National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for federal emissions standards

  1. Federal Flood Risk Management Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Flood Risk Management Standard builds upon Executive Order (E.O.) 11988 and is to be incorporated into existing Federal department and agency processes used to implement E.O. 11988.

  2. Federal Appliance Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: HR 6582 of 2012 made some modifications to the efficiency standards previously adopted for some appliance types. The bill did not adopt new standards for previously unregulated appliances,...

  3. Exploring Ways to Standardize Federal Energy Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2013 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers ways to standardize federal energy contracts and initial findings, including savings calculations, assurances and guarantees, equipment performance standards, pricing, and more.

  4. Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (FFRMS (2015)) expands upon E.O. 11988, Floodplain Management, (1977) by directing that federal agencies use a higher vertical flood elevation and...

  5. Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (FEMA, 2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (FFRMS (2015)) expands upon E.O. 11988, Floodplain Management, (1977) by directing that federal agencies use a higher vertical flood elevation and...

  6. 1998 federal technical standards workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The theme for the 1998 workshop was Standards Management -- A World of Change and Opportunities. The workshop`s goal was to further the implementation of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (Public Law 104-113) through the sharing of standards management success stories, lessons learned, and emerging initiatives within the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. The target audience for this workshop included agency/department and contractor personnel and representatives of standards developing organizations that either used technical standards in their work for the Federal Government of participated in standards writing/management activities in support of the missions and programs of Federal agencies/departments. As with previous standards workshops sponsored by the DOE, views on the technical subject areas under the workshop theme were solicited from and provided by agency Standards Executives and standards program managers, voluntary standards organizations, and the private sector. This report includes vugraphs of the presentations.

  7. Emission Market Opportunities for Federal Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Shah, C.

    2005-06-01

    This document assists federal agencies in incorporating emissions market opportunities in their energy projects, including emission reduction credit markets and cap and trade. It looks at how potential emissions costs/revenues can be incorporated into project proposals, how groups can apply for emissions allowances, and how agencies can sell emissions allowances and receive the financial benefit. The fact sheet also outlines how FEMP can provide assistance throughout the process.

  8. National Emission Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in-growth of Rn from the decay of Th in thorium 222 230 wastes would not exceed the ... RADON EMISSIONS FROM U AND Th SOURCES 238 232 In the past, material from Mound Applied ...

  9. ISSUANCE 2016-01-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings ISSUANCE 2016-01-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: ...

  10. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings EA-2001: Energy...

  11. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Appliance & Equipment Standards » Rulemakings & Notices » Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee The Appliance and Equipment Standards Program established the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) in an effort to further improve the Department of Energy's (DOE) process of establishing energy efficiency standards for certain appliances and commercial

  12. EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    20: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN 1904-AD56) EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise...

  13. EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN 1904-AC61) EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise...

  14. Public Meeting Transcript: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This transcript is from the public meeting to discuss sustainable design standards for Federal buildings held on July 28, 2010.

  15. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This rule updates the baseline Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2013. PUBLIC ...

  16. Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Europe - Euro 5 for LDV, amendment of EURO 5 for HDV | Department of Energy Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in Europe - Euro 5 for LDV, amendment of EURO 5 for HDV Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in Europe - Euro 5 for LDV, amendment of EURO 5 for HDV 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Federal Environmental Agency (UBA) 2002_deer_rodt.pdf (230 KB) More Documents & Publications Perspective on the Future Development of

  17. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee Charter |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee Charter Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee Charter This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) Advisory Committee Charter. asrac_charter_032715.pdf (44.53 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Issues a Notice of Public Meeting Pertaining to the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) Electricity Advisory Committee, U.S.

  18. Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings | Department of Energy Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings This document is an attendee list for the public meeting to discuss sustainable design standards for Federal buildings held on July 28, 2010. Download the public meeting attendee list. (43.68 KB) More Documents & Publications Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA (DOE,

  19. ISSUANCE 2015-07-14: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Open Meetings and Webinars ISSUANCE 2015-07-14: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings and Webinars This ...

  20. ISSUANCE 2015-05-26:Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar ISSUANCE 2015-05-26:Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar This ...

  1. ISSUANCE 2015-12-01: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings ISSUANCE 2015-12-01: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings This document is the ...

  2. Webinar: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE is conducting a public meeting and webinar regarding the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC). For more information, please visit the ASRAC page.

  3. Energy Goals and Standards for Federal Government

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Executive Order 13514, signed in October 2009, created a series of new requirements aimed at increasing the sustainability of all federal agencies. To help achieve these goals, the Executive Order...

  4. New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    President Obama signed Executive Order (E.O.) 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input, on January 30, 2015.

  5. Public Meeting Transcript: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This transcript is from the public meeting to discuss sustainable design standards for Federal buildings held on July 28, 2010. noprmeeting072810.pdf (345.56 KB) More Documents & ...

  6. EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update (RIN 1904-AD56) EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal...

  7. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2010 INL Report for Radionuclides (2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2011-06-01

    This report documents the calendar Year 2010 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'

  8. 1990 INEL national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency issued on December 15, 1989 final rules governing air emissions of radionuclides. Requirements concerning radionuclide emissions from Department of Energy Facilities are addressed under Title 40, Code Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.'' Section 61.94 of the regulations require that each DOE facility submit on an annual basis a report documenting compliance with the Subpart H requirements. This report addresses the section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for calendar year 1990. The Idaho Operations Office of the Department of Energy is the primary contact concerning NESHAPs compliance at the INEL.

  9. California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (Update) (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    The state of California was given authority under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) to set emissions standards for light-duty vehicles that exceed federal standards. In addition, other states that do not comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the Environmental Protection Agency under CAAA90 were given the option to adopt Californias light-duty vehicle emissions standards in order to achieve air quality compliance. CAAA90 specifically identifies hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and NOx as vehicle-related air pollutants that can be regulated. California has led the nation in developing stricter vehicle emissions standards, and other states have adopted the California standards.

  10. The role of the Federal Relighting Initiative in emission controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholls, A.K.; Purcell, C.W.; Friedman, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Relighting Initiative (FRI), under the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has developed a comprehensive process to assist federal agencies in meeting the nation`s energy mandate. This mandate states that federal facilities must use 20% less energy by the year 2000, based on 1985 consumption levels. Because lighting accounts for about 40% of total federal electricity consumption, the FRI was conceived to help reduce energy use in this important area while improving lighting quality and increasing productivity through relighting. Selected federal rules and regulations provide guidance on the types of energy efficiency techniques required, life-cycle costing methods and lighting levels that should be employed to achieve the federal mandate. Although the central focus of this paper is on the environment, this paper takes the perspective that the energy efficiency gains achieved through the FRI would produce both environmental and economic benefits for the United States. For example, improvements in energy efficiency would reduce electricity demand, and would consequently reduce the emissions associated with fossil fuel combustion for power production. These reduced emissions include carbon dioxide, which is associated with the potential for global climate change, and heavy metals, which pose a potential health threat to humans and aquatic ecosystems. Economic benefits of the FRI would include reduced federal expenditures on energy or, possibly, avoiding new power plant construction.This paper begins with a brief overview of the FRI process. Next, current lighting energy use in federal buildings is evaluated and the potential future energy savings achievable through full implementation of the FRI are estimated. The paper then translates these energy savings into avoided emissions of carbon dioxide and heavy metals and into avoided fuel expenditures.

  11. The role of the Federal Relighting Initiative in emission controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholls, A.K.; Purcell, C.W.; Friedman, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Relighting Initiative (FRI), under the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has developed a comprehensive process to assist federal agencies in meeting the nation's energy mandate. This mandate states that federal facilities must use 20% less energy by the year 2000, based on 1985 consumption levels. Because lighting accounts for about 40% of total federal electricity consumption, the FRI was conceived to help reduce energy use in this important area while improving lighting quality and increasing productivity through relighting. Selected federal rules and regulations provide guidance on the types of energy efficiency techniques required, life-cycle costing methods and lighting levels that should be employed to achieve the federal mandate. Although the central focus of this paper is on the environment, this paper takes the perspective that the energy efficiency gains achieved through the FRI would produce both environmental and economic benefits for the United States. For example, improvements in energy efficiency would reduce electricity demand, and would consequently reduce the emissions associated with fossil fuel combustion for power production. These reduced emissions include carbon dioxide, which is associated with the potential for global climate change, and heavy metals, which pose a potential health threat to humans and aquatic ecosystems. Economic benefits of the FRI would include reduced federal expenditures on energy or, possibly, avoiding new power plant construction.This paper begins with a brief overview of the FRI process. Next, current lighting energy use in federal buildings is evaluated and the potential future energy savings achievable through full implementation of the FRI are estimated. The paper then translates these energy savings into avoided emissions of carbon dioxide and heavy metals and into avoided fuel expenditures.

  12. 1999 INEEL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Tkachyk

    2000-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1999. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1999, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  13. 1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Tkachyk

    1999-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  14. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. Calendar Year 2012 INL Report for Radionuclides (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdoorn, Mark; Haney, Tom

    2013-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, ''Protection of the Environment,'' Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,'' Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  15. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2011 INL Report for Radionuclides (2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2012-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  16. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. Calendar Year 2013 INL Report for Radionuclides [2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdoorn, Mark; Haney, Tom

    2014-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2013 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, ''Protection of the Environment,'' Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,'' Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 3.02 E-02 mrem per year, 0.30 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  17. Development of the DDA 8. 2L diesel engine for 1988 emission standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winsor, R.E.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The emission development performed to meet 1988 Federal and California emission standards with a four-stroke direct-injection V-8 diesel engine of 8.2L displacement is described. On the naturally aspirated engine the major concern was meeting particulate and lug smoke standards at low NO/sub x/ levels. Acceleration smoke and particulate emission reduction was necessary on the turbocharged engine. The performance and emission goals were met by modifying the unit injectors and pistons of both naturally aspirated and turbocharged engines.

  18. Are renewables portfolio standards cost-effective emission abatement policy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katerina Dobesova; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave

    2005-11-15

    Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) could be an important policy instrument for 3P and 4P control. The authors examine the costs of renewable power, accounting for the federal production tax credit, the market value of a renewable credit, and the value of producing electricity without emissions of SO{sub 2}, NOx, mercury, and CO{sub 2}. The focus is on Texas, which has a large RPS and is the largest U.S. electricity producer and one of the largest emitters of pollutants and CO{sub 2}. The private and social costs of wind generation in an RPS is compared with the current cost of fossil generation, accounting for the pollution and CO{sub 2} emissions. It was found that society paid about 5.7 cents/kWh more for wind power, counting the additional generation, transmission, intermittency, and other costs. The higher cost includes credits amounting to 1.1 cents/kWh in reduced SO{sub 2}, NOx, and Hg emissions. These pollution reductions and lower CO{sub 2} emissions could be attained at about the same cost using pulverized coal (PC) or natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS); the reductions could be obtained more cheaply with an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CCS. 35 refs., 7 tabs.

  19. Uncle Sam goes to market: Federal agency disposal of emission reduction credits under the Federal property management regulations. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafferty, V.J.

    1994-01-30

    With the realignment and closure of Federal facilities, especially Department of Defense installations, Federal agencies have been presented with a unique opportunity: the chance to create and dispose of air emission reduction credits (ERCs). This situation and current commitments by the Congress and EPA to expand the use of market based pollution control programs have generated interest in certain circles as to whether and how Federal agencies can dispose of ERCs and similar pollution rights and allowances. This paper will discuss ERCs, why the disposal of ERCs by Federal agencies is a pressing issue, and how Federal agencies can dispose of ERCs under existing Federal property laws and regulations.

  20. Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in Europe - Euro 5 for LDV, amendment of EURO 5 for HDV Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission ...

  1. EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The amendments require federal agencies to use natural systems, ecosystem processes, and nature-based approaches to identify alternatives and require federal agency regulations or ...

  2. Federal Air Emissions Regulations (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized two regulations, the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and the Clean Air Mercury Rule CAMR, that would reduce emissions from coal-fired power plants in the United States. Both CAIR and CAMR are included in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 reference case. The EPA has received 11 petitions for reconsideration of CAIR and has provided an opportunity for public comment on reconsidering certain aspects of CAIR. Public comments were accepted until January 13, 2006. The EPA has also received 14 petitions for reconsideration of CAMR and is willing to reconsider certain aspects of the rule. Public comments were accepted for 45 days after publication of the reconsideration notice in the Federal Register. Several states and organizations have filed lawsuits against CAMR. The ultimate decision of the courts will have a significant impact on the implementation of CAMR.

  3. Regulated Emissions from Biodiesel Tested in Heavy-Duty Engines Meeting 2004 Emission Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Black, S.; Ireland, J.; McDaniel, T.; Williams, A.; Frailey, M.; Sharp, C. A.

    2005-11-01

    Biodiesel produced from soybean oil, canola oil, yellow grease, and beef tallow was tested in two heavy-duty engines. The biodiesels were tested neat and as 20% by volume blends with a 15 ppm sulfur petroleum-derived diesel fuel. The test engines were the following: 2002 Cummins ISB and 2003 DDC Series 60. Both engines met the 2004 U.S. emission standard of 2.5 g/bhp-h NO{sub x}+HC (3.35 g/kW-h) and utilized exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All emission tests employed the heavy-duty transient procedure as specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. Reduction in PM emissions and increase in NO{sub x} emissions were observed for all biodiesels in all engines, confirming observations made in older engines. On average PM was reduced by 25% and NO{sub x} increased by 3% for the two engines tested for a variety of B20 blends. These changes are slightly larger in magnitude, but in the same range as observed in older engines. The cetane improver 2-ethyl hexyl nitrate was shown to have no measurable effect on NO{sub x} emissions from B20 in these engines, in contrast to observations reported for older engines. The effect of intake air humidity on NO{sub x} emissions from the Cummins ISB was quantified. The CFR NO{sub x}/humidity correction factor was shown to be valid for an engine equipped with EGR, operating at 1700 m above sea level, and operating on conventional or biodiesel.

  4. 2014-10-31 Issuance: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee, Notice of Public Webinar | Department of Energy 31 Issuance: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee, Notice of Public Webinar 2014-10-31 Issuance: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee, Notice of Public Webinar This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee, Notice of Public Webinar. asrac_webinar.pdf (137.64 KB) More Documents & Publications 2014-07-21 Issuance: Appliance Standards and

  5. Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_parche.pdf (285.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation SCR Technologies

  6. ISSUANCE 2015-08-19: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy...

  7. ISSUANCE 2016-01-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Open Meetings | Department of Energy 1-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings ISSUANCE 2016-01-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings. ASRAC Feb and April Notice of Public Meetings.pdf (142.09 KB) More Documents & Publications ISSUANCE 2015-12-01: Appliance

  8. ISSUANCE 2015-05-26:Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar | Department of Energy Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar ISSUANCE 2015-05-26:Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar. asrac_june_meeting.pdf (127.08 KB) More Documents & Publications ISSUANCE 2015-07-14:

  9. ISSUANCE 2015-07-14: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Open Meetings and Webinars | Department of Energy 4: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings and Webinars ISSUANCE 2015-07-14: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings and Webinars This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings and Webinars. asrac_summer_webinars.pdf (160.02 KB) More Documents & Publications

  10. ISSUANCE 2015-12-01: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Open Meetings | Department of Energy 01: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings ISSUANCE 2015-12-01: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings. ASRAC December 2015 and January 2016 Open Meetings.pdf (280.66 KB) More Documents & Publications ISSUANCE 2016-01-27:

  11. Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The head of each Executive agency is responsible for ensuring that all necessary actions are taken for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution with respect to Federal...

  12. EO 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The head of each Executive agency is responsible for ensuring that all necessary actions are taken for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution with respect to Federal...

  13. EO 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards (1978)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The head of each Executive agency is responsible for ensuring that all necessary actions are taken for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution with respect to Federal...

  14. ISSUANCE 2015-06-08: Solicitation of Nominations for Membership on the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solicitation of Nominations for Membership on the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee

  15. 2014-07-21 Issuance: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Adivsory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee (ASRAC) - Manufactured Housing Working Group; Notice of Open Meeting | Department of Energy 1 Issuance: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Adivsory Committee (ASRAC) - Manufactured Housing Working Group; Notice of Open Meeting 2014-07-21 Issuance: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Adivsory Committee (ASRAC) - Manufactured Housing Working Group; Notice of Open Meeting This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of public meeting for the Appliance

  16. EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings’ Baseline Standards Update (RIN 1904-AD56)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including low-rise residential buildings.

  17. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants submittal -- 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Black, S.C.

    1998-06-01

    Each potential source of Nevada Test Site (NTS) emissions was characterized by one of the following methods: (1) monitoring methods and procedures previously developed at the NTS; (2) a yearly radionuclide inventory of the source, assuming that volatile radionuclide are released to the environment; (3) the measurement of tritiated water (as HTO or T{sub 2}O) concentration in liquid effluents discharged to containment ponds and assuming all the effluent evaporates over the course of the year to become an air emission; or (4) using a combination of environmental measurements and CAP88-PC to calculate emissions. The emissions for National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) reporting are listed. They are very conservative and are used in Section 3 to calculate the EDE to the maximally exposed individual offsite. Offsite environmental surveillance data, where available, are used to confirm that calculated emissions are, indeed, conservative.

  18. EO 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOURCE: The provisions of Executive Order 12088 of October 13,1978, appear at 43 FR 47707, ... Standards. 1-101. The head of each Executive agency is responsible for ensuring that ...

  19. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2006-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nations site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides that are resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds, dust-devils) along with historically-contaminated soils on the NTS. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent (EDE) to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS for inhaling radioactive particles that may be carried by wind off of the NTS. This limit assumes that members of the public surrounding the NTS may also inhale background levels or radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities that come from naturally-occurring elements in the environment (e.g., radon gas from the earth or natural building materials) or from other man-made sources (e.g., cigarette smoke). The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires DOE facilities (e.g., the NTS) to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP dose limit by annually estimating the dose to a hypothetical member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI), or the member of the public who resides within an 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius

  20. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants submittal -- 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Black, S.C.

    1995-06-01

    This report focuses on air quality at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for 1994. A general description of the effluent sources are presented. Each potential source of NTS emissions was characterized by one of the following: (1) by monitoring methods and procedures previously developed at NTS; (2) by a yearly radionuclide inventory of the source, assuming that volatile radionuclides are released to the environment; (3) by the measurement of tritiated water concentration in liquid effluents discharged to containment ponds and assuming all the effluent evaporates over the course of the year to become an air emission; or (4) by using a combination of environmental measurements and CAP88-PC to calculate emissions. Appendices A through J describe the methods used to determine the emissions from the sources. These National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) emissions are very conservative, are used to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the Maximally Exposed Individual offsite, and exceed, in some cases, those reported in DOE`s Effluent Information System (EIS). The NESHAP`s worst-case emissions that exceed the EIS reported emissions are noted. Offsite environmental surveillance data are used to confirm that calculated emissions are, indeed, conservative.

  1. 1990 INEL national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants. Annual report, June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency issued on December 15, 1989 final rules governing air emissions of radionuclides. Requirements concerning radionuclide emissions from Department of Energy Facilities are addressed under Title 40, Code Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.`` Section 61.94 of the regulations require that each DOE facility submit on an annual basis a report documenting compliance with the Subpart H requirements. This report addresses the section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for calendar year 1990. The Idaho Operations Office of the Department of Energy is the primary contact concerning NESHAPs compliance at the INEL.

  2. White House Announces New Executive Order To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Federal Government

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The White House today announced that President Obama will issue a new executive order that will cut the federal government's greenhouse gas emissions 40% over the next decade (from 2008 levels) and increase the share of electricity the federal government consumes from renewable sources to 30%.

  3. A Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Patrick; Logan, Jeffrey; Bird, Lori; Short, Walter

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Logan, J.; Bird, L.; Short, W.

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  5. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Public Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Public Meeting, is issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document." 1 [6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office

  6. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Cancellation of Open Meetings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) announces the cancellation of open meetings for the Commercial and Industrial Pumps Working Group of the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) scheduled for July 23 through July 25, 2014.

  7. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing this final rule to implement provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This rule updates the baseline Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2013.

  8. Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    In an earlier analysis completed in response to a request received from Representative David McIntosh, Chairman of the Subcommittee on National Economic Growth, Natural Resources, and Regulatory Affairs, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide emissions, assuming a policy instrument patterned after the sulfur dioxide allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This paper compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard as an instrument for reducing carbon dioxide emissions.

  9. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2011-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP

  10. Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, Stephen; Williams, Alison; Chan, Peter

    2014-06-30

    This paper presents estimates of the key impacts of Federal energy and water conservation standards adopted from 1987 through 2013. The standards for consumer products and commercial and industrial equipment include those set by legislation as well as standards adopted by DOE through rulemaking. In 2013, the standards saved an estimated 4.05 quads of primary energy, which is equivalent to 4% of total U.S. energy consumption. The savings in operating costs for households and businesses totaled $56 billion. The average household saved $361 in operating costs as a result of residential and plumbing product standards. The estimated reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions associated with the standards in 2013 was 218 million metric tons, which is equivalent to 4% of total U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions. The estimated cumulative energy savings over the period 1990-2090 amount to 181 quads. Accounting for the increased upfront costs of more-efficient products and the operating cost (energy and water) savings over the products’ lifetime, the standards have a past and projected cumulative net present value (NPV) of consumer benefit of between $1,271 billion and $1,487 billion, using 7 percent and 3 percent discount rates, respectively. The water conservation standards, together with energy conservation standards that also save water, reduced water use by 1.9 trillion gallons in 2013, and will achieve cumulative water savings by 2090 of 55 trillion gallons. The estimated consumer savings in 2013 from reduced water use amounted to $16 billon.

  11. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2010-06-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NTS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no

  12. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.

    2014-06-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitations to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has

  13. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.

    2013-06-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has

  14. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciucci, John

    2010-06-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NTS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no

  15. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2012-06-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the

  16. EA-1872: Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Design Standards for New Federal Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This EA evaluated the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend the current rule for commercial and high-rise multi-family residential buildings, 10 CFR 433 “Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings,” to replace ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 with the more stringent ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, incorporated by reference. This EA also evaluated the environmental impacts with regard to low-rise residential buildings; this rulemaking updated 10 CFR 435 Subpart A, “Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings,” to replace the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 2004 with the more stringent IECC 2009, incorporated by reference. This EA was completed as DOE/EA-1871.

  17. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update (RIN 1904-AD39)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing this final rule to implement provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This rule updates the baseline Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2013.

  18. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of ...

  19. 2014-06-06 Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee; Preliminary Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a preliminary agenda for the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee open meeting being held on June 6, 2014 from 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (EST) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Forrestal Building, Room 8E-089, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585.

  20. Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy,

  1. 2014-08-19 Issuance Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC)- Central Air Conditioner Regional Standards Enforcement Working Group; Notice of Open Meetings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Registe notice of open meetings regarding the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) - Central Air Conditioner Regional Standards Enforcement Working Group, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on August 19, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  2. New analysis techniques for estimating impacts of federal appliance efficiency standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, James E.

    2003-06-24

    Impacts of U.S. appliance and equipment standards have been described previously. Since 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has updated standards for clothes washers, water heaters, and residential central air conditioners and heat pumps. A revised estimate of the aggregate impacts of all the residential appliance standards in the United States shows that existing standards will reduce residential primary energy consumption and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by 89 percent in 2020 compared to the levels expected without any standards. Studies of possible new standards are underway for residential furnaces and boilers, as well as a number of products in the commercial (tertiary) sector, such as distribution transformers and unitary air conditioners. The analysis of standards has evolved in response to critiques and in an attempt to develop more precise estimates of costs and benefits of these regulations. The newer analysis elements include: (1) valuing energy savings by using marginal (rather than average) energy prices specific to an end-use; (2) simulating the impacts of energy efficiency increases over a sample population of consumers to quantify the proportion of households having net benefits or net costs over the life of the appliance; and (3) calculating marginal markups in distribution channels to derive the incremental change in retail prices associated with increased manufacturing costs for improving energy efficiency.

  3. EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input (2015)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Executive Order (E.O.) 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard [FFRMS] and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input (2015) amends E.O. 11988,...

  4. EO 13690 (2015): Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Executive Order (E.O.) 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard [FFRMS] and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input (2015) amends E.O. 11988,...

  5. EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AC61)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA was to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including low-rise residential buildings. DOE has canceled this EA and is replacing it with EA-2020.

  6. EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AD56)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including low-rise residential buildings.

  7. 1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

  8. Energy conservation standards for new federal residential buildings: A decision analysis study using relative value discounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, C. . Coll. of Business Administration); Merkhofer, M.M.; Hamm, G.L. )

    1990-07-02

    This report presents a reassessment of the proposed standard for energy conservation in new federal residential buildings. The analysis uses the data presented in the report, Economic Analysis: In Support of Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings (June 1988)-to be referred to as the EASIECS report. The reassessment differs from that report in several respects. In modeling factual information, it uses more recent forecasts of future energy prices and it uses data from the Bureau of the Census in order to estimate the distribution of lifetimes of residential buildings rather than assuming a hypothetical 25-year lifetime. In modeling social preferences decision analysis techniques are used in order to examine issues of public values that often are not included in traditional cost-benefit analyses. The present report concludes that the public would benefit from the proposed standard. Several issues of public values regarding energy use are illustrated with methods to include them in a formal analysis of a proposed energy policy. The first issue places a value on costs and benefits that will occur in the future as an irreversible consequence of current policy choices. This report discusses an alternative method, called relative value discounting which permits flexible discounting of future events-and the possibility of placing greater values on future events. The second issue places a value on the indirect benefits of energy savings so that benefits accrue to everyone rather than only to the person who saves the energy. This report includes non-zero estimates of the indirect benefits. The third issue is how the costs and benefits discussed in a public policy evaluation should be compared. In summary, selection of individual projects with larger benefit to cost ratios leads to a portfolio of projects with the maximum benefit to cost difference. 30 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs. (JF)

  9. 1996 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,`` each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1996. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contact concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For calendar year 1996, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 3.14E-02 mrem (3.14E-07 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  10. 2015-02-25 Issuance: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of open meeting and webinar regarding the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 25, 2015. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  11. ISSUANCE 2015-10-07: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings Regarding The Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings Regarding The Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group

  12. California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    In July 2002, California Assembly Bill 1493 (A.B. 1493) was signed into law. The law requires that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) develop and adopt, by January 1, 2005, greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles that provide the maximum feasible reduction in emissions. In estimating the feasibility of the standard, CARB is required to consider cost-effectiveness, technological capability, economic impacts, and flexibility for manufacturers in meeting the standard.

  13. EA-1463: 10 CFR 433: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings and 10 CFR 435: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EA examines the potential environmental impacts of the Final Rule on building habitability and the outdoor environment. To identify the potential environmental impacts that may result from implementing the Final Rule for new Federal commercial and residential buildings, DOE compared the Final Rule with the “no-action alternative” of using the current Federal standards – 10 CFR Part 434 and 10 CFR Part 435 Subpart C (referred to as the “no-action alternative”).

  14. STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENECKE MW

    2010-09-08

    This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Quality Assurance Project Plan for National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs), Subpart H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.; Biermann, A

    2000-06-27

    As a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility whose operations involve the use of radionuclides, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is subject to the requirements of 40 CFR 61, the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs). Subpart H of this Regulation establishes standards for exposure of the public to radionuclides (other than radon) released from DOE Facilities (Federal Register, 1989). These regulations limit the emission of radionuclides to ambient air from DOE facilities (see Section 2.0). Under the NESHAPs Subpart H Regulation (hereafter referred to as NESHAPs), DOE facilities are also required to establish a quality assurance program for radionuclide emission measurements; specific requirements for preparation of a Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) are given in Appendix B, Method 114 of 40 CFR 61. Throughout this QAPP, the specific Quality Assurance Method elements of 40 CFR 61 Subpart H addressed by a given section are identified. In addition, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) (US EPA, 1994a) published draft requirements for QAPP's prepared in support of programs that develop environmental data. We have incorporated many of the technical elements specified in that document into this QAPP, specifically those identified as relating to measurement and data acquisition; assessment and oversight; and data validation and usability. This QAPP will be evaluated on an annual basis, and updated as appropriate.

  16. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, June 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Grossman

    2005-06-01

    sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). At the NLVF, parts of Building A-1 were contaminated with tritium by a previous contractor in 1995. The incident involved the release of tritium as HTO. This unusual occurrence led to a very small potential exposure to an offsite person. The HTO emission has continued at lower levels (probably re-emanation from building materials), even after cleanup activities in November and December 1997. A description of the incident and the potential effective dose equivalent (EDE) for offsite exposure are set forth in Appendix A.

  17. ISSUANCE 2015-06-30: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Working Group

  18. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ASRAC is an action issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document. 1 [6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy [Docket Number

  19. Savannah River Site radionuclide air emissions annual report for national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, I.K.

    1993-12-31

    The radiological air emission sources at the SRS have been divided into three categories, Point, Grouped and Non-Point, for this report. Point sources, analyzed individually, are listed with a listing of the control devices, and the control device efficiency. The sources listed have been grouped together either for security reasons or where individual samples are composited for analytical purposes. For grouped sources the listed control devices may not be on all sources within a group. Point sources that did not have continuous effluent monitoring/sampling in 1993 are noted. The emissions from these sources was determined from Health Protection smear data, facility radionuclide content or other calculational methods, including process knowledge, utilizing existing analytical data. This report also contain sections on facility descriptions, dose assessment, and supplemental information.

  20. Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S.

  1. Midea Agrees to Pay $4.5M for Four Models that Fail to Meet Federal Energy Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midea America Corp., Hefei Hualing Co., Ltd., and China Refrigeration Industry Co., Ltd. (“Midea”)—all subsidiaries or affiliates of GD Midea Holding Co., Ltd.—agreed to pay $4,562,838 after admitting in a Compromise Agreement [insert link] that one refrigerator-freezer basic model and three freezer basic models fail to meet the relevant federal energy conservation standards.

  2. EA-1918: Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and MultiFamily High-Rise Residential Buildings" RIN 1904-AC60

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of implementing provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This EA addresses Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2010. The Final Rule was published in the Federal Register on July 9, 2013, 78 FR 40945.

  3. ISSUANCE 2016-04-14: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Circulator Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Circulator Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures

  4. ISSUANCE 2016-04-08: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps (DPPP) Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps (DPPP) Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

  5. ISSUANCE 2016-02-19: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps (DPPP) Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

  6. ISSUANCE 2016-03-10: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Circulator Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Circulator Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures

  7. ISSUANCE 2016-01-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish a Working Group for Circulator Pumps to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish a Working Group for Circulator Pumps to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

  8. ISSUANCE 2015-08-19: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

  9. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers. p-07_frazee.pdf (499.08 KB) More Documents & Publications 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods Vehicle

  10. 2014-08-07 Issuance: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC)- Manufactured Housing Working Group; Notice of Open Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of open meeting regarding the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) - Manufactured Housing Working Group on August 7, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  11. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

    2009-06-30

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo

  12. What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwab, A.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

  13. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Grossman; Ronald Warren

    2008-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS from radionuclides emitted to air from the NTS. This limit does not include the radiation doses that members of the public may receive through the intake of radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities, such as those that come from naturally occurring elements in the environment (e.g., naturally occurring radionuclides in soil or radon gas from the earth or natural building materials), or from other man-made sources (e.g., medical treatments). The NTS demonstrates compliance using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole

  14. The Federal manufactured home construction and safety standards -- implications for foam panel construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.D.; Schrock, D.W.; Flintoft, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    This report reviews the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development construction code for (HUD-code) manufactured homes, Part 3280: Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards (the HUD Code), to identify sections that might be relevant in determining if insulated foam core panels (or structural insulated panels, SIPs) meet the requirements of Part 3280 for use in manufactured home construction. The U.S. Department of Energy and other parties are interested in the use of SIPs in residential construction, including HUD-Code manufactured homes, because the foam panels can have a higher effective insulation value than standard stud-framed construction and use less dimensional lumber. Although SIPs have not been used in manufactured housing, they may be well suited to the factory production process used to manufacture HUD-Code homes and the fact that they require less virgin timber may reduce the effect of volatile and increasing timber prices. Part 3280 requirements for fire resistance, wind resistance, structural load strength, ventilation, transportation shock, and thermal protection are reviewed. A brief comparison is made between the HUD Code requirements and data collected from foam panel manufacturers. 8 refs.

  15. Secretary of Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Federal Agency Historic Preservation Programs Pursuant to the National Historic Preservation Act (Section 110 Guidelines) (NPS, 1998)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Federal Agency Historic Preservation Programs Pursuant to the National Historic Preservation Act (63 FR 20496; April 24, 1998) are the formal guidance to each Federal agency on meeting the requirements of Section 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act.

  16. Basis to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Stand-off Experiments Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Sandvig

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the basis and the documentation to demonstrate general compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, (the Standard) for outdoor linear accelerator operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-off Experiments Range (SOX). The intent of this report is to inform and gain acceptance of this methodology from the governmental bodies regulating the INL.

  17. 1995 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs): Radionuclides. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities), each DOE facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at INEL for CY 1995. For that year, airborne radionuclide emissions from INEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 1.80E-02 mrem (1.80E-07 Sievert), well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  18. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants petroleum refineries. Background information for final standards. Summary of public comments and responses. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) are promulgated for the petroleum refinery industry under authority of section 112 of the Clean Air Act. This background information document provides technical information and analyses used in the development of the final NESHAP and Agency reponses to public comments on the proposed rule.

  19. EA-1871: Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, “EE Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings” and 10 CFR 435, “EE Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE‘s Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, ―Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings‖ and 10 CFR 435, ―Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings‖ Baseline Standards Update. The final rule updates the baseline standards in 10 CFR 433 and 10 CFR 435 to the latest private sector standards based on the cost-effectiveness of the latest private sector standards and DOE‘s determination that energy efficiency has been improved in these codes as required by 42 U.S.C 6831 et seq. DOE is issuing its final determinations on American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 (ASHRAE 2007) and the International Code Council‘s 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) in the same edition of the Federal Register as this final rule.

  20. Interconnection Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: The North Carolina Utilities Commission approved revised interconnection standards in May 2015. The new standards used the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's most recent Small Generator...

  1. Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, Stephen; Williams, Alison; Chan, Peter

    2011-12-07

    This paper presents estimates of the key impacts of the energy and water conservation standards that have been adopted from 1987 through 2010. The standards covered include those set by legislation as well as standards adopted by DOE through rulemaking. We estimate that energy efficiency standards for consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment that have been adopted from 1987 through 2010 saved 3.0 quads in 2010, have had a cumulative energy savings of 25.9 quads through 2010 and will achieve cumulative energy savings of 158 quads over the period 1990-2070. Thus, the majority of the savings are still to come as products subject to standards enter the stock. Furthermore, the standards will have a cumulative net present value (NPV) of consumer benefit of between $851 billion and $1,103 billion, using 7 percent and 3 percent discount rates, respectively. In addition, we estimate the water conservation standards, together with those energy conservation standards that also save water, saved residential consumers 1.5 trillion gallons of water in 2010, have had cumulative water savings of 11.7 trillion gallons through 2010, and will achieve cumulative water savings by 2040 of 51.4 trillion gallons.

  2. Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector. A Review of Federal and State Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Gathering, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranhos, Elizabeth; Kozak, Tracy G.; Boyd, William; Bradbury, James; Steinberg, D. C.; Arent, D. J.

    2015-04-23

    This report provides an overview of the regulatory frameworks governing natural gas supply chain infrastructure siting, construction, operation, and maintenance. Information was drawn from a number of sources, including published analyses, government reports, in addition to relevant statutes, court decisions and regulatory language, as needed. The scope includes all onshore facilities that contribute to methane emissions from the natural gas sector, focusing on three areas of state and federal regulations: (1) natural gas pipeline infrastructure siting and transportation service (including gathering, transmission, and distribution pipelines), (2) natural gas pipeline safety, and (3) air emissions associated with the natural gas supply chain. In addition, the report identifies the incentives under current regulatory frameworks to invest in measures to reduce leakage, as well as the barriers facing investment in infrastructure improvement to reduce leakage. Policy recommendations regarding how federal or state authorities could regulate methane emissions are not provided; rather, existing frameworks are identified and some of the options for modifying existing regulations or adopting new regulations to reduce methane leakage are discussed.

  3. Federal environmental standards of potential importance to operations and activities at US Department of Energy sites. Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.M.; Bilyard, G.R.; Davidson, S.A.; Jonas, R.J.; Joseph, J.

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is now engaged in a program of environmental restoration nationwide across its 45 sites. It is also bringing its facilities into compliance with environmental regulations, decontaminating and decommissioning unwanted facilities, and constructing new waste management facilities. One of the most difficult questions that DOE must face in successfully remediating its inactive waste sites, decontaminating and decommissioning its inactive facilities, and operating its waste management facilities is: ``What criteria and standards should be met?`` Acceptable standards or procedures for determining standards will assist DOE in its conduct of ongoing waste management and pending cleanup activities by helping to ensure that those activities are conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations and are accepted by the regulatory community and the public. This document reports on the second of three baseline activities that are being conducted as prerequisites to either the development of quantitative standards that could be used by DOE, or consistent procedures for developing such standards. The first and third baseline activities are also briefly discussed in conjunction with the second of the three activities.

  4. Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants registered stack source assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency,, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site . The evaluation also determined if the effective dose equivalent from any of these stack emissions exceeded 0.1 mrem/yr, which will require the stack to have continuous monitoring. The result of this assessment identified a total of 16 stacks as having potential emissions that,would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr.

  5. Tritium emissions from 200 East Area Double-Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachand, D.D.

    1994-11-28

    This document evaluates the need for tritium sampling of the emissions from the 200 East Area Double Shell Tanks based on the requirements of {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants{close_quotes} (NESHAP). The NESHAP requirements are specified in 40 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H; {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities{close_quotes}.

  6. Federal Agency NEPA Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Each Federal agency is required to develop NEPA procedures that supplement the CEQ Regulations. Developed in consultation with CEQ, Federal agency NEPA procedures must meet the standards in the CEQ...

  7. Fact #825: June 16, 2014 Tier 3 Non-Methane Organic Gases Plus Nitrogen Oxide Emission Standards, Model Years 2017-2025

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Environmental Protection Agency finalized Tier 3 emission standards in a rule issued in March 2014. One effect of the rule is a decrease in the combined amount of non-methane organic gases ...

  8. Macro-System Model: A Federated Object Model for Cross-Cutting Analysis of Hydrogen Production, Delivery, Consumption and Associated Emissions; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Goldsby, M. E.; Sa, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    It is commonly accepted that the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier for light-duty vehicles involves concomitant technological development of infrastructure elements, such as production, delivery, and consumption, all associated with certain emission levels. To analyze these at a system level, the suite of corresponding models developed by the United States Department of Energy and involving several national laboratories is combined in one macro-system model (MSM). The macro-system model is being developed as a cross-cutting analysis tool that combines a set of hydrogen technology analysis models. Within the MSM, a federated simulation framework is used for consistent data transfer between the component models. The framework is built to suit cross-model as well as cross-platform data exchange and involves features of 'over-the-net' computation.

  9. Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A; Letschert, Virginie E.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Egan, Christine

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents an analysis of the potential impacts of an international initiative designed to support and promote the development and implementation of appliances standards and labelling programs throughout the world. As part of previous research efforts, LBNL developed the Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), an analysis framework that estimates impact potentials of energy efficiency policies on a global scale. In this paper, we apply this framework to an initiative that would result in the successful implementation of programs focused on high priority regions and product types, thus evaluating the potential impacts of such an initiative in terms of electricity savings and carbon mitigation in 2030. In order to model the likely parameters of such a program, we limit impacts to a five year period starting in 2009, but assume that the first 5 years of a program will result in implementation of 'best practice' minimum efficiency performance standards by 2014. The 'high priority' regions considered are: Brazil, China, the European Union,India, Mexico and the United States. The products considered are: refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting (both fluorescent and incandescent), standby power (for consumer electronics) and televisions in the residential sector, and air conditioning and lighting in commercial buildings. In 2020, these regions and enduses account for about 37percent of global residential electricity and 29percent of electricity in commercial buildings. We find that 850Mt of CO2 could be saved in buildings by 2030 compared to the baseline forecast.

  10. Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emission intensities and line ratios from a fast neutral helium beam J-W. Ahn a͒ Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA D. Craig, b͒ G. Fiksel, and D. J. Den Hartog Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA J. K. Anderson Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA M. G.

  11. Air Sample Conditioner Helps the Waste Treatment Plant Meet Emissions Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Pekour, Mikhail S.

    2014-12-02

    The air in three of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) melter off-gas discharge stacks will be hot and humid after passing through the train of emission abatement equipment. The off-gas temperature and humidity levels will be incompatible with the airborne emissions monitoring equipment required for this type of stack. To facilitate sampling from these facilities, an air sample conditioner system will be installed to introduce cool, dry air into the sample stream to reduce the temperature and dew point. This will avoid thermal damage to the instrumentation and problematic condensation. The complete sample transport system must also deliver at least 50% of the particles in the sample airstream to the sample collection and on-line analysis equipment. The primary components of the sample conditioning system were tested in a laboratory setting. The sample conditioner itself is based on a commercially-available porous tube filter design. It consists of a porous sintered metal tube inside a coaxial metal jacket. The hot gas sample stream passes axially through the porous tube, and the dry, cool air is injected into the jacket and through the porous wall of the inner tube, creating an effective sample diluter. The dilution and sample air mix along the entire length of the porous tube, thereby simultaneously reducing the dew point and temperature of the mixed sample stream. Furthermore, because the dilution air enters through the porous tube wall, the sample stream does not come in contact with the porous wall and particle deposition is reduced in this part of the sampling system. Tests were performed with an environmental chamber to supply air with the temperature and humidity needed to simulate the off-gas conditions. Air from the chamber was passed through the conditioning system to test its ability to reduce the temperature and dew point of the sample stream. To measure particle deposition, oil droplets in the range of 9 to 11 micrometer

  12. Feebates and Fuel Economy Standards: Impacts on Fuel Use in Light-Duty Vehicles and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential impacts of a national feebate system, a market-based policy that consists of graduated fees on low-fuel-economy (or high-emitting) vehicles and rebates for high-fuel-economy (or lowemitting) vehicles. In their simplest form, feebate systems operate under three conditions: a benchmark divides all vehicles into two categories-those charged fees and those eligible for rebates; the sizes of the fees and rebates are a function of a vehicle's deviation from its benchmark; and placement of the benchmark ensures revenue neutrality or a desired level of subsidy or revenue. A model developed by the University of California for the California Air Resources Board was revised and used to estimate the effects of six feebate structures on fuel economy and sales of new light-duty vehicles, given existing and anticipated future fuel economy and emission standards. These estimates for new vehicles were then entered into a vehicle stock model that simulated the evolution of the entire vehicle stock. The results indicate that feebates could produce large, additional reductions in emissions and fuel consumption, in large part by encouraging market acceptance of technologies with advanced fuel economy, such as hybrid electric vehicles.

  13. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, EmissionsAllowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables PortfolioStandards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-04-17

    Twenty-one states and the District of Columbia have adopted mandatory renewables portfolio standards (RPS) over the last ten years. Renewable energy attributes-such as the energy source, conversion technology, plant location and vintage, and emissions-are usually required to verify compliance with these policies, sometimes through attributes bundled with electricity, and sometimes with the attributes unbundled from electricity and traded separately as renewable energy certificates (RECs). This report summarizes the treatment of renewable energy attributes in state RPS rules. Its purpose is to provide a source of information for states considering RPS policies, and also to draw attention to certain policy issues that arise when renewable attributes and RECs are used for RPS compliance. Three specific issues are addressed: (1) the degree to which unbundled RECs are allowed under existing state RPS programs and the status of systems to track RECs and renewable energy attributes; (2) definitions of the renewable energy attributes that must be included in order to meet state RPS obligations, including the treatment of available emissions allowances; and (3) state policies on whether renewable energy or RECs sold through voluntary green power transactions may count towards RPS obligations.

  14. DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions Gustavo Vazquez*, DOE; Sandra Snyder, PNNL Abstract: The National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, (NESHAPs - Radioactive Air) meeting provides an opportunity for federal and state regulators, Department of Energy employees and contractors, standards developers, and industry representatives to work together

  15. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site, calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diediker, L.P.; Johnson, A.R.; Rhoads, K.; Klages, D.L.; Soldat, J.K.; Rokkan, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1992 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to an member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

  16. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site, Calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P.; Diediker, L.P.; Jette, S.J.; Rhoads, K.; Soldat, S.K.

    1995-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1994, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the ``MEI.`` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

  17. Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emission Standards Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Penrod

    2006-12-31

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub X} emission levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project plan consisted of the integration of low-NO{sub X} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The plan included the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software to optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub X} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program was set up in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler was equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler was equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub X} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler was to be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub X} emissions. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II would permit optimization of boiler performance, output, and emissions. This report summarizes the overall results from Phases I and II of the project. A significant amount of data was collected from the combustion sensors, coal flow monitoring equipment, and other existing boiler instrumentation to monitor performance of the burner modifications and the coal flow balancing equipment.

  18. Sequim Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Gervais, Todd L.

    2013-04-01

    This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and ashington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. This report meets the calendar year 2012 Sequim Site annual reporting requirement for its operations as a privately-owned facility as well as its federally-contracted status that began in October 2012. Compliance is indicated by comparing the estimated dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) with the 10 mrem/yr Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard. The MSL contains only sources classified as fugitive emissions. Despite the fact that the regulations are intended for application to point source emissions, fugitive emissions are included with regard to complying with the EPA standard. The dose to the Sequim Site MEI due to routine operations in 2012 was 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2012. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

  19. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utah’s interconnection rules are based on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) interconnection standards for small generators, adopted in May 2005 by FERC Order 2006. Utah's rules fo...

  20. Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards The head of each Executive agency is ...

  1. Software solutions for emission monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFriez, H.; Schillinger, S.; Seraji, H.

    1996-12-31

    Industry and state and federal environmental regulatory agencies are becoming ever more conciliatory due to the high cost of implementing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) for the operation of Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS). In many cases the modifications do nothing to reduce emissions or even to measure the pollution, but simply let the source owner or operator and the permitting authority agree on a monitoring method and/or program. The EPA methods and standards developed under the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) have proven to be extremely costly and burdensome. Now, the USEPA and state agencies are making efforts to assure that emissions data has a strong technical basis to demonstrate compliance with regulations such as Title V.

  2. ANALYSIS OF CHP POTENTIAL AT FEDERAL SITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HADLEY, S.W.

    2002-03-11

    This document was prepared at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) under its Technical Guidance and Assistance and Project Financing Programs. The purpose was to provide an estimate of the national potential for combined heat and power (also known as CHP; cogeneration; or cooling, heating, and power) applications at federal facilities and the associated costs and benefits including energy and emission savings. The report provides a broad overview for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies on when and where CHP systems are most likely to serve the government's best interest. FEMP's mission is to reduce the cost to and environmental impact of the federal government by advancing energy efficiency and water conservation, promoting the use of renewable energy, and improving utility management decisions at federal sites. FEMP programs are driven by its customers: federal agency sites. FEMP monitors energy efficiency and renewable energy technology developments and mounts ''technology-specific'' programs to make technologies that are in strong demand by agencies more accessible. FEMP's role is often one of helping the federal government ''lead by example'' through the use of advanced energy efficiency/renewable energy (EERE) technologies in its own buildings and facilities. CHP was highlighted in the Bush Administration's National Energy Policy Report as a commercially available technology offering extraordinary benefits in terms of energy efficiencies and emission reductions. FEMP's criteria for emphasizing a technology are that it must be commercially available; be proven but underutilized; have a strong constituency and momentum; offer large energy savings and other benefits of interest to federal sites and FEMP mission; be in demand; and carry sufficient federal market potential. As discussed in the report, CHP meets all of these criteria. Executive Order 13123 directs federal facilities to use

  3. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Emission Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Daryl; Papar, Riyaz; Wright, Dr. Anthony

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

  4. A reevaluation of the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) program at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, T.A.; Hylko, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    The initial National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) Program at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) required: (1) continuous air monitoring of sources if the calculated effective dose equivalent (EDE) to the maximum exposed individual (MEI) was > 0.1 mrem/yr; (2) the determination of emissions based on measurements or measured parameters if the EDE to the MEI was < 0.1 mrem/yr; and (3) the calculation of worst case releases when the expected air concentrations were below detection limits using standard monitoring equipment. This conservative interpretation of the regulation guided SNL/NM to model, track, and trend virtually all emission sources with the potential to include any radionuclides. The level of effort required to implement these activities was independent of the EDE contributing from individual sources. A recent programmatic review found the NESHAP program to be in excess of the legal requirements. A further review found that, in summation, 13 of 16 radionuclide sources had a negligible impact on the final calculated EDE to the MEI used to demonstrate compliance at 20 separate on-site receptor locations. A reevaluation was performed to meet the legal requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, and still be reasonable and appropriate under the existing circumstances.

  5. Federal Regulations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Regulations Federal Regulations NOTE: Adobe Acrobat Reader may be necessary to view PDF documents listed below. Accessibility Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act - Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility Standards Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act - Nondiscrimination Under Federal Grants and Programs Federal Records Act Freedom of Information Act (as amended) Freedom of Information Act Updates Privacy Act of 1974 (as amended) Privacy Act Overview Cyber Security Atomic

  6. Energy Efficiency Product Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey Energy Efficiency Product Standards, enacted in 2005, include minimum standards for eight products, which were preempted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. Future standards, if...

  7. Strengthening Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Office of the Federal Environ- mental Executive, which shall be maintained in the ... Council on, performance by agencies of functions assigned by sections 2 and 3 of this ...

  8. Federal Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Commercial Industrial Federal Agriculture About five percent of BPA's total electric supply goes to power facilities around...

  9. Implementation of CAA amendments: The federal perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, M.

    1995-12-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 established a rigorous timetable for EPA to develop and implement an unprecedented number of regulatory and policy initiatives. EPA has made great progress in meeting these mandates; however, much remains to be done if the Act`s health and environmental goals are to be achieved. EPA must issue dozens of additional regulations, guidance documents, and studies and reports over the next several years. The largest group of remaining rulemakings will be those controlling air toxics emissions. Other significant actions will include final rulemakings on emission standards for non-road engines, emissions standards for municipal and medical waste combustion, enhanced emissions monitoring, Federal operating permits, and newsource review simplification. EPA also must accelerate and expand a host of activities to ensure that the Agency and the States are implementing and enforcing the Act effectively. For example, EPA must assess hundreds of SIP revisions, as well as 120 State and local permit programs, and provide technical assistance to States and sources. Ms. Nichols will present EPA`s will present EPA`s plans for implementing these activities over the next several years. She will present a summary of the Agency`s current achievements under the 1990 amendments and EPA`s framework for completing the challenging tasks that lie ahead.

  10. Background to the development process, Automated Residential Energy Standard (ARES) in support of proposed interim energy conservation voluntary performance standards for new non-federal residential buildings: Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-09-01

    This report documents the development and testing of a set of recommendations generated to serve as a primary basis for the Congressionally-mandated residential standard. This report treats only the residential building recommendations.

  11. Federal Register

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Real Property Council Guidance for Improved Asset Management December 22, 2004 Federal Real Property Council Guidance for Improved Asset Management Table of Contents I. Overview............................................................................. 1 II. Guiding Principles .................................................................... 3 III. Asset Management Plan - Required Components............................... 4 IV. Asset Management Plan - "Shelf

  12. Experiences with CNG and LPG operated heavy duty vehicles with emphasis on US HD diesel emission standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanDerWeide, J.; Seppen, J.J.; VanLing, J.A.N.; Dekker, H.J

    1988-01-01

    The lengthy experience of TNO with the application of gaseous fuels in engines is discussed. The emphasis is on emissions and efficiency of optimal gaseous fuelled engines in comparison to systems with partial diesel fuel replacement. In spark ignition operation (100% diesel fuel replacement) lean-burn and stoichiometric (electronic control and 3-way catalyst) concepts have been developed. In the optimization mathematical modelling of combustion and flow phenomena is used in combination with engine test bed work. Essential new hardware including micro-electronic control systems is developed.

  13. WIPP Documents - Federal Regulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Federal Regulations 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental radiation protection standards for management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes. 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the certification and re-certification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's compliance with the 40 CFR Part 191 disposal regulations.

  14. Marine Sciences Laboratory Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2015-05-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) has oversight and stewardship duties associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) located on Battelle Land – Sequim.This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities” and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, “Radiation Protection–Air Emissions.'' The EDE to the MSL MEI due to routine operations in 2014 was 9E-05 mrem (9E-07 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2014. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

  15. Marine Sciences Laboratory Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) has oversight and stewardship duties associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) located on Battelle Land – Sequim (Sequim). This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities” and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, “Radiation Protection–Air Emissions.” The EDE to the Sequim MEI due to routine operations in 2013 was 5E-05 mrem (5E-07 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2013. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

  16. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROKKAN, D.J.

    2000-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in 1999 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities'', and with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247. Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The federal regulations in Subpart H of 40 CFR 61 require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from US. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1999 from Hanford Site point sources was 0.029 mrem (2.9 E-04 mSv), which is less than 0.3 percent of the federal standard. WAC 246-247 requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Hanford Site sources, during routine as well as nonroutine operations. The state has adopted the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE into their regulations. The state further requires that the EDE to the MEI be calculated not only from point source emissions but also from diffuse and fugitive sources of emissions. The EDE from diffuse and fugitive emissions at the Hanford Site in 1999 was 0.039 mrem (3.9 E-04 mSv) EDE. The total dose from point sources and from diffuse and fugitive sources of radionuclide emissions during all operating conditions in 1999 was 0.068 mrem (6.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is less than 0.7 percent of the state standard.

  17. Appliance Standards Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The federal government, and some states, have established minimum efficiency standards for certain appliances and equipment, such as refrigerators and clothes washers.

  18. Radionuclide air emission report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diediker, L.P.; Curn, B.L.; Rhoads, K.; Damberg, E.G.; Soldat, J.K.; Jette, S.J.

    1994-08-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1993 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, {open_quotes}National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,{close_quotes} Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.{close_quotes}

  19. Corrections Notice, Federal Register, 71 FR 10097, February 28...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Document displays a correction notice pertaining to Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal ...

  20. Green Power Purchasing Goal for Federal Government

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) extended and expanded several previous goals and standards to reduce energy use in existing and new federal buildings. Section 203 of EPAct 2005...

  1. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... water- spraying dust control measures to assure that air quality standards are not exceeded. A Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan will be developed and a Storm Water ...

  2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2013-06-06

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2012 from PNNL Site sources is 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 1E-7 mrem (1E-9 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 2E-6 mrem (2E-08 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2012. The total radiological dose for 2012 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 1E-5 mrem (1E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

  3. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Campus Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2014-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2013 from PNNL Site sources is 2E-05 mrem (2E-07 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 2E-6 mrem (2E-8 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 1E-11 mrem (1E-13 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2013. The total radiological dose for 2013 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 2E-5 mrem (2E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance

  4. ISSUANCE 2015-07-31: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish a Working Group for Certain Equipment Classes of Refrigeration Systems of Walk-in Coolers and Freezers to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish a Working Group for Certain Equipment Classes of Refrigeration Systems of Walk-in Coolers and Freezers to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

  5. Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities Standard Review Plan Volume 4 - Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review During Facility ...

  6. Proposed Rules Federal Register

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7963 Vol. 79, No. 128 Thursday, July 3, 2014 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 429 [Docket No. EERE-2013-BT-NOC-0039] Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Cancellation of Open Meetings AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of cancellation of open meetings. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) announces the cancellation of open meetings for the Commercial and Industrial Pumps Working Group of the Appliance

  7. Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings This document is ...

  8. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ASRAC is an action issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document ...

  9. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advisory Committee Charter. asraccharter032715.pdf More Documents & Publications Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter Electricity Advisory Committee, U.S. Department of...

  10. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 3 identification, such as a passport, driver's license, or government identification. ... Acceptable alternate forms of Photo-ID include: U. S. Passport or Passport Card; An ...

  11. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Central Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps Working Group is an action issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between...

  12. FEMP First Thursday Seminar Offers Training on New Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Efficiency Standards | Department of Energy First Thursday Seminar Offers Training on New Federal Energy-Efficiency Standards FEMP First Thursday Seminar Offers Training on New Federal Energy-Efficiency Standards February 24, 2014 - 5:26pm Addthis On April 3, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will present a First Thursday Seminar on New Developments in Federal Energy Efficiency Standards. This training session will be led by Mark Halverson,

  13. Federal Financial Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    REPORT (Follow form instructions) 1. Federal Agency and Organizational Element 2. Federal Grant or Other Identifying Number Assigned by Federal Agency Page of to Which Report is ...

  14. Biological Air Emissions Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol,...

  15. 107_4 Combined report on financial statements (unqualified opinion), internal controls, and compliance and other matters in accordance with Government Auditing Standards … for FEDERAL ENTITIES (rev. 09/29/2009)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Memorandum Department of Energy REPLY TO AITN TO: IG-30 (A09FN002) SUBJECT: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Fiscal Year 2009 Financial Statement Audit Report No.: OAS-FS-10-01 TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The attached report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants' audit of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) Fiscal Year 2009 balance sheet and the related statements of net cost, changes in net position, budgetary

  16. Executive Order 13693: Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of Executive Order 13693 is to maintain Federal leadership in sustainability and greenhouse gas emission reductions.

  17. EO 13693: Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade (2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of Executive Order 13693 is to maintain Federal leadership in sustainability and greenhouse gas emission reductions.

  18. Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York appliance efficiency standards legislation, enacted in 2005, covers the following products offered for sale in New York not preempted by federal standards as of August 2011:

  19. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2012-06-12

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation ProtectionAir Emissions. The EDE to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine emissions in 2011 from PNNL Site sources was 1.7E 05 mrem (1.7E-7 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2011. The total radiological dose for 2011 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions was more than 10,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

  20. Federal Technology Transfer and the Federal Laboratory Consortium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Technology Transfer and the Federal Laboratory Consortium: Federal Technology Transfer and the Federal Laboratory Consortium: Identifying and accessing U.S. federal lab ...

  1. About the Federal Energy Management Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Federal Energy Management Program About the Federal Energy Management Program With more than 350,000 buildings and 600,000 road vehicles, the federal government is our nation's largest energy consumer. Federal agencies have a tremendous opportunity and an obligation to reduce energy, water, and petroleum use, as well as greenhouse gas emissions in their operations. Directed by Dr. Timothy Unruh, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides agencies and organizations with the

  2. Air Quality/Emissions Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Air QualityEmissions Resources Air QualityEmissions Resources Federal agencies and certain state governments are required to acquire alternative fuel vehicles as part of the ...

  3. Energy Efficiency Standards for Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connecticut enacted efficiency standards through legislative actions in 2004 and 2007 and 2011. This law covers the following products that have not been pre-empted by federal standards:...

  4. Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data compilation and reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burris, S.A.; Thomas, S.P.

    1994-02-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling data from radioactie aiborne emissions. These data will be reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions are reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants , ``Subpart H, ``National Emissions Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities`` (EPA 1989a). Reporting to US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1988a).

  5. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-26

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1995, and the resulting effective dose equivalent (FDE) to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the `MEI.` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, `National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,` Subpart H, `National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.` This report has also been prepared for and will be submitted in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, `Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.`

  6. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

    2001-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

  7. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  8. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  9. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Edwards, Daniel L.

    2003-12-05

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the assessment performed in 2003.

  10. Evaluation of the Impact of EISA Federal Project Investments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Wendel, Emily M.; Morris, Scott L.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Halverson, Mark A.; Livingston, Olga V.; Loper, Susan A.

    2012-12-31

    The DOE's Federal Energy Management Program has been charged by Office of Management and Budget to conduct an evaluation on actual and verifiable energy savings and carbon emissions reductions from federal energy management investments made across the Federal government as a result of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. This study presents the findings from that evaluation.

  11. Final Rule, Federal Register, 72 FR 72565, 10 CFR Parts 433,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Document displays the final rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise ...

  12. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document outlines the Federal Energy Management Program's standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  13. Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Planning Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) On October 23, 2009, ...

  14. Corrections Notice, Federal Register, 71 FR 10097, February 28, 2006 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Corrections Notice, Federal Register, 71 FR 10097, February 28, 2006 Corrections Notice, Federal Register, 71 FR 10097, February 28, 2006 Document displays a correction notice pertaining to Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings, which was published in the Federal Register on February 28, 2006. Download the corrections notice document. (33.34 KB) More

  15. PRESERVATION OF FEDERAL RECORDS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PRESERVATION OF FEDERAL RECORDS The Federal Records Act requires the Department of Energy (DOE) Records Officer to remind departing Federal and contractor employees that Federal records may not be removed from Government custody nor may they be destroyed except in accordance with a records disposition schedule that has been approved by the Archivist of the United States. The creation of adequate documentation and the preservation of Federal records are required by law and regulation (contained

  16. Report of the Federal Internetworking Requirements Panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-05-31

    The Federal Internetworking Requirements Panel (FIRP) was established by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to reassess Federal requirements for open systems networks and to recommend policy on the Government`s use of networking standards. The Panel was chartered to recommend actions which the Federal Government can take to address the short and long-term issues of interworking and convergence of networking protocols--particularly the Internet Protocol Suite (IPS) and Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) protocol suite and, when appropriate, proprietary protocols. The Panel was created at the request of the Office of Management and Budget in collaboration with the Federal Networking Council and the Federal Information Resources Management Policy Council. The Panel`s membership and charter are contained in an appendix to this report.

  17. Interim Final Rule and Request for Comments, Federal Register...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Document displays the interim final rule and request for comments for Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and ...

  18. New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard New Executive Order ... Input, on January 30, 2015. The new E.O. amends E.O. 11988, "Floodplain ...

  19. Analysis of Federal Subsidies: Implied Price of Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Craig Cooper; Thomas Foulke

    2010-10-01

    For informed climate change policy, it is important for decision makers to be able to assess how the costs and benefits of federal energy subsidies are distributed and to be able to have some measure to compare them. One way to do this is to evaluate the implied price of carbon (IPC) for a federal subsidy, or set of subsidies; where the IPC is the cost of the subsidy to the U.S. Treasury divided by the emissions reductions it generated. Subsidies with lower IPC are more cost effective at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, while subsidies with a negative IPC act to increase emissions. While simple in concept, the IPC is difficult to calculate in practice. Calculation of the IPC requires knowledge of (i) the amount of energy associated with the subsidy, (ii) the amount and type of energy that would have been produced in the absence of the subsidy, and (iii) the greenhouse gas emissions associated with both the subsidized energy and the potential replacement energy. These pieces of information are not consistently available for federal subsidies, and there is considerable uncertainty in cases where the information is available. Thus, exact values for the IPC based upon fully consistent standards cannot be calculated with available data. However, it is possible to estimate a range of potential values sufficient for initial comparisons. This study has employed a range of methods to generate “first order” estimates for the IPC of a range of federal subsidies using static methods that do not account for the dynamics of supply and demand. The study demonstrates that, while the IPC value depends upon how the inquiry is framed and the IPC cannot be calculated in a “one size fits all” manner, IPC calculations can provide a valuable perspective for climate policy analysis. IPC values are most useful when calculated within the perspective of a case study, with the method and parameters of the calculation determined by the case. The IPC of different policy measures can

  20. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Efficiency Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Daryl; Papar, Riyaz; Wright, Dr. Anthony

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

  1. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2005-34 Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-34 PF2009-54.pdf (879.43 KB) PF2009-54a - Attachment-Summary of the Contents of Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-34 Published in the July 1, 2009 Issue of the Federal Register at Page 31556 (11.54 KB) More Documents & Publications Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-40 Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-47 Policy Flash Archive Search File

    Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-52 Item Subject FAR case I Sustainable Acquisition 2010-001 II Contract

  2. Standard operating procedure for the laboratory analysis of lead in paint, bulk dust, and soil by ultrasonic, acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometric measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grohse, P.M.; Gutknecht, W.F.; Luk, K.K.; Wilson, B.M.; Van Hise, C.C.

    1997-09-01

    The details and performance of a simplified extraction procedure and analysis for three media are provided. Paint, bulk dust, and soil are collected using standard or referenced methods. Up to 0.25 g of paint, bulk dust, or soil weighted out and placed in a 50-mL centrifuge tube. Five mL of 25% (v/v) nitric acid is added and the sample is ultrasonicated for 30 minutes.

  3. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Linnea; Wahl, Linnea

    2008-06-13

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). The EPA regulates radionuclide emissions that may be released from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or that may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2007, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor stack or building emissions sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]), there were no diffuse emissions, and there were no unplanned emissions. Emissions from minor sources either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities received for use or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 3.0, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2007 is 1.2 x 10{sup -2} mrem/yr (1.2 x 10{sup -4} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) EPA dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 3.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (3.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2007.

  4. Evaluating Radionuclide Air Emission Stack Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2002-12-16

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Hanford Site, Washington. These facilities are subject to Clean Air Act regulations that require sampling of radionuclide air emissions from some of these facilities. A revision to an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard on sampling radioactive air emissions has recently been incorporated into federal and state regulations and a re-evaluation of affected facilities is being performed to determine the impact. The revised standard requires a well-mixed sampling location that must be demonstrated through tests specified in the standard. It also carries a number of maintenance requirements, including inspections and cleaning of the sampling system. Evaluations were performed in 2000 2002 on two PNNL facilities to determine the operational and design impacts of the new requirements. The evaluation included inspection and cleaning maintenance activities plus testing to determine if the current sampling locations meet criteria in the revised standard. Results show a wide range of complexity in inspection and cleaning activities depending on accessibility of the system, ease of removal, and potential impact on building operations (need for outages). As expected, these High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA)-filtered systems did not show deposition significant enough to cause concerns with blocking of the nozzle or other parts of the system. The tests for sampling system location in the revised standard also varied in complexity depending on accessibility of the sample site and use of a scale model can alleviate many issues. Previous criteria to locate sampling systems at eight duct diameters downstream and two duct diameters upstream of the nearest disturbances is no guarantee of meeting criteria in the revised standard. A computational fluid dynamics model was helpful in understanding flow and

  5. Federal Acquisition Regulation Federal Acquisition Circular 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acquisition Regulation Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-86 Summary of Rules FAC 2005-86 Item Subject FAR Case I Definition of "Multiple-Award Contract" 2015-019 II Sole Source ...

  6. Federal Financial Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Financial Report, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website.

  7. Federal Biomass Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stewardship, environmental management systems stewardship, environmental management ... especially E85 pumps - - DOE GIS database identifying location of Federal fleets ...

  8. Federal Employee Training Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-11

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 360.1B, FEDERAL EMPLOYEE TRAINING. The information in this Manual is intended to assist in improving Federal workforce performance under Department of Energy (DOE) managed Federal employee training. Cancels DOE M 360.1A-1. Canceled by DOE O 360.1C.

  9. Federal Employee Training Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-09-21

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 360.1A, Federal Employee Training, dated 9-21-99. The information in this Manual is intended to assist in improving Federal workforce performance under Department of Energy (DOE) managed Federal employee training. Canceled by DOE M 360.1-1B.

  10. Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oland, CB

    2002-05-06

    Boiler owners and operators who need additional generating capacity face a number of legal, political, environmental, economic, and technical challenges. Their key to success requires selection of an adequately sized low-emission boiler and combustion equipment that can be operated in compliance with emission standards established by state and federal regulatory agencies. Recognizing that many issues are involved in making informed selection decisions, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsored efforts at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a guide for use in choosing low-emission boilers and combustion equipment. To ensure that the guide covers a broad range of technical and regulatory issues of particular interest to the commercial boiler industry, the guide was developed in cooperation with the American Boiler Manufacturers Association (ABMA), the Council of Industrial Boiler Owners (CIBO), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The guide presents topics pertaining to industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers. Background information about various types of commercially available boilers is provided along with discussions about the fuels that they burn and the emissions that they produce. Also included are discussions about emissions standards and compliance issues, technical details related to emissions control techniques, and other important selection considerations. Although information in the guide is primarily applicable to new ICI boilers, it may also apply to existing boiler installations.

  11. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIEDIKER, L.P.

    1999-06-15

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in I998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR SI), Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection--Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H; require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv), which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.5 E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event

  12. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP's standard procedures and guidelines for M&V for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  13. Measurement and Verification (M&V) Guidelines for Federal Energy Projects, V3.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-06-11

    FEMP's standard procedures and guidelines for M&V for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  14. Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Proposal for Standard Market Design Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design A report on an independent ...

  15. Federal Energy Management Program Report Template | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Energy Management Program Report Template Federal Energy Management Program Report Template Template to create reports for the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) 53483.pdf (491.71 KB) More Documents & Publications Testing and Validation of Vehicle to Grid Communication Standards Risk Management Tool Attributes: Taking It from Brown to Green: Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands

  16. Federal and Contractor Employee Roles in the Federal Workplace...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Contractor Employee Roles in the Federal Workplace: New DOE Acquisition Guide Chapter 37.114 Federal and Contractor Employee Roles in the Federal Workplace: New DOE Acquisition ...

  17. ORISE: Standards development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards development For 30 years, health physicists with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) have actively participated in the development of industry standards that provide guidance and support to decontamination and decommissioning projects across the United States. Because of our extensive experience conducting radiological surveys and site characterization, our federal agency customers, such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of

  18. Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Water Quality and Conservation Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    U.S. geothermal power plants can easily meet federal, state, and local water quality and conservation standards.

  19. Saving Energy and Money with Appliance and Equipment Standards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    patchwork of state standards with a single federal standard. This regulatory streamlining enhances industry competitiveness, profitability, and helps to protect and create...

  20. Standard of Ethical Conduct of Employee | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standard of Ethical Conduct of Employee Standard of Ethical Conduct of Employee Principles of Ethical Conduct for Federal Employees Ethical Briefing Certification

  1. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Edwards; KD Shields; MJ Sula; MY Ballinger

    1999-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP--US Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H). In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Pacific Northwest) on the Hanford Site. Two of the facilities evaluated, 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, and 331 Building Life Sciences Laboratory met state and federal criteria for continuous sampling of airborne radionuclide emissions. One other building, the 3720 Environmental Sciences Laboratory, was recognized as being in transition with the potential for meeting the continuous sampling criteria.

  2. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Linnea

    2009-05-21

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.

  3. Notices DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4008 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 204 / Thursday, October 22, 2015 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency [Docket ID FEMA-2015-0006] Guidelines for Implementing Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management, and Executive Order 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice serves to

  4. State Petitions for Exemption from Federal Preemption | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy State Petitions for Exemption from Federal Preemption State Petitions for Exemption from Federal Preemption Federal energy efficiency requirements for residential products generally preempt state laws or regulations concerning energy conservation testing, labeling, and standards. (42 U.S.C. 6297(a)-(c)) However, the Department of Energy (DOE) can grant waivers of federal preemption for particular state laws or regulations. In particular, any state or river basin commission with a

  5. Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE for Federal Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Contract ENABLE for Federal Projects Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE for Federal Projects ESPC ENABLE is a streamlined procurement process for small federal projects to install targeted ECMs in six months or less. ESPC ENABLE is a streamlined procurement process for small federal projects to install targeted ECMs in six months or less. Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) ENABLE is designed to permit a standardized and streamlined procurement process for

  6. Federal Acquisition Regulation Federal Acquisition Circular 59

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    I. Prohibition on Contracting With Inverted Domestic Corporations 2012-013 II. Free Trade Agreement--Colombia 2012-012 III. Revision of Cost Accounting Standards Threshold...

  7. Technical Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review for Technical Standards of Interest Legend: Red = Technical Standards Program Activities and Responsibilities Blue = Directives Program Activities and Responsibilities

  8. Award Number: Federal Non-Federal Federal Non-Federal Total

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    B - Budget Categories Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number Grant Program Function or Activity Estimated Unobligated Funds e. Supplies i. Total Direct Charges (sum of...

  9. Guide to Federal Funding,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... in the United States (foreign ownership or sponsorship ... petroleum gas (propane), natural gas, or diesel fuel blends ... and to ensure that investments of Federal-aid funds in ...

  10. Federated Testbed Circuits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testbed Circuits Network R&D Overview Experimental Network Testbeds 100G SDN Testbed Dark Fiber Testbed Federated Testbed Circuits Test Circuit Service Performance (perfSONAR)...

  11. Federal Employee Health Services

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-10-18

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for occupational medical, employee assistance, and workers' compensation programs for Federal employees. Supersedes DOE O 341.1.

  12. EO 13514: Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance (2009)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    It is therefore the policy of the United States that Federal agencies shall increase energy efficiency; measure, report, and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions from direct and indirect...

  13. Executive Order 13514: Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance (2009)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is therefore the policy of the United States that Federal agencies shall increase energy efficiency; measure, report, and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions from direct and indirect...

  14. Federal Technical Capability Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-05

    The Federal Technical Capability Manual provides the process for the recruitment, deployment, development, and retention of Federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Departments missions and responsibilities at defense nuclear facilities. Canceled by DOE M 426.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

  15. Federal Technical Capability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-11-19

    This directive defines requirements and responsibilities for meeting the Department of Energy (DOE) commitment to recruiting, deploying, developing, and retaining a technically competent workforce that will accomplish DOE missions in a safe and efficient manner through the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP). Cancels DOE M 426.1-1A, Federal Technical Capability Manual.

  16. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyer, K.-U. Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD

  17. Federal certification test results for 1992 model year. Control of air pollution from new motor vehicles and new motor vehicle engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Each manufacturer of a passenger car, (light-duty-vehicle), light-duty truck, motorcycle, heavy-duty gasoline engine, and heavy-duty diesel engine is required to demonstrate compliance with the applicable exhaust emission standard. This report contains all of the individual tests that were required by the certification-procedures found in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations in Part 86. These data were submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency's Certification Division at the National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory.

  18. Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Planning » Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) On October 23, 2009, the Department of Energy and eight other Federal agencies entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve coordination among project applicants, federal agencies, states and tribes involved in the siting and permitting process for electric transmission facilities on Federal land.

  19. Federal Acquisition Regulation Federal Acquisition Circular 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    subpart 23.7. The standard applicable to personal computer products has been revised and ... This rule adopts as final, without change, an interim rule that amended FAR 19.1505 ...

  20. Policy Standards, Guidance and Statutes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Policy Guidance and Statutes, DOE Standards, STD, Atomic Energy Act, Table, Draft DOE P, American Indian Religiuos Freedom, CERCLA, RCRA, Clean Air ACt, Clean Water Act, Emergency Planing and Community, Federal Environmental Laws, Surface Contamination Guidelines, DOE STD-1196-2011, Derived Concentration Technical Standard, ALARA, 0173T

  1. Standards, Ethics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards, Ethics Ombuds Standards and Ethics Committed to the fair and equitable treatment of all employees, contractors, and persons doing business with the Laboratory. Contact...

  2. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Commercial Refrigeration...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... NREL. Historic Energy Efficiency Rules Would Save Consumers Money and Cut Carbon Emissions New Energy Efficiency Standards to Help Americans Save Money by Saving Energy, Cut

  3. The Federal Energy Administration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Energy Administration - written by Roger AndersWashington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy, November 1980. 15 pp. 

  4. Federal Employee Health Services

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-12-01

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for occupational medical, employee assistance, and workers' compensation programs for Federal employees. Cancels DOE 3790.1B. Canceled by DOE O 341.1A.

  5. Federal Project Facilitators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following are U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved project facilitators who are required under the DOE indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract to develop federal energy savings performance contracts.

  6. Federal Thought Leaders Roundtable

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP Director Timothy Unruh will facilitate a round table discussion on cutting-edge topics among senior agency officials. Federal thought leaders will share insights, candid assessments, and challenge the status quo.

  7. Federal Protective Force

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-07-15

    This Manual establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal protective forces (FPFs). Cancels DOE M 470.4-3, Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

  8. Federal Water Use Indices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides water use indices as a guide for Federal agencies. Note that each is a rough estimate of water usage at different types of sites. Your site may vary considerably.

  9. Guide to Federal Funding,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Funding, Financing, and Technical Assistance for Plug-in Electric Vehicles and Charging Stations July 2016 This document was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Department of Transportation i Funding and Financing Opportunities This guidance document was collaboratively developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and Department Transportation to highlight examples of federal programs that support funding and financing for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and charging

  10. Proposed Rules Federal Register

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5383 Vol. 81, No. 21 Tuesday, February 2, 2016 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 900 RIN 1901-AB36 Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission Facilities AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to amend its regulations for the timely coordination of Federal Authorizations for proposed interstate electric transmission facilities pursuant to