Sample records for ferry-lower monumental 500-kilovolt

  1. Central Ferry-Lower Monumental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos Laboratory NastasiPASTCentral AirCentral Ferry Lower

  2. Central Ferry Lower Monumental | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower Monumental

  3. Central Ferry Lower Monumental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaff Highlight

  4. EIS-0422: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Line, Garfield, Columbia and Walla Walla Counties, Washington. Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt...

  5. Microsoft Word - 2011 March 11 ROD - Central Ferry-Lower Monumental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the No Action Alternative, allow BPA to relieve transmission constraints in southeast Washington and to fulfill requests for long-term firm transmission service that it...

  6. Microsoft Word - 2011 March 11 ROD - Central Ferry-Lower Monumental.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 21536222 ACRF9, 2010 FINALFerry-Lower

  7. The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to build a 500-kilovolt transmi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand Water |1Benefits of 3D vs. 2Dtransmis-

  8. The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to build a 500-kilovolt transmi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand Water |1Benefits of 3D vs.

  9. Proscribed scenes from a monument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadimioglu, Cagla Jane, 1968-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In producing the historic monument through attention to a neatly defined prescription of privileged concerns, architectural scholarship yields an effluvium of discarded issues proscribed by the conventions of scholarly ...

  10. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Monument Valley Site, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevalated the Monument Valley site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Monument Valley, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.1 million tons of tailings at the Monument Valley site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through IV). Cost estimates for the four options range from about $6,600,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $15,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for reprocessing the Monument Valley tailings were examined: heap leaching; Treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovery is economically unattractive.

  11. Performative monuments : public art, commemoration, and history in postwar Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widrich, Mechtild.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performative monument, as I term an emergent genre of interactive public actions, rests on a new notion of agency in public space, in which political responsibility is performed by historically aware individuals in ...

  12. Landbird Inventory for Devil's Postpile National Monument Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSante, David F.

    Landbird Inventory for Devil's Postpile National Monument Final Report Rodney B. Siegel and Robert species observed during our 2003 landbird inventory, as well as species detected by Gates and Heath (2003....................................................................................33 #12;iii List of Tables Table 1. Coordinates of landbird inventory point count stations in Devil

  13. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BPA to build the Central Ferry-Lower Monumental line. Now, a recent agreement between Puget Sound Energy and Portland General Electric gives BPA the confidence to move forward....

  14. Monument Beach, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana:Strategy | OpenMonument

  15. IAPRS, Vol. XXXIII, Amsterdam, 2000 MODELLING HISTORIC SITES AND MONUMENTS IN 3D HERITAGE INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    IAPRS, Vol. XXXIII, Amsterdam, 2000 MODELLING HISTORIC SITES AND MONUMENTS IN 3D HERITAGE.u-strasbg.fr TC V-8 Site recording and modelling TC V-10 World Cultural heritage and information ABSTRACT The modelling of 3D objects in surveying and particularly of historic monuments is generally

  16. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Cane Valley is a former uranium mill that has undergone surface remediation in the form of tailings and contaminated materials removal. Contaminated materials from the Monument Valley (Arizona) UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat (Utah) UMTRA Project site for consolidation with the Mexican Hat tailings. Tailings removal was completed in February 1994. Three geologic units at the site contain water: the unconsolidated eolian and alluvial deposits (alluvial aquifer), the Shinarump Conglomerate (Shinarump Member), and the De Chelly Sandstone. Water quality analyses indicate the contaminant plume has migrated north of the site and is mainly in the alluvial aquifer. An upward hydraulic gradient in the De Chelly Sandstone provides some protection to that aquifer. This water sampling and analysis plan recommends sampling domestic wells, monitor wells, and surface water in April and September 1994. The purpose of sampling is to continue periodic monitoring for the surface program, evaluate changes to water quality for site characterization, and provide data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples taken in April will be representative of high ground water levels and samples taken in September will be representative of low ground water levels. Filtered and nonfiltered samples will be analyzed for plume indicator parameters and baseline risk assessment parameters.

  17. 100-kWp photovoltaic power system at Natural Bridges National Monument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solman, F.J.; Helfrich, J.H.; Lyon, E.F.; Benoit, A.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Bridges National Monument in southeastern Utah is the location of the world's largest solar photovoltaic power system. This system, which operates in a stand-alone mode without utility backup, supplies from 300 to 400 kWh/day of 60-Hz AC electrical energy to the diversified loads in the monument headquarters area. A diesel-powered generator serves as backup for the system. The solutions to a number of problems encountered in the design, fabrication, testing and early operation of the system are discussed.

  18. Construction of history : Mohammad-Reza Shah revivalism, nationalism, and monumental architecture of Tehran, 1951-1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Der-Grigorian, Talin, 1972-

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Master's thesis focuses on modem Iranian national/revival architecture under the Pahlavi royal dynasty, in particular the reigning period of Mohammad-Reza Shah. I analyze and interpret three specific monuments: the ...

  19. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action(UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1996). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will be evaluated in the site-specific environmental assessment to determine potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholders a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

  20. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1995). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will assess potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholder a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information available for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

  1. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites.

  2. Mercedes Volait Surveying monuments in Egypt: the work of Emile Prisse d'Avennes (1807-1879)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mercedes Volait Surveying monuments in Egypt: the work of Emile Prisse d'Avennes (1807-1879) Lecture at the General Consulate of Egypt in Djeddah, 30 November 2013 The antiquarian work of the French orientalist Emile Prisse d'Avennes in Egypt can be, and has been, analysed through his notorious illustrated

  3. MONUMENT VALLEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 -PROJECTS

  4. MONUMENT VALLEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 -PROJECTS1998

  5. MONUMENT VALLEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 -PROJECTS19988

  6. MONUMENT VALLEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 -PROJECTS199889

  7. MONUMENT VALLEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1 -PROJECTS1998890

  8. MONUMENT VALLEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 1

  9. MONUMENT VALLEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 11 DATA PACKAGE

  10. Monument Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010Monthly

  11. BREN Tower: A Monument to the Material Culture of Radiation Dosimetry Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Edwards

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    With a height of more than 1,500 feet, the BREN (Bare Reactor Experiment, Nevada) Tower dominates the surrounding desert landscape of the Nevada Test Site. Associated with the nuclear research and atmospheric testing programs carried out during the 1950s and 1960s, the tower was a vital component in a series of experiments aimed at characterizing radiation fields from nuclear detonations. Research programs conducted at the tower provided the data for the baseline dosimetry studies crucial to determining the radiation dose rates received by the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Today, BREN Tower stands as a monument to early dosimetry research and one of the legacies of the Cold War.

  12. Ethanol Addition for Enhancing Denitrification at the Uranium Mill Tailing Site in Monument Valley, AZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borden, A. K.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; McMillan, Andrew; Akyol, N. H.; Berkompas, J.; Miao, Z.; Jordan, F.; Tick, Geoff; Waugh, W. J.; Glenn, E. P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium mining and processing near Monument Valley, Arizona resulted in the formation of a large nitrate plume in a shallow alluvial aquifer. The results of prior field characterization studies indicate that the nitrate plume is undergoing a slow rate of attenuation via denitrification, and the results of bench-scale studies suggest that denitrification rates can potentially be increased by an order of magnitude with the addition of ethanol as a carbon substrate. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential of ethanol amendment for enhancing the natural denitrification occurring in the alluvial aquifer. Pilot tests were conducted using the single well, push-pull method and a natural-gradient test. The results showed that the concentration of nitrate decreased, while the concentration of nitrous oxide (a product of denitrification) increased. In addition, changes in aqueous concentrations of sulfate, iron, and manganese indicate the ethanol amendment effected a change in prevailing redox conditions. The results of compound-specific stable isotope analysis for nitrogen indicated that the nitrate concentration reductions were biologically mediated. Continued monitoring after completion of the pilot tests has shown that nitrate concentrations in the injection zone have remained at levels three orders of magnitude lower than the initial values, indicating that the impacts of the pilot tests have been sustained for several months.

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

  14. Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site—10281

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Miller, D.E. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Morris, S.A. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Sheader, L.R. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Glenn, E.P. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Moore, D. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Carroll, K.C. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Benally, L. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ; Roanhorse, M. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, CO; none,

    2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Navajo Nation, and the University of Arizona are exploring natural and enhanced attenuation remedies for groundwater contamination at a former uranium-ore processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. DOE removed radioactive tailings from the Monument Valley site in 1994. Nitrate and ammonium, waste products of the milling process, remain in an alluvial groundwater plume spreading from the soil source where tailings were removed. Planting and irrigating two native shrubs, fourwing saltbush and black greasewood, markedly reduced both nitrate and ammonium in the source area over an 8-year period. Total nitrogen dropped from 350 mg/kg in 2000 to less than 200 mg/kg in 2008. Most of the reduction is attributable to irrigation-enhanced microbial denitrification rather than plant uptake. However, soil moisture and percolation flux monitoring show that the plantings control the soil water balance in the source area, preventing additional leaching of nitrogen compounds. Enhanced denitrification and phytoremediation also look promising for plume remediation. Microcosm experiments, nitrogen isotopic fractionation analysis, and solute transport modeling results suggest that (1) up to 70 percent of nitrate in the plume has been lost through natural denitrification since the mill was closed in 1968, and (2) injection of ethanol may accelerate microbial denitrification in plume hot spots. A field-scale ethanol injection pilot study is underway. Landscape-scale remote sensing methods developed for the project suggest that transpiration from restored native phreatophyte populations rooted in the aquifer could limit further expansion of the plume. An evaluation of landfarm phytoremediation, the irrigation of native shrub plantings with high nitrate water pumped from the alluvial aquifer, is also underway.

  15. Elemental and Technological Analyses of Basalt Adze Manufacture on Tutuila, Amerika Samoa: Economic Intensification and Specialization During the Monument Building Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Phillip R

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ELEMENTAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL ANALYSES OF BASALT ADZE MANUFACTURE ON TUTUILA, AMERIKA SAMOA: ECONOMIC INTENSIFICATION AND SPECIALIZATION DURING THE MONUMENT BUILDING PERIOD A Dissertation by PHILLIP RAY JOHNSON II Submitted... to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Chair of Committee, Suzanne Eckert Committee Members, William D. James Michael R. Waters Ted...

  16. The effects of proposed water development by AWDI on Great Sand Dunes National Monument and the San Luis Valley in southern Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raines, Richard Thomas

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF PROPOSED WATER DEVELOPMENT BY AWDI ON GREAT SAND DUNES NATIONAL MONUMENT AND THE SAN LUIS VALLEY IN SOUTHERN COLORADO A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by RICHARD THOMAS RAINES Submitted to thc College of Agriculture of Texas Agr... LUIS VALLEY IN SOUTHERN COLORADO A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by RICHARD THOMAS RAINES Approved as to style and content by: r Dr. Robert C. Ma mmittec Chairman Dr. Robert W. Kni@~mmittcc Member Dr. a igh olfe, Corbmittcc Member I'Dc t August, 1992...

  17. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

  18. MONUMENT VALLEY, ARIZONA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ IApril 11 DATA

  19. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a revision of the original Mexiacan Hat Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. This RAP has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3. 0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 presents the water resources protection strategy. Section 6.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring health and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on- site workers. Section 7.0 lists the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 8.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan.

  20. CX-005419: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to swap three 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines in Clackamas County, Oregon. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005419.pdf...

  1. EIS-0325: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA proposes to construct a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in central Washington. This project would increase transmission system capacity north of Hanford.

  2. EIS-0325: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0325 (January 2003)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA proposes to construct a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in central Washington. This project would increase transmission system capacity north of Hanford.

  3. EIS-0285-SA-62: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Rocky Reach - Maple Valley No. 1 Transmission Line Right of Way from structure 982 to structure 1101. The transmission line is a 500 kilovolt line (April 2002). Supplement...

  4. Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Reach National Monument consists of several units, one of which is the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) Unit. This unit is approximately 311 km2 of shrub-steppe habitat located to the south and west of Highway 240. To fulfill internal U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Historical soil monitoring conducted on ALE indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the Authorized Limits. However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the ALE Unit were below the Authorized Limits. This report contains the results of 50 additional soil samples. The 50 soil samples collected from the ALE Unit all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the Authorized Limits. The average concentrations for all detectable radionuclides were less than the estimated Hanford Site background. Furthermore, the maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the Authorized Limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.14 mrem assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem per year dose limit for a member of the public. Spatial analysis of the results indicated no observable statistically significant differences between radionuclide concentrations across the ALE Unit. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the ResRad Biota code, indicated that the concentrations of radionuclides in ALE Unit soil pose no significant health risk to biota.

  5. Monument Valley Phytoremediation Pilot Study:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3 Through AprilSiteS1.8

  6. CX-003611: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion Determination Schultz - Raver Number 3 and 4 500-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Lines Spacer Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08252010 Location(s): King...

  7. EIS-0421: Big Eddy-Knight Transmission Line

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA is proposing to build a new 500 kilovolt (kV) transmission line in Wasco County, Oregon and Klickitat County, Washington and a new substation in Klickitat County. The new BPA transmission line...

  8. EIS-0332: McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, OR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to construct, operate, and maintain a 79-mile-long 500-kilovolt transmission line in Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, and Umatilla and Sherman counties, Oregon.

  9. CX-004258: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Spacer Dampers Along the Ostrander-McLaughlin Number 1 500-Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 09/29/2010Location(s): Clackamas County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-005131: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Spacer-Damper Replacements on the Captain Jack-Malin 500-kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 01/24/2011Location(s): Klamath County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-004256: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Spacer Dampers Along the Dworshak PH-Dworshak Number 1 500-Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 10/05/2010Location(s): Clearwater County, IdahoOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-001944: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Spacer Dampers Along the Grizzly - Captain Jack No. 1 500 Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/21/2010Location(s): Crook County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-004257: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Spacer Dampers Along the Slatt-John Day Number 1 500-Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 10/04/2010Location(s): Sherman County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. EIS-0231: Navajo Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to by Dine Power Authority, a Navajo Nation enterprise, to construct, operate, and maintain a 500 kilovolt (kV) transmission line planned...

  15. Olmec monuments as agents of social memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mollenhauer, Jillian Louise

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8$,$"14. -&0,",$'>$a"" G8-)$".8$". $'%"W%&0;%$0.X"81,")&0+"2$"_'$=4)1,,-4"1'. :&'A,5" G8-)$"10"$B1%-01. -&0"&/".8$,$":&'7"ISSSd"! [! =! [TV"ISS\\ 2M5"G8-)$"? '$,"i19&. $,"1),&" ;,$"

  16. Case Study- Statue of Liberty National Monument

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This energy savings performance contract (ESPC) focuses on improvements to the infrastructure, with the addition of energy-efficient lighting, variable-speed drives, and installation of energy management control systems. The contractor, CES/Way, is investing $1 million, and the utility, Public Service Electric & Gas Company, will provide a rebate of $1.3 million. The potential energy savings resulting from this project are about 4 Billion Btu per year, about 75 percent of which will come from Ellis Island.

  17. Monument, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana:Strategy |

  18. Monument, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,Monterey County,Monticello, Indiana:Strategy |Pennsylvania:

  19. EIS-0060: Bonneville Power Administration Proposed FY 1981 Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration developed this statement to evaluate environmental impacts of the proposed fiscal year 1981 construction and maintenance program to construct system additions and modifications including 303–326 miles of new 500 kilovolt transmission lines, approximately 131 miles of upgraded existing lines, 6 new substations, and facility additions at 7–8 existing substations.

  20. EIS-0077-S: Bonneville Power Administration Crow Butte Slough Crossing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration developed this SEIS to evaluate potential impacts resulting from construction of a 4,700 -foot segment of the Ashe-Slatt transmission line at Crow Butte Slough, overhead on towers on the existing right-of-way. This SEIS is a supplement to DOE/EIS-0077, Ashe-Slatt (Pebble Springs) 500-kilovolt Transmission Line.

  1. EIS-0443: Project Financing for Southwest Intertie Project- South, Clark, Lincoln, Nye, and White Pine Counties, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration, is considering whether to provide partial financing of the southern portion of the Southwest lntertie Project (SWIP-South) which consists of approximately 235 miles of 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line.

  2. EIS-0296: South Oregon Coast Reinforcement Project, Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration proposes to build a 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and new substation to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of the state of Oregon. Nucor Steel, a division of Nucor Corporation, may build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon, area.

  3. EIS-0296: South Oregon Coast Reinforcement Project, Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's proposed action to build a 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and new substation to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of the state of Oregon. Nucor Steel, a division of Nucor Corporation, may build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon, area.

  4. EIS-0436: I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Project; Multnomah County, Oregon, and Cowlitz and Clark Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS that will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a BPA proposal to build a 500-kilovolt (kV) lattice-steel-tower transmission line that would run from a new 500-kV substation near Castle Rock, Washington, to a new 500-kV substation near Troutdale, Oregon.

  5. C A L I F O R N I A E N E R G Y C O M M I S S I O N B L U E P R I N T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to conservation. Conservation! Conservation! Conservation! ... Conservation is something that we can do right now transmission line.The upgrade adds a new 500 kilovolt power line to the transmission corridor that links and I meant it in more ways than just one." You can listen to the full speech at: http

  6. CX-001185: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Spacer Dampers Along the Wautoma-Rock Creek Number 1 500 Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/03/2010Location(s): Benton County, Yakima County, Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-009197: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 Spacer and Insulator Replacement Program; Hatwai-Dworshak No. 1 500-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line Spacer Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/24/2012 Location(s): Idaho, Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-004255: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Spacer Dampers Along the Chief Joseph PH-Chief Joseph Number 6 500-Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 10/05/2010Location(s): Douglas County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. EIS-0118: Proposed Eugene-Medford 500-kV Transmission Line

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Interior developed this statement to assess the environmental impact of a proposed 500-kilovolt transmission line linking Eugene and Medford, Oregon, that would cross through public lands. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) would provide service to the proposed line and is a cooperating agency in the statement. BPA adopted the EIS on 7/10/1985.

  10. EIS-0032: 500 kV International Transmission Line NSP-TR-1, Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada, Northern States Power Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Regulatory Administration developed this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of a 500-kilovolt transmission line proposed by the Northern States Power Company to provide a transmission facility for the exchange of electrical energy between Canada and the United States.

  11. CENAS DE VERANO con MARTIN BERASATEGUI TERRAZA MONUMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    minerales y Cafés Precio por persona: 45 (48.60 iva incluido) 8% IVA no incluido #12;CENAS DE VERANO con blanco, D.O.C. Rioja Mas Alquimia de Torres, D.O. Penedès Aguas minerales y Cafés Precio por persona: 54 blanco, D.O.C. Rioja Mas Alquimia de Torres, D.O. Penedès Aguas minerales y Cafés Precio por persona: 62

  12. Monumental effort: How a dedicated team completed a massive beam...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the plasma while the second beam box performs double-duty. Its beams will raise the temperature of the plasma and will help to maintain a current in the plasma to demonstrate...

  13. Calibration under uncertainty for finite element models of masonry monuments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atamturktur, Sezer,; Hemez, Francois,; Unal, Cetin

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical unreinforced masonry buildings often include features such as load bearing unreinforced masonry vaults and their supporting framework of piers, fill, buttresses, and walls. The masonry vaults of such buildings are among the most vulnerable structural components and certainly among the most challenging to analyze. The versatility of finite element (FE) analyses in incorporating various constitutive laws, as well as practically all geometric configurations, has resulted in the widespread use of the FE method for the analysis of complex unreinforced masonry structures over the last three decades. However, an FE model is only as accurate as its input parameters, and there are two fundamental challenges while defining FE model input parameters: (1) material properties and (2) support conditions. The difficulties in defining these two aspects of the FE model arise from the lack of knowledge in the common engineering understanding of masonry behavior. As a result, engineers are unable to define these FE model input parameters with certainty, and, inevitably, uncertainties are introduced to the FE model.

  14. Case Study - Statue of Liberty National Monument | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    focuses on improvements to the infrastructure, with the addition of energy-efficient lighting, variable-speed drives, and installation of energy management control systems. The...

  15. ancient monuments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle" 120 BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: @globalecology.stanford.edu...

  16. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MONUMENTS BY THE CONTACT DYNAMICS METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    relation for unilateral conditions and Coulomb law as a dry friction law are adopted together constraints problems. It may be complicated so as to take into account dry friction. Remeshing is a costly constraints and large friction. The method is applied to monu- ments made of blocks. The relevance

  17. National Park Service Statue of Liberty National Monument | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEW HAMPSHIRE BUILDSEnergy 1Department ofNationalEnergy Park

  18. International Symposium on the Conservation of Monuments in the Mediterranean Basin MULTI-SCALE CHARACTERISATION OF MONUMENT LIMESTONES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and to model deterioration process. In this paper, two sedimentary limestones are chosen. The first one, called, it is necessary to note the great diversity of the tuffeau family (important variability of minerals proportion and porosity [1]). So, studied tuffeau is tuffeau of Saumur, extracted from an underground quarry

  19. EIS-0091: Garrison-Spokane 500-kV Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of constructing between 254 and 271 miles of 500-kilovolt transmission line across western Montana and northern Idaho to the Spokane area in order to reinforce a section of the BPA electric power grid and to permit reliable integration of 1,240 megawatts of power produced by Colstrip Units 3 and 4, for use in Montana and throughout the Northwest.

  20. Gods Who Hear Prayers: Popular Piety or Kingship in Three Theban monuments of New Kingdom Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ausec, Cindy Lee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    God who hears prayers? (Htp-di-nswt RSpw ntr aA sDm nHwt).inscribed statues include the Htp-di-nswt formula in theirroyal offerings, ir.t di nswt Htp to Amun-Re. 112 Thus the

  1. SHIFTING PERCEPTIONS OF SACRED SPACES: CEREMONIAL REUSE OF MAYA ARCHITECTURE AND MONUMENTS AT SAN BARTOLO, GUATEMALA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Jessica H.

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    is anthropology or it is nothing” (Phillips 1955; Willey and Philips 1958). Lewis Binford (1962) later took up the cause in his seminal article, “Archaeology as Anthropology.” However, Binford was ultimately not concerned with ideology and meaning. He...

  2. ORNL and DOE team stay ahead of the computing curve in monumental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and one private-sector company on this long-term project, known as Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy, or ACME. Many of the ORNL team members are also Climate Change...

  3. Hydroacoustic Assessment of Downstream Migrating Salmonids at Lower Monumental Dam in Spring, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Ward R. (BioSonics, Inc., Seattle, WA)

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the effectiveness of the spillway in passing migrants, with the spillway operating per the criteria identified in the COE's 1985 Juvenile Fish Passage Plan. Specific study objectives were to estimate: (1) the effectiveness of the spillway for Passing migrants; (2) die1 variability in passage rates of migrants through the powerhouse and the spillway; (3) the daily and cumulative run timing of migrant passage; (4) the proportions of migrants that passed through each turbine intake and spill bay (i.e., the horizontal distributions across the powerhouse and the spillway); and (5) the vertical distributions of migrants approaching the powerhouse and spillway.

  4. Between document and monument : architectural artifact in an age of specialized institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savas, Aysen

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is a critical analysis of the transformations in the definition of a modem architectural artifact and the artifact's changing status in an institutional context. This work develops on a series of themes ...

  5. A macrofossil analysis of materials recovered from Hovenweep National Monument, Cajon Mesa, Colorado and Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Donna Ruth

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    baceous speci s i 1 ding ~0 ~ zo is sp. , ~sti a ccmata, Salsola sp. , E odium cic ta i m, ul bilis li ea i . ph elis c~o u ata and ~S ha al e sp. Shadscale ls adapt d t e i o ditio s b th mo pho- 1 ogically and physiologically. Sarcobatus vermiculatus... Mirabilis Oryzopsis Ph'rsalis P I flux Pc pulus Sails SphaeralCea Sclanum Pxlus tea Mays Figure S. Percentage of Species Recovered Relative to Time 35 percentage of a given sample, adding all percentages from all samples from the mesa...

  6. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton (DOE, 1994). Further, the supplement serves to confirm the Project`s present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as the intent to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 and 60 FR 2854. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Riverton site are the Riverton Baseline Risk Assessment (BLRA) (DOE, 1995a) and the Riverton Site Observational Work Plan (SOWP) (DOE, 1995b).

  7. Integrated reservoir study of the Monument Northwest field: a waterflood performance evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nduonyi, Moses Asuquo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    methodology for a deterministic approach. The data history of the wells in the field beginning from spud date were gathered and analyzed into information necessary for building an upscaled reservoir model of the field. Means of increasing production...

  8. Integrated reservoir study of the Monument Northwest field: a waterflood performance evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nduonyi, Moses Asuquo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    methodology for a deterministic approach. The data history of the wells in the field beginning from spud date were gathered and analyzed into information necessary for building an upscaled reservoir model of the field. Means of increasing production...

  9. Gods Who Hear Prayers: Popular Piety or Kingship in Three Theban monuments of New Kingdom Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ausec, Cindy Lee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Search for God in Ancient Egypt. Translated by David Lorton.Press. ———, 2002. The Mind of Egypt. History and Meaning inIn Temples of Ancient Egypt. Edited by Byron E. Schafer.

  10. Replacing the Icon: Seventeenth-Century Tomb Monuments for Dutch Naval Heroes by Rombout Verhulst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osenbaugh, Elizabeth Ryan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rubens, The Assumption of the Virgin, 1626. Oil painting.The Assumption of the Virgin, 1647. Dome oil painting.

  11. Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural0-2002Valley, Arizona, DOE

  12. Monumental effort: How a dedicated team completed a massive beam-box

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monument Valley Mill Site - AZ 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAPMonsanto ChemicalMill

  14. EIS-0107: Mead-Phoenix +500-kV Direct Current Transmission Line

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) prepared this statement to analyze the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts arising from WAPA and regional project sponsors’ proposal to construct a 500 kilovolt (kV) alternating current (AC) transmission line with the capability to be upgraded later to 500kV direct current (DC), connecting the Westwing Substation, located north of Phoenix, Arizona, with a new McCullough II Substation, located approximately 14 miles west of Boulder City, Nevada. This statement modifies a previously prepared federal statement from which the participants' election to proceed had not occurred at the time this statement was prepared.

  15. A study of bat populations at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Bandelier National Monument, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico: FY95--97 report to Los Alamos National Laboratory and Bandelier National Monument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogan, M.A.; O`Shea, T.J.; Cryan, P.M.; Ditto, A.M.; Schaedla, W.H.; Valdez, E.W.; Castle, K.T.; Ellison, L. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1995, a three-year study was initiated to assess the current status of bat species of concern, elucidate distribution and relative abundance, and obtain information on roosting sites of bats. The authors captured and released 1532 bats of 15 species (Myotis californicus, M. ciliolabrum, M. evotis, M. thysanodes, M. volans, M. yumanensis, Lasiurus cinereus, Lasionycteris noctivagans, Pipistrellus hesperus, Eptesicus fuscus, Euderma maculatum, Corynorhinus townsendii, Antrozous pallidus, Tadarida brasiliensis, and Nyctinomops macrotis) and followed 32 bats of eight species (M. evotis, M. thysanodes, M. volans, E. fuscus, E. maculatum, C. townsendii, A. pallidus, and N. macrotis) to 51 active diurnal roosts. The most abundant species were L. noctivagans, E. fuscus, L. cinereus, M. evotis, M. volans, and M. ciliolabrum. Most of these species are typical inhabitants of ponderosa pine-mixed coniferous forests.

  16. Monumentality and its shadows : a quest for modern Greek architectural discourse in nineteenth-century Athens (1834-1862)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatsea, Irene D

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation traces the sources of modern Greek architectural discourse in the first period of the modern Greek State following Independence and under the monarchy of Bavarian King Othon I (1834-1862). Its intent is ...

  17. Christian Hottin Monuments aux morts dans l'enseignement suprieur -2006 Le flambeau du savoir et la flamme du souvenir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    tombe du soldat inconnu prenne place sous l'Arc de Triomphe, est bien celle qui émane de l'ensemble de

  18. The Monumental Villa at Palazzi di Casignana and the Roman Elite in Calabria (Italy) during the Fourth Century AD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruni, Maria Gabriella

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pl. 70. 9.24. 1) The Palace of Ephesus ( 4 th c. AD). 2) Thethose at the Palace at Ephesus (Turkey) dated to the earlySusa), and at the Palace of Ephesus in Turkey. The chapel at

  19. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Lower Pennsylvanian (Bashkirian, Morrowan) Round Valley Limestone at Split Mountain (Dinosaur National Monument) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    of Geological Sciences Brigham Young University April 2011 Copyright © 2011 Nathan Robert Davis All Rights Robert Davis Department of Geological Sciences Master of Science The Early Pennsylvanian (Bashkirian are characterized by mudstone and heterozoan wackestone-packstone microfacies (MF1-4) and comprise the lower

  20. Landmarks of the Persian Renaissance : monumental funerary architecture in Iran and Central Asia in the tenth and eleventh centuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michailidis, Melanie

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates the sudden proliferation of mausolea in Iran and Central Asia in the tenth and eleventh centuries and how their patrons, who were secular rulers of Iranian descent, drew on the pre-Islamic ...

  1. Will to war, will to art : cultural internationalism and the modernist aesthetics of monuments, 1932-1964

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allais, Lucia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines a period around World War II when the prospect of widespread destruction provoked a profound re-evaluation of Europe's landmarks, their material value, and their ethical significance. Between ...

  2. A map of human impacts to a “pristine” coral reef ecosystem, the Papah?naumoku?kea Marine National Monument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coral Reefs (2009) 28:635–650 DOI 10.1007/s00338-009-0490-impacts to a ‘‘pristine’’ coral reef ecosystem, the Papahasmall to be visible here Coral Reefs (2009) 28:635–650 1.

  3. Abstract--Joshua Tree National Monument's nursery created methods for using native desert vegetation on disturbed areas in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , these containers offer benefits for use in remote areas, such as abandoned mine sites. Joshua Tree National, used along roadsides following road im- provements, on closed dirt roads and jeep trails, abandoned mine sites, as well as for facilities landscaping, and his- toric plant restoration. Joshua Tree's work

  4. Taypi, a View from the Middle (Court) : : analysis of liminal space in provincial Tiwanaku monumental architecture (Omo M10A)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitek, Matthew J.

    Archeology in Prehispanic Bolivia. Princeton Universityand Mortuary Ritual in Bolivia and Peru. Archaeometry, 46(the Tiwanaku Valley of Bolivia. Journal of Field Archaeology

  5. Energy SmartPARKS Retrofitting Parks, Landmarks | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington Monument greatly improves the monument's lighting, and it also decreases the energy used to light the obelisk while increasing security in the area. Through the years,...

  6. Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the Windy Point Wind Energy Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to offer contract terms for interconnection of 250 megawatts (MW) of power to be generated by the proposed Windy Point Wind Energy Project (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). Windy Point Partners, LLC (WPP) propose to construct and operate the proposed Wind Project and has requested interconnection to the FCRTS. The Wind Project will be interconnected at BPA's Rock Creek Substation, which is under construction in Klickitat County, Washington. The Rock Creek Substation will provide transmission access for the Wind Project to BPA's Wautoma-John Day No.1 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. BPA's decision to offer terms to interconnect the Wind Project is consistent with BPA's Business Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (BP EIS) (DOE/EIS-0183, June 1995), and the Business Plan Record of Decision (BP ROD, August 15, 1995). This decision thus is tiered to the BP ROD.

  7. Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary covers the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the BPA Schultz-Hanford Transmission Project proposed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project involves constructing a new 500-kilovolt (kV) line in central Washington, north of Hanford. The new line would connect to an existing line at the Schultz Substation near Ellensburg and to a new or existing substation in the Hanford area (see Map 2 in EIS). The project may also involve constructing a new substation to accommodate the new transmission line. As a federal agency, BPA is required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to take into account potential environmental consequences of its proposal and take action to protect, restore, and enhance the environment during and after construction. Preparation of this EIS assists in meeting those requirements.

  8. Comparison Of Intake Gate Closure Methods At Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, And Mcnary Dams Using Risk-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, Bryan F.; Blackburn, Tyrone R.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mara, Neil L.; Phan, Hahn K.; Bardy, David M.; Hollenbeck, Robert E.

    2001-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to compare the benefits and costs of modifications proposed for intake gate closure systems at four hydroelectric stations on the Lower Snake and Upper Columbia Rivers in the Walla Walla District that are unable to meet the COE 10-minute closure rule due to the installation of fish screens. The primary benefit of the proposed modifications is to reduce the risk of damage to the station and environs when emergency intake gate closure is required. Consequently, this report presents the results and methodology of an extensive risk analysis performed to assess the reliability of powerhouse systems and the costs and timing of potential damages resulting from events requiring emergency intake gate closure. As part of this analysis, the level of protection provided by the nitrogen emergency closure system was also evaluated. The nitrogen system was the basis for the original recommendation to partially disable the intake gate systems. The risk analysis quantifies this protection level.

  9. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendices C--E. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides appendices C, D, and E this Remedial Action Plan (RAP) which is a revision of the original Mexican Hat Remedial Action Plan and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. Appendix C provide the Radiological Support Plan, Appendix D provides the Site Characterization, and Appendix E provides the Water Resources Protection Strategy.

  10. Springer Publishers has just published the monumental (12,500 pages) Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology (ed. Robert Meyers). Prof. Nickolas Themelis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste-to-Energy for District Heating Kamuk and Tobiasen To see the publication reference: http Science and Technology (ed. Robert Meyers). Prof. Nickolas Themelis is Editor of the Waste to Energy and Liquefaction Alternatives to Incineration in Japan Kunio Yoshikawa 2 Greenhouse gas emission reduction by Waste

  11. DOE/EA-1313: Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Site (03/22/05)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-1313 Rev. 0 Environmental Assessment

  12. C:\WINNT\Profiles\caseys\DESKTOP\L T R C\PICs Program\Permanent Markers\monument survey.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Siteandscience, and8 FY0 By KortnyB ThisBFMonument

  13. Central Florida Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower

  14. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower| Open Energy

  15. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - December

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower| Open

  16. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - February

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower| Open2008 |

  17. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - February

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower| Open2008

  18. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - January

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|

  19. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - January

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009 | Open

  20. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - June 2008 |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009 |

  1. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009 || Open

  2. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - May 2008 |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009 ||

  3. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - November

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009 ||2008

  4. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - October

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|2009

  5. Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - September

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|20092008 |

  6. Central Indiana Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, NewCenterville, Ohio:Ferry Lower|20092008

  7. Historicizing the landscape : recovering the aesthetics of the Alhambra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Klerk, Marianne Magdalena, 1970-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis explores the conception and evolution of the Alhambra as a monument during the 19th and 20th centuries. The contemporary monument encompasses a vast landscape complex saturated by nine hundred years of continuous ...

  8. "Something Terrible Happened Here": Memory and Battlefield Preservation in the Construction of Race, Place, and Nation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Susan Chase

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residents from Eads and Lamar, as well as Levi Rutledge, themarker, Paul Steward, a Lamar monument worker and “lifetimeSite Officially Dedicated,” Lamar Daily News (Colorado),

  9. The Columbia River System: Inside Story

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxbow Bypass Unity Wolf Creek Lower Snake Basin Federal with Power Little Goose Lower Granite Ice Harbor Lower Monumental Dworshak Federal without Power Lower Pine Lake Upper Bear...

  10. A paradigm for Kemetic architectural design : the beginnings of a Kemetic architectural design language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riley, James Preston

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kemetic [Egyptian] architecture is highly recognizable. In particular, there was a distinct monumentality to its religious architecture. As well, familiar design characteristics permeated many of them. These edifices ...

  11. 11th LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering | Free-Day Excursion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Integrated Nanotechnologies Bandelier Cave dwelling at Bandelier National Monument... - Image courtesy of J. Rhyne (former LANSCE School on Neutron Scattering Co-Director)...

  12. A Partnership of the University of California Energy Institute and the Institute of Governmental Affairs at UC Davis P R O G R A M O N W O R K A B L E E N E R G Y R E G U L A T I O N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    Engaged in California's Electric Power Restructuring As the monumental restructuring and reform Gather to Debate the Market Structure of a Reformed Electric Power Industry In November, 1994 POWER

  13. Microsoft Word - CX-Pearl-Keeler_ROW_Marking_10June2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TO : 2 Multiple perennial and intermittent waterbodies, including the Tualatin River, and wetland complexes occur throughout the Project area. All monuments and markers would be...

  14. USING OF NON-EXPENSIVE 3D SCANNING INSTRUMENTS FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE DOCUMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockman, George

    of Monuments Research (Faculty of Nuclear Physics and Physical Engineering), new methods of 3D objects documentation are tested on school level. There are two types of 3D scanners under development: the first type of Monuments Research (Faculty of Nuclear Physics and Physical Engineering), new methods of 3D objects

  15. Forteviot, Perthshire 2008: Excavations of a henge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    Forteviot, Perthshire 2008: Excavations of a henge monument and timber circle Data Structure and Interim Report by Gordon Noble and Kenneth Brophy #12;Forteviot Henge Excavations 2008 1 Summary complex: a possible late Neolithic henge monument, and an adjacent pit-defined setting. Both

  16. cultural history New perspectives on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Making cultural history New perspectives on Western heritage Edited by Anna Källén nordic academic the relation between historical representation and monumental rhetoric. The rhetoric: universalism cultural v10.indd 49 2013-08-26 15:54 #12;50 making cultural history monument as an historical

  17. McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain a 79-mile-long 500-kilovolt-transmission line in Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, and Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon. The new line would start at Bonneville's McNary Substation in Oregon and would cross the Columbia River just north of the substation into Washington. The line would then proceed west for about 70 miles along the Columbia River. At the John Day Dam, the line would again cross the Columbia River into Oregon and terminate at Bonneville's John Day Substation. The new line would parallel existing transmission lines for the entire length; mostly within existing available right-of-way. Presently, the existing transmission lines in the area are operating at capacity. These lines help move power from the east side of the Cascades to the west side, where there is a high need for electricity (cities along the I-5 corridor). Because the Northwest has only recently recovered from a shortfall in electric energy supply and a volatile wholesale power market in which prices reached record highs, there are many new proposals for facilities to generate new power. Some of these facilities are in the vicinity of the McNary-John Day project; the proposed line would help insure that existing and newly generated power could move through the system. Bonneville is also considering the No Action Alternative and several short-line routing alternatives. The short routing alternatives include three half-mile-long routes for getting from the McNary Substation to the Columbia River crossing; three two-mile-long routes where the Hanford-John Day transmission line joins the existing corridor; two 1,000-foot-long routes at corridor mile 32; and two 500-foot-long routes at corridor mile 35. This abbreviated final EIS consists of an introduction to the document, changes to the draft EIS, copies of all the comments received on the draft EIS, and Bonneville's written responses to the comments. The final EIS should be used as a companion document to the draft EIS (dated February 2002), which contains the full text of the affected environment, environmental analysis, and appendices.

  18. Programming model Network Structue Analysis of the Cost-Effectiveness of Fish Tagging Technologies and Programs Segment code Segment Name RKM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monument Dam 589 X X X SNAK 7 SNAK4 Palouse 618 X X SNAK 7 SNAK5 Little Goose Dam 635 X X X SNAK 7 SNAK6

  19. Lower Snake River Subbasin Management Plan WDFW March 2004 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lower Granite pool and the Palouse and Tucannon Rivers join near the midpoint of Lower Monumental Ecoregion. Subbasin Land Ownership Palouse Lower Snake Tucannon Asotin Walla Walla Total Federal Lands 1 68

  20. What Do Emissions Markets Deliver and to Whom? Evidence from Southern California's NOx Trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    "command and control"(CAC) approaches involving prescriptive emissions limits or pollution control. In the United States, the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) of 1990 initiated a monumental shift away from CAC

  1. Bulk metallic glasses and their composites : composition optimization, thermal stability, and microstructural tunability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalifa, Hesham Ezzat

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    titanium alloys excellent candidates for advanced aerospace,titanium alloys have been widely used in the aerospacealloy alternatives, and therefore represent a monumental step towards applying BMG composites as structural materials in advanced aerospace

  2. Incorporating the past into one's future : a framework for conservation and economic development in Guayaquil, Ecuador

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Kristin S., 1968-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conservation and revitalization efforts in Latin America have been typically centered on the preservation of individual monuments and historic buildings. This approach has recently led to the development of more integrated ...

  3. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    end of World's Fair Park in Knoxville. The memorial will include a formation of 32 granite monuments inscribed with names of more than 6,000 veterans from 35 East Tennessee...

  4. 'Rocks and storms I'll fear no more': Anglo-American maritime memorialization, 1700-1940 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, David James

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    8 Chronological distribution of memorials from the United States ....... 131 9 Monument in Cedar Grove Cemetery, New London, Connecticut, commemorating the loss of the steamer Atlantic ................................ 133 10 Memorial...

  5. Power-law distributions in events involving nuclear and radiological materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Jijun

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear and radiological events are large-impact, hard-to-predict rare events, whose associated probability is exceedingly low. They can exert monumental impacts and lead to grave environmental and economic consequences. ...

  6. American archaeology and the conceptualization of preservation : Edgar Lee Hewett and the crafting of the 1906 Antiquities Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Adam Fulton

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Edgar Lee Hewett, an amateur archaeologist and pedagogue, came to the Southwestern United States in 1891 and was immediately captured by the monumental prehistoric ruins nestled in the winding canyons of the high desert. ...

  7. Reconsidering Lapita Ancestry: Evidence of Material Change and Migration on Tutuila Island, American Samoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Daniel Ryan

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    and raw material provisioning accompany the noted cessation of pottery production ca. 1,500-1,700 B.P. Two identifiable forms of technological organization, attributed to the Ceramic Period and Monument Building Period components, are separated in time...

  8. Technology: Machine and its interpretation in architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ju Hong

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FIGURE 22. J. Gocar, House, Tycho Brahe Street, Prague (1911-12). .. . . Page . . . . . . 3 9 23. J. Gocar, Entrance Detail. . 39 24. V. Tatlin, Monument to the Third International (1919-20). .. . . . . . . . 40 25. G T. Rietveld, Schroeder House...

  9. Timurid central Asia and Mughal India : some correlations regarding urban design concepts and the typology of the Muslim house

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobti, Manu P

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis commences with the basic premise that Timurid Central Asia (which included the regions of Khorasan and Transoxania), with its monumental achievements in Urban Planning and Civic Architecture, beginning with the ...

  10. Washington, D.C. : essays on the city form of a capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kousoulas, George

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is an exploration of the city form of Washington. D.C. through four independent essays. Each essay examines a different aspect of the city: its monumentality as determined by its relationship with the nation ...

  11. Site Name : Iloca permanent station Author : Sylvain, Marianne, Max Site Code :UIU ULU UOU UCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    RS receptor is in the house. MONUMENTATION Inox 12 cm rod (Delmont type) scealed in concrete + Inox Charger : / Regulator : Steca PRS1010 (10A). Battery : Lucas (12V 75Ah). Power connection : Solar

  12. Letters to ESEX High resolution transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    ), in south-eastern Libya (Haber- land, 1975), on gibbers (Jessup, 1960) and bedrock faces in Australia (Tratebas et al., 2004), and stone monuments (Paradise, 2005) and can act as an agent of rock art stability

  13. Drifting absence :: drafting memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, Marlene Eva

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emotive power of a memorial derives from its ability to engage the viewer in active remembrance. The project considers the limitations of a monumentality which embraces a distinct division between viewer and memorial. ...

  14. Modern architecture: an analysis of the Iconic vision in film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Benjamin Michael

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    ourselves what cultural forces contribute to the iconizing of certain architectural monuments in the world's subconscious. Are these icons valid? And most importantly, is it something we, as a society, should remedy in order to prevent other acts...

  15. CX-004748: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installation of Bryan Mound and West Hackberry Wellhead Survey MonumentsCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 11/23/2010Location(s): TexasOffice(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  16. Residential fabric as a memorable city form : a study of West London and Bath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalal, Pradeep

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis explores the idea of an 'intermediate order' in city form, one that lies between texture and monument, as an attempt to explain the form of London. Unlike Paris, London does not have a grand order of boulevards, ...

  17. Newsfront 14-20 May 2007, Issue 16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghimire, Yubaraj

    monument zones and evaluating the impact of economic and development pressures on the traditional urban fabric of the Pasupatinath and Bhaktapur monument zones in September- November 2003. This expert mission clearly said that, "We must know... to release more petroleum for Nepal with the promise that Nepal Oil Corporation would speed up the process of clearing in part the 5.4 billion Rupees that it owes to the Indian Oil Corpora- tion (IOC). But the meeting also focused on the Terai problem...

  18. Microtechnology: The key to the technical challenges of the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the ages each culture and civilization has expressed its values and world view in the form of monuments derived from its most advanced and valued technologies. From pyramids to cathedrals, skyscrapers and moon rockets, our technology has enabled us to leave our mark on the landscape and in the minds of our people. In the 21st century, the compelling technology will be that of the micro-world, enabling the fabrication of structures with features smaller than the wavelengths of light. Such structures will allow use to monitor and control electrical, chemical, and optical phenomena in ways never before imagined. As in the past we will continue to create monuments, but the technological monuments of the 21st century will likely be viewed through a microscope. This report provides a discussion of microtechnology in the 21st century.

  19. A FULLY COUPLED THERMO-HYDRO MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY VARIATION ON THE STATE OF HISTORICAL STONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A FULLY COUPLED THERMO-HYDRO MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY Keywords: Thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling, modelling, inverse problem, tuffeau, monument, in situ measures initiation and growth due to the variation of climate conditions; thermo-hydro-mechanical incompatibility

  20. The Savannah River Site is a 803 km2 (310 square mile) industrial complex operated by the Department of Energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    clearing and frequent burning for agriculture were extensive. European settlement subjected streams to cattle grazing followed by timber harvest, and intensive agriculture. Effects of the latter are evidenced was a monumental task. Networks of roads and railroads, power plants, five nuclear reactors as well as production

  1. Blue Mosque Istanbul, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    · · · · / · #12;V1 Blue Mosque Istanbul, Turkey 156 Cradle Of History V1 PRSRTSTD U Greece, Israel, Cyprus and Turkey. Depart Athens for Agios Nikolaos and admire its rich beauty that island of Rhodes, with its wealth of ancient archaeological monuments. Sail to Turkey and visit the ruins

  2. LA IDEOLOGA DE LA INDEPENDENCIA DE CHILE Y EL DISCURSO DE LA REVOLUCIN FRANCESA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Nueva estalló en Francia"3 . Barros Arana continuó esta tradición en su monumental "Historia General de historia, es decir, inteligida como un crecimiento continuo y rectilíneo hacia el progreso, Barros Arana y 4 BARROS ARANA, Diego. Historia General de Chile. Santiago de Chile, 1986. Tomo VII: 73 5 RIPPI

  3. www.u-bordeaux.fr/ Vie-des-campus/Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saut, Olivier

    © © © DANS LE CADRE DES INÉDITS DE L'ÉTÉ MÉTROPOLITAIN lu 22 sept 12 h 30 13 h 30 OPÉRA L'Histoire du Soldat (en fait un monument aux morts de 1914-18), pour assister à la représentation de L'Histoire du Soldat

  4. Iron County Minersville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Lund Cedar Breaks National Monument Solar Energy Study Areas in Utah Map Prepared June 5, 2009 State Line County Boundary Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6/5/2009) Existing Designated Corridor (See Note 2 Statement to Develop and Implement Agency-Specific Programs for Solar Energy Development Moab Cedar City

  5. Imagining TR: Commemorations and Representations of Theodore Roosevelt in Twentieth-Century America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heth, Jennifer Dawn

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    as an example of rugged, vigorous masculinity as well as the embodiment of Americanism. The monuments in this dissertation represent a broad geographical area, from Portland, Oregon, on the west coast to Washington, D.C., and New York City on the east coast...

  6. The PennsylvaniaStateUniversity HUB-RobesonAddition and Renovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Install Bookstore Lights · Prime Paint in Bookstore · Bookstore Café Piping & Hot Water Heater · HangGLevel StairBuild-out forATMs #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. BookstoreCaféPiping&DomesticWater Heater #12., Inc. EastExteriorConcreteStair #12;© Gilbane Building Co., Inc. HotWaterPipingUnderMonumental Stair

  7. On March 8, 2013, International Women's Day, OVDinfo.org reported 24 arrests at the demonstration "Feminism Is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    in police vans, the portal records. Moreover, those arrested have stated that they were beaten in transit IN RUSSIA By SvETlANA REITER 4 | harriman magazine THE #12;harriman magazine | 5 Demonstrators and security victory of the United Russia Party, made their way to the Griboyedov monument. I remember that day very

  8. INFORMATION MEETINGS: HBC 340-G from 12:00-1:00 on Wednesday, 9/28 Spend Spring Break in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovalev, Leonid

    in Spain Spring break 2012 in Madrid, Toledo and Barcelona SPA 300.3 Culture and Arts of Spain (1 and monuments in Castile Tuesday, March 13: Excursion to Toledo Lecture Jewish Spain and El Greco's paintings in Toledo Group lunch in Toledo Wednesday, March 14: Contemporary Spain

  9. *Underline indicates an OSU student MICHAEL J. OLSEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    . Diagnostic Investigation to Study and Characterize the Monument's Architectural Evolution"], in Il Palazzo.J., Cheung, K.F., and Azadbakht, M. (In Press). "Tsunami modeling, fluid load simulation and validation using., Robertson, I., Olsen, M.J., & Yu, G., (2013). Tohoku tsunami-induced building failure analysis

  10. Building Strong in Korea! -1 -NOVEMbEr 2013East GatE Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    degrees in civil engineering and urban planning he went to work for the Far East District in 1977, where of this pier was one of the highlights of my career." In addition, Pak helped manage the construction of the U the construction of this monument as it is a very special place where we honor the sacrifices of those who fought

  11. CARILLON STUDIO RECITAL Sunday, October 18, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Jing

    III. Set II, No. 6 IV. Set II, No. 4 Waer dat men sich al keerd of wend Dutch Folk Song arr. Valerius the Carillon Century Tower, a monument constructed in 1953 in memory of students killed in World War I

  12. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy; Kuyumjian, Gregory

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  13. Station GPS permanente IPG Paris DGF Uchile UNAP Iquique.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    working hours telephone nearby NONO Electric power nearby NONO Autonomous energy ­ (solar panel, regulator , Colchane Chile) Author : Socquet / Carrizo Site Code : COLC Date installation : 2007 11 04 Coordinates from IPGP / DGF network MONUMENTATION Antenna located in the top of the scholar library building, basic

  14. Student Health Insurance Designed Specifically for the Students of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    , may not meet the minimum standards required by the health care reform law for the restrictions on anStudent Health Insurance Designed Specifically for the Students of The University of Rhode Island to August 31, 2014 ``Your student health insurance coverage, offered by Monumental Life Insurance Company

  15. With ORNL's help, the new visitor's center at the Grand Staircase-Escalante National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    of prioritizing, setting goals, and funding energy improvements. These achievements are based on the comprehensive and prioritizing energy-improvement decisions. ORNL has unmatched expertise in building energy performance Monument received LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold Certification from the U

  16. Visible Spirit Gianlorenzo Bernini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the significance of the monumental support he designed for his last work, the great marble bust of the Savior, now than three meters. In a footnote I expressed puzzlement as to how the weight of an over lifesize marble' arms and hands and falls in loose vertical folds to the socle below. The device should not be thought

  17. On Human Culture Let us not dream that reason can ever be popular. Passions, emo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Rex L.

    languages. John Viega and Gary McGraw in Building Secure Software, 2002 Procedural programming is a monumental waste of human energy. 1985 The only important design or engineering aid offered by the object oriented paradigm is abstract data types, and they have been in use for at least 40 years. 1999

  18. Evaluation of seismic hazard for the assessment of historical elements at risk: description of1 input and selection of intensity measures2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , fragility curves, historical26 buildings, cultural heritage assets, monuments27 1. Introduction28 291 Evaluation of seismic hazard for the assessment of historical elements at risk: description of1, Athens, Greece.8 4 : Formerly at: BRGM, Orléans, France.9 Abstract The assessment of historical elements

  19. METHODOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN 3D SCANNING AND MODELLING OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL FRENCH HERITAGE SITE : THE BRONZE AGE PAINTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    METHODOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN 3D SCANNING AND MODELLING OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL FRENCH HERITAGE SITE: Documentation of World Heritage Sites KEY WORDS: Cultural Heritage, painted cave, TLS, Photogrammetry, Close Age painted cave, registrered in the French Historical Monuments. The archaeological cave of Les Fraux

  20. Source : Philippe Poirrier, Heritage and Cultural Policy in France under the Fifth Republic, International Journal of Cultural Policy, 2003, n 9-2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    There are several ways of treating the history of "heritage". In the French historical tradition, four approaches of heritage.2 Another work uses the criterion of restoration to determine when a historical monument falls into the category of heritage. 3 Fourth, a recent ground-breaking treatise considers heritage in historical

  1. BRYANT UNIVERSITY--2013 TENTATIVE PROGRAM Sophomore International Experience Malaysia and singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    (National Monument), Dataran Merdeka (Independence Square) and Sultan Abdul Samad Historic Building, Muzium (Artisan Village) and Petaling Street (Open-air Night Market ­ bargain prices Thursday, Jan 10 (Business Checkout 10.00am Sime Darby Plantation (Rubber and Palm Oil) Visit and Briefing 3.00pm Port Dickson Beach

  2. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2002 Water Year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.A. Shaull; D. Ortiz; M.R. Alexander; R.P. Romero

    2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 34 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data from 16 stations.

  3. The Cerro Grande Fire - From Wildfire Modeling Through the Fire Aftermath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudell, T. M. (Theresa M.); Gille, R. W. (Roland W.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cerro Grande Fire developed from a prescribed burn by the National Park Service at Bandelier National Monument near Los Alamos, New Mexico. When the burn went out of control and became a wildfire, it attracted worldwide attention because it threatened the birthplace of the atomic bomb, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Was LANL prepared for a fire? What lessons have been learned?

  4. The Cerro Grande Fire - From Wildlife Modeling Through the Fire Aftermath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudell, T. M. (Theresa M.); Gille, R. W. (Roland W.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cerro Grande Fire developed from a prescribed burn by the National Park Service at Bandelier National Monument near Los Alamos, New Mexico. When the burn went out of control and became a wildfire, it attracted worldwide attention because it threatened the birthplace of the atomic bomb, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Was LANL prepared for a fire? What lessons have been learned?

  5. PMI au service du patrimoine et dveloppement touristique Michle Dupr Page 1 sur 22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PMI au service du patrimoine et développement touristique ­ Michèle Dupré Page 1 sur 22 DEUXIEMES, LES 28-29 MARS 2008 Michèle Dupré ­ LYON PMI AU SERVICE DU PATRIMOINE ET DEVELOPPEMENT TOURISTIQUE, 1994). Les PMI qui ont pour métier « la préservation des monuments et objets remarquables. » (usine

  6. www.sciencemag.org/content/343/6167/1241484/suppl/DC1 Supplementary Materials for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    Nature Reserve Category Ia are strictly protected areas set aside to protect biodiversity and also their natural condition. II National Park Category II protected areas are large natural or near natural areas or Feature Category III protected areas are set aside to protect a specific natural monument, which can

  7. Exploring a Marine Sanctuary Lab 2 GEO 465/565

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    the Channel Islands National Monument. In 1980, Congress expanded the area being protected to include the rest for the nation's system of marine protected areas, to conserve, protect, and enhance their biodiversity environment, distribution of bioregions, and the natural history of the northern Channel Islands

  8. A better understanding of a Uinta Basin channelized analog reservoir through geostatistics and reservoir simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbana, Enis

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mahogany oil-shale bed Middle marker NC Jacks Canyon A' Sunnyside Peters Point Fh Tar sand Miural Bu tes pa 'ette Bench Altamom-Bluebell Field (A. B) island Ouchesne, Monument Redwash Field (Rwl soco Horseshoe Bend ''';&&, or sir K] Marginal...

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Annual Environmental Monitoring Report calendar year 1992: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains environmental monitoring information for the following UMTRA sites for the 1992 Calendar Year: Lakeview, OR; Lowman, ID; Mexican Hat, UT; Monument Valley, AZ; Rifle, CO; Riverton, WY; Shiprock, NM; Spook, WY; Tuba City, AZ. Each site report contains a site description, compliance summary, environmental program information, environmental radiological and non-radiological program information, water resources protection, and quality assurance information.

  10. Site Name : Park Fray Jorge -PermanenAuthor : Morvan Site Code : P F R J date : year 2006 month 11 day 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    the administration house. MONUMENTATION Brass 12 cm rod (Delmont type) scealed in outcrop + brass rotating adaptor between 45' and 1 hour to go to the postguard of the park. Ask to the guard to go to the house@conaf.cl. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Operational since 18/11/2006 (day 322 of year 2006) Charger : / Battery : Cellyte 12v

  11. The Great American Schism: Divergence of Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    of Panama; email: LessiosH@post.harvard.edu Annu. Rev. Ecol. Evol. Syst. 2008. 39:63­91 The Annual Review/1201-0063$20.00 Key Words adaptation, molecular clock, molecular substitution rate, Panama, productivity Abstract led to monumental species range expansions, radiations, and extinctions in both subcontinents

  12. http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet See Report By GR1938 HISTORY - 1957 MONUMENTED CGS #12;DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl

  13. Spatial patterns of cadmium and lead deposition on and adjacent to National Park Service lands in the vicinity of Red Dog Mine, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasselbach, L; Ver Hoef, J M.; Ford, Jesse; Neitlich, P; Crecelius, Eric A.; Berryman, Shanti D.; Wolk, B; Boehle, T

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy metal escapement associated with ore trucks is known to affect the DeLong Mountain Regional Transportation System (DMTS) haul road corridor in Cape Krusenstern National Monument, northwest Alaska. Tissue concentrations in Hylocomium splendens moss (n = 226) were used to determine the extent and pattern of airborne heavy metal deposition on Monument lands. A stratified grid-based sample design was used with more intensive sampling near mining-related activities. Spatial predictions using geostatistical models were employed to produce maps of depositional patterns, and to estimate the geographic area affected above various thresholds. Spatial regression analyses indicated that heavy metal deposition decreased with the log of distance from the DMTS haul road and the DMTS port site. Analysis of subsurface soil demonstrated that observed patterns of heavy metal deposition reflected in moss tissue concentrations were not attributable to local subsurface lithology. Based on comparisons with regional background data from arctic Alaska, deposition of airborne heavy metals related to mining activities appears to affect the northern half of the Monument. The affected area extends northward (beyond Monument boundaries) through the Kisimilot/Iyikrok hills (north of the Wulik River), and possibly beyond. South of the DMTS haul road, airborne deposition appears to be constrained by the Tahinichok Mountains. Moss tissue concentrations were highest immediately adjacent to the DMTS haul road (Cd > 24 mg/kg dw; Pb > 900 mg/kg dw). The influence of the mine site was not studied.

  14. Of Routes and Roots: Essays on Place and Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernagozzi, Brigette Marie

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Scott Monument, the stately ramparts of Edinburgh Castle, and the verdant slopes of that miniature mountain, Arthur’s Seat. As the airplane lurches into the night sky with a jolt, the misty shroud of memory giving way to the precise clarity...

  15. Protein folding: Then and now Yiwen Chen 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    Review Protein folding: Then and now Yiwen Chen 1 , Feng Ding 1 , Huifen Nie 1 , Adrian W decades the protein folding field has undergone monumental changes. Originally a purely academic question, how a protein folds has now become vital in understanding diseases and our abilities to rationally

  16. UNCORRECTED 3 Protein folding: Then and now

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    UNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Review 3 Protein folding: Then and now 4 Yiwen Chen 1 , Feng Ding 1 , Huifen 8 9 Abstract 10 Over the past three decades the protein folding field has undergone monumental changes. Originally a purely academic question, how 11 a protein folds has now become vital

  17. Author's personal copy Protein folding: Then and now

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    Author's personal copy Review Protein folding: Then and now Yiwen Chen 1 , Feng Ding 1 , Huifen Nie Available online 8 June 2007 Abstract Over the past three decades the protein folding field has undergone monumental changes. Originally a purely academic question, how a protein folds has now become vital

  18. La Charte dveloppement durable des tablissements publics et entreprises publiques est l'expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanjean, Louis

    organismes s'engagent à intégrer ces principes dans leur propre stratégie, leur management et leurs relations Centre des monuments nationaux Centre hospitalier universitaire de Brest Chambre de commerce et d les systèmes de management et d'évaluation des performances. Il est régulièrement évoqué au Conseil d

  19. 42 College of Architecture COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    42 College of Architecture COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE Dean: Professor Lambla; Chair: Associate of Architecture (CoA) is to further the discourse between the theory and practice of architecture by the education, the profession, and the community. Architecture in the narrow sense includes important public monuments and

  20. Path creation in the making the case of nanotechnology DRUID 2005 Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and search rules placed within a wider analysis of the organisation of (nano) knowledge production within is brought on how environmental issues enter into the strategies and heuristics of Danish nano researchers, we have a case of early technology evolution with possible long term monumental impacts on the econon

  1. The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: Colorado Rare Plant Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Land ownership/management: BLM, private, state Conservation Action Plan #12;Astragalus osterhoutii #12 · Land ownership/management: Colorado National Monument, BLM, possibly on adjacent private #12;Aletes · Land ownership/management: BLM, Mesa Verde NP, tribal (Southern Ute and Ute Mountain Ute), and private

  2. Hi everyone, The earthquake was officially upgraded from 6.6 to 6.8 in the Richter scale. That means that it was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beimel, Amos

    is in pain - my soul is happy. "Death Valley National Monument, America's most renowned desert is host plant life fill this valley of shear beauty. The mere existence of this awe inspiring land can boggle camping trip to the Death Valley that I took this weekend. I went to this trip alone since most of my

  3. Victims or Victors? Exploring America’s Slavery Roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lelo, Linda

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    visitors make sense of these sites (consumption side). The present study uses the case of the African Burial Ground National Monument, a former cemetery for enslaved and free Africans living in colonial New Amsterdam (today New York City) and now a...

  4. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2009 water year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, David; McCullough, Betsy

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 73 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory, an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, is operated by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract W-7405-ENG-36. By acceptance of this article, the publisher recognizes that the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract W-7405-ENG-36. By acceptance performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy. Los Alamos National Laboratory strongly Peak in the Bandelier National Monument [Figure 1]. That night, strong winds blew the fire out

  6. Manuscript received for review, February 2008; accepted for publication, SIX CENTURIES OF FIRE HISTORY AT DEVILS TOWER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stambaugh, Michael C

    OF FIRE HISTORY AT DEVILS TOWER NATIONAL MONUMENT WITH COMMENTS ON REGIONWIDE TEMPERATURE INFLUENCE-0985 ABSTRACT--This study documents over six centuries of historic fire events at Devils Tower National Monu­climate relationships derived from Devils Tower, the Black Hills, and other Great Plains sites suggest that Devils Tower

  7. THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING Sailing into antiquity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    The archeological digs at Egypt's Wadi Gawasis have yielded neither mummies nor grand monuments. But Boston in a series of lost chambers at Wadi Gawasis after shoveling through cubic meters of rock rubble and wind. However prosaic they seem, the finds at Wadi Gawasis - including the ancestor of the modern package label

  8. GIS Datasets Specific to the US (These do not include VENTYX, PLATTS or HSIP data.) I. Boundary Files

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Solar Vent Preheat vii. Wind 1. 50 m Wind Power Density/Class 2. Onshore/Offshore viii. Other 1 Files a. Political i. States ii. Counties iii. Congressional Districts iv. State Legislative Regions v. Interconnects c. Federal Lands i. National Parks/Monuments ii. National Forests

  9. News from the Texas A&M Foundation Summer 2004 THE TEXAS A&M CAMPAIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Care Ctr. Open House 18 Sterling Monument Dedication OCTOBER 1 Science Dev. Council 1 Look-Engineering Dev In this issue of Spirit, 'rofessor Sam Mannan says, "Engineers must be educat- e, , , ..-,afety culture." Willie leader in process safety engineering. Photo by Allen Pearson. #12;Foundatiun Calendar 1953-2003 I THANK

  10. Echoes of the Past: The Buddhist Cave Temples of Xiangtangshan September 30, 2010 January 16, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    to reconstruct and contextualize damaged cave temples The University of Chicago's Smart Museum of Art. Once home to a magnificent array of sculptures--monumental Buddhas, elaborate attendant figures market. After years of intensive research, it is now possible to digitally envision much of the caves

  11. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of data collected during the annual post-closure site inspection conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area, surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in June 2009. The annual post-closure site inspection included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspection conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated that the site and soil cover were in good condition. Three new fractures were identified in the soil cover and were filled with bentonite chips during the inspection. The vegetation on the soil cover was adequate but showed signs of the area's ongoing drought. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations

  12. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix E. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides Appendix E of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) presented in 1988 for the stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat, Utah site. The RAP was developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. The RAP has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action.

  13. Shrink-Swell Dynamics of Vertisol Catenae under Different Land Uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinka, Takele Mitiku

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    NOMENCLATURE b Surface shrinkage ratio COLE Coefficient of Linear Extensibility h Thickness of a soil layer hfc Maximum thickness of a soil layer kPa Killo pascal mw,i Mass of water at a given water potential mt,i Total mass....2 The relationship between COLE with CaCO3 and fine clay content of soils. ........................................................................................................ 44 3.3 The soil subsidence (?Z) between a monument and rod installed...

  14. Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project. Annual report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomax, J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful water flood of the Green River Formation in the Monument Butte unit was analyzed in detail in the last yearly report. It was shown that primary recovery and the water flood in the unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close its bubble point. The reservoir performance of the smaller Travis unit was also analyzed. The Monument Butte unit is currently producing at around 300 barrels per day of oil. Two of the new wells drilled in the unit had zones pressurized by the water flood. The third well produced from pressurized as well as from zones which were unaffected by the water flood. The water flood response of the Travis unit is slow possibly due to problems of reservoir continuity. Plans for water flooding the Boundary unit were drawn. Core description and Formation Micro Imaging log of well 14a-28 provided insight about the important Lower Douglas Creek sandstone. It was determined that this sandstone was extensively fractured and detailed fracture characteristics were obtained through comprehensive interpretation of the FMI log. Reservoir modeling and simulation studies of all the three units were also continued. A larger, more detailed model of the Monument Butte unit was built in order to study the performance of the new development wells being drilled. Three alternate models developed to explain the performance of the Travis flood revealed that intersecting hydraulic fractures may have also provided paths for water channeling observed in this unit. The reservoir characterization activities identified new reservoirs in the Travis unit. Reservoir simulations helped design an injection program in Travis, unit expansion plans on the west and north sides of the Monument Butte until and to evaluate the infill drilling. The reservoir simulations are being used to examine the role of the aquifer underlying the oil bearing D2 sandstone in Boundary on water flood strategies and injection patterns.

  15. Non-destructive radiocarbon and stable isotopic analyses of archaeological materials using plasma oxidation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steelman, Karen Lynn

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Sharapova; Elena Miklashevich; Paul Bahn; Robert Mark; Fernando Carrera Ram?rez; Ramon F?bregas Valcarce; Robert Boszhardt; Kenneth Tainter; Ray Guillemette; Carolyn Merrell; Richard Hill; Larry Loendorf; Max Pavesic; Lee Sappington; David Whitely; Debra... of panel 2a showing a bow-hunting scene with depictions presumed to be deer/elk???????????? 138 45 Map of Northwest Iberia with location of the monuments studied????????????????????????.. 145 46 Dolmen de Meixueiro, a characteristic megalithic...

  16. From First Principles Design to Realization of Bimetallic Catalysts for Enhanced Selectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobo, Raul F.; Crooks, Richard M.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    “Catalysis by design” has been a dream for decades. To specify the composition and structure of matter to effect a desired catalytic transformation with desired and predicted rate and selectivity remains a monumental challenge, especially in heterogeneous catalysis. Our research thrusts have been chosen not only for their practical and scientific relevance, e.g. for more efficient and sustainable chemicals and fuels production, but also because they provide a foundation for developing and exploring broadly applicable principles and strategies for catalyst design.

  17. The utilization of genetic markers to resolve modern management issues in historic bison populations: implications for species conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halbert, Natalie Dierschke

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Niobrara NWR; 50 ? Theodore Roosevelt NP (TRS) 1983 20 ? Colorado National Monument (unknown origin) Fort Niobrara NWR (FN) Nebraska 1913 6 ? private ranch, Nebraska; 2 ? Yellowstone NP 1935 4 ? Custer State Park 1937 4 ? Custer State Park...Peak from Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge; Steve Cain and Lee Jones from Grand Teton National Park; Lindy Garner and David Wiseman from the National Bison Range; Nancy Gilbertson from Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge; Michael Oehler and Russell...

  18. EIS-0458: Proposed Loan Guarantee to Support Construction and Startup of the Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts from DOE’s proposal to issue a federal loan guarantee to Royal Bank of Scotland to provide funding to Topaz Solar Farms, LLC, to construct and start up the Topaz Solar Farm, a nominal 550-megawatt photovoltaic solar energy generating facility. The facility would be located in unincorporated eastern San Luis Obispo County, California, approximately one mile north of the community of California Valley, California, and six miles northwest of the Carrizo Plain National Monument.

  19. To Begin the World Anew: Smart Grids and the Need for a Comprehensive U.S. Energy Policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, Nikolas AF

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States is in the midst of a monumental transformation of its electric power grid. Advances in information and communication technologies and grid measurement and control devices have initiated the transition toward a more resilient, sustainable and efficient future power grid. Deployment of these technologies is being driven by policies encouraging the shift to a greener grid, incorporating clean and low carbon energy; as well as rising consumer demand for smarter ways to use existing resources.

  20. Modification to the Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Volume 1, Text, Attachments 1--6. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the modifications to the 1988 Remedial Action Plan (RAP) of the contaminated materials at the Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah. The text detailing the modifications and attachments 1 through 6 are provided with this document. The RAP was developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  1. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada For Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites, CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit, and CAS 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill, and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits (5), an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action.

  2. 3!85%b%G%k$K$h$k%P%$%h%s;1!B:4i$N2r@O$H@):nG 3D Shape Analysis of Bayon Faces to Reveal Their Historical Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    that are useful for inspecting and classifying objects. The Bayon temple, which consists of 52 towers, is one of the most well-known buildings of the Angkor monument in Cambodia. The temple is famous for its towers which/$h$j3+;O$7!$ 8=:$^$G$K4 2s$N7WB,%%C%7%g%s$r9T$C$?!%0d@WA4B %G%k2=$K2C$(!$$9$Y$F$NB:4i$r%b%G%k2=$7$F

  3. Independent choices in Margaret Atwood's novels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAvoy, Michele Wells

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    woman in her early twenties, a surveyor for Seymour Surveys, and the girlfriend of Peter. Marian faces two decisions that are based on the expectations of others. First, Mrs. Grot, a clerk from the accounting office at Seymour, wants her to sign... not seem to have a problem with other people making demands on her finances. The second decision that Marian faces is the decision to marry Peter. The decision to marry Peter is monumental compared to deciding to sign the pension papers, yet the signing...

  4. A review of "The Writings of an English Sappho" edited by Patricia Phillippy, translated by Jaime Goodrich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raber, Karen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    one of the #23; ve learned daughters of Sir Anthony Cooke in 1540; that the sisters were given a thorough clas- sical education is evidenced by Elizabeth?s numerous poems, epitaphs and inscriptions in Latin and Greek, ably translated for the volume... created a monument to her father and mother that ?makes it clear that Anthony Cooke?s intellectual legacy was car- ried on not by his sons, but by his daughters? (160), yet a#27; rms the daughters as following their mother?s pattern by representing...

  5. Using reference frames and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to produce control networks for spatial data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naismith, James Mozeney

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Accuracy is the closeness of an estimated value to a standard or accepted value. Accuracy cannot be determined solely from measured values. A standard or accepted value must be available from another source (Wolf and Brinker 1994, 24). In order to assure... Rules of Procedures and Practices. For monuments set within the corporate limits of any city, the precision is listed as 1:10, 000 + 0. 10 feet (Texas Board of Professional Land Surveying 1997). 10 Digital Orthophotos are a new source of useful...

  6. The development of the atomic bomb, Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidel, R.W.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The historical presentation begins with details of the selection of Los Alamos as the site of the Army installation. Wartime efforts of the Army Corps of Engineers, and scientists to include the leader of Los Alamos, Robert Oppenheimer are presented. The layout and construction of the facilities are discussed. The monumental design requirements of the bombs are discussed, including but not limited to the utilization of the second choice implosion method of detonation, and the production of bomb-grade nuclear explosives. The paper ends with a philosophical discussion on the use of nuclear weapons.

  7. Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish Passage Center

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

  8. Rev. of Edgar Allan Poe, by Vincent Buranelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Stuart

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    78 Midcontinent American Studies Journal T w a y n e ' s U n i t e d S t a t e s A u t h o r s S e r i e s ( T U S A S ) , (Hardback Editions) EDGAR ALLEN POE. By Vincent Buranelli. New York: Twayne Publishers. 1961. $3.50. Generally, those... wri ters with the best feeling for Poe !s biography are the worst cri t ics. Poe scholars are deeply in debt to Arthur Hobson Quinn for Edgar Allan Poe: A Critical Biography(1941), monumental, revolutionary and sane as a biography, unbelievably...

  9. A review of "The Ends of Life: Roads to Fulfilment in Early Modern England" by Keith Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Catherine

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?s work and the notion that workers could be fulfilled by their callings. Status mattered?wage-earning manual laborers may have felt less fulfilled in their work than professionals. Yet they, too, might take pride in a job well done. Regarding honor...?s teach- ing that the only true fulfillment must be found beyond the earthly sphere and the practical fact that people hoped for fulfillment here in this world. Certainly people wished to be memorialized, through elaborate funeral monuments or works...

  10. State & Federal Initiatives Energy and Waste- The Landmark Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island Energy Savings Performance Contract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leach, M. D.

    programs since the late 1970's due to the oil embargo of 1973-74. Federal energy management programs were further strengthened by the natural gas shortages of 1977-78 and heightened by the Iranian hostage crisis in 1979. These programs and/or tax... of Liberty and Ellis Island National Monument are perhaps the most visible Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC) performed in the U.S. to date simply because of the international notoriety of the facilities themselves. While the technologies...

  11. A review of "Milton's Scriptural Reasoning: Narrative and Protestant Toleration" by Philip J. Donnelly 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulryan, John

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Miltonic De Doctrina Christiana: that his own words would be glossed by the biblical text, rather than vice versa? (1). Such extravagant claims can only discourage readers from taking on the now-monumental task of making sense of Paradise Lost. In sum... reviews 9 tury and their complicity with the orientalist and racist ideologies that supported England?s emerging global empire? (80). If the feminist orientalist dichotomy between Turkish women?s ?natural? slavery and the English woman?s...

  12. Microsoft Word - 12124998 DVP.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F ENatural GasandMonument Valley,

  13. Microsoft Word - 13015067 DVP.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F ENatural GasandMonument

  14. Microsoft Word - 13035181 13035182 DVP.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F ENatural GasandMonumentShiprock, New

  15. Microsoft Word - 13055299_DVP.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F ENatural GasandMonumentShiprock,

  16. Microsoft Word - 14046116 14046117 DVP.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F ENatural GasandMonumentShiprock,4

  17. Microsoft Word - 14086414 14096469 DVP.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F ENatural GasandMonumentShiprock,44

  18. Microsoft Word - 2005 Draft Shoal Monitoring Total Rpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F ENatural GasandMonumentShiprock,4439

  19. Microsoft Word - RIN 10063122 DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:FEngineers®6528 Groundwater9 Monument

  20. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclearand Characterization of a LargerMilrow RemediationMonument Valley

  1. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclearand Characterization of a LargerMilrow RemediationMonument

  2. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclearand Characterization of a LargerMilrow RemediationMonumentNaturita

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Arizona

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona Arizona az_map Monument Valley Processing

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- California

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona Arizona az_map Monument Valley

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colorado

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona Arizona az_map Monument ValleyColorado

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Edge

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona Arizona az_map Monument ValleyColoradoSouth

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona Arizona az_map Monument

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hallam

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona Arizona az_map MonumentNebraska Hallam,

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Illinois

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona Arizona az_map MonumentNebraska

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lowman

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona Arizona az_map MonumentNebraskaIdaho Lowman,

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Massachuetts

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona Arizona az_map MonumentNebraskaIdaho

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maxey

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona Arizona az_map MonumentNebraskaIdahoKentucky

  13. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2008 – December 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. J. Payne; N. S. Carpenter; J. M. Hodges; R. G. Berg

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2008, the INL Seismic Monitoring Program evaluated 7,284 earthquakes from around the world, the western United States, and local region of the eastern Snake River Plain. 2,396 earthquakes and man-made blasts were evaluated within the local region outside and within a 161-km (or 100-mile) radius of INL. Of these events, 25 were small to moderate size earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 3.0 to 3.9. 823 earthquakes occurred within the 161-km radius of INL and over 300 events were associated with eight different earthquake swarms which were located in active regions of the Basin and Range Province that surrounds the eastern Snake River Plain. Eight microearthquakes in 2008 of magnitude (M) 2.0 and less were located within the eastern Snake River Plain, seven at or near the Craters of the Moon National Monument and one within the INL boundary. Further analyses of the anomalously deep focal depths (15 to 42 km) and different waveform characteristics of all Craters of the Moon National Monument events (1999-2008) suggest association with magmatic processes. From 1972 to 2008, INL located 36 other small-magnitude microearthquakes (M < 2.0) at depths (< 11 km) within the eastern Snake River Plain and attributes these events to regional tectonic tensional stresses.

  14. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennington, B.I.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc. (United States); [Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, M.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter core, Formation Micro Imaging (FMI) logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using high-temperature gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2,000 barrels per day.

  15. Memory Saves Lives: Inter-generational Warnings Effectiveness - 13556

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Luik, Abraham; Patterson, Russell [U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 S. National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 S. National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Shafer, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States); Klein, Thomas [URS Regulatory and Environmental Services, 4021 S. National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [URS Regulatory and Environmental Services, 4021 S. National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami was a world-class natural disaster. It has been described as the most powerful earthquake ever in Japan, and as one of the most powerful earthquakes ever noted in the world. The toll in terms of human lives lost and property destruction was unimaginable. Even the word 'horrible' is inadequate to describe the suffering and misery that resulted. Nations with nuclear power programs are engaged in, or at least planning to become engaged in, arranging to eventually dispose of their higher-level radioactive waste materials in deep geologic repositories. Geologic repositories are passive safety systems, and if undisturbed isolate these dangerous materials form the biosphere for extremely long times. The key words, however, are 'if undisturbed'. To assure that future generations do not inadvertently drill into repositories, national programs, and the international community (the Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) preservation project of the Nuclear Energy Agency, for example), are proposing to place markers and/or monuments on closed repository sites that say 'do not drill here, and this is why' in various sophisticated ways. Such markers or monuments are attempts at providing passive institutional controls. The effectiveness of messages from past generations to a present generation may give an indication of how effective such passive institutional controls may be. (authors)

  16. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Text, Appendices A--C. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Appendices A,B, and C are provided as part of this document. Appendix A presents regulatory compliance issues, Appendix B provides details of the engineering design, and Appendix C presents the radiological support plan.

  17. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA; NNSA NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This post-closure inspection and monitoring report has been prepared according to the stipulations laid out in the Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA)--Surface (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV], 2001), and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This report provides an analysis and summary of site inspections, subsidence surveys, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data for CAU 417, which is located in Hot Creek Valley, Nye County, Nevada. This report covers Calendar Year 2004. Inspections at CAU 417 are conducted quarterly to document the physical condition of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 soil covers, monuments, signs, fencing, and use restricted areas. The physical condition of fencing, monuments, and signs is noted, and any unusual conditions that could impact the integrity of the covers are reported. The objective of the soil moisture monitoring program is to monitor the stability of soil moisture conditions within the upper 1.2 meters (m) (4 feet [ft]) of the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) cover and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement exceeding the cover design performance expectations.

  18. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit and 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits 9, an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action. Quarterly post-closure inspections are performed at the CASs that were closed in place at UC-I, UC-3, and UC-4. During calendar year 2005, site inspections were performed on March 15, June 16, September 22, and December 7. The inspections conducted at the UC-1 CMP documented that the site was in good condition and continued to show integrity of the cover unit. No new cracks or fractures were observed until the December inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover showed evidence of lateral expansion; however, it is not at an actionable level. The crack will be sealed by filling with bentonite during the first quarter of 2006 and monitored during subsequent inspections. The cover vegetation was healthy and well established. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The inspections at UC-3 indicated that the sites are in excellent condition. All monuments and signs showed no displacement, damage, or removal. A small erosion gully from spring rain runoff was observed during the June inspection, but it did not grow to an actionable level during 2005. No other issues or concerns were identified. Inspections performed at UC-4 Mud Pit C cover revealed that erosion rills were formed during March and September exposing the geosynthetic clay liner. Both erosion rills were repaired within 90 days of reporting. Sparse vegetation is present on the cover. The overall condition of the monuments, fence, and gate are in good condition. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other four UC-4 locations. Subsidence surveys were conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in March and September of 2005. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. The June vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas indicated that the revegetation has been very successful. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action in order to maintain a viable vegetative cover on the site. Vegetation surveys should be conducted only as required. Precipitation during 2005 was above average, with an annual rainfall total of 21.79 centimeters (8.58 inches). Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 CMP cover is performing as designed, with evapotranspiration effectively removing water from the cover. It is recommended to continue quarterly site inspections and the collection of soil moisture data for the UC-1 CMP cove

  19. Seismic Risk Mitigation of Historical Minarets Using SMA Wire Dampers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Attar, Adel G.; Saleh, Ahmed M.; El-Habbal, Islam R. [Structural Engineering Department, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a research program sponsored by the European Commission through project WIND-CHIME (Wide Range Non-INtrusive Devices toward Conservation of HIstorical Monuments in the MEditerranean Area), in which the possibility of using advanced seismic protection technologies to preserve historical monuments in the Mediterranean area is investigated. In the current research, two outstanding Egyptian Mamluk-Style minarets, are investigated. The first is the southern minaret of Al-Sultaniya (1340 A.D, 739 Hijri Date (H.D.)), the second is the minaret of Qusun minaret (1337 A.D, 736 H.D.), both located within the city of Cairo. Based on previous studies on the minarets by the authors, a seismic retrofit technique is proposed. The technique utilizes shape memory alloy (SMA) wires as dampers for the upper, more flexible, parts of the minarets in addition to vertical pre-stressing of the lower parts found to be prone to tensile cracking under ground excitation. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is numerically evaluated via nonlinear transient dynamic analyses. The results indicate the effectiveness of the technique in mitigating the seismic hazard, demonstrated by the effective reduction in stresses and in dynamic response.

  20. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2010 – December 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Seth Carpenter; Suzette J. Payne; Jed M. Hodges; Robert G. Berg

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2010, the INL Seismic Monitoring Program evaluated 11,606 earthquakes from around the world, the western United States, and local region of the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). INL located 2,085 earthquakes and man-made blasts within the local region outside and within a 161-km (or 100-mile) radius of INL. Of these events, 53 were small-to-moderate size earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 3.0 to 4.8. 672 earthquakes occurred within the 161-km radius of INL and the majority of these earthquakes were located in active regions of the Basin and Range Province that surrounds the ESRP. There were 10 microearthquakes within the boundary of the ESRP, all of magnitude less than or equal to 2.0. Five of those were located within and near the ESRP at Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM) at mid- and lower-crust depths and are interpreted to be related to fluid movement. Since 1972, INL has recorded 48 small-magnitude, microearthquakes (M = 2.2) within the ESRP (not including COM events) and 22 deep microearthquakes (M = 2.3) in the vicinity of Craters of the Moon National Monument.

  1. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2011 - December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. J. Payne; J. M. Hodges; R. G. Berg; D. F. Bruhn

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2011, the Idaho National Laboratory Seismic Monitoring Program evaluated 21,928 independent triggers that included earthquakes from around the world, the western United States, and local region of the Snake River Plain. Seismologists located 2,063 earthquakes and man-made blasts within and near the 161-km (or 100-mile) radius of the Idaho National Laboratory. Of these events, 16 were small-to-moderate size earthquakes ranging in magnitude (M) from 3.0 to 4.4. Within the 161-km radius, the majority of 941 earthquakes (M < 4.4) occurred in the active regions of the Basin and Range Province with only six microearthquakes occurring in the Snake River Plain. In the northern and southeastern Basin and Range, eight earthquake swarms occurred and included over 325 events. Five of the Snake River Plain earthquakes were located within and near the northern and southern ends of the Great Rift volcanic rift zone. All have anomalously deep focal depths (16 to 38 km) and waveforms indicative of fluid movement at mid- and lower-crustal levels and are a continuation of activity observed at Craters of the Moon National Monument since 2007. Since 1972, the Idaho National Laboratory has recorded 55 small-magnitude microearthquakes (M = 2.2) within the eastern Snake River Plain and 25 deep microearthquakes (M = 2.3) in the vicinity of Craters of the Moon National Monument.

  2. INL Seismic Monitoring Annual Report: January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. J. Payne; N. S. Carpenter; J. M. Hodges; R. G. Berg

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2007, the INL Seismic Monitoring Program evaluated 2,515 earthquakes from around the world, the western United States, and local region of the eastern Snake River Plain. 671 earthquakes and man-made blasts occurred within the local region outside and within a 161-km (or 100-mile) radius of INL. Of these events, eleven were small to moderate size earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 3.0 to 4.8. 341 earthquakes occurred within the 161-km radius of INL and the majority of these earthquakes were located in active regions of the Basin and Range Province that surrounds the ESRP. Three earthquakes were located within the ESRP at Craters of the Moon National Monument. The earthquakes were of Mc 0.9, 1.4, and 1.8. Since 1972, INL has recorded 36 small-magnitude microearthquakes (M < 2.0) within the ESRP.

  3. Geophysical investigation of the ``Thimble,`` 100-H Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrom, K.A.

    1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the geophysical investigations conducted as part of the characterization of the buried ``Thimble`` site. The site is located just south of the 116-H-2 Crib and is in the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit. Available documentation has it located between, and at the convergence of, two railroad spurs that run north-south. A concrete monument is believed to mark the site. The burial ground is suspected of containing a vertical safety rod thimble that is reportedly 40 ft long. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) were the two techniques used in the investigation. The methods were selected because they are non-intrusive, relatively fast, economical, and have been used successfully in other similar investigations on the Hanford Site. The objective of the investigation was to locate the buried thimble.

  4. BEHAVIOR OF RADON PROGENY NEAR OUTDOOR SURFACES IN CONTRASTING TERRAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. D. Schery; P. T. Wasiolek; Y. Li

    Federal legislation expresses a long-term goal of reducing indoor radon to levels comparable to those outdoors. A thorough understanding of the behavior of radon and its progeny in the outdoor environment is therefore important We report near-surface measurements of radon, attached-to-aerosol progeny, and unattachcd-toaerosol progeny in the contrasting environments of the forested hill country of Oak Ridge, TN and the desert sands of White Sands National Monument, NM. Vertical progeny gradients are greater at White Sands due to a smoother terrain, and dose levels tend to be lower due to lower radon flux from the gypsum sand. Both sites show a significant diurnal variation of dose rate with a maximum occurring usually in the early morning. Correlation of dose rate variation with radon variation is surprisingly small suggesting the importance of other factors such as progeny deposition and aerosol concentration in controlling outdoor dose.

  5. Results of long term ground surface measurements at the Hoe Creek III site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganow, H.C.

    1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground surface subsidence was first observed over the Hoe Creek III burn cavity 21 days after gasification ceased. It manifested itself as a small circular depression or sink and was followed five days later by the formation of a second collapse structure. Concurrently, a single large elliptically shaped depression, whose major axis parallels the experimental axis, slowly formed over the burn cavity. These features appear to represent two distinctly different deformation modes. The first mode includes discrete voids that propagate rapidly upward. The second mode is represented by the elliptically shaped classical subsidence depression that forms slowly by a strata bending. Seventeen isolation type survey monuments have been used to track both the horizontal (one dimensional) and vertical motion components intermittently over a 54 month span. The resulting data set is combined with ground surface sketches and post-burn core drilling results and provides an important case study against which numerical and centrifugation model results can be compared. 5 references, 13 figures.

  6. VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

  7. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2011 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (3) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (4) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (5) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C, field notes are included in Appendix D, and photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted May 3 and 4, 2011. Maintenance was performed at CAU 424, CAU 453, and CAU 487. At CAU 424, two surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 could not be located during the inspection. The two monuments were located and marked with lava rock on July 13, 2011. At CAU 453, there was evidence of animal burrowing. Animal burrows were backfilled on July 13, 2011. At CAU 487, one use restriction warning sign was missing, and wording was faded on the remaining signs. A large animal burrow was also present. The signs were replaced, and the animal burrow was backfilled on July 12, 2011. As a best management practice, the use restriction warning signs at CAU 407 were replaced with standard Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order signs on July 13, 2011. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2011, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  8. Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

  9. Closure Report for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of the 92-Acre Area, which includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that the closure objectives were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). Closure activities began in January 2011 and were completed in January 2012. Closure activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for the 92-Acre Area and CAU 111 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2010). The following closure activities were performed: (1) Construct an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the boreholes, trenches, and pits in the 92-Acre Area; (2) Install use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; and (3) Establish vegetation on the covers. UR documentation is included as Appendix C of this report. The post-closure plan is presented in detail in Revision 1 of the CADD/CAP for the 92-Acre Area and CAU 111, and the requirements are summarized in Section 5.2 of this document. When the next request for modification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit NEV HW0101 is submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), the requirements for post-closure monitoring of the 92-Acre Area will be included. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from NDEP to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 111; and (2) The transfer of CAU 111 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO.

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the 92-Acre Area, the southeast quadrant of the Radioactive Waste Management Site, located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The 92-Acre Area includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 92-Acre Area, which includes CAU 111. The result of the DQO process was that the 92-Acre Area is sufficiently characterized to provide the input data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) without the collection of additional data. The DQOs are included as Appendix A of this document. This CADD/CAP identifies and provides the rationale for the recommended CAA for the 92-Acre Area, provides the plan for implementing the CAA, and details the post-closure plan. When approved, this CADD/CAP will supersede the existing Pit 3 (P03) Closure Plan, which was developed in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities.' This document will also serve as the Closure Plan and the Post-Closure Plan, which are required by 40 CFR 265, for the 92-Acre Area. After closure activities are complete, a request for the modification of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit that governs waste management activities at the NNSS will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to incorporate the requirements for post-closure monitoring. Four CAAs, ranging from No Further Action to Clean Closure, were evaluated for the 92-Acre Area. The CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. Based on the evaluation of the data used to develop the conceptual site model; a review of past, current, and future operations at the site; and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred CAA for the 92-Acre Area. Closure activities will include the following: (1) Constructing an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the 92-Acre Area; (2) Installing use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; (3) Establishing vegetation on the cover; (4) Implementing a UR; and (5) Implementing post-closure inspections and monitoring. The Closure in Place with Administrative Controls alternative meets all requirements for the technical components evaluated, fulfills all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site, and will minimize potential future exposure pathways to the buried waste at the site.

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the 92-Acre Area, the southeast quadrant of the Radioactive Waste Management Site, located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 92-Acre Area includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 92-Acre Area, which includes CAU 111. The result of the DQO process was that the 92-Acre Area is sufficiently characterized to provide the input data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) without the collection of additional data. The DQOs are included as Appendix A of this document. This CADD/CAP identifies and provides the rationale for the recommended CAA for the 92-Acre Area, provides the plan for implementing the CAA, and details the post-closure plan. When approved, this CADD/CAP will supersede the existing Pit 3 (P03) Closure Plan, which was developed in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities.' This document will also serve as the Closure Plan and the Post-Closure Plan, which are required by 40 CFR 265, for the 92-Acre Area. After closure activities are complete, a request for the modification of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit that governs waste management activities at the NTS will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to incorporate the requirements for post-closure monitoring. Four CAAs, ranging from No Further Action to Clean Closure, were evaluated for the 92-Acre Area. The CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. Based on the evaluation of the data used to develop the conceptual site model; a review of past, current, and future operations at the site; and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred CAA for the 92-Acre Area. Closure activities will include the following: (1) Constructing an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the 92-Acre Area; (2) Installing use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; (3) Establishing vegetation on the cover; (4) Implementing a UR; and (5) Implementing post-closure inspections and monitoring. The Closure in Place with Administrative Controls alternative meets all requirements for the technical components evaluated, fulfills all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site, and will minimize potential future exposure pathways to the buried waste at the site.

  12. Technical program plan for the transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundreds of aging nuclear materials processing facilities within the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Weapons Complex are now being shut down and deactivated. These facilities, situated throughout the United States, will require a monumental effort to clean up safely and with minimal environmental insult. Current cleanup technologies tend to be labor intensive and expensive, they produce an unacceptably large volume of waste, and they expose workers to radioactive and other hazardous substances. This document describes an emerging program designed to develop and demonstrate new technical approaches to the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) program for DOE`s nuclear materials processing facilities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), the program seeks to integrate the strengths of DOE`s technical, managerial, and systems engineering capabilities with those of industry, universities, and other government agencies. Once developed, these technologies will help to provide US industry with a competitive edge in the worldwide market that exists for improved environmental restoration and D&D services.

  13. Survey of Revegetated Areas on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve: Status and Initial Monitoring Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Link, Steven O.; Rozeboom, Latricia L.; Durham, Robin E.; Cruz, Rico O.; Mckee, Sadie A.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office removed a number of facilities and debris from the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument (HRNM). Revegetation of disturbed sites is necessary to stabilize the soil, reduce invasion of these areas by exotic weeds, and to accelerate re-establishment of native plant communities. Seven revegetation units were identified on ALE based on soils and potential native plant communities at the site. Native seed mixes and plant material were identified for each area based on the desired plant community. Revegetation of locations affected by decommissioning of buildings and debris removal was undertaken during the winter and early spring of 2010 and 2011, respectively. This report describes both the details of planting and seeding for each of the units, describes the sampling design for monitoring, and summarizes the data collected during the first year of monitoring. In general, the revegetation efforts were successful in establishing native bunchgrasses and shrubs on most of the sites within the 7 revegetation units. Invasion of the revegetation areas by exotic annual species was minimal for most sites, but was above initial criteria in 3 areas: the Hodges Well subunit of Unit 2, and Units 6 and 7.

  14. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, D.L.; Mitchell, R.G.; Bowman, G.C.; Moore, R.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To verify that exposures resulting from operations at the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities have remained very small, each site at which nuclear activities are underway operates an environmental surveillance program to monitor the air, water and any other pathway where radionuclides from operations might conceivably reach workers or members of the public. This report presents data collected in 1989 for the routine environmental surveillance program conducted by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) of DOE and the US Geological Survey (USGS) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. The environmental surveillance program for the INEL and vicinity for 1989 included the collection and analysis of samples from potential exposure pathways. Three basic groups of samples were collected. Those collected within the INEL boundaries will be referred to as onsite samples. Samples collected outside, but near, the Site boundaries will be referred to as boundary samples or part of a group of offsite samples. Samples collected from locations considerably beyond the Site boundaries will be referred to as distant samples or part of the offsite group. With the exception of Craters of the Moon National Monument, the distant locations are sufficiently remote from the Site to ensure that detectable radioactivity is primarily due to natural background sources or sources other than INEL operations. 35 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. 2011 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gnome-Coach was the site of a 3-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1961. Surface and subsurface contamination resulted from the underground nuclear testing, post-test drilling, and groundwater tracer test performed at the site. The State of New Mexico is currently proceeding with a conditional certificate of completion for the surface. As for the subsurface, monitoring activities that include hydraulic head monitoring and groundwater sampling of the wells onsite are conducted as part of the annual site inspection. These activities were conducted on January 19, 2011. The site roads, monitoring well heads, and the monument at surface ground zero were observed as being in good condition at the time of the site inspection. An evaluation of the hydraulic head data obtained from the site indicates that water levels in wells USGS-4 and USGS-8 appear to respond to the on/off cycling of the dedicated pump in well USGS-1 and that water levels in wells LRL-7 and DD-1 increased during this annual monitoring period. Analytical results obtained from the sampling indicate that concentrations of tritium, strontium-90, and cesium-137 were consistent with concentrations from historical sampling events.

  16. Software solutions manage the definition, operation, maintenance and configuration control of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, D; Churby, A; Krieger, E; Maloy, D; White, K

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest laser composed of millions of individual parts brought together to form one massive assembly. Maintaining control of the physical definition, status and configuration of this structure is a monumental undertaking yet critical to the validity of the shot experiment data and the safe operation of the facility. The NIF business application suite of software provides the means to effectively manage the definition, build, operation, maintenance and configuration control of all components of the National Ignition Facility. State of the art Computer Aided Design software applications are used to generate a virtual model and assemblies. Engineering bills of material are controlled through the Enterprise Configuration Management System. This data structure is passed to the Enterprise Resource Planning system to create a manufacturing bill of material. Specific parts are serialized then tracked along their entire lifecycle providing visibility to the location and status of optical, target and diagnostic components that are key to assessing pre-shot machine readiness. Nearly forty thousand items requiring preventive, reactive and calibration maintenance are tracked through the System Maintenance & Reliability Tracking application to ensure proper operation. Radiological tracking applications ensure proper stewardship of radiological and hazardous materials and help provide a safe working environment for NIF personnel.

  17. Understanding the nature of nuclear power plant risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denning, R. S. [Ohio State Univ., 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1142 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the evolution of understanding of severe accident consequences from the non-mechanistic assumptions of WASH-740 to WASH-1400, NUREG-1150, SOARCA and today in the interpretation of the consequences of the accident at Fukushima. As opposed to the general perception, the radiological human health consequences to members of the Japanese public from the Fukushima accident will be small despite meltdowns at three reactors and loss of containment integrity. In contrast, the radiation-related societal impacts present a substantial additional economic burden on top of the monumental task of economic recovery from the nonnuclear aspects of the earthquake and tsunami damage. The Fukushima accident provides additional evidence that we have mis-characterized the risk of nuclear power plant accidents to ourselves and to the public. The human health risks are extremely small even to people living next door to a nuclear power plant. The principal risk associated with a nuclear power plant accident involves societal impacts: relocation of people, loss of land use, loss of contaminated products, decontamination costs and the need for replacement power. Although two of the three probabilistic safety goals of the NRC address societal risk, the associated quantitative health objectives in reality only address individual human health risk. This paper describes the types of analysis that would address compliance with the societal goals. (authors)

  18. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  19. Air quality assessments in support of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), Oregon Air Contaminant Discharge Permit (ACDP) and Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council certificate (EFSC) for the Newberry Geothermal Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houck, J.E. [AGI Technologies, Portland, OR (United States); McClain, D.W. [CE Newberry, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Air quality monitoring, emission predictions and impact modeling have been performed in support of the regulatory process for the Newberry Geothermal Pilot Project located near Newberry Crater, Oregon. The proposed power plant will generate 33 NM of power utilizing double flash technology. Air emissions from construction activities, well drilling, wellfield testing and operation, power plant operation, and unplanned upsets were evaluated. Wellfield and plant emission rates for hydrogen sulfide and other air pollutants were developed based on expected resource chemistry and operational scenarios. In addition, nitrogen dioxide and particulate emissions were estimated for drill rig diesel engines and construction activities, respectively. Air pollutant impacts at property boundaries, inside the Newberry National Volcanic Monument and at the nearest Class I area (Three Sisters Wilderness) were predicted using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency dispersion models. Cooling tower plume dimensions were predicted using an Electric Power Research Institute model. The deposition and impact of airborne heavy metals and hydrogen sulfide on two nearby watersheds were calculated. The effect of cooling tower plume drift was also evaluated. Preconstruction background air quality was estimated from published data. The results of the studies have demonstrated that good air quality can be expected at the proposed project site.

  20. Bringing the world home: International activities at the Department of Energy`s environmental management sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slate, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Flage, E. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken the monumental task of environmental cleanup at its many sites and facilities. To accomplish this effort more efficiently, the DOE has embarked on a program to develop new environmental technologies through private industry, its national laboratories, and its contractors. These new technologies will be lower cost, faster, or more effective than technologies currently available. DOE also realizes that many foreign countries have similar problems and possess developed technologies and scientific capabilities which are not available in the United States. The Department has made a wide variety of investments to access these technologies and capabilities and to work with the international community on several common environmental problems. This paper summarizes a set of papers that will be presented at a special session at Spectrum `96. These papers will describe recently completed and current international activities at each of the major DOE sites and at Headquarters, plans for additional activities, and lessons learned. They will also provide recommendations for improving the effectiveness of DOE`s international initiatives.

  1. Sol-gel preservation of mankind`s cultural heritage in objects constructed of stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinker, C.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Sellinger, A.S. [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monuments, buildings, and works of art constructed of carbonate-based stone (calcite, e.g., limestone and marble) are subject to deterioration resulting from the effects of environmental exposure, granular disintegration, freeze/thaw cycles, and salt recrystallization. This damage can potentially be reversed by the use of mineral-specific chemical passivants and consolidants that prevent hydrolytic attack and mechanical weakening. The treatment strategy combined the use of calcite coupling molecules to passivate the surfaces against new weathering with alkoxysilane strengthening or consolidating layers to arrest physical deterioration. The authors report on the effectiveness of passivating agents designed through a combined approach of modeling their adhesive and passivating properties using computations at the molecular scale and testing those properties using simulated leaching tests, microscopic evaluation, and characterization of mechanical strength. The experimental results indicate that there may be a threshold binding energy for the passivant above which the dissolution rate of calcite is actually enhanced. Passivant/consolidant treatments were identified which showed substantial reductions in the leach rate of calcite exposed to simulated acid rain conditions.

  2. Twenty years of service at NBNM - Analysis of Spectrolab module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DHERE,N.G.; PANDIT,M.B.; GHONGADI,S.R.; QUINTANA,MICHAEL A.; KING,DAVID L.; KRATOCHVIL,JAY A.

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This study of adhesional strength and surface analysis of encapsulant and silicon cell samples from a Natural Bridges National Monument (NBNM) Spectrolab module is an attempt to understand from its success. The module was fabricated using polyvinyl butyral (PVB) as an encapsulant. The average adhesional shear strength of the encapsulant at the cell/encapsulant interface in this module was 4.51 MPa or {approximately} 18% lower than that in currently manufactured modules. Typical encapsulant surface composition was as follows: C 75.0 at.% O 23.2 at.%, and Si 1.6 at.%, with Ag {approximately}0.2 at.% and Pb {approximately} 0.5 at.% with some tin respectively over the grid lines and solder bond. Representative silicon cell surface composition was: K 1.4 at.%, C 20.8 at.%, Sn 0.94 at.%, O 15.1 at.%, Na 2.7 at.% and Si 59.0 at.%. The presence of tin detected on the silicon cell surface may be attributed to corrosion of solder bond. The module differs from typical contemporary modules in the use of PVB, metallic mesh type interconnection, and silicon oxide AR coating.

  3. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT tag was recorded along with a measurement of length, a determination of sex, and a scale sample. The returns to the hatchery rack were adjusted for any sport and tribal harvest to provide an estimate of total return to the hatchery. Adult and jack return data from return years 1997 through 1999 are covered in this status report. Only the returns from the 1996 migration year are complete. A very low overall average of 0.136% survival rate from Lower Granite Dam and back to Lower Granite Dam was estimated for the 1996 migrants. The outcome expected for the 1997 migrants is much better. With one year of returns still to come, the overall average Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite Dam survival rate is 0.666%, with the McCall Hatchery and Imnaha Hatchery fish already producing return rates in excess of 1%. With 635 returning adults (plus jacks) from the 1997 migration year detected at Lower Granite Dam to date, and one additional year of returns to come, there will be a large sample size for statistically testing differences in transportation versus in- river survival rates next year. From the conduct of this study over a series of years, in addition to obtaining estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates, we should be able to investigate what factors may be causing differences in survival rates among the various hatchery stocks used in this study.

  4. Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions from hydropower complexes on large rivers in Eastern Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; O'Toole, Amanda C.; Niehus, Sara E.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Water bodies, such as freshwater lakes, are known to be net emitters of carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4). In recent years, significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from tropical, boreal, and mid-latitude reservoirs have been reported. At a time when hydropower is increasing worldwide, better understanding of seasonal and regional variation in GHG emissions is needed in order to develop a predictive understanding of such fluxes within man-made impoundments. We examined power-producing dam complexes within xeric temperate locations in the northwestern United States. Sampling environments on the Snake (Lower Monumental Dam Complex) and Columbia Rivers (Priest Rapids Dam Complex) included tributary, mainstem, embayment, forebay, and tailrace areas during winter and summer 2012. At each sampling location, GHG measurement pathways included surface gas flux, degassing as water passed through dams during power generation, ebullition within littoral embayments, and direct sampling of hyporheic pore-water. Measurements were also carried out in a free-flowing reach of the Columbia River to estimate unaltered conditions. Surface flux resulted in very low emissions, with reservoirs acting as a sink for CO2 (up to –262 mg m-2 d-1, which is within the range previously reported for similarly located reservoirs). Surface flux of methane remained below 1 mg CH4 m-2d-1, a value well below fluxes reported previously for temperate reservoirs. Water passing through hydroelectric projects acted as a sink for CO2 during winter and a small source during summer, with mean degassing fluxes of –117 and 4.5 t CO2 d-1, respectively. Degassing of CH4 was minimal, with mean fluxes of 3.1 × 10-6 and –5.6 × 10-4 t CH4 d-1 during winter and summer, respectively. Gas flux due to ebullition was greater in coves located within reservoirs than in coves within the free flowing Hanford Reach–and CH4 flux exceeded that of CO2. Methane emissions varied widely across sampling locations, ranging from 10.5 to 1039 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, with mean fluxes of 324 mg CH4 m-2 d-1in Lower Monumental Dam reservoir and 482 mg CH4 m-2d-1 in the Priest Rapids Dam reservoir. The magnitude of methane flux due to ebullition was unexpectedly high, and falls within the range recently reported for other temperate reservoirs around the world, further suggesting that this methane source should be considered in estimates of global greenhouse gas emissions. Methane flux from sediment pore-water within littoral embayments averaged 4.2 mg m-2 d-1 during winter and 8.1 mg m-2 d-1 during summer, with a peak flux of 19.8 mg m-2d-1 (at the same location where CH4 ebullition was also the greatest). Carbon dioxide flux from sediment pore-water averaged approximately 80 mg m-2d-1 with little difference between winter and summer. Similar to emissions from ebullition, flux from sediment pore-water was higher in reservoirs than in the free flowing reach.

  5. A process for selecting ecological indicators for application in monitoring impacts to Air Quality Related Values (AQRVs) from atmospheric pollutants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, G.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 160 of the Clean Air Act (CAA) calls for measures be taken {open_quotes}to preserve, protect, and enhance air quality in national parks, national wilderness areas, national monuments, national seashores, and other areas of special national or regional natural, recreational, scenic, or historic value.{close_quotes} Pursuant to this, stringent requirement have been established for {open_quotes}Class I{close_quotes} areas, which include most National Parks and Wilderness Areas. Federal Land Managers (FLMs) are charged with the task of carrying out these requirements through the identification of air quality related values (AQRVs) that are potentially at risk from atmospheric pollutants. This is a complex task, the success of which is dependent on the gathering of information on a wide variety of factors that contribute to the potential for impacting resources in Class I areas. Further complicating the issue is the diversity of ecological systems found in Class I areas. There is a critical need for the development of monitoring programs to assess the status of AQRVs in Class I areas with respect to impacts caused by atmospheric pollutants. These monitoring programs must be based on the measurement of a carefully selected suite of key physical, chemical, and biological parameters that serve as indicators of the status of the ecosystems found in Class I areas. Such programs must be both scientifically-based and cost-effective, and must provide the data necessary for FLMs to make objective, defensible decisions. This document summarizes a method for developing AQRV monitoring programs in Class I areas.

  6. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We collected, radio-tagged, and PIT-tagged 41 bull trout at the Tucannon River Hatchery trap from May 17, through June 14, 2002. An additional 65 bull trout were also collected and PIT tagged by June 24, at which time we ceased PIT tagging operations because water temperatures were reaching 16.0 C or higher on a regular basis. Six radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 35 remained in the river through November 30, 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon Subbasin. We began to observe some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. These movements appeared to be associated with post spawning migrations. As of November 30, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 11.3, near Pataha Creek. None of the radio-tagged bull trout left the Tucannon Subbasin and entered the federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. We conducted some initial transmission tests of submerged radio tags at depths of 25, 35, 45, and 55 ft. in Lower Monumental Pool to test our capability of detection at these depths. Equipment used included Lotek model MCFT-3A transmitters, an SRX 400 receiver, a 4 element Yagi antenna, and a Lotek ''H'' antenna. Test results indicated that depth transmission of these tags was poor; only the transmitter placed at 25 ft. was audibly detectable.

  7. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Campbell

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

  8. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zabel, Richard; Williams, John G.; Smith, Steven G. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the ninth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tagged fish. We PIT tagged and released at Lower Granite Dam a total of 17,028 hatchery and 3,550 wild steelhead. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream of the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using the Single-Release Model. Primary research objectives in 2001 were to: (1) estimate reach and project survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2001 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures with a minimum of text. More details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited in the text. Results for summer-migrating chinook salmon will be reported separately.

  9. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the thirteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,439 hatchery steelhead, 5,315 wild steelhead, and 6,964 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''single-release model''). Primary research objectives in 2005 were: (1) Estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. (2) Evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions. (3) Evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2005 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here.

  10. Pore-scale dynamics of salt transport and distribution in drying porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shokri, Nima, E-mail: nima.shokri@manchester.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, water quality, and mineral-fluid interactions. We applied synchrotron x-ray micro-tomography to investigate the pore-scale dynamics of dissolved salt distribution in a three dimensional drying saline porous media using a cylindrical plastic column (15 mm in height and 8 mm in diameter) packed with sand particles saturated with CaI{sub 2} solution (5% concentration by mass) with a spatial and temporal resolution of 12 ?m and 30 min, respectively. Every time the drying sand column was set to be imaged, two different images were recorded using distinct synchrotron x-rays energies immediately above and below the K-edge value of Iodine. Taking the difference between pixel gray values enabled us to delineate the spatial and temporal distribution of CaI{sub 2} concentration at pore scale. Results indicate that during early stages of evaporation, air preferentially invades large pores at the surface while finer pores remain saturated and connected to the wet zone at bottom via capillary-induced liquid flow acting as evaporating spots. Consequently, the salt concentration increases preferentially in finer pores where evaporation occurs. Higher salt concentration was observed close to the evaporating surface indicating a convection-driven process. The obtained salt profiles were used to evaluate the numerical solution of the convection-diffusion equation (CDE). Results show that the macro-scale CDE could capture the overall trend of the measured salt profiles but fail to produce the exact slope of the profiles. Our results shed new insight on the physics of salt transport and its complex dynamics in drying porous media and establish synchrotron x-ray tomography as an effective tool to investigate the dynamics of salt transport in porous media at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  11. US Geological Survey research on the environmental fate of uranium mining and milling wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landa, E.R.; Gray, J.R. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies by the US Geological Survey (USGS) of uranium mill tailings (UMT) have focused on characterizing the forms in which radionuclides are retained and identifying factors influencing the release of radionuclides to air and water. Selective extraction studies and studies of radionuclide sorption by and reaching from components of UMT showed alkaline earth sulfate and hydrous ferric oxides to be important hosts of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) in UMT. Extrapolating from studies of barite dissolution in anerobic lake sediments, the leaching of {sup 226}Ra from UMT by sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated; a marked increase in {sup 226}Ra release to aqueous solution as compared to sterile controls was demonstrated. A similar action of iron(III)-reducing bacteria was later shown. Ion exchangers such as clay minerals can also promote the dissolution of host-phase minerals and thereby influence the fate of radionuclides such as {sup 226}Ra. Radon release studies examined particle size and ore composition as variables. Aggregation of UMT particles was shown to mask the higher emanating fraction of finer particles. Studies of various ores and ore components showed that UMT cannot be assumed to have the same radon-release characteristics as their precursor ores, nor can {sup 226}Ra retained by various substrates be assumed to emanate the same fraction of radon. Over the last decade, USGS research directed at offsite mobility of radionuclides form uranium mining and milling processes has focused on six areas: the Midnite Mine in Washington; Ralston Creek and Reservoir, Colorado; sites near Canon City, Colorado; the Monument Valley District of Arizona and Utah; the Cameron District of Arizona; and the Puerco River basin of Arizona and New Mexico. 48 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS, AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT - 11052

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, C.; Flora, M.; Belencan, H.

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical Separation Facilities (canyons).

  13. ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, C

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

  14. The US Geological Survey-Bureau of Land Management cultural resources program in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska, 1977-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.S. Jr.; Gal, R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of northern Alaska's riches long predates the recent oil exploration program in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA). Though the earliest known archaeological site in the reserve dates back only 7600 yr, most archaeologists believe human groups first occupied the area at least 4000 yr earlier. The as-yet-undiscovered physical remains left behind by these first inhabitants of the area, as well as the known and unknown traces of the peoples who succeeded them through time, constitute the cultural resources of the NPRA. First among the laws protecting cultural resources is the Antiquities Act of 1906, which provides for the establishment of national monuments by Presidential proclamation, sets up a permit system for the scientific investigation of cultural resources on Federal land, and details penalities for unauthorized disturbance of archaeological remains. The Archaeological and Historic Preservation Act of 1974, which extended the earlier Reservoir Salvage Act of 1960, authorizes funds for the preservation of historical and archaeological data that otherwise might be lost through any Federal construction project or federally licensed or assisted activity or program. The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established the National Register of Historic Places and a National Advisory Council to assist all Federal agencies in evaluating the effects of their actions on properties included, or eligible for inclusion, in the National Register. Finally, Executive Order 11593 of May 13, 1971, requires all Federal agencies to inventory cultural resources on lands they manage or affect in order to determine eligibility for the National Register, and to use due caution in regard to those resources until the inventory, evaluation, and nomination processes are completed. The oil exploration program in the NPRA is subject to this body of law for cultural resource protection.

  15. Avian Field guide and checklist for Kunsan Air Base, Korea.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levenson, J. B.; Environmental Assessment

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the avian surveys conducted at Kunsan Air Base (AB). This on-going survey is conducted to comply with requirements of the Environmental Governing Standards (EGS) for the Republic of Korea, the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Kunsan AB, and the 8th Fighter Wing's Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) Plan. One hundred sixteen bird species representing 34 families were identified and recorded. Seven species are designated as Cultural Property Monuments, and their protection is accorded by the Korean Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Six species appear on the Korean Association for Conservation of Nature's(KACN's) list of Reserved Wild Species and are protected by the Korean Ministry of Environment. Combined, only ten different species are Republic of Korea (ROK)-protected because the Eurasian Spoonbill, Peregrine Falcon, and Eurasian Oystercatcher are listed by both agencies. The primary objective of the avian survey at Kunsan AB was to determine what species of birds are present on the airfield and their respective habitat requirements during the critical seasons of the year. This requirement is specified in Annex C.4.a.(1-4) of the 8th Fighter Wing BASH Plan(8FWOPLAN 91-202). The second objective was to initiate surveys to determine what bird species are present on Kunsan AB throughout the year, and from the survey results determine if threatened, endangered, or other Korean-listed bird species are present on Kunsan AB. This overall census satisfies Criterion 13-3.e of the EGS for Korea. The final objective was to formulate management strategies within Kunsan AB's operational requirements to protect and enhance habitats of known threatened, endangered, and ROK-protected species in accordance with EGS Criterion 13-3.a and also that are favorable for the reproduction of indigenous species in accordance with the EGS Criterion 13-3.h.

  16. Avian survey and field guide for Osan Air Base, Korea.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levenson, J.

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the avian surveys conducted at Osan Air Base (AB). This ongoing survey is conducted to comply with requirements of the Environmental Governing Standards (EGS) for the Republic of Korea, the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Osan AB, and the 51st Fighter Wing's Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) Plan. One hundred ten bird species representing 35 families were identified and recorded. Seven species are designated as Natural Monuments, and their protection is accorded by the Korean Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Three species appear on the Korean Association for Conservation of Nature's (KACN's) list of Reserved Wild Species and are protected by the Korean Ministry of Environment. Combined, ten different species are Republic of Korea (ROK)-protected. The primary objective of the avian survey at Osan AB was to determine what species of birds are present on the airfield and their respective habitat requirements during the critical seasons of the year. This requirement is specified in Annex J.14.c of the 51st Fighter BASH Plan 91-212 (51 FW OPLAN 91-212). The second objective was to initiate surveys to determine what bird species are present on Osan AB throughout the year and from the survey results, determine if threatened, endangered, or other Korean-listed bird species are present on Osan AB. This overall census satisfies Criterion 13-3.e of the EGS for Korea. The final objective was to formulate management strategies within Osan AB's operational requirements to protect and enhance habitats of known threatened, endangered, and ROK-protected species in accordance with EGS Criterion 13-3.a that are also favorable for the reproduction of indigenous species in accordance with the EGS Criterion 13-3.h.

  17. Evidence for biological activity in mineralization of secondary sulphate deposits in a basaltic environment: implications for the search for life in the Martian subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Jill R. Scott

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence of microbial activity associated with mineralization of secondary Na-sulphate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) in the basaltic subsurface of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM), Idaho were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser desorption Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LD-FTICR-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Peaks suggestive of bio/organic compounds were observed in the secondary Na-sulphate deposits by LD-FTICR-MS. FTIR provided additional evidence for the presence of bio/organic compounds. Sulphur fractionation was explored to assist in determining if microbes may play a role in oxidizing sulphur. The presence of bio/organic compounds associated with Na-sulphate deposits, along with the necessity of oxidizing reduced sulphur to sulphate, suggests that biological activity may be involved in the formation of these secondary minerals. The secondary Na-sulphate minerals probably form from the overlying basalt through leached sodium ions and sulphate ions produced by bio-oxidation of Fe-sulphide minerals. Since the COM basalts are one of the most comparable terrestrial analogues for their Martian counterparts, the occurrence of biological activity in the formation of sulphate minerals at COM has direct implications for the search for life on Mars. In addition, the presence of caves on Mars suggests the importance of these environments as possible locations for growth and preservation of microbial activity. Therefore, understanding the physiochemical pathways of abiotic and biotic mineralization in the COM subsurface and similar basaltic settings has direct implications for the search for extinct or extant life on Mars.

  18. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A. J.

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2013 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: • CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) • CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) • CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) • CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) • CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports and subsequent correspondence with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The post-closure inspection plans and subsequent correspondence modifying the requirements for each CAU are included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C. Field notes are included in Appendix D. Photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted on May 14, 2013. Maintenance was performed at CAU 400, CAU 424, and CAU 453. At CAU 400, animal burrows were backfilled. At CAU 424, erosion repairs were completed at Landfill Cell A3-3, subsidence was repaired at Landfill Cell A3-4, and additional lava rock was placed in high-traffic areas to mark the locations of the surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 and Landfill Cell A3-8. At CAU 453, two areas of subsidence were repaired and animal burrows were backfilled. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2013. The vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  19. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the twelfth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 19,621 hatchery steelhead, 8,128 wild steelhead, and 9,227 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2004 were to (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2004 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures; details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2004 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. Overall, the percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses were 68% hatchery-reared yearling Chinook salmon and 32% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 73% hatchery-reared and 27% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.923 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.860 for steelhead. Respective average survival estimates for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead were 0.875 and 0.820 from Little Goose Dam tailrace to Lower Monumental Dam tailrace; 0.818 and 0.519 from Lower Monumental Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace (including passage through Ice Harbor Dam); and 0.809 and 0.465 from McNary Dam tailrace to John Day Dam tailrace. Survival for yearling Chinook salmon from John Day Dam tailrace to Bonneville Dam tailrace (including passage through The Dalles Dam) was 0.735. We were unable to estimate survival through this reach for steelhead during 2004 because too few fish were detected at Bonneville Dam due to operation of the new corner collector at the second powerhouse. Combining average estimates from the Snake River smolt trap to Lower Granite Dam, from Lower Granite Dam to McNary Dam, and from McNary Dam to Bonneville Dam, estimated annual average survival through the entire hydropower system from the head of Lower Granite reservoir to the tailrace of Bonneville Dam (eight projects) was 0.353 (s.e. 0.045) for Snake River yearling Chinook salmon. We could not empirically estimate survival through the entire system for steelhead in 2004 because of low detection rates for this species at Bonneville Dam. For yearling spring Chinook salmon released in the Upper Columbia River, estimated survival from point of release to McNary Dam tailrace was 0.484 (s.e. 0.005) for fish released from Leavenworth Hatchery, 0.748 (s.e. 0.015) for fish released from Entiat Hatchery, 0.738 (s.e. 0.036) for fish released from Winthrop Hatchery, and 0.702 (s.e. 0.048) and 0.747 (s.e.0.047) for those from Methow Hatchery, Chewuch Pond and

  20. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following site closure activities were performed at the 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) comprising Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 and are documented in this report: (1) No closure action was taken at 13 CASs (17 sites): 58-05-01,58-07-01,58-05-04, 58-09-05 (Mud Pits C and D only), 58-35-01,58-05-02,58-09-06 (Mud Pits A, B, C, and D), 58-10-06,58-19-01,58-35-02,58-44-04,58-05-04, and 58-09-03 (Mud Pit E only). (2) Housekeeping activities, collecting scrap materials, and transporting to approved landfill sites at the NTS were used to close seven CASs: 58-44-01,58-44-02,58-44-05, 58-98-03,58-98-01,58-98-02, and 58-98-04. (3) Two CASs (58-05-03 and 58-99-01) were closed by excavation and removal of USTs. (4) Two septic tanks (CASs 58-05-05 and 58-05-06) were closed by backfilling with clean fill. (5) Site posting with above-grade monuments and attached warning signs and land-use restrictions were used to close seven CASs (nine sites): 58-09-02,58-09-05 (Mud Pit E only), 58-09-06 (Mud Pit E only), 58-10-01,58-25-01,58-09-03 (Mud Pits A, B, and D), and 58-10-05. (6) Clean closure by excavation soil with TPH levels greater than the NDEP action level of 100 mg/kg and limited regrading was used to close five CASs: 58-10-03,58-44-06, 58-44-03,58-10-02, and 58-10-04. (7) Construction of engineered covers was used to close in place two CASs: 58-09-01 and 58-09-03 (Mud Pit C only). Following construction, a fence was constructed around each cover to prevent damage to the cover or intrusion by wildlife.

  1. 2012 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gnome-Coach was the site of a 3-kiloton underground nuclear test conducted in 1961. Surface and subsurface contamination resulted from the underground nuclear testing, post-test drilling, and a groundwater tracer test performed at the site. Surface reclamation and remediation began after the underground testing. A Completion Report was prepared, and the State of New Mexico is currently proceeding with a conditional certificate of completion for the surface. Subsurface corrective action activities began in 1972 and have generally consisted of annual sampling and monitoring of wells near the site. In 2008, the annual site inspections were refined to include hydraulic head monitoring and collection of samples from groundwater monitoring wells onsite using the low-flow sampling method. These activities were conducted during this monitoring period on January 18, 2012. Analytical results from this sampling event indicate that concentrations of tritium, strontium-90, and cesium-137 were generally consistent with concentrations from historical sampling events. The exceptions are the decreases in concentrations of strontium-90 in samples from wells USGS-4 and USGS-8, which were more than 2.5 times lower than last year's results. Well USGS-1 provides water for livestock belonging to area ranchers, and a dedicated submersible pump cycles on and off to maintain a constant volume in a nearby water tank. Water levels in wells USGS-4 and USGS-8 respond to the on/off cycling of the water supply pumping from well USGS-1. Well LRL-7 was not sampled in January, and water levels were still increasing when the transducer data were downloaded in September. A seismic reflection survey was also conducted this year. The survey acquired approximately 13.9 miles of seismic reflection data along 7 profiles on and near the site. These activities were conducted from February 23 through March 10, 2012. The site roads, monitoring well heads, and the monument at surface ground zero were in good condition at the time of the site inspection. However, it was reported in September 2012 that the USGS-1 well head had been damaged by a water truck in April 2012.

  2. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 547 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 547 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 3, and 9 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; AND (3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly Closure activities began in August 2011 and were completed in June 2012. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for CAU 547 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2011). The recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 was closure in place with administrative controls. The following closure activities were performed: (1) Open holes were filled with concrete; (2) Steel casings were placed over vertical expansion joints and filled with cement; (3) Engineered soil covers were constructed over piping and exposed sections of the gas sampling system components; (4) Fencing, monuments, Jersey barriers, radiological postings, and use restriction (UR) warning signs were installed around the perimeters of the sites; (5) Housekeeping debris was picked up from around the sites and disposed; and (6) Radiological surveys were performed to confirm final radiological postings. UR documentation is included in Appendix D. The post-closure plan was presented in detail in the CADD/CAP for CAU 547 and is included as Appendix F of this report. The requirements are summarized in Section 5.2 of this report. The proposed post-closure requirements consist of visual inspections to determine the condition of postings and radiological surveys to verify contamination has not migrated. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 547; and (2) The transfer of CAU 547 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO.

  3. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater than observed in the past ten years averaged together. In 2002, about 87 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, Tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This represents an increase over the past season, when only 71 million juvenile fish were released into the same area.

  4. Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities and specific methods for seeding and planting at each area. evegetation work is scheduled to commence during the first quarter of FY 2011 to minimize the amount of time that sites are unvegetated and more susceptible to invasion by non-native weedy annual species.

  5. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

  6. Numerically Simulating the Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Environment for Migrating Salmon in the Lower Snake River, 2002-2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, C.; Richmond, M.; Coleman, A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer temperatures in the Lower Snake River can be altered by releasing cold waters that originate from deep depths within Dworshak Reservoir. These cold releases are used to lower temperatures in the Clearwater and Lower Snake Rivers and to improve hydrodynamic and water quality conditions for migrating aquatic species. This project monitored the complex three-dimensional hydrodynamic and thermal conditions at the Clearwater and Snake River confluence and the processes that led to stratification of Lower Granite Reservoir (LGR) during the late spring, summer, and fall of 2002. Hydrodynamic, water quality, and meteorological conditions around the reservoir were monitored at frequent intervals, and this effort is continuing in 2003. Monitoring of the reservoir is a multi-year endeavor, and this report spans only the first year of data collection. In addition to monitoring the LGR environment, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model has been applied. This model uses field data as boundary conditions and has been applied to the entire 2002 field season. Numerous data collection sites were within the model domain and serve as both calibration and validation locations for the numerical model. Errors between observed and simulated data varied in magnitude from location to location and from one time to another. Generally, errors were small and within expected ranges, although, as additional 2003 field data becomes available, model parameters may be improved to minimize differences between observed and simulated values. A two-dimensional, laterally-averaged hydrodynamic and water quality model was applied to the three reservoirs downstream of LGR (the pools behind Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and Ice Harbor Dams). A two-dimensional model is appropriate for these reservoirs because observed lateral thermal variations during summer and fall 2002 were almost negligible; however, vertical thermal variations were quite large (see USACE 2003). The numerical model was applied to each reservoir independently to simulate the time period between May 1 and October 1, 2002. Differences between observed and simulated data were small, although improvements to model coefficients may be performed as additional thermal data, collected in the reservoirs during 2003, becomes available.

  7. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2002 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2002 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11.4 times greater in 2002 than in 2001. The wild Chinook catch was 15.5 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 2.9 times greater than in 2001. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.8 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 3,996 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2002, the Snake River trap captured 69 hatchery and 235 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 114 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant increase in catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery Chinook production and a more normal spring runoff. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on June 7. The trap was out of operation for a total of four days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 4.2 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 2.4 times greater than in 2001. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the 2001 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on May 29 due to high flows. The trap was out of operation for four days due to high flow or debris. The increase in hatchery Chinook catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery production and differences in flow between years. Changes in hatchery and wild steelhead catch are probably due to differences in flow between years. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2002 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild Chinook salmon. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 4.7-fold and a 3.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.8-fold and a 1.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2002 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. The analysis was unable to detect a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon. The lack of a detectable relation was probably a result of the migration rate data being spread over a very narrow range of discharge. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.2-fold for hatchery steelhead between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at

  8. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

  9. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2001 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2001 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11% of the 2000 numbers. The wild chinook catch was 3% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 49% of 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 69% of 2000 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 28 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2001 the Snake River trap captured zero hatchery and zero wild/natural sockeye salmon and six hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant reduction in catch during 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery chinook production (60% of 2000 release) and due to extreme low flows. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 29. The trap was out of operation for a total of two days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 47% and wild chinook salmon catch was 67% of 2000 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 178% of the 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 145% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 8 due to the end of the smolt monitoring season. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery chinook catch in 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery production (39% of 2000 releases). The increase in hatchery and wild steelhead trap catch is due to the ability to operate the trap in the thalweg for a longer period of time because of the extreme low flow condition in 2001. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. There were not enough hatchery and wild chinook salmon tagged at the Snake River trap in 2001 to allow migration rate/discharge analysis. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate in, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon and hatchery and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 3.7-fold for hatchery chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for wild chinook salmon between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.6-fold increase in migration rate, and for wild steelhead trout there was a 2.2-fold increase between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 86% for hatchery chinook, 70% for wild chinook, 71% for hatchery steelhead, and 89% for wild steelhead. Cumulat

  10. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2005 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2005 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, the age-1 and older fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Age-0 Chinook salmon are more difficult to distinguish between wild and non-adclipped hatchery fish and therefore classified as unknown rearing. The total annual hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 0.34 times greater in 2005 than in 2004. The wild spring/summer Chinook catch was 0.34 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 0.67 times less than in 2004. Wild steelhead trout catch was 0.72 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 1,152 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2005, the Snake River trap captured 219 hatchery and 44 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 110 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on June 3. The trap was out of operation for a total of one day due to heavy debris. FPC requested that the trap be restarted on June 15 through June 22 to collect and PIT tag age-0 Chinook salmon. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 1.06 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.26 times greater than in 2004. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2005 was 1.41 times greater and wild steelhead trout collection was 1.27 times greater than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on May 17 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because of mechanical failure. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2005 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook but was unable to detect a relation for wild Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for wild Chinook salmon was caused by a lack of data. For hatchery Chinook salmon there was a 1.8-fold increase in migration rate between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 2.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2005 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead trout, and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.2-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 2.9-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for hatchery steelhead, and 1.7-fold for wild steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at Lower Granite Dam in 2001, caution must be used in comparing cumulative interrogation data. Cumulative interrogations at the fo

  11. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We collected 279 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Tucannon River during the Spring and Fall of 2003. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 191 of them, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 31bull trout. Thirty five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Fourteen radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 21 remained in the river through December 31, 2003. Four bull trout that were radio-tagged in spring 2002 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring and/or summer of 2003. One of these fish spent the winter near river mile (RM) 13.0; the other 3 over-wintered in the vicinity of the Tucannon Hatchery between RM 34 and 36. Twenty-one radio tags from bull trout tagged in 2002 were recovered during the spring and summer, 2003. These tags became stationary the winter of 2002/2003, and were recovered between RM 11 and 55. We were unable to recover the remaining 15 tags from 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. We observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 6.4, near Lower Monumental Pool. As in 2002, we did not conduct work associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the Federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged ATS model F1830 radio-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20 and 30 ft. Tests were conducted using an ATS R-4000 Receiver equipped with an ''H'' antenna at 200 and 700 feet above water surface from a helicopter. Audible detection and frequency separation were possible at both elevations. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we are planning to reduce the size of the radio tags that we implant, and delay most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

  12. Interwell Connectivity and Diagnosis Using Correlation of Production and Injection Rate Data in Hydrocarbon Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry L. Jensen; Larry W. Lake; Ali Al-Yousef; Dan Weber; Ximing Liang; T.F. Edgar; Nazli Demiroren; Danial Kaviani

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details progress and results on inferring interwell communication from well rate fluctuations. Starting with the procedure of Albertoni and Lake (2003) as a foundation, the goal of the project was to develop further procedures to infer reservoir properties through weights derived from correlations between injection and production rates. A modified method, described in Yousef and others (2006a,b), and herein referred to as the 'capacitance model', is the primary product of this research project. The capacitance model (CM) produces two quantities, {lambda} and {tau}, for each injector-producer well pair. For the CM, we have focused on the following items: (1) Methods to estimate {lambda} and {tau} from simulated and field well rates. The original method uses both non-linear and linear regression and lacks the ability to include constraints on {lambda} and {tau}. The revised method uses only non-linear regression, permitting constraints to be included as well as accelerating the solution so that problems with large numbers of wells are more tractable. (2) Approaches to integrate {lambda} and {tau} to improve connectivity evaluations. Interpretations have been developed using Lorenz-style and log-log plots to assess heterogeneity. Testing shows the interpretations can identify whether interwell connectivity is controlled by flow through fractures, high-permeability layers, or due to partial completion of wells. Applications to the South Wasson and North Buck Draw Fields show promising results. (3) Optimization of waterflood injection rates using the CM and a power law relationship for watercut to maximize economic return. Tests using simulated data and a range of oil prices show the approach is working. (4) Investigation of methods to increase the robustness of {lambda} and {tau} estimates. Human interventions, such as workovers, also cause rate fluctuations and can be misinterpreted by the model if bottom hole pressure data are not available. A revised method, called the 'segmented capacitance model', identifies times when production changes might not be caused strictly by water injection changes. Application to data from Monument Butte Field shows encouraging results. Our results show the CM and its modified forms can be an important tool for waterflood management. We have moved beyond the proof of principle stage to show it can actually be applied to assess connectivity in field situations. Several shortcomings, however, remain to be addressed before the CM can be routinely applied by field operators. The CM and its modifications analyze well rates in the time domain. We also explored the assessment of interwell connectivity in the spectral domain. We applied conventional methods, based on analyzing passive linear electrical networks, to the analysis of injection and production data. In particular, we assessed the effects of near-wellbore gas on the apparent connectivity. With only oil and water in the system, the results were as expected, giving good connectivity estimates. In the presence of gas, however, the methods could not produce useful estimates of connectivity.

  13. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this plan, spill hours were increased at Lower Monumental Dam. Spill volume at The Dalles was reduced and daytime spill tests were conducted at John Day and Bonneville Dams. Although provided for fish, most spill that occurred in 2000 was either in excess of project hydraulic capacity or excess generation. This effectively reduced the actual cost of the spill program. For the most part, spill in 2000 was managed to the waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. Hatchery spring chinook returns comprised an estimated 81.4% of the total spring chinook adult return to Lower Granite Dam. Smolt travel time and survival were similar to past years for most Smolt Monitoring Program groups. The notable exceptions were Snake River hatchery steelhead groups and mid-Columbia hatchery sub-yearling groups from Wells and Ringold hatcheries, which had significantly lower survival than previous years. Yearling chinook travel time showed variation from past years, reflecting the atypical flow shape in 2000 which had high flows in April, declining through May.

  14. Factors Affecting Route Selection and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at Snake River Dams in 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Li, Xinya; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2012 and 2013, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a study that summarized the passage proportions and route-specific survival rates of steelhead kelts that passed through Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) dams. To accomplish this, a total of 811 steelhead kelts were tagged with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters. Acoustic receivers, both autonomous and cabled, were deployed throughout the FCRPS to monitor the downstream movements of tagged-kelts. Kelts were also tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder tags to monitor passage through juvenile bypass systems and detect returning fish. The current study evaluated data collected in 2012 and 2013 to identify individual, behavioral, environmental and dam operation variables that were related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts that passed through FCRPS dams. Bayesian model averaging of multivariable logistic regression models was used to identify the environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that had the highest probability of influencing the route of passage and the route-specific survival probabilities for kelts that passed Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), and Lower Monumental (LMN) dams in 2012 and 2013. The posterior probabilities of the best models for predicting route of passage ranged from 0.106 for traditional spill at LMN to 0.720 for turbine passage at LGS. Generally, the behavior (depth and near-dam searching activity) of kelts in the forebay appeared to have the greatest influence on their route of passage. Shallower-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the weir and deeper-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines than other routes. Kelts that displayed a higher level of near-dam searching activity had a higher probability of passing via the spillway weir and those that did less near-dam searching had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines. The side of the river in which kelts approached the dam and dam operations also affected route of passage. Dam operations and the size and condition of kelts were found to have the greatest effect on route-specific survival probabilities for fish that passed via the spillway at LGS. That is, longer kelts and those in fair condition had a lower probability of survival for fish that passed via the spillway weir. The survival of spillway weir- and deep-spill passed kelts was positively correlated with the percent of the total discharge that passed through turbine unit 4. Too few kelts passed through the traditional spill, JBS, and turbine units to evaluate survival through these routes. The information gathered in this study describes Snake River steelhead kelt passage behavior, rates, and distributions through the FCRPS as well as provide information to biologists and engineers about the dam operations and abiotic conditions that are related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts.

  15. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The runoff volumes in 2003 were below average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (79%) and The Dalles Dam (82%). The year 2003 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that met the spring seasonal Biological Opinion flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam, McNary Dam and Priest Rapids Dam. However, summer seasonal flows at Lower Granite Dam and McNary Dam were considerably below the Biological Opinion objectives of 50.7 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam and 2000 Kcfs at McNary Dam. Actual summer seasonal flows were just 32.3 Kcfs and 135.5 Kcfs, respectively. In most instances spill was provided as described by the Biological Opinion program for fish passage, within the constraints of the State waivers for total dissolved gas supersaturation levels. Spill was altered during spill testing and most notably during the month of August at Ice Harbor dam. At this project spill was modified from a 24-hour program to a 12-hour nightly spill period pending the evaluation of studies being conducted in-season. Spill was not returned to full implementation of the Biological Opinion levels even after data showed that spillway passage had the highest associated fish survival. This experience demonstrated the difficulty of managing the hydrosystem for fish passage based on preliminary data and data collected in-season. Increased hatchery releases and higher wild fish production resulted in a population of yearling chinook at Lower Granite Dam being one of the highest observed in recent years. However, the increased hatchery production may have been offset to some extent by decreased survival from release to Lower Granite Dam as suggested by the lower than average survival observed for the PIT tagged trap released fish to Lower Monumental Dam. Travel times were also longer for hatchery spring chinook compared to recent past years. The short duration of high flows that occurred in the Lower Snake River was too late for yearling chinook, but likely was a benefit for steelhead. Survivals for spring fish in the Lower Granite to McNary Dam and the McNary to Bonneville Dam reach were similar to recent years. Returning numbers of adult spring and summer chinook, coho and steelhead were less than observed in 2002, but far exceeded the ten-year average return numbers. Sockeye numbers were less than both the 2002 returning adults and the ten-year average number. However, fall chinook numbers surpassed all previous counts at Bonneville Dam since 1938. In 2003, about 81 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This was slightly less than the number released last year, but about average for the past several years.

  16. Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River During Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Richmond, Marshall C.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Fu, Tao

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10°C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir’s epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four lower Snake reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water’s surface, and during periods of low river discharge, often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The depth of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may also be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004 plus a brief one-week period in 2005 of Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite Reservoirs. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are sufficiently capable of matching diurnal and long term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the 3-D model Flow3-D. This model was used to better understand mixing processing and entrainment. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake discharge. Simulation results were also linked with the particle tracking model FINS to better understand alterations of integrated metrics due to alternative operation schemes. These findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir and may have a significant impact on the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

  17. Ecological Impacts of the Cerro Grande Fire: Predicting Elk Movement and Distribution Patterns in Response to Vegetative Recovery through Simulation Modeling October 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Rupp

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 17,200 ha in north-central New Mexico as the result of an escaped prescribed burn initiated by Bandelier National Monument. The interaction of large-scale fires, vegetation, and elk is an important management issue, but few studies have addressed the ecological implications of vegetative succession and landscape heterogeneity on ungulate populations following large-scale disturbance events. Primary objectives of this research were to identify elk movement pathways on local and landscape scales, to determine environmental factors that influence elk movement, and to evaluate movement and distribution patterns in relation to spatial and temporal aspects of the Cerro Grande Fire. Data collection and assimilation reflect the collaborative efforts of National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Department of Energy (Los Alamos National Laboratory) personnel. Geographic positioning system (GPS) collars were used to track 54 elk over a period of 3+ years and locational data were incorporated into a multi-layered geographic information system (GIS) for analysis. Preliminary tests of GPS collar accuracy indicated a strong effect of 2D fixes on position acquisition rates (PARs) depending on time of day and season of year. Slope, aspect, elevation, and land cover type affected dilution of precision (DOP) values for both 2D and 3D fixes, although significant relationships varied from positive to negative making it difficult to delineate the mechanism behind significant responses. Two-dimensional fixes accounted for 34% of all successfully acquired locations and may affect results in which those data were used. Overall position acquisition rate was 93.3% and mean DOP values were consistently in the range of 4.0 to 6.0 leading to the conclusion collar accuracy was acceptable for modeling purposes. SAVANNA, a spatially explicit, process-oriented ecosystem model, was used to simulate successional dynamics. Inputs to the SAVANNA included a land cover map, long-term weather data, soil maps, and a digital elevation model. Parameterization and calibration were conducted using field plots. Model predictions of herbaceous biomass production and weather were consistent with available data and spatial interpolations of snow were considered reasonable for this study. Dynamic outputs generated by SAVANNA were integrated with static variables, movement rules, and parameters developed for the individual-based model through the application of a habitat suitability index. Model validation indicated reasonable model fit when compared to an independent test set. The finished model was applied to 2 realistic management scenarios for the Jemez Mountains and management implications were discussed. Ongoing validation of the individual-based model presented in this dissertation provides an adaptive management tool that integrates interdisciplinary experience and scientific information, which allows users to make predictions about the impact of alternative management policies.

  18. Water Supply at Los Alamos 1998-2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard J. Koch; David B. Rogers

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the period 1998 through 2001, the total water used at Los Alamos from all sources ranged from 1325 million gallons (Mg) in 1999 to 1515 Mg in 2000. Groundwater production ranged from 1323 Mg in 1999 to 1506 Mg in 2000 from the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi fields. Nonpotable surface water used from Los Alamos reservoir ranged from zero gallons in 2001 to 9.3 Mg in 2000. For years 1998 through 2001, over 99% of all water used at Los Alamos was groundwater. Water use by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) between 1998 and 2001 ranged from 379 Mg in 2000 to 461 Mg in 1998. The LANL water use in 2001 was 393 Mg or 27% of the total water use at Los Alamos. Water use by Los Alamos County ranged from 872 Mg in 1999 to 1137 Mg in 2000, and averaged 1006 Mg/yr. Four new replacement wells in the Guaje field (G-2A, G-3A, G-4A, and G-5A) were drilled in 1998 and began production in 1999; with existing well G-1A, the Guaje field currently has five producing wells. Five of the old Guaje wells (G-1, G-2, G-4, G-5, and G-6) were plugged and abandoned in 1999, and one well (G-3) was abandoned but remains as an observation well for the Guaje field. The long-term water level observations in production and observation (test) wells at Los Alamos are consistent with the formation of a cone of depression in response to water production. The water level decline is gradual and at most has been about 0.7 to 2 ft per year for production wells and from 0.4 to 0.9 ft/yr for observation (test) wells. The largest water level declines have been in the Guaje field where nonpumping water levels were about 91 ft lower in 2001 than in 1951. The initial water levels of the Guaje replacement wells were 32 to 57 ft lower than the initial water levels of adjacent original Guaje wells. When production wells are taken off-line for pump replacement or repair, water levels have returned to within about 25 ft of initial static levels within 6 to 12 months. Thus, the water-level trends suggest no adverse impacts by production on long-term water supply sustainability at Los Alamos. This report summarizes production data and aquifer conditions for water production and monitor wells in the Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) area (Figure 1). Water production wells are grouped within the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi fields, the locations of which are shown on Figure 1. Wells from these fields supply all the potable water used for municipal and most industrial purposes in Los Alamos County (LAC), at LANL, and at Bandelier National Monument. This report has three primary objectives: (1) Provide a continuing historical record of metered well production and overall water usage; (2) Provide data to the Department of Energy (DOE) and LANL management, and Los Alamos County planners for operation of the water supply system and for long-range water resource planning; and (3) Provide water-level data from regional aquifer production wells, test wells, and monitoring wells.

  19. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 1998, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the modification of the UR for CAS TA-03-001-TARC Roller Coaster Lagoons. This UR was established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and was based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This reevaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to modify the UR for CAS TA-03-001-TARC to an administrative UR. Administrative URs differ from standard URs in that they do not require onsite postings (i.e., signs) or other physical barriers (e.g., fencing, monuments), and they do not require periodic inspections (see Section 6.2 of the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels [NNSA/NSO, 2006c]). This Administrative UR was based on a “Remote Work Sites” future land use scenario that was used to calculate the FAL. The administrative UR will protect workers from an exposure exceeding that used in the calculation of the FAL (i.e., 336 hours per year). Any proposed activity within these use restricted areas that would potentially cause an exposure exceeding this exposure limit would require approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  20. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 1998, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS TA-03-001-TARC Roller Coaster Lagoons • CAS TA-21-001-TARC Roller Coaster N. Disposal Trench These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to modify these URs to administrative URs. Administrative URs differ from standard URs in that they do not require onsite postings (i.e., signs) or other physical barriers (e.g., fencing, monuments), and they do not require periodic inspections (see Section 6.2 of the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels [NNSA/NSO, 2006c]). These Administrative URs were based on a “Remote Work Sites” future land use scenario that was used to calculate the FAL. The administrative UR will protect workers from an exposure exceeding that used in the calculation of the FAL (i.e., 336 hours per year). Any proposed activity within these use restricted areas that would potentially cause an exposure exceeding this exposure limit would require approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  1. The Revised WIPP Passive Institutional Controls Program - A Conceptual Plan - 13145

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Russ [Department of Energy-Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [Department of Energy-Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Klein, Thomas [URS-Professional Solutions, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [URS-Professional Solutions, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Van Luik, Abraham [Department of Energy-Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [Department of Energy-Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy/Carlsbad Field Office (DOE/CBFO) is responsible for managing all activities related to the disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed waste in the geologic repository, 650 m below the land surface, at WIPP, near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The main function of the Passive Institutional Controls (PIC's) program is to inform future generations of the long-lived radioactive wastes buried beneath their feet in the desert. For the first 100 years after cessation of disposal operations, the rooms are closed and the shafts leading underground sealed, WIPP is mandated by law to institute Active Institutional Controls (AIC's) with fences, gates, and armed guards on patrol. At this same time a plan must be in place of how to warn/inform the future, after the AIC's are gone, of the consequences of intrusion into the geologic repository disposal area. A plan was put into place during the 1990's with records management and storage, awareness triggers, permanent marker design concepts and testing schedules. This work included the thoughts of expert panels and individuals. The plan held up under peer review and met the requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Today the NEA is coordinating a study called the 'Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) Across Generations' to provide the international nuclear waste repository community with a guide on how a nuclear record archive programs should be approached and developed. CBFO is cooperating and participating in this project and will take what knowledge is gained and apply that to the WIPP program. At the same time CBFO is well aware that the EPA and others are expecting DOE to move forward with planning for the future WIPP PIC's program; so a plan will be in place in time for WIPP's closure slated for the early 2030's. The DOE/CBFO WIPP PIC's program in place today meets the regulatory criteria, but complete feasibility of implementation is questionable, and may not be in conformance with the international guidance being developed. International guidance currently under development may suggest that the inter-generational equity principle strives to warn the future, however, in doing so not to unduly burden present generations. Building markers and monuments that are out of proportion to the risk being presented to the future is not in keeping with generational equity. With this in mind the DOE/CBFO is developing conceptual plans for re-evaluating and revising the current WIPP PIC's program. These conceptual plans will suggest scientific and technical work that must be completed to develop a 'new' PICs program that takes the best ideas of the present plan, blended with new ideas from the RK and M project, and proposed alternative permanent markers designs and materials in consideration. (authors)

  2. MAJOR PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land-use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the second project year (July 1 through September 30, 2003). This work included (1) describing the Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play, subplays, and outcrop reservoir analogs of the Uinta Green River Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit (Eocene Green River Formation), and (2) technology transfer activities. The Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit can be divided into plays having a dominantly southern sediment source (Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play) and plays having a dominantly northern sediment source (Conventional Northern Uinta Basin Play). The Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play is divided into six subplays: (1) conventional Uteland Butte interval, (2) conventional Castle Peak interval, (3) conventional Travis interval, (4) conventional Monument Butte interval, (5) conventional Beluga interval, and (6) conventional Duchesne interval fractured shale/marlstone. We are currently conducting basin-wide correlations to define the limits of the six subplays. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. Outcrop analogs for each subplay except the Travis interval are found in Indian and Nine Mile Canyons. During this quarter, the project team members submitted an abstract to the American Association of Petroleum Geologists for presentation at the 2004 annual national convention in Dallas, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  3. Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, James A.; Cantwell, Brian J.; Hlava, Kevin J.; Moore, H Robert; Orr, Andrew B.; Zvolanek, Emily A.

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), was prepared by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). The intent of WECC’s work was to identify planning-level energy corridors that the Department of Energy (DOE) and its affiliates could study in greater detail. Argonne was tasked by DOE to analyze the WECC Proposed Energy Corridors in five topic areas for use in reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. In compliance with Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), the Secretaries of Energy, Agriculture, and the Interior (Secretaries) published a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement in 2008 to address the proposed designation of energy transport corridors on federal lands in the 11 western states. Subsequently, Records of Decision designating the corridors were issued in 2009 by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). The 2012 settlement of a lawsuit, brought by The Wilderness Society and others against the United States, which identified environmental concerns for many of the corridors requires, among other things, periodic reviews of the corridors to assess the need for revisions, deletions, or additions. A 2013 Presidential Memorandum requires the Secretaries to undertake a continuing effort to identify and designate energy corridors. The WECC Proposed Energy Corridors and their analyses in this report provide key information for reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. Load centers and generation hubs identified in the WECC analysis, particularly as they reflect renewable energy development, would be useful in reviewing and potentially updating the designated Section 368 corridor network. Argonne used Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to analyze the proposed energy corridors in the WECC report in five topic areas: ? Federal land jurisdiction, ? Existing Section 368 corridors, ? Existing transmission lines, ? Previously studied corridor locations, and ? Protected areas. Analysis methods are explained and tables and maps are provided to describe the results of the analyses in all five topic areas. WECC used a rational approach to connecting the hubs it identified, although there may be opportunities for adapting some of the proposed WECC routes to previously designated Section 368 corridors, for example: ? The WECC proposed energy corridors are in fact centerlines of proposed routes connecting hubs of various descriptions related to electric energy transmission. Although the centerlines were sited to avoid sensitive areas, infrastructure proposed within actual pathways or corridors defined by the centerlines would sometimes affect lands where such development would not normally be allowed, such as National Parks and Monuments, National Wildlife Refuges, and Wilderness Areas. ? Many WECC proposed energy corridors are sited along centerlines of existing roads, including Interstate Highways, where in some cases additional width to accommodate energy transmission infrastructure may not be available. Examples include the WECC Proposed Corridor along Interstate 70 through Glenwood Canyon in Colorado, and along U.S. Highway 89 across Glen Canyon Dam in Arizona. ? Several WECC proposed energy corridors are parallel to designated Section 368 corridors that have already cleared the preliminary steps to right-of-way approval. In many of these cases, the WECC hub connection objectives can be met more efficiently by routing on the designated Section 368 corridors.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Gels; Stress from Confined Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George W. Scherer

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract for Grant DE-FG02-97ER45642 Period: 1997-2002 Mechanical Properties of Gels 2002-2008 Stress from Confined Fluids Principal investigator: Prof. George W. Scherer Dept. Civil & Env. Eng./PRISM Eng. Quad. E-319 Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Recipient organization: Trustees of Princeton University 4 New South Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Abstract: The initial stage of this project, entitled Mechanical Properties of Gels, was dedicated to characterizing and explaining the properties of inorganic gels. Such materials, made by sol-gel processing, are of interest for fabrication of films, fibers, optical devices, advanced insulation and other uses. However, their poor mechanical properties are an impediment in some applications, so understanding the origin of these properties could lead to enhanced performance. Novel experimental methods were developed and applied to measure the stiffness and permeability of gels and aerogels. Numerical simulations were developed to reproduce the growth process of the gels, resulting in structures whose mechanical properties matched the measurements. The models showed that the gels are formed by the growth of relatively robust clusters of molecules that are joined by tenuous links whose compliance compromises the stiffness of the structure. Therefore, synthetic methods that enhance the links could significantly increase the rigidity of such gels. The next stage of the project focused on Stress from Confined Fluids. The first problem of interest was the enhanced thermal expansion coefficient of water that we measured in the nanometric pores of cement paste. This could have a deleterious effect on the resistance of concrete to rapid heating in fires, because the excessive thermal expansion of water in the pores of the concrete could lead to spalling and collapse. A series of experiments demonstrated that the expansion of water increases as the pore size decreases. To explain this behavior, we undertook a collaboration with Prof. Stephen Garofalini (Rutgers), who has developed the best simulations of water ever reported by use of molecular dynamics. Simulated heating of water in small pores provided quantitative agreement with experiments, and showed that the origin of the high expansion is the altered structure of water in the first two molecular layers adjacent to the pore wall. The final focus of the project was to understand the damage done by crystals growing in small pores. For example, the primary cause of damage to ancient monuments in the Mediterranean Basin is growth of salt crystals in the pores of the stone. Salt may enter stone as a result of capillary rise of groundwater, by leaching of mortar joints, deposition of marine spray, or reactions with atmospheric pollutants (such as oxides of nitrogen or sulfur). As the water evaporates, the salt solution becomes supersaturated and crystals precipitate. Stress results, because the salt usually repels the minerals in the pore walls. Our goal was to identify the factors contributing to the repulsion, so that we could develop a chemical treatment to reduce the repulsion and hence the stress. (We have recently demonstrated an effective treatment as part of a separately funded study.) In collaboration with Prof. Garofalini, molecular dynamics simulations have been done that correctly reproduce the structure of water around dissolved ions of sodium and chloride. We simulated the interaction between crystals of sodium chloride and quartz, and found that this particular system exhibits attractive forces, in agreement with experiment. The origin of the attraction is the orientation of dipolar water molecules near the surfaces of the crystals. Similar calculations now must be done in systems, such as potassium chloride and quartz, where the interaction is repulsive. This grant supported the education of two doctoral students, Hang-Shing Ma (Ph.D., 2002) and Melanie Webb (Ph.D. expected 2010), three post-doctoral researchers, Joachim Gross, Gudrun Reichenauer, and Shuangyan (Sonia) Xu, and five undergraduates (for senior theses or independent projects

  5. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2004 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2004 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.1 times greater in 2004 than in 2003. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.2 times greater than in 2003. Wild steelhead trout catch was 1.6 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 978 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2004, the Snake River trap captured 23 hatchery and 18 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 60 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on June 4. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 10.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 19.0% less than in 2003. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2004 was 20.0% less and wild steelhead trout collection was 22.3% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on May 28 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because wild Chinook catch was very low, hatchery Chinook catch was very high, and the weekly quota of PIT tagged hatchery Chinook had been met. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2004 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook salmon was caused by age-0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age-0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age-1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. When several groups, which consisted of significant numbers of age-0 Chinook salmon, were removed from the analysis a relation was detected. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 2.8-fold and a 2.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.3-fold and a 2.0-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2004 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 7.0-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 4.7-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 3.8-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monume

  6. Fish Passage Center 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele [Fish Passage Center of the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Authority

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The January-July runoff volume above the Dalles Dam in 2007 was 89% of the average runoff volume for the 1971-2000 historical record. The April-July runoff volume at Lower Granite Dam was 68% of the 1971-2000 historical record. Over the 79 year historical record from 1929 through 2007, the 2007 January-July runoff volume at the Dalles was the 50th lowest year out of the 79th year record. The January through July runoff volume at Lower Granite was the 65th lowest runoff year out of 79 on record. This year can be characterized by steadily decreasing snowpack which was below average in the Columbia Basin by the end of April. The combination of runoff volume, decreasing snowpack and reservoir operations resulted in spring migration flows at McNary Dam averaging 239 Kcfs, slightly above the Biological Opinion flow objective of 237 Kcfs. However the spring period migration flows in the Snake River averaged 61 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam, substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 85 Kcfs. Summer migration period Biological Opinion flow objectives averaged 163 Kcfs at McNary Dam, substantially below the summer flow objective of 200 Kcfs. Summer migration period flows in the Snake River at Lower Granite Dam averaged 29 Kcfs, also substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 50 Kcfs. Overall spring migrants in the Columbia River experienced better migration flows than spring migrants in the Snake River reach. Summer migration flow objectives were not achieved in either the Columbia or Snake rivers. The 2007 FCRPS Operations Agreement represents an expanded and improved spill program that goes beyond the measures contained in the 2004 Biological Opinion. During the spring period, spill now occurs for twenty-four hours per day at all projects, except for John Day Dam where the daily program remains at 12 hours. A summer spill program provides spill at all the fish transportation collector projects (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams), whereas prior to 2005 spill was terminated at these projects after the spring period. In addition, the 2007 operations agreement provided regardless of flow conditions. For the first time spill for fish passage was provided in the low flow conditions that prevailed in the Snake River throughout the spring and summer migration periods. Gas bubble trauma (GBT) monitoring continued throughout the spill period. A higher incidence of rank 1, GBT signs were observed in late arriving steelhead smolts arriving after the 95% passage date had occurred. During this time dissolved gas levels were generally below the 110% water quality standard in the forebay where fish were sampled. This occurrence was due to prolonged exposure and extended travel times due to low migration flows. The 2007 migration conditions differed from any year in the historic record. The migration conditions combined low river flows in the Snake River with spill throughout the spring and summer season. The juvenile migration characteristics observed in 2007 were unique compared to past years in that high levels of 24 hour spill for fish passage were provided in low flow conditions, and with a delayed start to the smolt transportation program a smaller proportion of the total run being transported. This resulted in relatively high spring juvenile survival despite the lower flows. The seasonal spring average flow in the Snake River was 61 Kcfs much lower than the spring time average of 120 Kcfs that occurred in 2006. However juvenile steelhead survival through the Lower Granite to McNary reach in 2007 was nearly 70% which was similar to the juvenile steelhead survival seen in 2006 under higher migration flows. The low flows in the May-July period of 2007 were similar to the 2001 low flow year, yet survival for fall chinook juveniles in this period in 2007 was much higher. In 2001 the reach survival estimate for juvenile fall Chinook from Lower Granite to McNary Dam ranged from 0.25-0.34, while survival in the same reach ranged between 0.54-0.60 in 2007. In addition travel time estimat