Dynamic Precision Measurement of the Casimir Force using Short Coherence Length Fiber-Based Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chia-Cheng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photo- resist reflow, photolithography) to make our low noise spherical sensor.photo-detector). Fiber-optic interferometer Many cantilever deflection sensorsspherical sensor fabrication. SOI (e) (a) ICP (i) Photo-

  10. Fiber optic interferometry: Statistics of visibility and closure phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Tatulli; A. Chelli

    2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Interferometric observations with three telescopes or more provide two observables: closure phase information together with visibilities measurements. When using single-mode interferometers, both observables have to be redefined in the light of the coupling phenomenon betwe en the incoming wavefront and the fiber. We introduce in this paper the estimator of both so-called modal visibility and modal closure phase. Then, we compute the statistics of the two observables in presence of partial correction by Adaptive Optics. From this theoretical analysis, data reduction process using classical least square minimization is investigated. In the framework of the AMBER instrument, the three beams recombiner of the VLTI, we simulate the observation of a single Gaussian source and we study the performances of the interferometer in terms of diameter measurements. We show that the observation is optimized, i.e. that the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the diameter is maximal, when the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the source is roughly 1/2 of the mean resolution of the interferometer. We finally point out that in the case of an observation with 3 telescopes, neglecting the correlation between the measurements leads to overestimate the SNR by a factor of $\\sqrt{2}$. We infer that in any cases, this value is an upper limit.

  11. Fiber-Optic-Gyroscope Measurements Close to Rotating Liquid Helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tajmar; F. Plesescu

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We previously reported anomalous fiber-optic gyroscope signals observed above rotating rings at temperatures close to liquid helium. Our results suggested that the liquid helium itself may be the source of our observed phenomenon. We constructed a new cryostat experiment that allows rotating a large quantity of liquid helium together with a superconducting niobium tube. The facility is built in such a way that our gyroscope can be placed directly in the center of rotation along the axis; however, the cryostat is built around the gyroscope to allow measuring without interference of helium liquid or gas. An anomalous signal was found of similar value compared to our previous measurements with a changed sign. As this measurement was done at a different location (center position) with respect to our old setup (top position), first hints for a possible field distribution of this phenomenon can be made. However, due to lower angular velocities used in this new setup so far, our measurement resolution was close to three times the resolution of our gyroscope and hence our data represent work in progress.

  12. Design and Verification of an Optical System to Interrogate Dermally-implanted Microparticle Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Ruiqi

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    patient adherence to the recommended self-monitoring frequency, non-invasive/ minimally invasive glucose testing approaches are needed. Luminescent microparticle sensor is an attractive solution. For these sensors to be deployed in vivo, a matched optical...

  13. Focal-Plane Image and Beam Quality Sensors for Adaptive Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cauwenberghs, Gert

    Focal-Plane Image and Beam Quality Sensors for Adaptive Optics Marc CohenÝ, Gert Cauwenberghs]. Therefore a critical component in the stochastic control system for adaptive optics is the metric sensor Engineering 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21211 ŢArmy Research Laboratory, Intelligent Optics

  14. Miniaturized optical sensor for cursor control Michael Linde Jakobsen, Henning Larsen, Finn Pedersen, Henrik Pedersen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    20 Miniaturized optical sensor for cursor control Michael Linde Jakobsen, Henning Larsen, Finn and Jřrgen Korsgaard OPDI Technologies, Denmark A miniaturized optical displacement sensor that can information of the movement but also to optically establish a dynamic high-pass filtering, thus removing

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Fiber-optic Bragg grating sensor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capacity factor. While present systems include instrumentation to measure power output, few adequately monitor mechanical loads and structural response, which are equally...

  16. Fiber-Optic Sensor for Industrial Process Measurement and Control |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 Meeting Federal

  17. Single-mode optical fiber for high-power, low-loss UV transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yves Colombe; Daniel H. Slichter; Andrew C. Wilson; Dietrich Leibfried; David J. Wineland

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report large-mode-area solid-core photonic crystal fibers made from fused silica that resist ultraviolet (UV) solarization even at relatively high optical powers. Using a process of hydrogen loading and UV irradiation of the fibers, we demonstrate stable single-mode transmission over hundreds of hours for fiber output powers of 10 mW at 280 nm and 125 mW at 313 nm (limited only by the available laser power). Fiber attenuation ranges from 0.9 dB/m to 0.13 dB/m at these wavelengths, and is unaffected by bending for radii above 50 mm.

  18. Characterization of the Los Alamos IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser using multiple optical paths and laser focusing optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milewski, John O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bernal, John E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber laser technology has been identified as the replacement power source for the existing Los Alamos TA-55 production laser welding system. An IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser was purchased, installed at SM-66 R3, and accepted in February 2008. No characterization of the laser and no welding was performed in the Feb 2008 to May 2009 interval. T. Lienert and J. Bernal (Ref. 1, July 2009) determined the existing 200 mm Rofin collimator and focus heads used with the Rofin diode pumped lasers were inadequate for use with the IPG laser due to clipping of the IPG laser beam. Further efforts in testing of the IPG laser with Optoskand fiber delivery optics and a Rofin 120 mm collimator proved problematic due to optical fiber damage. As a result, IPG design optical fibers were purchased as replacements for subsequent testing. Within the same interval, an IPG fiber-to-fiber (F2F) connector, custom built for LANL, (J. Milewski, S. Gravener, Ref.2) was demonstrated and accepted at IPG Oxford, MA in August 2009. An IPG service person was contracted to come to LANL to assist in the installation, training, troubleshooting and characterization of the multiple beam paths and help perform laser head optics characterization. The statement of work is provided below: In summary the laser system, optical fibers, F2F connector, Precitec head, and a modified Rofin type (w/120mm Optoskand collimator) IWindowIBoot system focus head (Figure 1) were shown to perform well at powers up to 6 kW CW. Power measurements, laser spot size measurements, and other characterization data and lessons learned are contained within this report. In addition, a number of issues were identified that will require future resolution.

  19. Radiometric Correctionradiometric correction Radiometric correction is important to ensure that terrestrial variables retrieved from optical satellite sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coburn, Craig

    that terrestrial variables retrieved from optical satellite sensor systems are calibrated to a common physical interactions. Radiometric corrections of optical sensor data consider sensor radiometric calibration, surface reflectance propagated through the atmosphere to the satellite sensor. Given that the optical properties

  20. Enhanced-locality fiber-optic two-photon-fluorescence live-brain interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, I. V.; Doronina-Amitonova, L. V. [International Laser Center, Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 1430125 (Russian Federation); Kurchatov Institute National Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B. [International Laser Center, Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 1430125 (Russian Federation); Anokhin, K. V. [Kurchatov Institute National Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); P.K. Anokhin Institute of Normal Physiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kilin, S. Ya. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Sakoda, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Zheltikov, A. M. [International Laser Center, Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 1430125 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Center of Photochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Novatorov 7a, Moscow 117421 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-photon excitation is shown to substantially enhance the locality of fiber-based optical interrogation of strongly scattering biotissues. In our experiments, a high-numerical-aperture, large-core-are fiber probe is used to deliver the 200-fs output of a 100-MHz mode-locked ytterbium fiber laser to samples of live mouse brain, induce two-photon fluorescence of nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond markers in brain sample. Fiber probes with a high numerical aperture and a large core area are shown to enable locality enhancement in fiber-laser–fiber-probe two-photon brain excitation and interrogation without sacrificing the efficiency of fluorescence response collection.