National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for federal emissions standards

  1. Federal Appliance Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: HR 6582 of 2012 made some modifications to the efficiency standards previously adopted for some appliance types. The bill did not adopt new standards for previously unregulated appliances,...

  2. National Emission Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999 June 2000 June 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada DOE/NV/11718--442 DOE/NV/11718--442 DISCLAIMER Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

  3. Exploring Ways to Standardize Federal Energy Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2013 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers ways to standardize federal energy contracts and initial findings, including savings calculations, assurances and guarantees, equipment performance standards, pricing, and more.

  4. Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (FEMA, 2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (FFRMS (2015)) expands upon E.O. 11988, Floodplain Management, (1977) by directing that federal agencies use a higher vertical flood elevation and...

  5. 1998 federal technical standards workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The theme for the 1998 workshop was Standards Management -- A World of Change and Opportunities. The workshop`s goal was to further the implementation of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (Public Law 104-113) through the sharing of standards management success stories, lessons learned, and emerging initiatives within the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. The target audience for this workshop included agency/department and contractor personnel and representatives of standards developing organizations that either used technical standards in their work for the Federal Government of participated in standards writing/management activities in support of the missions and programs of Federal agencies/departments. As with previous standards workshops sponsored by the DOE, views on the technical subject areas under the workshop theme were solicited from and provided by agency Standards Executives and standards program managers, voluntary standards organizations, and the private sector. This report includes vugraphs of the presentations.

  6. Emission Market Opportunities for Federal Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Shah, C.

    2005-06-01

    This document assists federal agencies in incorporating emissions market opportunities in their energy projects, including emission reduction credit markets and cap and trade. It looks at how potential emissions costs/revenues can be incorporated into project proposals, how groups can apply for emissions allowances, and how agencies can sell emissions allowances and receive the financial benefit. The fact sheet also outlines how FEMP can provide assistance throughout the process.

  7. Federal Flood Risk Management Standard | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Standard Federal Flood Risk Management Standard The Federal Flood Risk Management Standard builds upon Executive Order (E.O.) 11988 and is to be incorporated into existing Federal department and agency processes used to implement E.O. 11988. PDF icon FederalFloodRiskManagement.pdf More Documents & Publications Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (2015)

  8. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) Advisory Committee Charter.

  9. ISSUANCE 2015-05-26:Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar ISSUANCE 2015-05-26:Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open...

  10. EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk...

  11. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings EA-2001: Energy...

  12. Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (2015) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Standard (2015) Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (2015) The Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (FFRMS (2015)) expands upon E.O. 11988, Floodplain Management, (1977) by directing that federal agencies use a higher vertical flood elevation and corresponding horizontal floodplain for federally funded projects to address current and future flood risk and ensure that projects last as long as intended. The FFRMS provides 3 approaches that federal agencies can use to define a floodplain for

  13. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Appliance & Equipment Standards » Rulemakings & Notices » Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee The Appliance and Equipment Standards Program established the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) in an effort to further improve the Department of Energy's (DOE) process of establishing energy efficiency standards for certain appliances and commercial

  14. EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN 1904-AC61) EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise...

  15. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update (RIN 1904-AD39) EA-2001: Energy Efficiency...

  16. Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Europe - Euro 5 for LDV, amendment of EURO 5 for HDV | Department of Energy Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in Europe - Euro 5 for LDV, amendment of EURO 5 for HDV Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in Europe - Euro 5 for LDV, amendment of EURO 5 for HDV 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Federal Environmental Agency (UBA) PDF icon 2002_deer_rodt.pdf More Documents & Publications Perspective on the Future Development of

  17. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings | Department of Energy 1: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing

  18. Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy 2088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards The head of each Executive agency is responsible for ensuring that all necessary actions are taken for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution with respect to Federal facilities and activities under the control of the agency. PDF icon Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards More

  19. Public Meeting Transcript: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings | Department of Energy Public Meeting Transcript: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings Public Meeting Transcript: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings This transcript is from the public meeting to discuss sustainable design standards for Federal buildings held on July 28, 2010. PDF icon nopr_meeting072810.pdf More Documents & Publications Public Roundtable- Data Access and Privacy Issues Related to Smart Grid Technologies Office of Information

  20. Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Buildings | Department of Energy Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings This document is an attendee list for the public meeting to discuss sustainable design standards for Federal buildings held on July 28, 2010. PDF icon nopr_attendees072810.pdf More Documents & Publications Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Diversity Employment and

  1. Webinar: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE is conducting a public meeting and webinar regarding the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC). For more information, please visit the ASRAC page.

  2. Energy Goals and Standards for Federal Government

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Executive Order 13514, signed in October 2009, created a series of new requirements aimed at increasing the sustainability of all federal agencies. To help achieve these goals, the Executive Order...

  3. New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    President Obama signed Executive Order (E.O.) 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input, on January 30, 2015.

  4. EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update (RIN 1904-AD56) EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal...

  5. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2010 INL Report for Radionuclides (2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2011-06-01

    This report documents the calendar Year 2010 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'

  6. 1990 INEL national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency issued on December 15, 1989 final rules governing air emissions of radionuclides. Requirements concerning radionuclide emissions from Department of Energy Facilities are addressed under Title 40, Code Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.'' Section 61.94 of the regulations require that each DOE facility submit on an annual basis a report documenting compliance with the Subpart H requirements. This report addresses the section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for calendar year 1990. The Idaho Operations Office of the Department of Energy is the primary contact concerning NESHAPs compliance at the INEL.

  7. California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (Update) (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    The state of California was given authority under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) to set emissions standards for light-duty vehicles that exceed federal standards. In addition, other states that do not comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the Environmental Protection Agency under CAAA90 were given the option to adopt Californias light-duty vehicle emissions standards in order to achieve air quality compliance. CAAA90 specifically identifies hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and NOx as vehicle-related air pollutants that can be regulated. California has led the nation in developing stricter vehicle emissions standards, and other states have adopted the California standards.

  8. The role of the Federal Relighting Initiative in emission controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholls, A.K.; Purcell, C.W.; Friedman, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Relighting Initiative (FRI), under the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has developed a comprehensive process to assist federal agencies in meeting the nation`s energy mandate. This mandate states that federal facilities must use 20% less energy by the year 2000, based on 1985 consumption levels. Because lighting accounts for about 40% of total federal electricity consumption, the FRI was conceived to help reduce energy use in this important area while improving lighting quality and increasing productivity through relighting. Selected federal rules and regulations provide guidance on the types of energy efficiency techniques required, life-cycle costing methods and lighting levels that should be employed to achieve the federal mandate. Although the central focus of this paper is on the environment, this paper takes the perspective that the energy efficiency gains achieved through the FRI would produce both environmental and economic benefits for the United States. For example, improvements in energy efficiency would reduce electricity demand, and would consequently reduce the emissions associated with fossil fuel combustion for power production. These reduced emissions include carbon dioxide, which is associated with the potential for global climate change, and heavy metals, which pose a potential health threat to humans and aquatic ecosystems. Economic benefits of the FRI would include reduced federal expenditures on energy or, possibly, avoiding new power plant construction.This paper begins with a brief overview of the FRI process. Next, current lighting energy use in federal buildings is evaluated and the potential future energy savings achievable through full implementation of the FRI are estimated. The paper then translates these energy savings into avoided emissions of carbon dioxide and heavy metals and into avoided fuel expenditures.

  9. The role of the Federal Relighting Initiative in emission controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholls, A.K.; Purcell, C.W.; Friedman, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Relighting Initiative (FRI), under the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has developed a comprehensive process to assist federal agencies in meeting the nation's energy mandate. This mandate states that federal facilities must use 20% less energy by the year 2000, based on 1985 consumption levels. Because lighting accounts for about 40% of total federal electricity consumption, the FRI was conceived to help reduce energy use in this important area while improving lighting quality and increasing productivity through relighting. Selected federal rules and regulations provide guidance on the types of energy efficiency techniques required, life-cycle costing methods and lighting levels that should be employed to achieve the federal mandate. Although the central focus of this paper is on the environment, this paper takes the perspective that the energy efficiency gains achieved through the FRI would produce both environmental and economic benefits for the United States. For example, improvements in energy efficiency would reduce electricity demand, and would consequently reduce the emissions associated with fossil fuel combustion for power production. These reduced emissions include carbon dioxide, which is associated with the potential for global climate change, and heavy metals, which pose a potential health threat to humans and aquatic ecosystems. Economic benefits of the FRI would include reduced federal expenditures on energy or, possibly, avoiding new power plant construction.This paper begins with a brief overview of the FRI process. Next, current lighting energy use in federal buildings is evaluated and the potential future energy savings achievable through full implementation of the FRI are estimated. The paper then translates these energy savings into avoided emissions of carbon dioxide and heavy metals and into avoided fuel expenditures.

  10. 1998 INEEL National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Tkachyk

    1999-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1998. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1998, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  11. 1999 INEEL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Tkachyk

    2000-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1999. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1999, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  12. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. Calendar Year 2012 INL Report for Radionuclides (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdoorn, Mark; Haney, Tom

    2013-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, ''Protection of the Environment,'' Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,'' Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  13. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. Calendar Year 2013 INL Report for Radionuclides [2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdoorn, Mark; Haney, Tom

    2014-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2013 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, ''Protection of the Environment,'' Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,'' Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.'' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 3.02 E-02 mrem per year, 0.30 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  14. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants—Calendar Year 2011 INL Report for Radionuclides (2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Verdoorn; Tom Haney

    2012-06-01

    This report documents the calendar year 2011 radionuclide air emissions and resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public from operations at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory Site. This report was prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, 'Protection of the Environment,' Part 61, 'National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,' Subpart H, 'National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.' The effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual member of the public was 4.58E-02 mrem per year, 0.46 percent of the 10 mrem standard.

  15. EO 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2088-Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards SOURCE: The provisions of Executive Order 12088 of October 13,1978, appear at 43 FR 47707, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 243, unless otherwise noted. By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and statutes of the United States of America, including Section 22 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2621), Section 313 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1323), Section 1447 of the Public

  16. Public Meeting Transcript: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    UNITED STATES OF AMERICA OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY PUBLIC MEETING SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL BUILDINGS U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Room 8E-089 Wednesday July 28, 2010 Chair: Cyrus Nasseri Department of Energy (FEMP) Facilitator: Jim Raba Department of Energy Executive Court Reporters (301) 565-0064 2 Participants Identified: Mark Ames American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air- Conditioning Engineers

  17. Development of the DDA 8. 2L diesel engine for 1988 emission standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winsor, R.E.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The emission development performed to meet 1988 Federal and California emission standards with a four-stroke direct-injection V-8 diesel engine of 8.2L displacement is described. On the naturally aspirated engine the major concern was meeting particulate and lug smoke standards at low NO/sub x/ levels. Acceleration smoke and particulate emission reduction was necessary on the turbocharged engine. The performance and emission goals were met by modifying the unit injectors and pistons of both naturally aspirated and turbocharged engines.

  18. Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in Europe - Euro 5 for LDV, amendment of EURO 5 for HDV Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission...

  19. Uncle Sam goes to market: Federal agency disposal of emission reduction credits under the Federal property management regulations. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafferty, V.J.

    1994-01-30

    With the realignment and closure of Federal facilities, especially Department of Defense installations, Federal agencies have been presented with a unique opportunity: the chance to create and dispose of air emission reduction credits (ERCs). This situation and current commitments by the Congress and EPA to expand the use of market based pollution control programs have generated interest in certain circles as to whether and how Federal agencies can dispose of ERCs and similar pollution rights and allowances. This paper will discuss ERCs, why the disposal of ERCs by Federal agencies is a pressing issue, and how Federal agencies can dispose of ERCs under existing Federal property laws and regulations.

  20. Federal Air Emissions Regulations (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized two regulations, the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and the Clean Air Mercury Rule CAMR, that would reduce emissions from coal-fired power plants in the United States. Both CAIR and CAMR are included in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 reference case. The EPA has received 11 petitions for reconsideration of CAIR and has provided an opportunity for public comment on reconsidering certain aspects of CAIR. Public comments were accepted until January 13, 2006. The EPA has also received 14 petitions for reconsideration of CAMR and is willing to reconsider certain aspects of the rule. Public comments were accepted for 45 days after publication of the reconsideration notice in the Federal Register. Several states and organizations have filed lawsuits against CAMR. The ultimate decision of the courts will have a significant impact on the implementation of CAMR.

  1. Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_parche.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation SCR Technologies for

  2. Public Meeting Transcript: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Federal buildings held on July 28, 2010. PDF icon noprmeeting072810.pdf More Documents & Publications Public Roundtable- Data Access and Privacy Issues Related to Smart Grid ...

  3. ISSUANCE 2015-08-19: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy...

  4. ISSUANCE 2015-05-26:Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar | Department of Energy 5-26:Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar ISSUANCE 2015-05-26:Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar. PDF icon asrac_june_meeting.pdf More Documents & Publications ISSUANCE 2015-07-14:

  5. ISSUANCE 2015-07-14: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Open Meetings and Webinars | Department of Energy 4: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings and Webinars ISSUANCE 2015-07-14: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings and Webinars This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings and Webinars. PDF icon asrac_summer_webinars.pdf More Documents & Publications ISSUANCE

  6. ISSUANCE 2016-01-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Committee: Notice of Open Meetings | Department of Energy 1-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings ISSUANCE 2016-01-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings. PDF icon ASRAC Feb and April Notice of Public Meetings.pdf More Documents & Publications ISSUANCE 2015-12-01: Appliance

  7. EO 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The head of each Executive agency is responsible for ensuring that all necessary actions are taken for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution with respect to Federal...

  8. ISSUANCE 2015-06-08: Solicitation of Nominations for Membership on the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solicitation of Nominations for Membership on the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee

  9. EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings’ Baseline Standards Update (RIN 1904-AD56)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including low-rise residential buildings.

  10. EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AD56) | Department of Energy 20: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AD56) EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AD56) Summary This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency

  11. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants submittal -- 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Black, S.C.

    1998-06-01

    Each potential source of Nevada Test Site (NTS) emissions was characterized by one of the following methods: (1) monitoring methods and procedures previously developed at the NTS; (2) a yearly radionuclide inventory of the source, assuming that volatile radionuclide are released to the environment; (3) the measurement of tritiated water (as HTO or T{sub 2}O) concentration in liquid effluents discharged to containment ponds and assuming all the effluent evaporates over the course of the year to become an air emission; or (4) using a combination of environmental measurements and CAP88-PC to calculate emissions. The emissions for National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) reporting are listed. They are very conservative and are used in Section 3 to calculate the EDE to the maximally exposed individual offsite. Offsite environmental surveillance data, where available, are used to confirm that calculated emissions are, indeed, conservative.

  12. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2006-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nations site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides that are resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds, dust-devils) along with historically-contaminated soils on the NTS. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent (EDE) to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS for inhaling radioactive particles that may be carried by wind off of the NTS. This limit assumes that members of the public surrounding the NTS may also inhale background levels or radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities that come from naturally-occurring elements in the environment (e.g., radon gas from the earth or natural building materials) or from other man-made sources (e.g., cigarette smoke). The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires DOE facilities (e.g., the NTS) to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP dose limit by annually estimating the dose to a hypothetical member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI), or the member of the public who resides within an 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius of the facility who would experience the highest annual dose. This dose to a hypothetical person living close to the NTS cannot exceed 10 mrem/yr. C.1 This report has been produced annually for the EPA Region IX, and for the state of Nevada since 1992 and documents that the estimated EDE to the MEI has been, and continues to be, well below the NESHAP dose limit. The report format and level of technical detail has been dictated by the EPA and DOE Headquarters over the years. It is read and evaluated for NESHAP compliance by federal and state regulators. Each section and appendix presents technical information (e.g., NTS emission source estimates, onsite air sampling data, air transport model input parameters, dose calculation methodology, etc.), which supports the annual dose assessment conclusions. In 2005, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the estimated dose to the public from inhalation of radiological emissions from current and past NTS activities is shown to be well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. This was demonstrated by air sampling data collected onsite at each of six EPA-approved critical receptor stations on the NTS. The sum of measured EDEs from the four stations at the NTS boundaries is 2.5 mrem/yr. This dose is 25 percent of the allowed NESHAP dose limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, this individual receives only a small fraction of this dose. NESHAP compliance does not require DOE facilities to estimate annual inhalation dose from non-DOE activities. Therefore, this report does not estimate public radiation doses from any other sources or activities (e.g., naturally-occurring radon, global fallout).

  13. ISSUANCE 2015-06-30: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Working Group | Department of Energy Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Working Group ISSUANCE 2015-06-30: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Working Group This document is the Appliance Standards and

  14. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants submittal -- 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Black, S.C.

    1995-06-01

    This report focuses on air quality at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for 1994. A general description of the effluent sources are presented. Each potential source of NTS emissions was characterized by one of the following: (1) by monitoring methods and procedures previously developed at NTS; (2) by a yearly radionuclide inventory of the source, assuming that volatile radionuclides are released to the environment; (3) by the measurement of tritiated water concentration in liquid effluents discharged to containment ponds and assuming all the effluent evaporates over the course of the year to become an air emission; or (4) by using a combination of environmental measurements and CAP88-PC to calculate emissions. Appendices A through J describe the methods used to determine the emissions from the sources. These National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) emissions are very conservative, are used to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the Maximally Exposed Individual offsite, and exceed, in some cases, those reported in DOE`s Effluent Information System (EIS). The NESHAP`s worst-case emissions that exceed the EIS reported emissions are noted. Offsite environmental surveillance data are used to confirm that calculated emissions are, indeed, conservative.

  15. 1990 INEL national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants. Annual report, June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency issued on December 15, 1989 final rules governing air emissions of radionuclides. Requirements concerning radionuclide emissions from Department of Energy Facilities are addressed under Title 40, Code Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.`` Section 61.94 of the regulations require that each DOE facility submit on an annual basis a report documenting compliance with the Subpart H requirements. This report addresses the section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for calendar year 1990. The Idaho Operations Office of the Department of Energy is the primary contact concerning NESHAPs compliance at the INEL.

  16. White House Announces New Executive Order To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Federal Government

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The White House today announced that President Obama will issue a new executive order that will cut the federal government's greenhouse gas emissions 40% over the next decade (from 2008 levels) and increase the share of electricity the federal government consumes from renewable sources to 30%.

  17. Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Logan, J.; Bird, L.; Short, W.

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Patrick; Logan, Jeffrey; Bird, Lori; Short, Walter

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  19. ISSUANCE 2015-04-07: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar | Department of Energy This document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar.

  20. ISSUANCE 2015-04-07: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar | Department of Energy this document is the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar.

  1. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Cancellation of Open Meetings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) announces the cancellation of open meetings for the Commercial and Industrial Pumps Working Group of the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) scheduled for July 23 through July 25, 2014.

  2. Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    In an earlier analysis completed in response to a request received from Representative David McIntosh, Chairman of the Subcommittee on National Economic Growth, Natural Resources, and Regulatory Affairs, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide emissions, assuming a policy instrument patterned after the sulfur dioxide allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This paper compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard as an instrument for reducing carbon dioxide emissions.

  3. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2011-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  4. Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, Stephen; Williams, Alison; Chan, Peter

    2014-06-30

    This paper presents estimates of the key impacts of Federal energy and water conservation standards adopted from 1987 through 2013. The standards for consumer products and commercial and industrial equipment include those set by legislation as well as standards adopted by DOE through rulemaking. In 2013, the standards saved an estimated 4.05 quads of primary energy, which is equivalent to 4% of total U.S. energy consumption. The savings in operating costs for households and businesses totaled $56 billion. The average household saved $361 in operating costs as a result of residential and plumbing product standards. The estimated reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions associated with the standards in 2013 was 218 million metric tons, which is equivalent to 4% of total U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions. The estimated cumulative energy savings over the period 1990-2090 amount to 181 quads. Accounting for the increased upfront costs of more-efficient products and the operating cost (energy and water) savings over the products’ lifetime, the standards have a past and projected cumulative net present value (NPV) of consumer benefit of between $1,271 billion and $1,487 billion, using 7 percent and 3 percent discount rates, respectively. The water conservation standards, together with energy conservation standards that also save water, reduced water use by 1.9 trillion gallons in 2013, and will achieve cumulative water savings by 2090 of 55 trillion gallons. The estimated consumer savings in 2013 from reduced water use amounted to $16 billon.

  5. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciucci, John

    2010-06-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NTS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration of each detected radionuclide at each of these locations is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. At any one location, if multiple radionuclides are detected, then compliance with NESHAP is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclides concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2009, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NTS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was a maximum of 1.69 mrem/yr, well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all six critical receptor stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NTS, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000044 mrem/yr, 230,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  6. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.

    2014-06-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitations to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide’s concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2013, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from 0.2% to a maximum of 10.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000011 mrem/yr, more than 900,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  7. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.

    2013-06-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. NNSA/NFO demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations on the NNSS (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 (EPA 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide’s concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2012, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 0.5% to a maximum of 11.1% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 9 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  8. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

    2012-06-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of legacy-related tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Radionuclides from the Fukushima nuclear power plant were detected at the NNSS in March 2011 and are discussed further in Section III. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2011, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1% to a maximum of 12.2% of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of the value measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000024 mrem/yr, more than 400,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  9. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of...

  10. EA-1872: Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Design Standards for New Federal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluated the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend the current rule for commercial and high-rise multi-family residential buildings, 10 CFR 433 “Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings,” to replace ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 with the more stringent ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, incorporated by reference. This EA also evaluated the environmental impacts with regard to low-rise residential buildings; this rulemaking updated 10 CFR 435 Subpart A, “Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings,” to replace the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 2004 with the more stringent IECC 2009, incorporated by reference. This EA was completed as DOE/EA-1871.

  11. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update (RIN 1904-AD39)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing this final rule to implement provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This rule updates the baseline Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2013.

  12. 2014-06-06 Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee; Preliminary Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a preliminary agenda for the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee open meeting being held on June 6, 2014 from 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (EST) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Forrestal Building, Room 8E-089, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585.

  13. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ASRAC is an action issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document. 1 [6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 429 [Docket No. EERE-2013-BT-NOC-0005] Appliance Standards and Rulemaking

  14. Impacts of Federal Tax Credit Extensions on Renewable Deployment and Power Sector Emissions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impacts of Federal Tax Credit Extensions on Renewable Deployment and Power Sector Emissions Trieu Mai, Wesley Cole, Eric Lantz, Cara Marcy, and Benjamin Sigrin National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-65571 February 2016 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  15. Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy,

  16. 2014-08-19 Issuance Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC)- Central Air Conditioner Regional Standards Enforcement Working Group; Notice of Open Meetings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Registe notice of open meetings regarding the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) - Central Air Conditioner Regional Standards Enforcement Working Group, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on August 19, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  17. New analysis techniques for estimating impacts of federal appliance efficiency standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, James E.

    2003-06-24

    Impacts of U.S. appliance and equipment standards have been described previously. Since 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has updated standards for clothes washers, water heaters, and residential central air conditioners and heat pumps. A revised estimate of the aggregate impacts of all the residential appliance standards in the United States shows that existing standards will reduce residential primary energy consumption and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by 89 percent in 2020 compared to the levels expected without any standards. Studies of possible new standards are underway for residential furnaces and boilers, as well as a number of products in the commercial (tertiary) sector, such as distribution transformers and unitary air conditioners. The analysis of standards has evolved in response to critiques and in an attempt to develop more precise estimates of costs and benefits of these regulations. The newer analysis elements include: (1) valuing energy savings by using marginal (rather than average) energy prices specific to an end-use; (2) simulating the impacts of energy efficiency increases over a sample population of consumers to quantify the proportion of households having net benefits or net costs over the life of the appliance; and (3) calculating marginal markups in distribution channels to derive the incremental change in retail prices associated with increased manufacturing costs for improving energy efficiency.

  18. 1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

  19. EO 13690 (2015): Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Executive Order (E.O.) 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard [FFRMS] and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input (2015) amends E.O. 11988,...

  20. EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 30, 2015, President Obama signed an Executive Order (E.O.) 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder...

  1. EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AC61)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA was to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including low-rise residential buildings. DOE has canceled this EA and is replacing it with EA-2020.

  2. EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AD56)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including low-rise residential buildings.

  3. 1996 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,`` each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1996. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contact concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For calendar year 1996, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 3.14E-02 mrem (3.14E-07 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  4. California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    In July 2002, California Assembly Bill 1493 (A.B. 1493) was signed into law. The law requires that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) develop and adopt, by January 1, 2005, greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles that provide the maximum feasible reduction in emissions. In estimating the feasibility of the standard, CARB is required to consider cost-effectiveness, technological capability, economic impacts, and flexibility for manufacturers in meeting the standard.

  5. ISSUANCE 2015-10-07: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings Regarding The Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings Regarding The Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group

  6. 2015-02-25 Issuance: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meeting and Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of open meeting and webinar regarding the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 25, 2015. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  7. EA-1463: 10 CFR 433: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings and 10 CFR 435: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EA examines the potential environmental impacts of the Final Rule on building habitability and the outdoor environment. To identify the potential environmental impacts that may result from implementing the Final Rule for new Federal commercial and residential buildings, DOE compared the Final Rule with the “no-action alternative” of using the current Federal standards – 10 CFR Part 434 and 10 CFR Part 435 Subpart C (referred to as the “no-action alternative”).

  8. STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENECKE MW

    2010-09-08

    This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is expected that Tc-99 and nitrate will remain with the water residual that is not removed, or remain as a salt bound to the soil particles. In addition, the SDPT will be conducted at lower extraction velocities to preclude pore water entrainment and thus, the extracted air effluent should be free of the contaminant residual present in the targeted moist zone. However, to conservatively bound the planned activity for potential radionuclide air emissions, it is assumed, hypothetically, that the Tc-99 does not remain in the zone of interest, but that it instead travels with the evaporated moisture to the extraction well and to the test equipment at the land surface. Thus, a release potential would exist from the planned point source (powered exhaust) for Tc-99 in the extracted moist air. In this hypothetical bounding case there would also be a potential for very minor fugitive emissions to occur due to nitrogen injection into the soil. The maximum value for Tc-99, measured in the contaminated moist zone, is used in calculating the release potential described in Section 2.3. The desiccation mechanism will be evaporation. Nitrate is neither a criteria pollutant nor a toxic air pollutant. It would remain nitrate as a salt adhered to sand and silt grains or as nitrate dissolved in the pore water. Nitrogen, an inert gas, will be injected into the ground during the test. Tracer gasses will also be injected near the beginning, middle, and the end of the test. The tracer gasses are sulfur hexafluoride, trichlorofluoromethane, and difluoromethane.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Quality Assurance Project Plan for National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs), Subpart H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.; Biermann, A

    2000-06-27

    As a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility whose operations involve the use of radionuclides, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is subject to the requirements of 40 CFR 61, the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs). Subpart H of this Regulation establishes standards for exposure of the public to radionuclides (other than radon) released from DOE Facilities (Federal Register, 1989). These regulations limit the emission of radionuclides to ambient air from DOE facilities (see Section 2.0). Under the NESHAPs Subpart H Regulation (hereafter referred to as NESHAPs), DOE facilities are also required to establish a quality assurance program for radionuclide emission measurements; specific requirements for preparation of a Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) are given in Appendix B, Method 114 of 40 CFR 61. Throughout this QAPP, the specific Quality Assurance Method elements of 40 CFR 61 Subpart H addressed by a given section are identified. In addition, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) (US EPA, 1994a) published draft requirements for QAPP's prepared in support of programs that develop environmental data. We have incorporated many of the technical elements specified in that document into this QAPP, specifically those identified as relating to measurement and data acquisition; assessment and oversight; and data validation and usability. This QAPP will be evaluated on an annual basis, and updated as appropriate.

  10. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, June 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Grossman

    2005-06-01

    The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS. The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) underground testing between 1951 and 1992, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing (DOE, 1996a). No nuclear tests have been conducted since September 23,1992 (DOE, 2000), however; radionuclides remaining on the soil surface in many NTS areas after several decades of radioactive decay are re-suspended into the atmosphere at concentrations that can be detected by air sampling. Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (formerly called the Hazardous Materials Spill Center), private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses; handling, transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices or radioactive targets for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun; and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE, 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in calendar year (CY) 2004 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and water pumped from wells used to characterize the aquifers at the sites of past underground nuclear tests, (2) onsite radioanalytical laboratories, (3) the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS facilities, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium (H{sup 3}) and re-suspension of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) and americium ({sup 241}Am) at the sites of past nuclear tests. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). At the NLVF, parts of Building A-1 were contaminated with tritium by a previous contractor in 1995. The incident involved the release of tritium as HTO. This unusual occurrence led to a very small potential exposure to an offsite person. The HTO emission has continued at lower levels (probably re-emanation from building materials), even after cleanup activities in November and December 1997. A description of the incident and the potential effective dose equivalent (EDE) for offsite exposure are set forth in Appendix A.

  11. Savannah River Site radionuclide air emissions annual report for national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, I.K.

    1993-12-31

    The radiological air emission sources at the SRS have been divided into three categories, Point, Grouped and Non-Point, for this report. Point sources, analyzed individually, are listed with a listing of the control devices, and the control device efficiency. The sources listed have been grouped together either for security reasons or where individual samples are composited for analytical purposes. For grouped sources the listed control devices may not be on all sources within a group. Point sources that did not have continuous effluent monitoring/sampling in 1993 are noted. The emissions from these sources was determined from Health Protection smear data, facility radionuclide content or other calculational methods, including process knowledge, utilizing existing analytical data. This report also contain sections on facility descriptions, dose assessment, and supplemental information.

  12. Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S.

  13. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers. PDF icon p-07_frazee.pdf More Documents & Publications 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods Urea SCR and DPF

  14. EA-1918: Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and MultiFamily High-Rise Residential Buildings" RIN 1904-AC60

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of implementing provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This EA addresses Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2010. The Final Rule was published in the Federal Register on July 9, 2013, 78 FR 40945.

  15. ISSUANCE 2016-03-10: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Circulator Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Circulator Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures

  16. ISSUANCE 2015-08-19: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

  17. ISSUANCE 2016-02-19: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings for the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps (DPPP) Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

  18. ISSUANCE 2016-01-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish a Working Group for Circulator Pumps to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish a Working Group for Circulator Pumps to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

  19. 2014-08-07 Issuance: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC)- Manufactured Housing Working Group; Notice of Open Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of open meeting regarding the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) - Manufactured Housing Working Group on August 7, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  20. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

    2009-06-30

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration of each detected radionuclide at each of these locations is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2008a). At any one location, if multiple radionuclides are detected then compliance with NESHAP is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2008, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, from both current and past NTS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was a maximum of 1.9 mrem/yr; well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all six pseudo-critical receptor stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61 (CFR, 2008a). Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 19 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS. Potential dose to the public from NLVF was also very low at 0.00006 mrem/yr; more than 160,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

  1. What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwab, A.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

  2. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Grossman; Ronald Warren

    2008-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS from radionuclides emitted to air from the NTS. This limit does not include the radiation doses that members of the public may receive through the intake of radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities, such as those that come from naturally occurring elements in the environment (e.g., naturally occurring radionuclides in soil or radon gas from the earth or natural building materials), or from other man-made sources (e.g., medical treatments). The NTS demonstrates compliance using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. There are six critical receptor locations on the NTS that are actually pseudocritical receptor locations because they are hypothetical receptor locations; no person actually resides at these onsite locations. Annual average concentrations of detected radionuclides are compared with Concentration Levels (CL) for Environmental Compliance values listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. Compliance is demonstrated if the sum of fractions (CL/measured concentrations) of all detected radionuclides at each pseudo-critical receptor location is less than one. In 2007, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the NTS has demonstrated that the potential dose to the public from radiological emissions to air from current and past NTS activities is well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected onsite at each of the six pseudo-critical receptor stations on the NTS had average concentrations of nuclear test-related radioactivity that were a fraction of the limits listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61. They ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 20 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS.

  3. Secretary of Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Federal Agency Historic Preservation Programs Pursuant to the National Historic Preservation Act (Section 110 Guidelines) (NPS, 1998)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Federal Agency Historic Preservation Programs Pursuant to the National Historic Preservation Act (63 FR 20496; April 24, 1998) are the formal guidance to each Federal agency on meeting the requirements of Section 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act.

  4. The Federal manufactured home construction and safety standards -- implications for foam panel construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.D.; Schrock, D.W.; Flintoft, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    This report reviews the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development construction code for (HUD-code) manufactured homes, Part 3280: Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards (the HUD Code), to identify sections that might be relevant in determining if insulated foam core panels (or structural insulated panels, SIPs) meet the requirements of Part 3280 for use in manufactured home construction. The U.S. Department of Energy and other parties are interested in the use of SIPs in residential construction, including HUD-Code manufactured homes, because the foam panels can have a higher effective insulation value than standard stud-framed construction and use less dimensional lumber. Although SIPs have not been used in manufactured housing, they may be well suited to the factory production process used to manufacture HUD-Code homes and the fact that they require less virgin timber may reduce the effect of volatile and increasing timber prices. Part 3280 requirements for fire resistance, wind resistance, structural load strength, ventilation, transportation shock, and thermal protection are reviewed. A brief comparison is made between the HUD Code requirements and data collected from foam panel manufacturers. 8 refs.

  5. Basis to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Stand-off Experiments Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Sandvig

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the basis and the documentation to demonstrate general compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, (the Standard) for outdoor linear accelerator operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-off Experiments Range (SOX). The intent of this report is to inform and gain acceptance of this methodology from the governmental bodies regulating the INL.

  6. 2014-07-21 Issuance: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Adivsory Committee (ASRAC)- Manufactured Housing Working Group; Notice of Open Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of public meeting for the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) - Manufactured Housing Working Group, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on July 21, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register ​publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  7. 1995 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs): Radionuclides. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities), each DOE facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at INEL for CY 1995. For that year, airborne radionuclide emissions from INEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 1.80E-02 mrem (1.80E-07 Sievert), well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  8. Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi- Family High-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update" (RIN 1904-AD39) (DOE/EA-2001) Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy September 2015 2 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

  9. EA-1871: Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, “EE Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings” and 10 CFR 435, “EE Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE‘s Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, ―Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings‖ and 10 CFR 435, ―Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings‖ Baseline Standards Update. The final rule updates the baseline standards in 10 CFR 433 and 10 CFR 435 to the latest private sector standards based on the cost-effectiveness of the latest private sector standards and DOE‘s determination that energy efficiency has been improved in these codes as required by 42 U.S.C 6831 et seq. DOE is issuing its final determinations on American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 (ASHRAE 2007) and the International Code Council‘s 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) in the same edition of the Federal Register as this final rule.

  10. Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector: A Review of Federal & State Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Gathering, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector: A Review of Federal & State Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Gathering, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution Elizabeth Paranhos and Tracy G. Kozak Energy Innovation Partners William Boyd Energy Innovation Partners and University of Colorado - Boulder James Bradbury U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Daniel C. Steinberg National Renewable Energy Laboratory Douglas J. Arent Joint

  11. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The North Carolina Utilities Commission approved revised interconnection standards in May 2015. The new standards used the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's most recent Small Generator...

  12. Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, "Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update" (RIN 1904-AD56) (DOE/EA-2020) Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy January 11, 2016 1 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CAP Climate Action Plan CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CH 4 methane CO 2 carbon

  13. Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, Stephen; Williams, Alison; Chan, Peter

    2011-12-07

    This paper presents estimates of the key impacts of the energy and water conservation standards that have been adopted from 1987 through 2010. The standards covered include those set by legislation as well as standards adopted by DOE through rulemaking. We estimate that energy efficiency standards for consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment that have been adopted from 1987 through 2010 saved 3.0 quads in 2010, have had a cumulative energy savings of 25.9 quads through 2010 and will achieve cumulative energy savings of 158 quads over the period 1990-2070. Thus, the majority of the savings are still to come as products subject to standards enter the stock. Furthermore, the standards will have a cumulative net present value (NPV) of consumer benefit of between $851 billion and $1,103 billion, using 7 percent and 3 percent discount rates, respectively. In addition, we estimate the water conservation standards, together with those energy conservation standards that also save water, saved residential consumers 1.5 trillion gallons of water in 2010, have had cumulative water savings of 11.7 trillion gallons through 2010, and will achieve cumulative water savings by 2040 of 51.4 trillion gallons.

  14. Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector. A Review of Federal and State Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Gathering, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranhos, Elizabeth; Kozak, Tracy G.; Boyd, William; Bradbury, James; Steinberg, D. C.; Arent, D. J.

    2015-04-23

    This report provides an overview of the regulatory frameworks governing natural gas supply chain infrastructure siting, construction, operation, and maintenance. Information was drawn from a number of sources, including published analyses, government reports, in addition to relevant statutes, court decisions and regulatory language, as needed. The scope includes all onshore facilities that contribute to methane emissions from the natural gas sector, focusing on three areas of state and federal regulations: (1) natural gas pipeline infrastructure siting and transportation service (including gathering, transmission, and distribution pipelines), (2) natural gas pipeline safety, and (3) air emissions associated with the natural gas supply chain. In addition, the report identifies the incentives under current regulatory frameworks to invest in measures to reduce leakage, as well as the barriers facing investment in infrastructure improvement to reduce leakage. Policy recommendations regarding how federal or state authorities could regulate methane emissions are not provided; rather, existing frameworks are identified and some of the options for modifying existing regulations or adopting new regulations to reduce methane leakage are discussed.

  15. Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants registered stack source assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency,, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site . The evaluation also determined if the effective dose equivalent from any of these stack emissions exceeded 0.1 mrem/yr, which will require the stack to have continuous monitoring. The result of this assessment identified a total of 16 stacks as having potential emissions that,would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr.

  16. Tritium emissions from 200 East Area Double-Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachand, D.D.

    1994-11-28

    This document evaluates the need for tritium sampling of the emissions from the 200 East Area Double Shell Tanks based on the requirements of {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants{close_quotes} (NESHAP). The NESHAP requirements are specified in 40 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H; {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities{close_quotes}.

  17. Federal Agency NEPA Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Each Federal agency is required to develop NEPA procedures that supplement the CEQ Regulations. Developed in consultation with CEQ, Federal agency NEPA procedures must meet the standards in the CEQ...

  18. Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A; Letschert, Virginie E.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Egan, Christine

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents an analysis of the potential impacts of an international initiative designed to support and promote the development and implementation of appliances standards and labelling programs throughout the world. As part of previous research efforts, LBNL developed the Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), an analysis framework that estimates impact potentials of energy efficiency policies on a global scale. In this paper, we apply this framework to an initiative that would result in the successful implementation of programs focused on high priority regions and product types, thus evaluating the potential impacts of such an initiative in terms of electricity savings and carbon mitigation in 2030. In order to model the likely parameters of such a program, we limit impacts to a five year period starting in 2009, but assume that the first 5 years of a program will result in implementation of 'best practice' minimum efficiency performance standards by 2014. The 'high priority' regions considered are: Brazil, China, the European Union,India, Mexico and the United States. The products considered are: refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting (both fluorescent and incandescent), standby power (for consumer electronics) and televisions in the residential sector, and air conditioning and lighting in commercial buildings. In 2020, these regions and enduses account for about 37percent of global residential electricity and 29percent of electricity in commercial buildings. We find that 850Mt of CO2 could be saved in buildings by 2030 compared to the baseline forecast.

  19. Macro-System Model: A Federated Object Model for Cross-Cutting Analysis of Hydrogen Production, Delivery, Consumption and Associated Emissions; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Goldsby, M. E.; Sa, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    It is commonly accepted that the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier for light-duty vehicles involves concomitant technological development of infrastructure elements, such as production, delivery, and consumption, all associated with certain emission levels. To analyze these at a system level, the suite of corresponding models developed by the United States Department of Energy and involving several national laboratories is combined in one macro-system model (MSM). The macro-system model is being developed as a cross-cutting analysis tool that combines a set of hydrogen technology analysis models. Within the MSM, a federated simulation framework is used for consistent data transfer between the component models. The framework is built to suit cross-model as well as cross-platform data exchange and involves features of 'over-the-net' computation.

  20. Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emission intensities and line ratios from a fast neutral helium beam J-W. Ahn a͒ Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA D. Craig, b͒ G. Fiksel, and D. J. Den Hartog Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA J. K. Anderson Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA M. G.

  1. Air Sample Conditioner Helps the Waste Treatment Plant Meet Emissions Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Pekour, Mikhail S.

    2014-12-02

    The air in three of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) melter off-gas discharge stacks will be hot and humid after passing through the train of emission abatement equipment. The off-gas temperature and humidity levels will be incompatible with the airborne emissions monitoring equipment required for this type of stack. To facilitate sampling from these facilities, an air sample conditioner system will be installed to introduce cool, dry air into the sample stream to reduce the temperature and dew point. This will avoid thermal damage to the instrumentation and problematic condensation. The complete sample transport system must also deliver at least 50% of the particles in the sample airstream to the sample collection and on-line analysis equipment. The primary components of the sample conditioning system were tested in a laboratory setting. The sample conditioner itself is based on a commercially-available porous tube filter design. It consists of a porous sintered metal tube inside a coaxial metal jacket. The hot gas sample stream passes axially through the porous tube, and the dry, cool air is injected into the jacket and through the porous wall of the inner tube, creating an effective sample diluter. The dilution and sample air mix along the entire length of the porous tube, thereby simultaneously reducing the dew point and temperature of the mixed sample stream. Furthermore, because the dilution air enters through the porous tube wall, the sample stream does not come in contact with the porous wall and particle deposition is reduced in this part of the sampling system. Tests were performed with an environmental chamber to supply air with the temperature and humidity needed to simulate the off-gas conditions. Air from the chamber was passed through the conditioning system to test its ability to reduce the temperature and dew point of the sample stream. To measure particle deposition, oil droplets in the range of 9 to 11 micrometer aerodynamic diameter were injected into the environmental chamber and drawn through the conditioning system, which included a filter to capture droplets that passed through the conditioner. The droplets were tagged with a fluorescent dye which allowed quantification of droplet deposition on each component of the system. The tests demonstrated the required reductions in temperature and moisture, with no condensation forming when heat tracing was added on the upstream end of the sample conditioner. Additionally, tests indicated that the system, operating at several flow rates and in both vertical and horizontal orientations, delivers nearly all of the sampled particles for analysis. Typical aerosol penetration values were between 98 and 99%. PNNL, Bechtel National Inc., and the instrument vendor are working to implement the sample conditioner into the air monitoring systems used for the melter off-gas exhaust streams. Similar technology may be useful for processes in other facilities with air exhaust streams with elevated temperature and/or humidity.

  2. Feebates and Fuel Economy Standards: Impacts on Fuel Use in Light-Duty Vehicles and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential impacts of a national feebate system, a market-based policy that consists of graduated fees on low-fuel-economy (or high-emitting) vehicles and rebates for high-fuel-economy (or lowemitting) vehicles. In their simplest form, feebate systems operate under three conditions: a benchmark divides all vehicles into two categories-those charged fees and those eligible for rebates; the sizes of the fees and rebates are a function of a vehicle's deviation from its benchmark; and placement of the benchmark ensures revenue neutrality or a desired level of subsidy or revenue. A model developed by the University of California for the California Air Resources Board was revised and used to estimate the effects of six feebate structures on fuel economy and sales of new light-duty vehicles, given existing and anticipated future fuel economy and emission standards. These estimates for new vehicles were then entered into a vehicle stock model that simulated the evolution of the entire vehicle stock. The results indicate that feebates could produce large, additional reductions in emissions and fuel consumption, in large part by encouraging market acceptance of technologies with advanced fuel economy, such as hybrid electric vehicles.

  3. PNNL: About: Air Emissions (Radioactive) Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Emissions (Radioactive) Reports At PNNL, we value the environment and strive to protect it and the public from unacceptable risks resulting from its operations. These reports document PNNL Campus and Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest dose to a member of the public. The reports have been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for

  4. DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions Gustavo Vazquez*, DOE; Sandra Snyder, PNNL Abstract: The National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, (NESHAPs - Radioactive Air) meeting provides an opportunity for federal and state regulators, Department of Energy employees and contractors, standards developers, and industry representatives to work together

  5. Emissions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from the Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity Volume 1: Main Text ::_:_ii_i!!._i_!!!i_!!_!_!i!ii_!).._i!iiii!!_i!i_!!_iii!i!_ii_iii!!_i!i!ii_!i!!_!!!_ii!!_)i!i_i_i!!ii!i!_!!ii!!i_!i_!iii_!!i!i_i!i!!_!ii_i!i._!ii_i!i!_i!_!!!i!!_!_!!_!_!!!!i_!_!!!i_:``.!ii!!_i_i_i!!!_!_!_ii_i_!_i_i_!!i!i!i!!!ii:!i_i!_ii!_!!ii_! ,qh_...dllri" :._m..41W..- ,,mm,m_ - Centerfor TransportationResearch Argonne NationalLaboratory Operated by lhe University of Chicago, under

  6. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site, Calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P.; Diediker, L.P.; Jette, S.J.; Rhoads, K.; Soldat, S.K.

    1995-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1994, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the ``MEI.`` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

  7. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site, calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diediker, L.P.; Johnson, A.R.; Rhoads, K.; Klages, D.L.; Soldat, J.K.; Rokkan, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1992 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to an member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,`` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.``

  8. Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emission Standards Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Penrod

    2006-12-31

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub X} emission levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project plan consisted of the integration of low-NO{sub X} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The plan included the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software to optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub X} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program was set up in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler was equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler was equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub X} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler was to be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub X} emissions. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II would permit optimization of boiler performance, output, and emissions. This report summarizes the overall results from Phases I and II of the project. A significant amount of data was collected from the combustion sensors, coal flow monitoring equipment, and other existing boiler instrumentation to monitor performance of the burner modifications and the coal flow balancing equipment.

  9. Sequim Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2013-04-01

    This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and ashington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. This report meets the calendar year 2012 Sequim Site annual reporting requirement for its operations as a privately-owned facility as well as its federally-contracted status that began in October 2012. Compliance is indicated by comparing the estimated dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) with the 10 mrem/yr Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard. The MSL contains only sources classified as fugitive emissions. Despite the fact that the regulations are intended for application to point source emissions, fugitive emissions are included with regard to complying with the EPA standard. The dose to the Sequim Site MEI due to routine operations in 2012 was 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2012. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

  10. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utah’s interconnection rules are based on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) interconnection standards for small generators, adopted in May 2005 by FERC Order 2006. Utah's rules fo...

  11. Notices and Rules Related to Federal Energy Management | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) issues notices and rules related to federal ... Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise ...

  12. Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards The head of each Executive agency is ...

  13. Software solutions for emission monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFriez, H.; Schillinger, S.; Seraji, H.

    1996-12-31

    Industry and state and federal environmental regulatory agencies are becoming ever more conciliatory due to the high cost of implementing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) for the operation of Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS). In many cases the modifications do nothing to reduce emissions or even to measure the pollution, but simply let the source owner or operator and the permitting authority agree on a monitoring method and/or program. The EPA methods and standards developed under the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) have proven to be extremely costly and burdensome. Now, the USEPA and state agencies are making efforts to assure that emissions data has a strong technical basis to demonstrate compliance with regulations such as Title V.

  14. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Emission Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Daryl; Papar, Riyaz; Wright, Dr. Anthony

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

  15. A reevaluation of the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) program at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, T.A.; Hylko, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    The initial National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) Program at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) required: (1) continuous air monitoring of sources if the calculated effective dose equivalent (EDE) to the maximum exposed individual (MEI) was > 0.1 mrem/yr; (2) the determination of emissions based on measurements or measured parameters if the EDE to the MEI was < 0.1 mrem/yr; and (3) the calculation of worst case releases when the expected air concentrations were below detection limits using standard monitoring equipment. This conservative interpretation of the regulation guided SNL/NM to model, track, and trend virtually all emission sources with the potential to include any radionuclides. The level of effort required to implement these activities was independent of the EDE contributing from individual sources. A recent programmatic review found the NESHAP program to be in excess of the legal requirements. A further review found that, in summation, 13 of 16 radionuclide sources had a negligible impact on the final calculated EDE to the MEI used to demonstrate compliance at 20 separate on-site receptor locations. A reevaluation was performed to meet the legal requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, and still be reasonable and appropriate under the existing circumstances.

  16. Energy Efficiency Product Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey Energy Efficiency Product Standards, enacted in 2005, include minimum standards for eight products, which were preempted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. Future standards, if...

  17. Federal Regulations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Regulations Federal Regulations NOTE: Adobe Acrobat Reader may be necessary to view PDF documents listed below. Accessibility Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act - Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility Standards Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act - Nondiscrimination Under Federal Grants and Programs Federal Records Act Freedom of Information Act (as amended) Freedom of Information Act Updates Privacy Act of 1974 (as amended) Privacy Act Overview Cyber Security Atomic

  18. Experiences with CNG and LPG operated heavy duty vehicles with emphasis on US HD diesel emission standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanDerWeide, J.; Seppen, J.J.; VanLing, J.A.N.; Dekker, H.J

    1988-01-01

    The lengthy experience of TNO with the application of gaseous fuels in engines is discussed. The emphasis is on emissions and efficiency of optimal gaseous fuelled engines in comparison to systems with partial diesel fuel replacement. In spark ignition operation (100% diesel fuel replacement) lean-burn and stoichiometric (electronic control and 3-way catalyst) concepts have been developed. In the optimization mathematical modelling of combustion and flow phenomena is used in combination with engine test bed work. Essential new hardware including micro-electronic control systems is developed.

  19. Strengthening Federal

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Jan. 24 / Administration of George W. Bush, 2007 Executive Order 13423- Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management January 24, 2007 By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and to strengthen the environmental, energy, and transpor- tation management of Federal agencies, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. It is the policy of the United States that Federal agencies conduct their

  20. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8646 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 143 / Wednesday, July 25, 2001 / Notices the Director of OMB provide interested Federal agencies and the public an early opportunity to comment on information collection requests. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) may amend or waive the requirement for public consultation to the extent that public participation in the approval process would defeat the purpose of the information collection, violate State or Federal law, or substantially interfere with

  1. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9906 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 251 / Tuesday, December 31, 2002 / Notices provide an MMAP authorization for all fishers who participate in an integrated Category I or II fishery, provided that the fisher holds a valid Federal fishing permit or license for the affected regulated fishery. A fisher who participates in state and/ or Federal fisheries not yet integrated with the MMAP registration system must continue to send in the registration form to NMFS. Dated: December 16, 2002. Rebecca

  2. Background to the development process, Automated Residential Energy Standard (ARES) in support of proposed interim energy conservation voluntary performance standards for new non-federal residential buildings: Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-09-01

    This report documents the development and testing of a set of recommendations generated to serve as a primary basis for the Congressionally-mandated residential standard. This report treats only the residential building recommendations.

  3. Federal Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Commercial Industrial Federal Agriculture About five percent of BPA's total electric supply goes to power facilities around...

  4. Implementation of CAA amendments: The federal perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, M.

    1995-12-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 established a rigorous timetable for EPA to develop and implement an unprecedented number of regulatory and policy initiatives. EPA has made great progress in meeting these mandates; however, much remains to be done if the Act`s health and environmental goals are to be achieved. EPA must issue dozens of additional regulations, guidance documents, and studies and reports over the next several years. The largest group of remaining rulemakings will be those controlling air toxics emissions. Other significant actions will include final rulemakings on emission standards for non-road engines, emissions standards for municipal and medical waste combustion, enhanced emissions monitoring, Federal operating permits, and newsource review simplification. EPA also must accelerate and expand a host of activities to ensure that the Agency and the States are implementing and enforcing the Act effectively. For example, EPA must assess hundreds of SIP revisions, as well as 120 State and local permit programs, and provide technical assistance to States and sources. Ms. Nichols will present EPA`s will present EPA`s plans for implementing these activities over the next several years. She will present a summary of the Agency`s current achievements under the 1990 amendments and EPA`s framework for completing the challenging tasks that lie ahead.

  5. Marine Sciences Laboratory Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.

    2015-05-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) has oversight and stewardship duties associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) located on Battelle Land – Sequim.This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities” and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, “Radiation Protection–Air Emissions.'' The EDE to the MSL MEI due to routine operations in 2014 was 9E-05 mrem (9E-07 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2014. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

  6. Marine Sciences Laboratory Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) has oversight and stewardship duties associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) located on Battelle Land – Sequim (Sequim). This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities” and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, “Radiation Protection–Air Emissions.” The EDE to the Sequim MEI due to routine operations in 2013 was 5E-05 mrem (5E-07 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2013. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

  7. WIPP Documents - Federal Regulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Federal Regulations 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental radiation protection standards for management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes. 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the certification and re-certification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's compliance with the 40 CFR Part 191 disposal regulations.

  8. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8014 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 249 / Thursday, December 26, 1996 / Notices SUMMARY: The Department of Defense (DoD) announces a meeting of the Defense Partnership Council. Notice of this meeting is required under the Federal Advisory Committee Act. This meeting is open to the public. The topics to be covered are the Federal Managers Association (FMA) membership on the Council and a discussion of general DoD Human Resources initiatives. DATES: The meeting is to be held January 22, 1997, in

  9. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROKKAN, D.J.

    2000-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in 1999 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities'', and with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247. Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The federal regulations in Subpart H of 40 CFR 61 require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from US. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1999 from Hanford Site point sources was 0.029 mrem (2.9 E-04 mSv), which is less than 0.3 percent of the federal standard. WAC 246-247 requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Hanford Site sources, during routine as well as nonroutine operations. The state has adopted the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE into their regulations. The state further requires that the EDE to the MEI be calculated not only from point source emissions but also from diffuse and fugitive sources of emissions. The EDE from diffuse and fugitive emissions at the Hanford Site in 1999 was 0.039 mrem (3.9 E-04 mSv) EDE. The total dose from point sources and from diffuse and fugitive sources of radionuclide emissions during all operating conditions in 1999 was 0.068 mrem (6.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is less than 0.7 percent of the state standard.

  10. Radionuclide air emission report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diediker, L.P.; Curn, B.L.; Rhoads, K.; Damberg, E.G.; Soldat, J.K.; Jette, S.J.

    1994-08-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1993 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, {open_quotes}National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,{close_quotes} Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.{close_quotes}

  11. Standard Contracts Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standard Contracts Team Standard Contracts Team The Standard Contracts Team has responsibility to: Act as Federal contracting officer for contracts with the nuclear power ...

  12. Green Power Purchasing Goal for Federal Government

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) extended and expanded several previous goals and standards to reduce energy use in existing and new federal buildings. Section 203 of EPAct 2005...

  13. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Campus Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2014-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2013 from PNNL Site sources is 2E-05 mrem (2E-07 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 2E-6 mrem (2E-8 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 1E-11 mrem (1E-13 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2013. The total radiological dose for 2013 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 2E-5 mrem (2E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance

  14. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2013-06-06

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2012 from PNNL Site sources is 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 1E-7 mrem (1E-9 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 2E-6 mrem (2E-08 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2012. The total radiological dose for 2012 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 1E-5 mrem (1E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

  15. ISSUANCE 2015-07-31: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish a Working Group for Certain Equipment Classes of Refrigeration Systems of Walk-in Coolers and Freezers to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish a Working Group for Certain Equipment Classes of Refrigeration Systems of Walk-in Coolers and Freezers to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

  16. Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings This document is...

  17. Federal Financial Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    FEDERAL FINANCIAL REPORT (Follow form instructions) 1. Federal Agency and Organizational Element 2. Federal Grant or Other Identifying Number Assigned by Federal Agency Page of to ...

  18. Proposed Rules Federal Register

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7963 Vol. 79, No. 128 Thursday, July 3, 2014 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 429 [Docket No. EERE-2013-BT-NOC-0039] Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Cancellation of Open Meetings AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of cancellation of open meetings. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) announces the cancellation of open meetings for the Commercial and Industrial Pumps Working Group of the Appliance

  19. Federal Register

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    65541 Vol. 79, No. 214 Wednesday, November 5, 2014 NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 [NRC-2014-0238] RIN 3150-AJ48 Definition of a Utilization Facility AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Direct final rule; correction. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is correcting the docket identification number and Regulation Identifier Number (RIN) for a Direct Final Rule published in the Federal Register (FR) on October 17, 2014, to amend the NRC's regulations to

  20. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5551 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 241 / Friday, December 13, 1996 / Notices cash prices for fresh pork bellies is intended to reflect changes in cash market practices. The CME indicates, specifically, that the quantity of frozen pork bellies being placed into cold storage is declining because more pork bellies are being utilized as fresh pork bellies. The CME notes that, as a result of this trend, the demand for pork bellies is becoming less seasonal and is tending to follow more closely the

  1. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    10 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 150 / Wednesday, August 5, 1998 / Notices and Hopewell Townships, Mercer County, New Jersey, to replace an existing deteriorating pipeline stream crossing. The new steel pipeline crossing will be 14 inches in diameter and approximately 250 feet long, and will be excavated four feet under the existing stream bed, at a point approximately 1,500 feet west of the intersection of Jacobs Creek and Bear Tavern Roads. The pipeline crossing is part of maintenance work

  2. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2985 Federal Register / Vol. 65, No. 251 / Friday, December 29, 2000 / Notices collection; and (6) Reporting and/or Recordkeeping burden. OMB invites public comment. The Department of Education is especially interested in public comment addressing the following issues: (1) Is this collection necessary to the proper functions of the Department; (2) will this information be processed and used in a timely manner; (3) is the estimate of burden accurate; (4) how might the Department enhance the

  3. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2479 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 86 / Friday, May 3, 2002 / Notices Mariner Document (MMD) transactions. Given the sheer volume of inquiries, the Coast Guard has determined that making available a list of service agents that provide a complete drug test service would be beneficial to mariners. Request for Submissions The Coast Guard wants to identify for mariners those service agents who provide a complete drug test service. A complete drug test service includes the specimen collection,

  4. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    54 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 143 / Tuesday, July 27, 2004 / Notices accordance with the comprehensive set of DOE requirements and applicable regulatory requirements that have been established to protect public health and the environment. These requirements encompass a wide variety of areas, including radiation protection, facility design criteria, fire protection, emergency preparedness and response, and operational safety requirements. * Cylinder management activities will be conducted in

  5. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advisory Committee Charter. asraccharter032715.pdf More Documents & Publications Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Charter Electricity Advisory Committee, U.S. Department of...

  6. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Central Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps Working Group is an action issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between...

  7. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the public are welcome to observe the business of the meeting and, if time allows, may ... DHS has determined that regular driver's licenses (and ID cards) from the following ...

  8. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    989 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 173 / Friday, September 6, 2002 / Notices 1 The only exception to this decision was the Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico, which will ship its TRU waste to the Los Alamos National Laboratory for disposal preparation and storage before disposal at WIPP. SANDEL, E. A. MS. SAUL, E. L. MR. SCHAEFER, J. C. MR. SCHAEFER JR, W. J. MR. SCHNEIDER, P. A. MR. SCHREGARDOUS, D. R. MR. SCHUBERT, D. CAPT SHEA, R. M. MAJGEN SHECK, E. E. MR. SHEPHARD, M. R. MS. SIMON,

  9. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    49 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 143 / Tuesday, July 27, 2004 / Notices halseypj@oro.doe.gov or check the Web site at www.oakridge.doe.gov/em/ssab. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Board: The purpose of the Board is to make recommendations to DOE in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and related activities. Tentative Agenda 8 a.m.-Introductions, overview of meeting agenda and logistics (Dave Mosby) 8:15 a.m.-Past year evaluation-Board and stakeholder survey

  10. FEMP First Thursday Seminar Offers Training on New Federal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy-Efficiency Standards | Department of Energy Seminar Offers Training on New Federal Energy-Efficiency Standards FEMP First Thursday Seminar Offers Training on New Federal Energy-Efficiency Standards February 24, 2014 - 5:26pm Addthis On April 3, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will present a First Thursday Seminar on New Developments in Federal Energy Efficiency Standards. This training session will be led by Mark Halverson, Ph.D., an

  11. Federal Agency NEPA Procedures | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Agency NEPA Procedures Federal Agency NEPA Procedures Each Federal agency is required to develop NEPA procedures that supplement the CEQ Regulations. Developed in consultation with CEQ, Federal agency NEPA procedures must meet the standards in the CEQ Regulations while also reflecting each agency's unique mandate and mission. As a result, NEPA procedures vary from agency to agency. Further procedural differences may derive from other statutory requirements, agency-specific regulations

  12. Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York appliance efficiency standards legislation, enacted in 2005, covers the following products offered for sale in New York not preempted by federal standards as of August 2011:

  13. Federal Technical Capability Panel

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Updated: April 2015 1 U. S. Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Technical Capability Panel Organization Name Telephone Fax E-Mail FTCP CHAIR Chair (DOE/NTC) Karen L. Boardman (505) 845-6444 (505) 845-6079 kboardman@ntc.doe.gov FTCP Deputy Dave Chaney (505) 845-4300 (505) 845-4879 david.chaney@nnsa.doe.gov FTCP Technical Standards Mgr. Jeanette Yarrington (301) 903-7030 (301) 903-3445 Jeanette.Yarrington@hq.doe.gov FTCP Program Coordinator Jeannie Lozoya

  14. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2012-06-12

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The EDE to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine emissions in 2011 from PNNL Site sources was 1.7E 05 mrem (1.7E-7 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2011. The total radiological dose for 2011 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions was more than 10,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

  15. Executive Order 13693: Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of Executive Order 13693 is to maintain Federal leadership in sustainability and greenhouse gas emission reductions.

  16. EO 13693: Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade (2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of Executive Order 13693 is to maintain Federal leadership in sustainability and greenhouse gas emission reductions.

  17. Energy Efficiency Standards for Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connecticut enacted efficiency standards through legislative actions in 2004 and 2007 and 2011. This law covers the following products that have not been pre-empted by federal standards:...

  18. About the Federal Energy Management Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Federal Energy Management Program About the Federal Energy Management Program With more than 350,000 buildings and 600,000 road vehicles, the federal government is our nation's largest energy consumer. Federal agencies have a tremendous opportunity and an obligation to reduce energy, water, and petroleum use, as well as greenhouse gas emissions in their operations. Directed by Dr. Timothy Unruh, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides agencies with the information, tools,

  19. Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards Presentation given at DEER 2006, ...

  20. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-26

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1995, and the resulting effective dose equivalent (FDE) to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the `MEI.` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, `National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,` Subpart H, `National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.` This report has also been prepared for and will be submitted in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, `Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.`

  1. Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data compilation and reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burris, S.A.; Thomas, S.P.

    1994-02-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling data from radioactie aiborne emissions. These data will be reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions are reported to the US Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants , ``Subpart H, ``National Emissions Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities`` (EPA 1989a). Reporting to US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1988a).

  2. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. M.

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  3. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  4. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

    2001-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

  5. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Edwards, Daniel L.

    2003-12-05

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the assessment performed in 2003.

  6. Recent Federal Register Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rulemakings & Notices » Recent Federal Register Notices Recent Federal Register Notices The Department of Energy (DOE) has compiled a table of Federal Register notices published by the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program, beginning January 2014. Information regarding notices associated with current rulemakings, but not listed, can be found on the appropriate rulemakings web page section. Each rulemaking page provides links to notices and to rulemaking dockets, and other information

  7. Evaluation of the Impact of EISA Federal Project Investments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Wendel, Emily M.; Morris, Scott L.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Halverson, Mark A.; Livingston, Olga V.; Loper, Susan A.

    2012-12-31

    The DOE's Federal Energy Management Program has been charged by Office of Management and Budget to conduct an evaluation on actual and verifiable energy savings and carbon emissions reductions from federal energy management investments made across the Federal government as a result of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. This study presents the findings from that evaluation.

  8. STANDARD REVIEW PLAN

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities Standard Review Plan Safety Design Strategy January 2015 OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Standard Review Plan Safety Design Strategy Critical Decision (CD) Applicability CD-0 CD-1 CD-2 CD-3 CD-4 Post Operation January 2015 i FOREWORD The Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) is developing of series of Standard Review Plans (SRPs) to provide consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and

  9. Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Planning Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) On October 23, 2009, ...

  10. Corrections Notice, Federal Register, 71 FR 10097, February 28, 2006 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Corrections Notice, Federal Register, 71 FR 10097, February 28, 2006 Corrections Notice, Federal Register, 71 FR 10097, February 28, 2006 Document displays a correction notice pertaining to Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings, which was published in the Federal Register on February 28, 2006. PDF icon 71_fr_10097.pdf More Documents & Publications

  11. Executive Order 13693-Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Decade | Department of Energy 93-Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade Executive Order 13693-Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade PDF icon Executive Order 13693-Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade More Documents & Publications E.O. 13690 (2015): Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input Executive Order 13423: Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy,

  12. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Efficiency Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Daryl; Papar, Riyaz; Wright, Dr. Anthony

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

  13. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and ...

  14. Federal Biomass Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Biomass Federal Biomass Activities Activities Dana Arnold Dana Arnold Office of the Federal Environmental Office of the Federal Environmental Executive Executive September 10, 2009 September 10, 2009 OFEE OFEE Established in the Clinton Administration Established in the Clinton Administration Part of the White House Council on Environmental Part of the White House Council on Environmental Quality Quality Works with Federal agencies to make the operations Works with Federal agencies to make the

  15. Standard operating procedure for the laboratory analysis of lead in paint, bulk dust, and soil by ultrasonic, acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometric measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grohse, P.M.; Gutknecht, W.F.; Luk, K.K.; Wilson, B.M.; Van Hise, C.C.

    1997-09-01

    The details and performance of a simplified extraction procedure and analysis for three media are provided. Paint, bulk dust, and soil are collected using standard or referenced methods. Up to 0.25 g of paint, bulk dust, or soil weighted out and placed in a 50-mL centrifuge tube. Five mL of 25% (v/v) nitric acid is added and the sample is ultrasonicated for 30 minutes.

  16. Analysis of Federal Subsidies: Implied Price of Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Craig Cooper; Thomas Foulke

    2010-10-01

    For informed climate change policy, it is important for decision makers to be able to assess how the costs and benefits of federal energy subsidies are distributed and to be able to have some measure to compare them. One way to do this is to evaluate the implied price of carbon (IPC) for a federal subsidy, or set of subsidies; where the IPC is the cost of the subsidy to the U.S. Treasury divided by the emissions reductions it generated. Subsidies with lower IPC are more cost effective at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, while subsidies with a negative IPC act to increase emissions. While simple in concept, the IPC is difficult to calculate in practice. Calculation of the IPC requires knowledge of (i) the amount of energy associated with the subsidy, (ii) the amount and type of energy that would have been produced in the absence of the subsidy, and (iii) the greenhouse gas emissions associated with both the subsidized energy and the potential replacement energy. These pieces of information are not consistently available for federal subsidies, and there is considerable uncertainty in cases where the information is available. Thus, exact values for the IPC based upon fully consistent standards cannot be calculated with available data. However, it is possible to estimate a range of potential values sufficient for initial comparisons. This study has employed a range of methods to generate first order estimates for the IPC of a range of federal subsidies using static methods that do not account for the dynamics of supply and demand. The study demonstrates that, while the IPC value depends upon how the inquiry is framed and the IPC cannot be calculated in a one size fits all manner, IPC calculations can provide a valuable perspective for climate policy analysis. IPC values are most useful when calculated within the perspective of a case study, with the method and parameters of the calculation determined by the case. The IPC of different policy measures can then be quantitatively evaluated within the case. Results can be qualitatively compared across cases, so long as such comparisons are considered to be preliminary and treated with the appropriate level of caution.

  17. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Linnea; Wahl, Linnea

    2008-06-13

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). The EPA regulates radionuclide emissions that may be released from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or that may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2007, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor stack or building emissions sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]), there were no diffuse emissions, and there were no unplanned emissions. Emissions from minor sources either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities received for use or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 3.0, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2007 is 1.2 x 10{sup -2} mrem/yr (1.2 x 10{sup -4} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) EPA dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 3.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (3.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2007.

  18. Evaluating Radionuclide Air Emission Stack Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2002-12-16

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Hanford Site, Washington. These facilities are subject to Clean Air Act regulations that require sampling of radionuclide air emissions from some of these facilities. A revision to an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard on sampling radioactive air emissions has recently been incorporated into federal and state regulations and a re-evaluation of affected facilities is being performed to determine the impact. The revised standard requires a well-mixed sampling location that must be demonstrated through tests specified in the standard. It also carries a number of maintenance requirements, including inspections and cleaning of the sampling system. Evaluations were performed in 2000 2002 on two PNNL facilities to determine the operational and design impacts of the new requirements. The evaluation included inspection and cleaning maintenance activities plus testing to determine if the current sampling locations meet criteria in the revised standard. Results show a wide range of complexity in inspection and cleaning activities depending on accessibility of the system, ease of removal, and potential impact on building operations (need for outages). As expected, these High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA)-filtered systems did not show deposition significant enough to cause concerns with blocking of the nozzle or other parts of the system. The tests for sampling system location in the revised standard also varied in complexity depending on accessibility of the sample site and use of a scale model can alleviate many issues. Previous criteria to locate sampling systems at eight duct diameters downstream and two duct diameters upstream of the nearest disturbances is no guarantee of meeting criteria in the revised standard. A computational fluid dynamics model was helpful in understanding flow and contaminant mixing in an exhaust system and may be useful to identify potential sampling locations in an exhaust system that are likely to meet criteria in the revised standard.

  19. Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oland, CB

    2002-05-06

    Boiler owners and operators who need additional generating capacity face a number of legal, political, environmental, economic, and technical challenges. Their key to success requires selection of an adequately sized low-emission boiler and combustion equipment that can be operated in compliance with emission standards established by state and federal regulatory agencies. Recognizing that many issues are involved in making informed selection decisions, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsored efforts at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a guide for use in choosing low-emission boilers and combustion equipment. To ensure that the guide covers a broad range of technical and regulatory issues of particular interest to the commercial boiler industry, the guide was developed in cooperation with the American Boiler Manufacturers Association (ABMA), the Council of Industrial Boiler Owners (CIBO), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The guide presents topics pertaining to industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers. Background information about various types of commercially available boilers is provided along with discussions about the fuels that they burn and the emissions that they produce. Also included are discussions about emissions standards and compliance issues, technical details related to emissions control techniques, and other important selection considerations. Although information in the guide is primarily applicable to new ICI boilers, it may also apply to existing boiler installations.

  20. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIEDIKER, L.P.

    1999-06-15

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in I998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR SI), Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection--Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H; require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv), which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.5 E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event was similar in magnitude to that from routine releases during 1998. Were the release from this unplanned event combined with routine releases, the total dose would be less than 1 percent ofthe 10 mrem/yr standard.

  1. Executive Order 12699 - Seismic Safety of Federal and Federally Assisted or Regulated New Building Construction

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5, 1990 Executive Order 12699 Seismic Safety of Federal and Federally Assisted or Regulated New Building Construction By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, and in furtherance of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977, as amended (42 U.S.C. 7701 et seq. ), which requires that Federal preparedness and mitigation activities are to include ``development and promulgation of specifications, building standards, design criteria,

  2. Measurement and Verification (M&V) Guidelines for Federal Energy Projects, V3.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-06-11

    FEMP's standard procedures and guidelines for M&V for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  3. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP's standard procedures and guidelines for M&V for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  4. ORISE: Standards development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards development For 30 years, health physicists with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) have actively participated in the development of industry standards that provide guidance and support to decontamination and decommissioning projects across the United States. Because of our extensive experience conducting radiological surveys and site characterization, our federal agency customers, such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of

  5. Saving Energy and Money with Appliance and Equipment Standards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    patchwork of state standards with a single federal standard. This regulatory streamlining enhances industry competitiveness, profitability, and helps to protect and create...

  6. Standard of Ethical Conduct of Employee | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standard of Ethical Conduct of Employee Standard of Ethical Conduct of Employee Principles of Ethical Conduct for Federal Employees Ethical Briefing Certification

  7. Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Water Quality and Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. geothermal power plants can easily meet federal, state, and local water quality and conservation standards.

  8. Federal Financial Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Financial Report, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website.

  9. Award Number: Federal Non-Federal Federal Non-Federal Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Award Number: Federal Non-Federal Federal Non-Federal Total (a) (b) (c ) (d) (e) (f) (g) 1. - 2. - 3. - 4. - 5. Totals - - - - - (1) (2) (3) (4) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 7. - SF-424A (Rev. 4-92) Applicant Name: Budget Information - Non Construction Programs OMB Approval No. 0348-0044 New or Revised Budget Section A - Budget Summary i. Total Direct Charges (sum of 6a-6h) Grant Program, Function or Activity Object Class Categories Authorized for Local Reproduction h. Other a.

  10. Federal Energy Management Program Report Template | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Energy Management Program Report Template Federal Energy Management Program Report Template Template to create reports for the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) PDF icon 53483.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Fuel Cell Subprogram (Presentation) Testing and Validation of Vehicle to Grid Communication Standards Risk Management Tool Attributes:

  11. Federal Employee Training Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-11

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 360.1B, FEDERAL EMPLOYEE TRAINING. The information in this Manual is intended to assist in improving Federal workforce performance under Department of Energy (DOE) managed Federal employee training. Cancels DOE M 360.1A-1. Canceled by DOE O 360.1C.

  12. Federal Employee Training Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-09-21

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 360.1A, Federal Employee Training, dated 9-21-99. The information in this Manual is intended to assist in improving Federal workforce performance under Department of Energy (DOE) managed Federal employee training. Canceled by DOE M 360.1-1B.

  13. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Edwards; KD Shields; MJ Sula; MY Ballinger

    1999-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP--US Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H). In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Pacific Northwest) on the Hanford Site. Two of the facilities evaluated, 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, and 331 Building Life Sciences Laboratory met state and federal criteria for continuous sampling of airborne radionuclide emissions. One other building, the 3720 Environmental Sciences Laboratory, was recognized as being in transition with the potential for meeting the continuous sampling criteria.

  14. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Linnea

    2009-05-21

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.

  15. Find Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards Find Standards1354608000000Find StandardsIn IHS, please free up a standard for another person: downloadprint the PDF, then Log Out.NoQuestion? 667-5809library@lanl.go...

  16. Technical Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review for Technical Standards of Interest Legend: Red Technical Standards Program Activities and Responsibilities Blue Directives Program Activities and Responsibilities...

  17. Notices DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    008 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 204 / Thursday, October 22, 2015 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency [Docket ID FEMA-2015-0006] Guidelines for Implementing Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management, and Executive Order 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice serves to

  18. State Petitions for Exemption from Federal Preemption | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy State Petitions for Exemption from Federal Preemption State Petitions for Exemption from Federal Preemption Federal energy efficiency requirements for residential products generally preempt state laws or regulations concerning energy conservation testing, labeling, and standards. (42 U.S.C. 6297(a)-(c)) However, the Department of Energy (DOE) can grant waivers of federal preemption for particular state laws or regulations. In particular, any state or river basin commission with a

  19. Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE for Federal Projects |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Contract ENABLE for Federal Projects Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE for Federal Projects ESPC ENABLE is a streamlined procurement process for small federal projects to install targeted ECMs in six months or less. ESPC ENABLE is a streamlined procurement process for small federal projects to install targeted ECMs in six months or less. Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) ENABLE is designed to permit a standardized and streamlined procurement process for

  20. Executive Order 13514Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is therefore the policy of the United States that Federal agencies shall increase energy efficiency; measure, report, and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions from direct and indirect...

  1. Federal Acquisition Regulation Federal Acquisition Circular 59

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    I. Prohibition on Contracting With Inverted Domestic Corporations 2012-013 II. Free Trade Agreement--Colombia 2012-012 III. Revision of Cost Accounting Standards Threshold...

  2. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyer, K.-U. Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (Umweltbundesamt), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 1824 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, 2006, was used to estimate the methane emissions from MBT landfills. Due to the calculation made by the authors emissions in the range of 60,000135,000 t CO{sub 2-eq.}/a for all German MBT landfills can be expected. This wide range shows the uncertainties when the here used procedure and the limited available data are applied. It is therefore necessary to generate more data in the future in order to calculate more precise methane emission rates from MBT landfills. This is important for the overall calculation of the climate gas production in Germany which is required once a year by the German Government.

  3. Federal Employee Health Services

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-10-18

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for occupational medical, employee assistance, and workers' compensation programs for Federal employees. Supersedes DOE O 341.1.

  4. Federated Testbed Circuits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testbed Circuits Network R&D Overview Experimental Network Testbeds 100G SDN Testbed Dark Fiber Testbed Federated Testbed Circuits Test Circuit Service Performance (perfSONAR)...

  5. affects on the transport of airborne emissions. This information is needed durin

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    affects on the transport of airborne emissions. This information is needed during the period of repository operation and closure to "estimate the potential effects on the transport of airborne emissions." 1.3.3 Environmental Quality Further federal regulations 10 CFR 960.5-2-5 include the need for information on existing air quality and trends in order to estimate potential impacts on public health and welfare and on environmental quality. 1.3.4 National Ambient Air Quality Standards

  6. Federal certification test results for 1992 model year. Control of air pollution from new motor vehicles and new motor vehicle engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Each manufacturer of a passenger car, (light-duty-vehicle), light-duty truck, motorcycle, heavy-duty gasoline engine, and heavy-duty diesel engine is required to demonstrate compliance with the applicable exhaust emission standard. This report contains all of the individual tests that were required by the certification-procedures found in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations in Part 86. These data were submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency's Certification Division at the National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory.

  7. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Includes Federal Offshore Alabama, Louisiana,

  8. Standards, Ethics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards, Ethics Ombuds Standards and Ethics Committed to the fair and equitable treatment of all employees, contractors, and persons doing business with the Laboratory. Contact...

  9. Federal Technical Capability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-11-19

    This directive defines requirements and responsibilities for meeting the Department of Energy (DOE) commitment to recruiting, deploying, developing, and retaining a technically competent workforce that will accomplish DOE missions in a safe and efficient manner through the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP). Cancels DOE M 426.1-1A, Federal Technical Capability Manual.

  10. Federal Technical Capability Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-05

    The Federal Technical Capability Manual provides the process for the recruitment, deployment, development, and retention of Federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Departments missions and responsibilities at defense nuclear facilities. Canceled by DOE M 426.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

  11. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Commercial Refrigeration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... NREL. Historic Energy Efficiency Rules Would Save Consumers Money and Cut Carbon Emissions New Energy Efficiency Standards to Help Americans Save Money by Saving Energy, Cut

  12. Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, Stephen P.; McMahon, James; Atkinson, Barbara

    2008-05-08

    This study estimated energy, environmental and consumer economic impacts of U.S. Federal residential energy efficiency standards that became effective in the 1988-2006 period, and of energy efficiency standards for fluorescent lamp ballasts and distribution transformers. These standards have been the subject of in-depth analyses conducted as part of DOE's standards rulemaking process. This study drew on those analyses, but updated certain data and developed a common framework and assumptions for all of the products in order to estimate realized impacts and to update projected impacts. It also performed new analysis for the first (1990) fluorescent ballast standards, which had been introduced in the NAECA legislation without a rulemaking. We estimate that the considered standards will reduce residential/ commercial primary energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in 2030 by 4percent compared to the levels expected without any standards. The reduction for the residential sector is larger, at 8percent. The estimated cumulative energy savings from the standards amount to 39 quads by 2020, and 63 quads by 2030. The standards will also reduce emissions of carbon dioxide by considerable amounts.The estimated cumulative net present value of consumer benefit amounts to $241 billion by 2030, and grows to $269 billion by 2045. The overall ratio of consumer benefits to costs (in present value terms) in the 1987-2050 period is 2.7 to 1. Although the estimates made in this study are subject to a fair degree of uncertainty, we believe they provide a reasonable approximation of the national benefits resulting from Federal appliance efficiency standards.

  13. Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Planning » Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) On October 23, 2009, the Department of Energy and eight other Federal agencies entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve coordination among project applicants, federal agencies, states and tribes involved in the siting and permitting process for electric transmission facilities on Federal land.

  14. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connecticut's interconnection guidelines, like FERC's standards, include provisions for three levels of systems:

  15. DOJ Title Standards for Acquisition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOJ Title Standards for Acquisition DOJ Title Standards for Acquisition PDF icon Title Standards 2001 More Documents & Publications Acquisition Guide for Federal Agencies REAL ESTATE PROPERTY GUIDE 2014 REAL ESTATE PROPERTY GUIDE 2013

  16. Maldives-Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (GIZ) Partner Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission...

  17. Expanding the Pool of Federal Policy Options to Promote Industrial Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann; Cox, Matthew; Jackson, Roderick K; Lapsa, Melissa Voss

    2011-01-01

    Improving the energy efficiency of industry is essential for maintaining the viability of domestic manufacturing, especially in a world economy where production is shifting to low-cost, less regulated developing countries. Numerous studies have shown the potential for significant cost-effective energy-savings in U.S. industries, but the realization of this potential is hindered by regulatory, information, workforce, and financial obstacles. This report evaluates seven federal policy options aimed at improving the energy efficiency of industry, grounded in an understanding of industrial decision-making and the barriers to efficiency improvements. Detailed analysis employs the Georgia Institute of Technology's version of the National Energy Modeling System and spreadsheet calculations, generating a series of benefit/cost metrics spanning private and public costs and energy bill savings, as well as air pollution benefits and the social cost of carbon. Two of the policies would address regulatory hurdles (Output-Based Emissions Standards and a federal Energy Portfolio Standard with Combined Heat and Power); three would help to fill information gaps and workforce training needs (the Superior Energy Performance program, Implementation Support Services, and a Small Firm Energy Management program); and two would tackle financial barriers (Tax Lien Financing and Energy-Efficient Industrial Motor Rebates). The social benefit-cost ratios of these policies appear to be highly favorable based on a range of plausible assumptions. Each of the seven policy options has an appropriate federal role, broad applicability across industries, utilizes readily available technologies, and all are administratively feasible.

  18. Federal Water Use Indices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides water use indices as a guide for Federal agencies. Note that each is a rough estimate of water usage at different types of sites. Your site may vary considerably.

  19. Federal Thought Leaders Roundtable

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP Director Timothy Unruh will facilitate a round table discussion on cutting-edge topics among senior agency officials. Federal thought leaders will share insights, candid assessments, and challenge the status quo.

  20. Federal Protective Force

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-07-15

    This Manual establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal protective forces (FPFs). Cancels DOE M 470.4-3, Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

  1. Federal Employee Health Services

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-12-01

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for occupational medical, employee assistance, and workers' compensation programs for Federal employees. Cancels DOE 3790.1B. Canceled by DOE O 341.1A.

  2. Proposed Rules Federal Register

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5383 Vol. 81, No. 21 Tuesday, February 2, 2016 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 900 RIN 1901-AB36 Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission Facilities AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to amend its regulations for the timely coordination of Federal Authorizations for proposed interstate electric transmission facilities pursuant to

  3. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rule 569 applies to all qualifying facilities (QFs) under the federal Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act, which generally includes all renewable energy systems and combined heat and power (CH...

  4. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Virginia's interconnection standards include two levels of review. The qualifications and application fees for each level are as follows:...

  5. Project Facilitation and Quality Assurance for Federal ESPCs | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Project Facilitation and Quality Assurance for Federal ESPCs Project Facilitation and Quality Assurance for Federal ESPCs Document offers guidance on how to agencies can qualify their own project facilitators after notifying the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program energy savings performance contract (ESPC) program manager in writing who they have designated to serve as the qualifying official and confirming their use of the qualification standards. Microsoft

  6. Draft M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document describes the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal, state, and local government energy managers and procurement officials and utility and energy service providers.

  7. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 3.0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document describes the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  8. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions- Fact Sheet, 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utilizing Supplemental Ultra-Low-NOx Burner Technology to Meet Emissions Standards and Improve System Efficiency

  9. Federal Register | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Register Federal Register Federal Register, dated June 30, 2003. Extracted Pages,Department of Energy, Privacy Act, PArecordsJun30.pdf PDF icon Federal Register More Documents & Publications Privacy Act of 1974; Publication of Compilation of Privacy Act Systems of Records Document, Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 129 / Wednesday, July 7, 2004 / Notices Document, Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 17 / Tuesday, January 27, 2004 / Notices

  10. Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site -- calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

    1998-06-17

    This report documents radionuclide air emission from the Hanford Site in 1997, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the MEI. The report has been prepared in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. This report has also been prepared in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The effective dose equivalent to the MEI from the Hanford Site`s 1997 point source emissions was 1.2 E-03 mrem (1.2 E-05 mSv), which is well below the 40 CFR 61 Subpart H regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr. Radon and thoron emissions, exempted from 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, resulted in an effective dose equivalent to the MEI of 2.5 E-03 mrem (2.5 E-05 mSv). The effective dose equivalent to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive emissions was 2.2 E-02 mrem (2.2 E-04 mSv). The total effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions was 2.6 E-02 mrem (2.6 E-04 mSv). The effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions is well below the Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 246-247, regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr.

  11. Renewable Fuel Standards Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Fuel Standards Resources Renewable Fuel Standards Resources Federal agencies and certain state governments are required to acquire alternative fuel vehicles as part of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, though they are also entitled to choose a petroleum reduction path as an alternative to the mandate. Find renewable fuel standards resources. State Clean Energy Practices: Renewable Fuel Standards Understanding and Informing the Policy Environment: State-Level Renewable Fuel Standards.

  12. Federal Register | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Federal agencies, and provides a forum for public participation in the democratic process. The publications provide access to a wide range of Federal benefits and...

  13. Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Zia Haq, Senior Analyst, Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

  14. Better Building Federal Award Underway

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    See which federal building is leading this year's race to reduce energy consumption as part of the Better Building Federal Award.

  15. Federal Employee Health Benefits (FEHB)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) program is the largest employer-sponsored health insurance program in the world, covering more than 8 million Federal employees, retirees, former...

  16. ISSUANCE 2015-06-30: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PDF icon cacworkinggroup.pdf More Documents & Publications 2015-03-26: Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products; Notice of Intent to Establish an ASRAC Working Group 2014-06-09 ...

  17. Federal Sustainable Print Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-07-07

    This Guide provides acceptable approaches for implementing the IT sustainability requirements and criteria required by DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, dated 5-2-11 and related to the sustainability requirements contained in Executive Order 13693, "Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade.

  18. Federal Sustainable Print Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-11-17

    The Guide provides acceptable approaches for implementing the IT sustainability requirements and criteria required by DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, dated 5-2-11, and related to the sustainability requirements contained in Executive Order 13693, "Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade." Does not cancel/supersede other directives.

  19. Federal Employee Training

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-09-21

    To plan and establish requirements and assign responsibilities for Department of Energy (DOE) Federal employee training, education, and development under the Government Employees Training Act of 1958, as amended. Cancels DOE O 360.1. Canceled by DOE O 360.1B.

  20. Federal Employee Training

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-11

    To plan and establish requirements and assign responsibilities for Department of Energy (DOE) Federal employee training, education, and development (hereafter referred to as "training") under the Government Employees Training Act of 1958. Cancels DOE O 360.1A. Canceled by DOE O 360.1C.

  1. Federal Employee Training

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-06

    This Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for DOE Federal employee training in accordance with Chapter 41 of Title 5, United States Code (U.S.C.). Supersedes DOE O 360.1B and DOE M 360.1-1B.

  2. Federal Technical Capability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-11-19

    To define requirements and responsibilities for meeting the Department of Energy (DOE) commitment to recruiting, deploying, developing, and retaining a technically competent workforce that will accomplish DOE missions in a safe and efficient manner through the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP). Chg 1 dated 9-20-11 supersedes DOE O 426.1 and cancels DOE P 426.1.

  3. Notice and Request for Comments, Federal Register, 71 FR 7749, February 14,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2006 | Department of Energy and Request for Comments, Federal Register, 71 FR 7749, February 14, 2006 Notice and Request for Comments, Federal Register, 71 FR 7749, February 14, 2006 Document displays the notice and request for comments for Standard for Premium Energy-Efficient Electric Motors for Federal Acquisition, which was published in the Federal Register on February 14, 2006. PDF icon 71_fr_7749.pdf More Documents & Publications Notice of Final Determination, Federal Register, 71

  4. Notice of Final Determination, Federal Register, 71 FR 47791, August 18,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2006 | Department of Energy Final Determination, Federal Register, 71 FR 47791, August 18, 2006 Notice of Final Determination, Federal Register, 71 FR 47791, August 18, 2006 Document displays the notice of final determination on Standard for Premium Energy-Efficient Electric Motors for Federal Acquisition, which was published in the Federal Register on August 18, 2006. PDF icon 71_fr_47791.pdf More Documents & Publications Notice and Request for Comments, Federal Register, 71 FR 7749,

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): Standard Relating to Solar Hot Water - Requires new Federal buildings, or Federal buildings undergoing major renovations, to meet at least 30 percent of hot water demand through the use of solar hot water heaters, if cost-effective. [Section 523] Federally-Procured Appliances with Standby Power - Requires all Federal agencies to procure appliances with standby power consumption

  6. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Massachusetts' interconnection standards apply to all forms of distributed generation (DG), including renewables, and to all customers of the state's three investor-owned utilities (Unitil,...

  7. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia has two interconnection standards: one for net-metered systems and one for systems that are not net-metered.

  8. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The interconnection standards approved by the PUC also updated Nevada's net-metering policy, originally enacted in 1997. Previously, Nevada Revised Statute 704.774 addressed basic interconnection...

  9. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: On March 2016, the NY Public Service Commission (PSC) modified the Standard Interconnection Requirements (SIR) increasing the maximum threshold for interconnection capacity of distributed...

  10. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technical screens have been established for each level, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 technical standard is used for all interconnections. Reasonable time frames ...

  11. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In response to state legislation enacted in 2001, in September 2004 the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (MPUC) adopted an order establishing generic standards for utility tariffs for...

  12. Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Proposal for Standard Market Design | Department of Energy Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design A report on an independent study to assess various potential impacts of the proposed rulemaking by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), "Remedying Undue Discrimination through Open Access Transmission

  13. Federal Incentives for Water Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-05

    This factsheet lists the major federal incentives for water power technologies available as of April 2013.

  14. Better Buildings Federal Award | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. Courthouse was the winner of the 2013 Better Buildings Federal Award. The Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Better Buildings Federal Award recognizes the federal...

  15. Funding Federal Energy and Water Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Funding Federal Energy and Water Projects The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) helps Federal agencies ...

  16. Federal laboratory nondestructive testing research and development applicable to industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.A.; Moore, N.L.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents the results of a survey of nondestructive testing (NDT) and related sensor technology research and development (R and D) at selected federal laboratories. Objective was to identify and characterize NDT activities that could be applied to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in US manufacturing. Numerous federally supported R and D programs were identified in areas such as acoustic emissions, eddy current, radiography, computer tomography and ultrasonics. A Preliminary Findings Report was sent to industry representatives, which generated considerable interest.

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Executive Order 13423, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): -- Requires Federal agencies to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by either 3 percent annual reductions through FY 2015, or by 30 percent by 2015, as compared to FY 2003. -- Requires Federal agencies to obtain at least half of required renewable energy from new renewable sources. Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation

  18. Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    rulemaking by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), "Remedying Undue Discrimination through Open Access Transmission Service and Standard Electricity Market Design."...

  19. E.O. 13690 (2015): Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    On January 30, 2015, President Obama signed an Executive Order (E.O.) 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and...

  20. Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington enacted appliance efficiency legislation in 2005, creating minimum efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have been preempted by federal law. HB 1004, signed in May 2009...

  1. Assessment of the feasibility of reducing emissions from gasoline and LPG industrial equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekken, M.; Wood, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    In 1994, the California Air Resources Board (ARB) approved a State Implementation Plan (SIP) to bring California`s South Coast Air Basin into compliance with federal ozone standards. The plan includes the adoption of emission controls for previously un(der)regulated off-road vehicles and equipment. Off-road industrial equipment in the 25 to 175 horsepower range has been designed to meet power and fuel economy priorities, with little effort going to emission reductions. California`s plan requires substantial emission reductions for such equipment. The application of catalysts or other emission control technologies to spark-ignited industrial equipment can feasibly and cost-effectively achieve the emission reductions required in the SIP. The paper discusses off-road catalyst application, availability, and packaging. In addition, other technologies to reduce emissions are addressed, including engine, fuel system, and exhaust system modifications, and the use of alternate fuels. Anticipated costs are also discussed. There is good reason to presume that spark-ignited industrial equipment will be able to achieve the required emission reductions in the time frame indicated in the SIP.

  2. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  3. Needle Federated Search Engine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has combined a number of technologies, tools, and resources to accomplish a new means of federating search results. The resulting product is a search engine called Needle, an open-source-based tool that the INL uses internally for researching across a wide variety of information repositories. Needle has a flexible search interface that allows end users to point at any available data source. A user can select multiple sources such as commercialmore » databases (Web of Science, Engineering Index), external resources (WorldCat, Google Scholar), and internal corporate resources (email, document management system, library collections) in a single interface with one search query. In the future, INL hopes to offer this open-source engine to the public. This session will outline the development processes for making Needle™s search interface and simplifying the federation of internal and external data sources.« less

  4. Award Number: Federal Non-Federal Federal Non-Federal Total

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prescribed by OMB Circular A-102 Previous Edition Usable Total (5) f. Contractual g. Construction Section B - Budget Categories Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number Grant Program Function or Activity Estimated Unobligated Funds e. Supplies i. Total Direct Charges (sum of 6a-6h) Grant Program, Function or Activity Object Class Categories Authorized for Local Reproduction h. Other a. Personnel b. Fringe Benefits c. Travel d. Equipment 6. j. Indirect Charges k. Totals (sum of 6i-6j)

  5. Award Number: Federal Non-Federal Federal Non-Federal Total

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    j. Indirect Charges k. Totals (sum of 6i-6j) Program Income Applicant Name: Budget Information - Non Construction Programs OMB Approval No. 0348-0044 New or Revised Budget Section A - Budget Summary i. Total Direct Charges (sum of 6a-6h) Grant Program, Function or Activity Object Class Categories Authorized for Local Reproduction h. Other a. Personnel b. Fringe Benefits c. Travel d. Equipment 6. Total (5) f. Contractual g. Construction Section B - Budget Categories Catalog of Federal Domestic

  6. From Federal Computer Week:

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Federal Computer Week: Energy agency launches performance-based pay system By Richard W. Walker Published on March 27, 2008 The Energy Department's National Nuclear Security Administration has launched a new performance- based pay system involving about 2,000 of its 2,500 employees. NNSA officials described the effort as a pilot project that will test the feasibility of the new system, which collapses the traditional 15 General Schedule pay bands into broader pay bands. The new structure

  7. Notices Federal Register

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    documents other than rules or proposed rules that are applicable to the public. Notices of hearings and investigations, committee meetings, agency decisions and rulings, delegations of authority, filing of petitions and applications and agency statements of organization and functions are examples of documents appearing in this section. Notices Federal Register 67156 Vol. 79, No. 218 Wednesday, November 12, 2014 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Census Bureau Proposed Information Collection; Comment

  8. Federal Interagency Geothermal Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Arlene; Prencipe, Loretta; Todaro, Richard M.; Cuyler, David; Eide, Elizabeth

    2011-06-01

    This collaborative document describes the roles and responsibilities of key Federal agencies in the development of geothermal technologies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), including the U.S. Forest Service; the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI), including the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM); the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); and the Department of Defense (DOD).

  9. Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities Standard Review Plan Volume 2 -- Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review During Design February 2015 i Standard Review Plan Volume 2 Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review during Design Facility Life Cycle Applicability CD-1 CD-2 CD-3 CD-4 Operations and Transitions Decommissioning & Environmental Restoration February 2015 ii Table of Contents Acronyms

  10. NMOG Emissions Characterization and Estimation for Vehicles Using Ethanol-Blended Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sluder, Scott; West, Brian H

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol is a biofuel commonly used in gasoline blends to displace petroleum consumption; its utilization is on the rise in the United States, spurred by the biofuel utilization mandates put in place by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the statutory responsibility to implement the EISA mandates through the promulgation of the Renewable Fuel Standard. EPA has historically mandated an emissions certification fuel specification that calls for ethanol-free fuel, except for the certification of flex-fuel vehicles. However, since the U.S. gasoline marketplace is now virtually saturated with E10, some organizations have suggested that inclusion of ethanol in emissions certification fuels would be appropriate. The test methodologies and calculations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations for gasoline-fueled vehicles have been developed with the presumption that the certification fuel does not contain ethanol; thus, a number of technical issues would require resolution before such a change could be accomplished. This report makes use of the considerable data gathered during the mid-level blends testing program to investigate one such issue: estimation of non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions. The data reported in this paper were gathered from over 600 cold-start Federal Test Procedure (FTP) tests conducted on 68 vehicles representing 21 models from model year 2000 to 2009. Most of the vehicles were certified to the Tier-2 emissions standard, but several older Tier-1 and national low emissions vehicle program (NLEV) vehicles were also included in the study. Exhaust speciation shows that ethanol, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde dominate the oxygenated species emissions when ethanol is blended into the test fuel. A set of correlations were developed that are derived from the measured non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions and the ethanol blend level in the fuel. These correlations were applied to the measured NMHC emissions from the mid-level ethanol blends testing program and the results compared against the measured NMOG emissions. The results show that the composite FTP NMOG emissions estimate has an error of 0.0015 g/mile {+-}0.0074 for 95% of the test results. Estimates for the individual phases of the FTP are also presented with similar error levels. A limited number of tests conducted using the LA92, US06, and highway fuel economy test cycles show that the FTP correlation also holds reasonably well for these cycles, though the error level relative to the measured NMOG value increases for NMOG emissions less than 0.010 g/mile.

  11. NMOG Emissions Characterizations and Estimation for Vehicles Using Ethanol-Blended Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sluder, Scott; West, Brian H

    2011-10-01

    Ethanol is a biofuel commonly used in gasoline blends to displace petroleum consumption; its utilization is on the rise in the United States, spurred by the biofuel utilization mandates put in place by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the statutory responsibility to implement the EISA mandates through the promulgation of the Renewable Fuel Standard. EPA has historically mandated an emissions certification fuel specification that calls for ethanol-free fuel, except for the certification of flex-fuel vehicles. However, since the U.S. gasoline marketplace is now virtually saturated with E10, some organizations have suggested that inclusion of ethanol in emissions certification fuels would be appropriate. The test methodologies and calculations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations for gasoline-fueled vehicles have been developed with the presumption that the certification fuel does not contain ethanol; thus, a number of technical issues would require resolution before such a change could be accomplished. This report makes use of the considerable data gathered during the mid-level blends testing program to investigate one such issue: estimation of non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions. The data reported in this paper were gathered from over 600 cold-start Federal Test Procedure (FTP) tests conducted on 68 vehicles representing 21 models from model year 2000 to 2009. Most of the vehicles were certified to the Tier-2 emissions standard, but several older Tier-1 and national low emissions vehicle program (NLEV) vehicles were also included in the study. Exhaust speciation shows that ethanol, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde dominate the oxygenated species emissions when ethanol is blended into the test fuel. A set of correlations were developed that are derived from the measured non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions and the ethanol blend level in the fuel. These correlations were applied to the measured NMHC emissions from the mid-level ethanol blends testing program and the results compared against the measured NMOG emissions. The results show that the composite FTP NMOG emissions estimate has an error of 0.0015 g/mile {+-}0.0074 for 95% of the test results. Estimates for the individual phases of the FTP are also presented with similar error levels. A limited number of tests conducted using the LA92, US06, and highway fuel economy test cycles show that the FTP correlation also holds reasonably well for these cycles, though the error level relative to the measured NMOG value increases for NMOG emissions less than 0.010 g/mile.

  12. Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector: A Review of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal & State Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution | Department of Energy Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector: A Review of Federal & State Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector: A Review of Federal & State Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution This paper

  13. Appliance Standards Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance Standards Resources Appliance Standards Resources The federal government, and some states, have established minimum efficiency standards for certain appliances and equipment, such as refrigerators and clothes washers. Standards may require products adhere to a certain maximum allowable energy consumption or dictate that a product contain particular features or devices. Alternatively, they may also require an average efficiency across all models of a product, which allows a mix of less

  14. EOS standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeff, Carl W

    2011-01-12

    An approach to creating accurate EOS for pressure standards is described. Applications to Cu, Au, and Ta are shown. Extension of the method to high compressions using DFT is illustrated. Comparisons with modern functionals show promise.

  15. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The revised standards provide for three separate levels of interconnection based on system capacity and other requirements. The first level, Tier 1 systems, applies generally to systems up to 25...

  16. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The PUC standards generally apply to investor-owned utilities (IOUs) with 40,000 or more customers and all electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities with 5,000 customers or more are required to ...

  17. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The PSC has published two sets of standard forms for interconnection, available on the program web site. One set pertains to systems smaller than 20 kW while the second set applies to larger syst...

  18. Quality assurance program plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boom, R.J.

    1995-03-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies quality assurance program requirements and addresses the various Westinghouse Hanford Company organizations and their particular responsibilities in regards to sample and data handling of airborne emissions. The Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions requirements are defined in National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1991a). Reporting of the emissions to the US Department of Energy is performed in compliance with requirements of US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE-RL 1988). This Quality Assurance Program Plan is prepared in accordance with and to the requirements of QAMS-004/80, Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Program Plans (EPA 1983). Title 40 CFR Part 61, Appendix B, Method 114, Quality Assurance Methods (EPA 1991b) specifies the quality assurance requirements and that a program plan should be prepared to meet the requirements of this regulation. This Quality Assurance Program Plan identifies NESHAP responsibilities and how the Westinghouse Hanford Company Environmental, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance Division will verify that the methods are properly implemented.

  19. Pretreatment [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose Positron Emission Tomography Maximum Standardized Uptake Value as Predictor of Distant Metastasis in Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy: Rethinking the Role of Positron Emission Tomography in Personalizing Treatment Based on Risk Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, Vimoj J.; MacRae, Robert; Sirisegaram, Abby; Pantarotto, Jason R.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether the preradiation maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the primary tumor for [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has a prognostic significance in patients with Stage T1 or T2N0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative radiation therapy, whether conventional or stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2007 and December 2011, a total of 163 patients (180 tumors) with medically inoperable histologically proven Stage T1 or T2N0 NSCLC and treated with radiation therapy (both conventional and SBRT) were entered in a research ethics board approved database. All patients received pretreatment FDG-PET / computed tomography (CT) at 1 institution with consistent acquisition technique. The medical records and radiologic images of these patients were analyzed. Results: The overall survival at 2 years and 3 years for the whole group was 76% and 67%, respectively. The mean and median SUV{sub max} were 8.1 and 7, respectively. Progression-free survival at 2 years with SUV{sub max} <7 was better than that of the patients with tumor SUV{sub max} ?7 (67% vs 51%; P=.0096). Tumors with SUV{sub max} ?7 were associated with a worse regional recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival. In the multivariate analysis, SUV{sub max} ?7 was an independent prognostic factor for distant metastasis-free survival. Conclusion: In early-stage NSCLC managed with radiation alone, patients with SUV{sub max} ?7 on FDG-PET / CT scan have poorer outcomes and high risk of progression, possibly because of aggressive biology. There is a potential role for adjuvant therapies for these high-risk patients with intent to improve outcomes.

  20. Federated Search Not your ordinary search technology!

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Federated Search at OSTI Download latest version of Flash Player exit federal site to view video

  1. Energy Management Mandates by Federal Legal Authority

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal agencies are required to meet energy management mandates outlined by the following federal legal authorities.

  2. Federal Acquisition Regulation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 & 2005-74 Summary of Rules FAC 2005-73 Item Subject FAR Case I Positive Law Codification of Title 41 2011-018 II Technical Amendments Item I--Positive Law Codification of Title 41 (FAR Case 2011-018) Title 41 of the United States Code, "Public Contracts" was enacted into positive law on January 4, 2011 (Pub.L 111-350). This codification reorganized and renumbered the statutes, but did not change their meaning or legal effect. This final rule amended the Federal Acquisition

  3. Furnace Standard Analysis Discussion Document

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Standard * Using field intelligence and thoughtful analysis - assess and quantify the effects a regional or national condensing standard for natural gas furnaces could have on energy efficiency and environmental objectives.  Provide insight on the potential impact limiting customer choices for heating systems could have on overall energy usage, cost, and carbon emissions outcomes.  Provide all data, models and sources of information to DOE and other stakeholders, to gain their confidence

  4. Energy Corridors on Federal Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To improve energy delivery and enhance the electric transmission grid for the future, several government agencies currently are working together to establish a coordinated network of Federal energy corridors on Federal lands throughout the United States.

  5. Meeting Federal Energy Security Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the opportunity to increase the scope of federal-utility partnerships for meeting energy security requirements.

  6. Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs Fiscal Year 2005

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs Fiscal Year 2005 September 26, 2006 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy Management Program Washington, DC 20585 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................E-1 I. Overview of Federal Energy Consumption and Costs ................................................1 A. Standard

  7. Applicability issues and compliance strategies for the proposed oil and gas industry hazardous air pollutant standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tandon, N.; Winborn, K.A.; Grygar, W.W. II

    1999-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has targeted oil and natural gas transmission and storage facilities located across the United States for regulation under the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) program (proposed in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 63 [40 CFR 63], Subparts HH and HHH). The proposed NESHAP were published in the February 6, 1998 Federal Register and are expected to be promulgated in May 1999. These rules are intended to reduce Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) emitted from oil and gas facilities. It is expected that these rules will require more than 400 major sources and more than 500 non-major sources (also referred to as area sources) to meet maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards defined in the NESHAP. The rules would regulate HAP emission from glycol dehydration units, storage vessels and various fugitive leak sources. This technical paper addresses the applicability issues and compliance strategies related to the proposed NESHAP. The applicability criteria for both rules differ from those promulgated for other source categories under 40 CFR 63. For example, individual unit throughput and/or HAP emission thresholds may exempt specific units from the MACT standards in the NESHAP. The proposed Subpart HH would apply not only to major sources, but also to triethylene glycol (TEC) dehydration units at area sources located in urban areas. For both proposed NESHAP all 199 HAP must be considered for the major source determinations, but only 15 specific HAP are targeted for control under the proposed standards. An overview of the HAP control requirements, exemption criteria, as well as initial and continued compliance determination strategies are presented. Several industry examples are included to assist industry develop compliance strategies.

  8. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) establishes partnerships and facilitates communications among Federal agencies, utilities, and energy service companies. The group develops strategies to implement cost-effective energy efficiency and water conservation projects through utility incentive programs at Federal sites.

  9. City of Asheville- Efficiency Standards for City Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April 2007, the Asheville City Council adopted carbon emission reduction goals and set LEED standards for new city buildings. The council committed to reducing carbon emissions by 2% per year...

  10. Biological Air Emissions Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Air Emissions Control Biological Air Emissions Control Innovative Technology Enables Low-Cost, Energy-Efficient Treatment of Industrial Exhaust Streams Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol, formaldehyde, acetylaldehyde, and acrolein) during production of wood products must be tightly controlled. Conventional VOCs and HAPs emission

  11. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  12. Notice of Opportunity Templates and Best Practices for Federal ESPCs |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Opportunity Templates and Best Practices for Federal ESPCs Notice of Opportunity Templates and Best Practices for Federal ESPCs Use the following documents to complete the notice of opportunity (NOO) activities in phase 2 of the energy savings performance contract (ESPC) process. Standard Basic Notice of Opportunity Template: Template and sample of a brief, basic, compliant NOO NOO Templates and Best Practices: Text version of the ESCO Selector, which includes all NOO

  13. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subpart A - General Provisions | Department of Energy PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities. PDF icon Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION

  14. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Version 4.0) | Department of Energy M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0) M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0) Document outlines the Federal Energy Management Program's standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers. PDF icon Download the M&V Guidelines

  15. Renewable Energy used in State Renewable Portfolio Standards...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from reduced greenhouse gas emissions and 5.2 billion from reductions in other air pollution, in mid-range estimates, for state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies ...

  16. SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE Sam Nunn Federal Building

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE Sam Nunn Federal Building 61 Forsyth Street SW, Atlanta, GA 30303 April 2, 2015 April 1, 2015: Meet on the Glenn Hotel roof at 6:00 p.m. to walk to Dutch-treat dinner at Ted's Montana Grill, 133 Luckie Street Northwest. April 2, 2015: Meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. in the Sam Nunn Federal Building. *************************************** 1. Welcome, Announcements & Introductions .................................................. Joel Seymour 2. Opening

  17. OSHA`s process safety management standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morelli, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    On February 24, 1992, OSHA published the final rule for its Process Safety Management Standard (PSM) mandated by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. (see Federal Register 57 FR 6356-6417). This standard imposes several responsibilities upon employers whose processes can cause large accident releases that could result in processes can cause large accident releases that could result in catastrophes. In contrast to OSHA`s Hazard Communication standard which focuses on routine daily exposures to hazardous materials, the PSM Standard is concerned with processes whereby the use, storage, manufacturing, handling or on-site movement of highly hazardous chemicals which exceed threshold quantities, provides potential for a catastrophic release. The PSM Standard requires: a written program, plans, training, hazard analysis and compliance auditing. This paper outlines the provisions under this Standard pursuant to OSHA regulation 29 Code of Federal Regulation 1910.119.

  18. Summary Description Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-58 Federal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Federal preference for purchasing biobased products. Contractors may need to create an inventory management system to track the biobased products purchased for each contract....

  19. Federated Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Federated Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Federated Wind Farm Facility Federated Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  20. Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission Facilities: Federal Register Notice Volume 73, No. 183 - Sep. 19, 2008 Coordination of Federal Authorizations for...

  1. Memorandum of Understanding Regarding Coordination in Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regarding Coordination in Federal Agency Review of Electric Transmission Facilities on Federal Land, October 23, 2009 Memorandum of Understanding Regarding Coordination in Federal...

  2. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  3. Costa Rica-Supporting the Zero Emissions Strategy of Costa Rica...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (GIZ) Partner Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission...

  4. Safeguards and Security Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1-2009 May 2009 DOE STANDARD SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1171-2009 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1171-2009 iii APPROVAL The Federal

  5. Enforcement Policy Statement: Regional Standards Enforcement Rulemaking

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regional Standards Enforcement Rulemaking and Distributors April 24, 2014 On June 27, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) published in the Federal Register a direct final rule (DFR) under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), 42 U.S.C. §§ 6291-6309, which set forth amended energy conservation standards for central air conditioners and heat pumps, including regional standards in certain States. 76 FR 37408. DOE has initiated a rulemaking to consider possible approaches to enforcing

  6. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program focused on reducing the federal government's energy consumption by providing federal agencies with information, tools, and assistance toward tracking and meeting energy- related requirements and goals. FEMP seeks contracts with small businesses to aid in this effort. This fact sheet outlines essential resources and tips to get you started in small business contracting with FEMP.

  7. Federal Regulations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Regulations Federal Regulations keyboard-621831_960_720.jpg Cybersecurity Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (pdf) Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 (Title III of E-Gov) Homeland Security Act of 2002 (includes Cyber Security Act of 2002 and Critical Infrastructure Act of 2002) Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act Cyber

  8. Energy Standard

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Standard as requested by Chairman Bingaman November 2011 Analysis of Impacts of a Clean www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as

  9. Air Quality/Emissions Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Air Quality/Emissions Resources Air Quality/Emissions Resources Federal agencies and certain state governments are required to acquire alternative fuel vehicles as part of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, though they are also entitled to choose a petroleum reduction path as an alternative to the mandate. Find air quality/emissions resources below. Emission-Related Information for Heavy Trucks, Buses, and Engines National Clean Diesel Campaign: Sector Programs. Back to Transportation Policies and

  10. Information Technology Standards Program management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    This document presents a logical and realistic plan to implement the Information Technology (IT) Standards Program throughout the Department of Energy (DOE). It was developed by DOE Chief Information Officer (CIO) staff, with participation from many other individuals throughout the DOE complex. The DOE IT Standards Program coordinates IT standards activities Department-wide, including implementation of standards to support the DOE Information Architecture. The Program is voluntary, participatory, and consensus-based. The intent is to enable accomplishment of the DOE mission, and the Program is applicable to all DOE elements, both Federal and contractor. The purpose of this document is to describe the key elements of the DOE IT Standards Program.

  11. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Energy Conservation Features in FBSS Building in Federal Region 3, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1993 Total Floorspace Number of Buildings (thousand square feet) Any Any...

  12. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities in FBSS Buildings in Federal Region 3, 1993 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Distribution of Building-Level...

  13. Federal Requirements for the Web

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal laws and requirements govern the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) with regards to its websites and other digital media.

  14. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    grants to Federal agencies to implement energy efficiency and water conservation projects. (See Energy Conservation Program Assistance and Retrofit or Purchase of Any...

  15. Commissioning Process for Federal Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The commissioning process for federal facilities can be completed in four steps: planning, investigation, implementation, and hand-off and integration.

  16. Federal Electronics Challenge Gold Award

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 18th, DOE Headquarters was presented the Federal Electronics Challenge Gold Award for exemplary performance in Green Computing, including green procurement, energy efficient operations and...

  17. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey -- Overview

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993 provides building-level energy-related characteristics for a special sample of commercial buildings owned by the...

  18. Federal Railroad Administration | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration PDF icon Federal Railroad Administration More Documents & Publications Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNFHLW Rail...

  19. Federal Aviation Administration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aviation Administration Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Federal Aviation Administration Name: Federal Aviation Administration Address: 800 Independence Ave., SW Place:...

  20. Sustainability in Existing Federal Buildings | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Sustainability in Existing Federal Buildings Sustainability in Existing Federal Buildings The General Services Administration ...

  1. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: Chairman's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seminar: Chairman's Corner Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: Chairman's Corner Presentation covers the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar:...

  2. Federal Spectrum Management at the National Telecommunications...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Spectrum Management at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration Federal Spectrum Management at the National Telecommunications and Information...

  3. 2009 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2010-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2009. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  4. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  5. 2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2009-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  6. After the Clean Air Mercury Eule: prospects for reducing mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jana B. Milford; Alison Pienciak

    2009-04-15

    Recent court decisions have affected the EPA's regulation of mercury emissions from coal burning, but some state laws are helping to clear the air. In 2005, the US EPA issued the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR), setting performance standards for new coal-fired power plants and nominally capping mercury emissions form new and existing plants at 38 tons per year from 2010 to 2017 and 15 tpy in 2018 and thereafter; these down from 48.5 tpy in 1999. To implement the CAMR, 21 states with non-zero emissions adopted EPA's new source performance standards and cap and trade program with little or no modification. By December 2007, 23 other states had proposed or adopted more stringent requirements; 16 states prohibited or restricted interstate trading of mercury emissions. On February 2008, the US Court of Appeal for the District of Columbia Circuit unanimously vacated the CAMR. This article assesses the status of mercury emission control requirements for coal-fired power plants in the US in light of this decision, focusing on state actions and prospects for a new federal rule. 34 refs., 1 fig.

  7. 2010 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Page 1 of 20 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Department of Energy 2010 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey: Trend Report (2006 and 2008 results have been recalculated to exclude Do Not Know/No Basis to Judge responses) Response Summary Surveys Completed 2010 Governmentwide 263,475 2010

  8. Federal Real Property Council Guidance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Real Property Council Guidance for Improved Asset Management December 22, 2004 Federal Real Property Council Guidance for Improved Asset Management Table of Contents I. Overview............................................................................. 1 II. Guiding Principles .................................................................... 3 III. Asset Management Plan - Required Components............................... 4 IV. Asset Management Plan - "Shelf

  9. Maryland's efforts to develop regulations creating an air emissions offset trading program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guy, D.M.; Zaw-Mon, M.

    1999-07-01

    Under the federal Clean Air Act's New Source Review program, many companies located in or planning to locate in areas that do not meet federal air quality standards or in the Northeast Ozone Transport Region (northern Virginia to Maine) must obtain emission reductions (called offsets) of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides that are greater than the new emissions that will be released. This offset requirement allows growth in industry while protecting air quality against deterioration. Despite the federal offset requirement, a formal banking and trading program is not mandated by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Still, a mechanism is needed to ensure that emission reduction credits (ERCs) are available for sources to use to meet the offset requirement. Currently, Maryland does not have regulations covering the sale or transfer of ERCs from one facility to another. Maryland works with industry on a case-by-case basis to identify potential sources of ERCs and to assist in obtaining them. Then, the offset requirement and the ERCs used to meet the offsets are incorporated into individual permits using various permitting mechanisms. Desiring certainty and stability in the banking and trading process, Maryland's business community has pressed for regulations to formalize Maryland's procedures. Working over several years through a stakeholder process, Maryland has developed concepts for a trading program and a draft regulation. This paper describes Maryland's current case-by-case banking and trading procedure and traces efforts to develop a regulation to formalize the process. The paper discusses complex policy issues related to establishing a banking and trading program, describes the principal elements of Maryland's draft regulation, and summarizes elements of other states' emissions banking and trading programs.

  10. Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities Standard Review Plan Volume 4 - Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review During Facility Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration February 2015 i Standard Review Plan Volume 4 Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review during Facility Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration Facility Life Cycle Applicability CD-1 CD-2 CD-3 CD-4 Operations and Transitions Decommissioning & Environmental Restoration February

  11. Fuel economy and emissions evaluation of BMW hydrogen 7 mono-fuel demonstration vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallner, T.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Gurski, S.; Duoba, M.; Thiel, W.; Martin, D.; Korn, T.; Energy Systems; BMW Group Munich Germany; BMW Group Oxnard USA

    2008-12-01

    This article summarizes the testing of two BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF). The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles are derived from the BMW Hydrogen 7 bi-fuel vehicles and based on a BMW 760iL. The mono-fuel as well as the bi-fuel vehicle(s) is equipped with cryogenic hydrogen on-board storage and a gaseous hydrogen port fuel injection system. The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles were tested for fuel economy as well as emissions on the Federal Test Procedure FTP-75 cold-start test as well as the highway test. The results show that these vehicles achieve emissions levels that are only a fraction of the Super Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (SULEV) standard for nitric oxide (NO{sub x}) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. For non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions the cycle-averaged emissions are actually 0 g/mile, which require the car to actively reduce emissions compared to the ambient concentration. The fuel economy numbers on the FTP-75 test were 3.7 kg of hydrogen per 100 km, which, on an energy basis, is equivalent to a gasoline fuel consumption of 17 miles per gallon (mpg). Fuel economy numbers for the highway cycle were determined to be 2.1 kg of hydrogen per 100 km or 30 miles per gallon of gasoline equivalent (GGE). In addition to cycle-averaged emissions and fuel economy numbers, time-resolved (modal) emissions as well as air/fuel ratio data is analyzed to further investigate the root causes of the remaining emissions traces. The BMW Hydrogen 7 vehicles employ a switching strategy with lean engine operation at low engine loads and stoichiometric operation at high engine loads that avoids the NO{sub x} emissions critical operating regime with relative air/fuel ratios between 1 < {lambda} < 2. The switching between these operating modes was found to be a major source of the remaining NO{sub x} emissions. The emissions results collected during this period lead to the conclusion that the BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles are likely the cleanest combustion engine vehicles ever tested at Argonne's APRF.

  12. Federal Supply Schedules References Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subparts

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    -Chapter 8.4 (June 2011) 1 Federal Supply Schedules References Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subparts 1.1 Purpose, Authority, Issuance - 1.108 FAR conventions 2.1 Definitions 5.3 Synopses of Contract Awards 5.4 Release of Information 6 Competition Requirements 8.4 Federal Supply Schedules 9.1 Responsible Prospective Contractors - 9.105 Procedures 9.4 Debarment, Suspension and Ineligibility - 9.406 Debarment and 9.407 Suspension 12 Acquisition of Commercial Items 12.4 Unique Requirements

  13. CAFE Standards (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Pursuant to the Presidents announcement of a National Fuel Efficiency Policy, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the EPA have promulgated nationally coordinated standards for tailpipe Carbon Dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions and fuel economy for light-duty vehicles (LDVs), which includes both passenger cars and light-duty trucks. In the joint rulemaking, the Environmental Protection Agency is enacting CO2-equivalent emissions standards under the Clean Air Act (CAA), and NHTSA is enacting companion Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  14. SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal Building 77 Forsyth Street SW, Atlanta, GA 30303 November 6, 2014 November 5, 2014: Meet at the Glenn Hotel lobby at 6:00 p.m. to walk to...

  15. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Biedermann, Grant (Albuquerque, NM); Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stick, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, III, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  16. Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection The guide provides background information about various types of industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers along with discussion about the fuels that they burn and the emissions that they produce. Also included are discussions about emissions standards and compliance issues, technical details related to emissions control techniques, and

  17. Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technology | Department of Energy Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology January 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative technology that could potentially help some coal-based power generation facilities comply with anticipated new mercury emissions standards was successfully demonstrated in a recently concluded milestone project at a Michigan power

  18. CILogon-HA. Higher Assurance Federated Identities for DOE Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basney, James

    2015-08-01

    The CILogon-HA project extended the existing open source CILogon service (initially developed with funding from the National Science Foundation) to provide credentials at multiple levels of assurance to users of DOE facilities for collaborative science. CILogon translates mechanism and policy across higher education and grid trust federations, bridging from the InCommon identity federation (which federates university and DOE lab identities) to the Interoperable Global Trust Federation (which defines standards across the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid, the Open Science Grid, and other cyberinfrastructure). The CILogon-HA project expanded the CILogon service to support over 160 identity providers (including 6 DOE facilities) and 3 internationally accredited certification authorities. To provide continuity of operations upon the end of the CILogon-HA project period, project staff transitioned the CILogon service to operation by XSEDE.

  19. Better Buildings Federal Award | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Better Buildings Federal Award Better Buildings Federal Award U.S. General Services Administration's Wichita U.S. Courthouse was the winner of the 2013 Better Buildings Federal Award. U.S. General Services Administration's Wichita U.S. Courthouse was the winner of the 2013 Better Buildings Federal Award. The Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Better Buildings Federal Award recognizes the federal government's highest-performing buildings through a competition to reduce annual energy use

  20. Federal Advisory Committee Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Advisory Committee Management Federal Advisory Committee Management The Federal Advisory Committee Management Program assures the Department of Energy's overall compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA). The program is located in the Office of the Executive Secretariat. Federal Advisory Committee Act The Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (Public Law 92-463) establishes the policies and minimum requirements for Federal agencies to manage and administer advisory

  1. Bioproducts in the Federal Bioeconomy Portfolio Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will present a live webinar titled “Bioproducts in the Federal Bioeconomy Portfolio” on Monday October 26, 2015, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. In order for the U.S. bioeconomy to expand, it will require increased consideration of the development of commercial bioproducts. Bioproducts can displace traditional products made from fossil fuels at competitive prices, lower greenhouse gas emissions, and enable the commercialization of biofuels. Bioproducts can also make everyday products, like plastic, that enhance our quality of life. There is currently abundant opportunity to produce renewable chemicals, while producing biofuels using sustainable biomass. Join DOE’s Bioenergy Technologies Office Technology Manager Nichole Fitzgerald, U.S. Department of Agriculture BioPreferred Deputy Program Manager Kate Lewis, and the Ohio State University Bioproducts Innovation Center’s Director Dennis Hall, for a webinar on how the federal government is promoting sustainability through bioproducts research, commercialization, and market development.

  2. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Consumption and Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels, Electricity, and Natural Gas in FBSS Buildings in Federal Region 3, 1993 Sum of Sum of Major Major Electricity Natural...

  3. Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-01-30

    The Order establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the DOE Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program which covers drug and alcohol testing. Supersedes DOE O 3792.3 Chg 1.

  4. * Milepost Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... L.P. CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CGT Columbia Gulf ... the late 1970s at the Naval Weapons Center in China Lake, California. ...

  5. Sustainability in Existing Federal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For meeting federal sustainability requirements, agencies can use evaluation methods, such as benchmarking and energy audits, and planning to make existing buildings energy efficient. Agencies can follow these steps to comply with energy reduction requirements.

  6. Federal Interagency Geothermal Activities 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy FEDERAL INTERAGENCY GEOTHERMAL ACTIVITIES Updated JUNE 2011 WORKING DRAFT 2 FEDERAL INTERAGENCY GEOTHERMAL ACTIVITIES D R A F T The principal organizers of this updated document were Arlene Anderson of the Geothermal Technologies Program, U.S. Department of Energy, and Loretta Prencipe, Richard M. Todaro (technical editor), New West Technologies, LLC, and David Cuyler, Distinguished Technical Fellow, Sandia

  7. Federal Authorities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Authorities Federal Authorities DOE is the Sector Specific Agency (SSA) for Energy and within the Department ISER oversees all activities associated with the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and the Energy Sector Specific Plan (SSP). In doing so, ISER maintains a close partnership with the two Energy Sector Coordinating Councils (SCCs), the Electricity SCC and the Oil and Natural Gas SCC, and governmental partners through the Critical Infrastructure Protection Advisory

  8. The RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy The RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD The RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD The broader goal of the RPS is to achieve various benefits associated with renewable energy. These benefits relate to the environment, resource diversity, technology advancement, and in-state economic development. PDF icon THE THE RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD More Documents & Publications Reference Manual and

  9. California Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update on Key Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities for Federal Sites in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-01

    A spate of recently enacted energy legislation and associated program changes is providing numerous opportunities to help California federal energy managers cut costs and meet their renewables, energy efficiency and GHG emissions goals. In April 2011, Governor Jerry Brown approved the nations most ambitious renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires 33% of the states electricity to come from renewable energy sources by 2020. Policy changes that will support the RPS include expanded eligibility rules that fill previous gaps in incentives for certain sizes of on-site renewable energy systems. Program updates described in this document include: $200 million more in funding for California Solar Initiative rebates to commercial and industrial customers; an increase in the eligible system size for the Feed-In-Tariff (FIT) from 1.5MW to 3MW; and pending changes that may allow customer-side systems to sell tradable renewable energy credits (TRECs) to entities with RPS compliance obligations in California.

  10. Federal Biomass Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Biomass Activities Federal Biomass Activities Statutory and executive order requirements for Bioproducts and Biofuels PDF icon federal_biomass_activities.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: Bioproducts in the Federal Bioeconomy Portfolio Webinar Vision for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States Federal Activities Report on the Bioeconomy

  11. Reducing cold-start emissions by catalytic converter thermal management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, S D; Potter, T F; Keyser, M A; Brady, M J; Michaels, K F

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum insulation and phase-change thermal storage have been used to enhance the heat retention of a prototype catalytic converter. Storing heat in the converter between trips allows exhaust gases to be converted more quickly, significantly reducing cold-start emissions. Using a small metal hydride, the thermal conductance of the vacuum insulation can be varied continuously between 0.49 and 27 W/m{sup 2}K (R-12 to R-0.2 insulation) to prevent overheating of the catalyst. A prototype was installed in a Dodge Neon with a 2.0-liter engine. Following a standard preconditioning and a 23-hour cold soak, an FTP (Federal Test Procedure) emissions test was performed. Although exhaust temperatures during the preconditioning were not hot enough to melt the phase-change material, the vacuum insulation performed well, resulting in a converter temperature of 146{degrees}C after the 23-hour cold soak at 27{degrees}C. Compared to the same converter at ambient conditions, overall emissions of CO and HC were reduced by 52 % and 29 %, to 0.27 and 0.037 g/mile, respectively. The maximum converter temperature during the FTP cycle was 720{degrees}C. This limited testing was performed with a nearly-fresh palladium-only catalyst, but demonstrates the potential of this vacuum insulation approach for emissions reduction and thermal control. Further testing is ongoing. An initial assessment of several production issues is made, including high-volume fabrication challenges, durability, and cost.

  12. Reviewing Post-Installation and Annual Reports for Federal ESPC Projects |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Reviewing Post-Installation and Annual Reports for Federal ESPC Projects Reviewing Post-Installation and Annual Reports for Federal ESPC Projects The purpose of this document is to provide a framework for implementing uniform and consistent reviews of post-installation and annual reports for federal ESPC projects. These procedures will allow for consistent evaluations of performance reports, produce standardized reviews, and enable centralized tracking of ongoing project

  13. Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracting Steering Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) Steering Committee shares experiences and lessons learned and coordinates process and procedural improvements among federal agency implementers to promote improved ESPCs throughout the federal government.

  14. Federal Utility Program Overview (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01

    Fact sheet overview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Federal Utility Program, including common contracts and services available to Federal agencies through local serving utilities.

  15. Federal Reporting Recipient Information | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery Act Recipient Reporting details as of February 13, 2013. File ARRA870A Recovery Act - Recip Details Feb 13 2013.xlsx More Documents & Publications Federal Reporting Recipient Information Federal Reporting Recipient Information Federal Reporting Recipient Information

  16. BETO Federal Partnerships | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETO Federal Partnerships BETO Federal Partnerships EERE Federal Partnerships 2013 PDF icon program_management_review2013_collaborations_lindauer.pdf More Documents & Publications 2015 Program Management Review Presentations 2015 Peer Review Presentations-Plenaries Bioenergy Technologies Office Overview

  17. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. Methane Emissions 3.1. Total emissions The major sources of U.S. methane emissions are energy production, distribution, and use; agriculture; and waste management (Figure 17). U.S. methane emissions in 2009 totaled 731 MMTCO2e, 0.9 percent higher than the 2008 total of 724 MMTCO2e (Table 17). Methane emissions declined steadily from 1990 to 2001, as emissions from coal mining and landfills fell, then rose from 2002 to 2009 as a result of moderate increases in emissions related to energy,

  18. Geothermal Direct-Use — Meeting Water Quality Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal direct-use applications—such as greenhouses, district and space heating, and aquaculture—can easily meet local and federal water quality standards, which help protect our environment.

  19. Geothermal Direct-Use Meeting Clean Air Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal direct-use applicationssuch as greenhouses, district and space heating, and aquaculturecan easily meet local and federal clean air standards, which help protect our environment.

  20. Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs Fiscal Year 2003

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 August 9, 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy Management Program Washington, DC 20585 i TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Overview of Federal Energy Consumption and Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A. Standard Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 B. Industrial, Laboratory and Other Energy Intensive Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 C. Exempt

  1. Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs Fiscal Year 2004

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Conservation Programs Fiscal Year 2004 February 24, 2006 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy Management Program Washington, DC 20585 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Overview of Federal Energy Consumption and Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A. Standard Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 B. Industrial, Laboratory and Other Energy Intensive

  2. National Energy Efficiency Evaluation, Measurement and Verification (EM&V) Standard: Scoping Study of Issues and Implementation Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiller Consulting, Inc.; Schiller, Steven R.; Goldman, Charles A.; Galawish, Elsia

    2011-02-04

    This report is a scoping study that identifies issues associated with developing a national evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) standard for end-use, non-transportation, energy efficiency activities. The objectives of this study are to identify the scope of such a standard and define EM&V requirements and issues that will need to be addressed in a standard. To explore these issues, we provide and discuss: (1) a set of definitions applicable to an EM&V standard; (2) a literature review of existing guidelines, standards, and 'initiatives' relating to EM&V standards as well as a review of 'bottom-up' versus 'top-down' evaluation approaches; (3) a summary of EM&V related provisions of two recent federal legislative proposals (Congressman Waxman's and Markey's American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 and Senator Bingaman's American Clean Energy Leadership Act of 2009) that include national efficiency resource requirements; (4) an annotated list of issues that that are likely to be central to, and need to be considered when, developing a national EM&V standard; and (5) a discussion of the implications of such issues. There are three primary reasons for developing a national efficiency EM&V standard. First, some policy makers, regulators and practitioners believe that a national standard would streamline EM&V implementation, reduce costs and complexity, and improve comparability of results across jurisdictions; although there are benefits associated with each jurisdiction setting its own EM&V requirements based on their specific portfolio and evaluation budgets and objectives. Secondly, if energy efficiency is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency to be a Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for avoiding criteria pollutant and/or greenhouse gas emissions, then a standard can be required for documenting the emission reductions resulting from efficiency actions. The third reason for a national EM&V standard is that such a standard is likely to be required as a result of future federal energy legislation that includes end-use energy efficiency, either as a stand-alone energy-efficiency resource standard (EERS) or as part of a clean energy or renewable energy standard. This study is focused primarily on this third reason and thus explores issues associated with a national EM&V standard if energy efficiency is a qualifying resource in federal clean energy legislation. Developing a national EM&V standard is likely to be a lengthy process; this study focuses on the critical first step of identifying the issues that must be addressed in a future standard. Perhaps the most fundamental of these issues is 'how good is good enough?' This has always been the fundamental issue of EM&V for energy efficiency and is a result of the counter-factual nature of efficiency. Counter-factual in that savings are not measured, but estimated to varying degrees of accuracy by comparing energy consumption after a project (program) is implemented with what is assumed to have been the consumption of energy in the absence of the project (program). Therefore, the how good is good enough question is a short version of asking how certain does one have to be of the energy savings estimate that results from EM&V activities and is that level of certainty properly balanced against the amount of effort (resources, time, money) that is utilized to obtain that level of certainty. The implication is that not only should energy efficiency investments be cost-effective, but EM&V investments should consider risk management principles and thus also balance the costs and value of information derived from EM&V (EM&V should also be cost-effective).

  3. Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Climate Change in NEPA Reviews | Department of Energy Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change in NEPA Reviews Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change in NEPA Reviews On December 18, 2014, CEQ released revised draft guidance for public comment that describes how Federal departments and agencies should consider the effects of greenhouse gas emissions and climate change in their National Environmental Policy

  4. Federal Government Energy Management Conservation Programs Reports...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Government Energy Management Conservation Programs Reports to Congress Federal Government Energy Management Conservation Programs Reports to Congress Annual reports on federal ...

  5. Federal Register Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 42 - March 4, 2015 Application from Sempra to export electric energy to Mexico. Federal Register Notice. February 17, 2015 Electricity...

  6. Federal Loan Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    less. In recent years, the federal government has offered loans for renewables and energy efficiency projects. 1 Federal Loan Program Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 13) Incentive...

  7. Funding Mechanisms for Federal Geothermal Permitting (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherbee, K.

    2014-03-01

    This presentation is about the GRC paper, which discusses federal agency revenues received for geothermal projects and potential federal agency budget sources for processing geothermal applications.

  8. Federal / State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues Federal and State Blending Restrictions Action by ASTM NCWM to address higher ethanol blends PDF icon Federal State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...

  9. Federal Business Opportunities website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Opportunities website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Federal Business Opportunities website Abstract This website lists federal...

  10. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminars

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meets twice per year to share success stories, information on Federal Energy Management Program activities and other business.

  11. Federal Highway Administration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Administration Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Federal Highway Administration Name: Federal Highway Administration Abbreviation: FHWA Address: 1200 New Jersey Ave, SE Place:...

  12. Sustainable Federal Fleets Catalog of Services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable Federal Fleets Catalog of Services The U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program November 2014 Renewable Energy Catalog of Services Contacts Contacts ...

  13. 2006 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Federal Register Notice & Comments 2006 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Federal Register Notice & Comments The...

  14. Electricity Advisory Committee - Federal Register Notices | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electricity Advisory Committee - Federal Register Notices February 17, 2015 Electricity Advisory Committee Notice of Open Meeting March 26 and 27, 2015: Federal Register Notice...

  15. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) utility partners are eager to work closely with Federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals.

  16. Federal Energy Subsidies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Federal Energy Subsidies Jump to: navigation, search Does wind energy receive federal subsidies, and if so how much? Do other forms of energy receive subsidies? Do fossil fuels...

  17. Federal Energy Efficiency through Utility Partnerships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01

    Two-page fact sheet on FEMP's Federal Utility Program that works with federal agencies and their utilities to reduce energy use.

  18. Executive Order 13423: Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Executive Order 13514-Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance Executive Order 13693-Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next...

  19. Information Security: Coordination of Federal Cyber Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Security: Coordination of Federal Cyber Security Research and Development Information Security: Coordination of Federal Cyber Security Research and Development GAO recommends that ...

  20. Federally Led Accident Investigation Reports | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federally Led Accident Investigation Reports Federally Led Accident Investigation Reports Includes Pre-March 2011 Type A Reports June 1, 1999 Type A Accident Investigation Board...

  1. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Federal Facility Agreement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order State Idaho Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Scope Summary Ensure that the environmental impacts...

  2. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey - Index Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey Overview Full Report Tables Energy usage and energy costs, by building characteristics, for federally-owned buildings in...

  3. Federal Renewable Energy Projects and Technologies | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    By 2025, 30% of the electricity consumed by the federal government is to come from renewable energy sources. In fiscal year 2014, federal renewable electricity consumption was...

  4. German Renewable Energy Federation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Federation Jump to: navigation, search Name: German Renewable Energy Federation Place: Paderborn, Germany Zip: 33100 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Paderborn-based pressure...

  5. NREL: Technology Deployment - Federal Energy Management Program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assistance to help federal fleets maximize their use of alternative fuels and compare strategies for reducing fuel use through FEMP's Sustainable Federal Fleets program....

  6. Federal Progress Toward Energy/Sustainability Goals

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress Toward Energy Sustainability Goals June 10, 2014 Chris Tremper Program Analyst, Federal Energy Management Program U.S. Department of Energy 2 Overall Federal Energy...

  7. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Federal Buildings Personnel Training Act of 2010, Commit to Efficiency campaign, customer service, other Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) activities, and more. ...

  8. Federal NEPA Contacts | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal NEPA Contacts CEQ and most Federal agencies identify primary points of contact for NEPA compliance. Normally a senior environmental professional, environmental law...

  9. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Chairman's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting Chairman's Corner Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Chairman's Corner Presentation-given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG)...

  10. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Chairman's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting: Chairman's Corner Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Chairman's Corner Presentation-given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group...

  11. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting:...

  12. Implications of Low Particulate Matter Emissions on System Fuel Efficiency for High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, II, James E; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y

    2009-01-01

    Advanced diesel combustion regimes such as High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) offer the benefits of reduced engine out NOX and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Lower PM emissions during advanced combustion reduce the demand on diesel particulate filters (DPFs) and can, thereby, reduce the fuel penalty associated with DPF regeneration. In this study, a SiC DPF was loaded and regenerated on a 1.7-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operated in conventional and advanced combustion modes at different speed and load conditions. A diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a lean NOX trap (LNT) were also installed in the exhaust stream. Five steady-state speed and load conditions were weighted to estimate Federal Test Procedure (FTP) fuel efficiency. The DPF was loaded using lean-rich cycling with frequencies that resulted in similar levels of NOX emissions downstream of the LNT. The pressure drop across the DPF was measured at a standard point (1500 rpm, 5.0 bar) before and after loading, and a P rise rate was determined for comparison between conventional and advanced combustion modes. Higher PM emissions in conventional combustion resulted in a higher rate of backpressure rise across the DPF at all of the load points leading to more frequent DPF regenerations and higher fuel penalty. The fuel penalty during conventional combustion was 4.2% compared with 3.1% for a mixture of conventional and advanced modes.

  13. MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM: NANCY H. SUTLEY, Chair, Council on Environmental Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 18, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM: NANCY H. SUTLEY, Chair, Council on Environmental Quality SUBJECT: DRAFT NEPA GUIDANCE ON CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS I. INTRODUCTION The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) provides this draft guidance memorandum for public consideration and comment on the ways in which Federal agencies can improve their consideration of the effects of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions

  14. November 3-5, 2015, Federal Technical Capability Program Face to Face Meeting - Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FAQS Recommendations FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PANEL FACE-TO-FACE MEETING NOV 3-5, 2015 Presented by Al MacDougall DOE National Training Center Background  Currently 34 TQP qualifications standards  Recommendations:  Retain standards that are directly related to nuclear facility operations  STSM/FR/NSS/S&S  Create new standards that consolidate new and/or remaining critical functions  Archive low-need/unique qual standards (available for conversion to a site-specific

  15. Criticality Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE-STD-1173-2009 April 2009 DOE STANDARD CRITICALITY SAFETY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1173-2009 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1173-2009 iii APPROVAL The Federal

  16. Fuel Economy and Emissions of a Vehicle Equipped with an Aftermarket Flexible-Fuel Conversion Kit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, John F; Huff, Shean P; West, Brian H

    2012-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grants Certificates of Conformity for alternative fuel conversion systems and also offers other forms of premarket registration of conversion kits for use in vehicles more than two model years old. Use of alternative fuels such as ethanol, natural gas, and propane are encouraged by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) produce emissions-certified vehicles capable of using alternative fuels, and several alternative fuel conversion system manufacturers produce EPA-approved conversion systems for a variety of alternative fuels and vehicle types. To date, only one manufacturer (Flex Fuel U.S.) has received EPA certifications for ethanol fuel (E85) conversion kits. This report details an independent evaluation of a vehicle with a legal installation of a Flex Fuel U.S. conversion kit. A 2006 Dodge Charger was baseline tested with ethanol-free certification gasoline (E0) and E20 (gasoline with 20 vol % ethanol), converted to flex-fuel operation via installation of a Flex Box Smart Kit from Flex Fuel U.S., and retested with E0, E20, E50, and E81. Test cycles included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP or city cycle), the highway fuel economy test (HFET), and the US06 test (aggressive driving test). Averaged test results show that the vehicle was emissions compliant on E0 in the OEM condition (before conversion) and compliant on all test fuels after conversion. Average nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions exceeded the Tier 2/Bin 5 intermediate life NO{sub X} standard with E20 fuel in the OEM condition due to two of three test results exceeding this standard [note that E20 is not a legal fuel for non-flexible-fuel vehicles (non-FFVs)]. In addition, one E0 test result before conversion and one E20 test result after conversion exceeded the NOX standard, although the average result in these two cases was below the standard. Emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde increased with increasing ethanol, while nonmethane organic gas and CO emissions remained relatively unchanged for all fuels and cycles. Higher fraction ethanol blends appeared to decrease NO{sub X} emissions on the FTP and HFET (after conversion). As expected, fuel economy (miles per gallon) decreased with increasing ethanol content in all cases.

  17. Federal Reporting Recipient Information | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reporting Recipient Information Federal Reporting Recipient Information Recovery Act Recipient Reporting details as of March 6, 2012. File ARRA870A Recovery Act - Recip Details 03062012.xlsx More Documents & Publications Federal Reporting Recipient Information Federal Reporting Recipient Information Federal Reporting Recipient Information

  18. Certified Federal Project Directors | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Certified Federal Project Directors Certified Federal Project Directors PDF icon Certified_Federal_Project_Directors_4_30_2013.xls More Documents & Publications Certified Federal Project Directors 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA HQ Need to Consider Intentional Destructive Acts in NEPA Documents

  19. Certified Federal Project Directors | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services » Career Development (PMCDP) » Certified Federal Project Directors Certified Federal Project Directors PDF icon List of Certified Federal Project Directors More Documents & Publications Certified Federal Project Directors Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting Project Management Earned Value Management Career Development (PMCDP) FPD

  20. Federal Reporting Recipient Information | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    July, 19, 2011 Office spreadsheet icon Federal_Reporting_Recipient_Information.xls

  1. Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Legislation | Department of Energy Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Robert Bosch GMBH Common Rail System Engineering for PC Diesel Systems PDF icon 2004_deer_busch.pdf More Documents & Publications Injection System and Engine Strategies for Advanced Emission Standards SCR Technologies for NOx Reduction Powertrain

  2. Federal Methanol Fleet Project final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, B.H.; McGill, R.N.; Hillis, S.L.; Hodgson, J.W.

    1993-03-01

    The Federal Methanol Fleet Project concluded with the termination of data collection from the three fleet sites in February 1991. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) completed five years of operation, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) completed its fourth year in the project, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed its third. Twenty of the thirty-nine vehicles in the fleet were powered by fuel methanol (typically M85, 85 % methanol, 15 % unleaded gasoline, although the LBL fleet used M88), and the remaining control vehicles were comparable gasoline vehicles. Over 2.2 million km (1.4 million miles) were accumulated on the fleet vehicles in routine government service. Data collected over the years have included vehicle mileage and fuel economy, engine oil analysis, emissions, vehicle maintenance, and driver acceptance. Fuel economies (on an energy basis) of the methanol and gasoline vehicles of the same type were comparable throughout the fleet testing. Engine oil analysis has revealed higher accumulation rates of iron and other metals in the oil of the methanol vehicles, although no significant engine damage has been attributed to the higher metal content. Vehicles of both fuel types have experienced degradation in their emission control systems, however, the methanol vehicles seem to have degraded their catalytic converters at a higher rate. The methanol vehicles have required more maintenance than their gasoline counterparts, in most cases, although the higher levels of maintenance cannot be attributed to ``fuel-related`` repairs. According to the daily driver logs and results from several surveys, drivers of the fleet vehicles at all three sites were generally satisfied with the methanol vehicles.

  3. Federal Methanol Fleet Project final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, B.H.; McGill, R.N. ); Hillis, S.L.; Hodgson, J.W. )

    1993-03-01

    The Federal Methanol Fleet Project concluded with the termination of data collection from the three fleet sites in February 1991. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) completed five years of operation, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) completed its fourth year in the project, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed its third. Twenty of the thirty-nine vehicles in the fleet were powered by fuel methanol (typically M85, 85 % methanol, 15 % unleaded gasoline, although the LBL fleet used M88), and the remaining control vehicles were comparable gasoline vehicles. Over 2.2 million km (1.4 million miles) were accumulated on the fleet vehicles in routine government service. Data collected over the years have included vehicle mileage and fuel economy, engine oil analysis, emissions, vehicle maintenance, and driver acceptance. Fuel economies (on an energy basis) of the methanol and gasoline vehicles of the same type were comparable throughout the fleet testing. Engine oil analysis has revealed higher accumulation rates of iron and other metals in the oil of the methanol vehicles, although no significant engine damage has been attributed to the higher metal content. Vehicles of both fuel types have experienced degradation in their emission control systems, however, the methanol vehicles seem to have degraded their catalytic converters at a higher rate. The methanol vehicles have required more maintenance than their gasoline counterparts, in most cases, although the higher levels of maintenance cannot be attributed to fuel-related'' repairs. According to the daily driver logs and results from several surveys, drivers of the fleet vehicles at all three sites were generally satisfied with the methanol vehicles.

  4. Final Rule, Federal Register, 72 FR 72565, 10 CFR Parts 433, 434, and 435,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 21, 2007 | Department of Energy 2 FR 72565, 10 CFR Parts 433, 434, and 435, December 21, 2007 Final Rule, Federal Register, 72 FR 72565, 10 CFR Parts 433, 434, and 435, December 21, 2007 Document displays the final rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings, which was published in the Federal Register on December 21, 2007. PDF icon 72_fr_72565.pdf More

  5. February 2007 Standards Actions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Publication Staff Roster 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 01-26-2007 Activity

  6. Sustainable Federal Fleets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable Federal Fleets Sustainable Federal Fleets Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles charge at a rapid charging system powered by a solar canopy. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles charge at a rapid charging system powered by a solar canopy. The Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Sustainable Federal Fleets section provides guidance and assistance to help agencies implement federal legislative and regulatory requirements mandating reduced petroleum consumption and increased alternative

  7. Ethics - Fourteen Principles of Ethical Conduct for Federal Employees |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy This guide provides a brief overview of the ethics rules and standards of ethical conduct that all employees should know and follow. Discuss any question not answered here with your supervisor or ethics counsel. Your ethics counsel is: For Field Office employees, your respective field counsel. For Headquarters employees, the Office of the Assistant General Counsel for General Law: 202-586-1522 or Standardsofconduct@hq.doe.gov. Public service is a public trust. Federal

  8. Labor Standards for Construction

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    --------------------------Chapter 23.0 (September 2010) 1 Executive Order 13514 - Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance Reference: FAR 23, 52.223, DEAR 923, 952.223, 970.23, and 970.5223 Overview Executive Order 13514 - Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance continues an increasing awareness of mankind's effect on the Earth's environment. The Executive Order was issued as a follow on to Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal

  9. Federal Government Project Performance Benchmarks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Government Project Performance Benchmarks (All ASHRAE Zones) We define an ESCO as a company that provides energy efficiency-related and other value-added services and that employs performance contracting as a core part of its energy efficiency services business. 1 For projects with electricity savings, we assume site energy conversion (1 kWh = 3,412 Btu). We did not estimate avoided Btus from gallons of water conserved. In general, we followed the analytical approach documented in Hopper

  10. Effects of Mid-Level Ethanol Blends on Conventional Vehicle Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, K.; West, B.; Huff, S.; Thomas, J.; Orban, J.; Cooper, C.

    2010-06-01

    Tests were conducted in 2008 on 16 late-model conventional vehicles (1999-2007) to determine short-term effects of mid-level ethanol blends on performance and emissions. Vehicle odometer readings ranged from 10,000 to 100,000 miles, and all vehicles conformed to federal emissions requirements for their federal certification level. The LA92 drive cycle, also known as the Unified Cycle, was used for testing because it more accurately represents real-world acceleration rates and speeds than the Federal Test Procedure. Test fuels were splash-blends of up to 20 volume percent ethanol with federal certification gasoline. Both regulated and unregulated air-toxic emissions were measured. For the 16-vehicle fleet, increasing ethanol content resulted in reductions in average composite emissions of both nonmethane hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide and increases in average emissions of ethanol and aldehydes.

  11. Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    Annual reports on Federal energy management respond to section 548 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619), as amended, and provide information on energy consumption in Federal buildings, operations, and vehicles. Compiled by the Federal Energy Management Program, these reports document activities conducted by Federal agencies under the: Energy management and energy consumption requirements of section 543 of NECPA, as amended (42 U.S.C. § 8253); Energy savings performance contract authority of section 801 of NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619, as amended (42 U.S.C. §§ 8287-8287d); Renewable energy purchase goal of section 203 of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 15852); Federal building performance standard requirements under Section 109 of EPAct 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 6834(a)); Requirements on the procurement and identification of energy efficient products under section 161 of EPAct 1992, Pub. L. No. 102-486 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 8262g); Sections 431, 432, and 434 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), Pub. L. No. 110-140 (42 U.S.C. § 8253) and section 527 of EISA (42 U.S.C. § 17143); Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, 72 Fed. Reg. 3,919 (Jan. 26, 2007); Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, 74 Fed. Reg. 52,117 (Oct. 5, 2009).

  12. Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    Annual reports on Federal energy management respond to section 548 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619), as amended, and provide information on energy consumption in Federal buildings, operations, and vehicles. Compiled by the Federal Energy Management Program, these reports document activities conducted by Federal agencies under the: Energy management and energy consumption requirements of section 543 of NECPA, as amended (42 U.S.C. § 8253); Energy savings performance contract authority of section 801 of NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619, as amended (42 U.S.C. §§ 8287-8287d); Renewable energy purchase goal of section 203 of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 15852); Federal building performance standard requirements under Section 109 of EPAct 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 6834(a)); Requirements on the procurement and identification of energy efficient products under section 161 of EPAct 1992, Pub. L. No. 102-486 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 8262g); Sections 431, 432, and 434 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), Pub. L. No. 110-140 (42 U.S.C. § 8253) and section 527 of EISA (42 U.S.C. § 17143); Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, 72 Fed. Reg. 3,919 (Jan. 26, 2007); Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, 74 Fed. Reg. 52,117 (Oct. 5, 2009).

  13. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors

  14. Checking out HUD`s proposed mobile home performance standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.

    1993-11-01

    This article evaluates both the performance of two mobile homes built to meet recently proposed federal energy performance standards and the standards themselves. Topics include test methods, results, thermal exposure infrared scan results; regulators, thermal characteristics of test homes, real life conditions, factory observations, the future of mobile home energy efficiency.

  15. Codes and Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Currently, thirteen U.S. and two international standards development organizations (SDOs) are developing and publishing the majority of the voluntary domestic codes and standards. These...

  16. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington voters passed Initiative 937 in 2006, creating a renewable energy standard and an energy efficiency resource standard for the state's electric utilities. Initiative 937, enacted as th...

  17. April 2008 Standards Actions

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http:www.hss.energy.govnuclear ... Standards Program (TSP) web page at http:hss.energy.govnuclear safetytechstds. ...

  18. 2015 Standard Scenarios Annual Report: U.S. Electric Sector Scenario...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... energy prices, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. ... * This 2015 Standard Scenarios Annual Report describing the ... solar, geothermal) require some special consideration. ...

  19. Federal laboratories for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gover, J.; Huray, P.G.

    1998-04-01

    Federal laboratories have successfully filled many roles for the public; however, as the 21st Century nears it is time to rethink and reevaluate how Federal laboratories can better support the public and identify new roles for this class of publicly-owned institutions. The productivity of the Federal laboratory system can be increased by making use of public outcome metrics, by benchmarking laboratories, by deploying innovative new governance models, by partnerships of Federal laboratories with universities and companies, and by accelerating the transition of federal laboratories and the agencies that own them into learning organizations. The authors must learn how government-owned laboratories in other countries serve their public. Taiwan`s government laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, has been particularly successful in promoting economic growth. It is time to stop operating Federal laboratories as monopoly institutions; therefore, competition between Federal laboratories must be promoted. Additionally, Federal laboratories capable of addressing emerging 21st century public problems must be identified and given the challenge of serving the public in innovative new ways. Increased investment in case studies of particular programs at Federal laboratories and research on the public utility of a system of Federal laboratories could lead to increased productivity of laboratories. Elimination of risk-averse Federal laboratory and agency bureaucracies would also have dramatic impact on the productivity of the Federal laboratory system. Appropriately used, the US Federal laboratory system offers the US an innovative advantage over other nations.

  20. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. E. Townsend

    2002-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities, experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Program, and the activities listed below. Located in Nye County, Nevada, the site's southeast corner is about 88 km (55 mi) northwest of the major population center, Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km2 (1,375 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands (Figure 1.0). The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS, and slow-moving groundwater is present hundreds to thousands of feet below the land surface. The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS (Figure 2.0). The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing above or at ground surface has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) earth-cratering experiments, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing. Since the mid-1950s, testing of nuclear explosive devices has occurred underground in drilled vertical holes or in mined tunnels (DOE 1996a). No such tests have been conducted since September 23, 1992 (DOE 2000). Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center, private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses, and handling is restricted to transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in CY 2001 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and from discharges of two wells (Well U-3cn PS No. 2 and Well ER-20-5 No.3) into lined ponds, (2) onsite radio analytical laboratories, (3) the Area 5 RWMS (RWMS-5) facility, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium and re- suspension of plutonium and americium. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility.

  1. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Technical Services

    2007-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically-contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration.

  2. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. F. Grossman

    2000-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the US Department of Energy's Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km{sup 2} (1,375 mi{sup 2}), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  3. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Submittal - 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart Black; Yvonne Townsend

    1999-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,500 km2 (1,350 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi)north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  4. Neutron Sources for Standard-Based Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radev, Radoslav; McLean, Thomas

    2014-11-10

    The DHS TC Standards and the consensus ANSI Standards use 252Cf as the neutron source for performance testing because its energy spectrum is similar to the 235U and 239Pu fission sources used in nuclear weapons. An emission rate of 20,000 20% neutrons per second is used for testing of the radiological requirements both in the ANSI standards and the TCS. Determination of the accurate neutron emission rate of the test source is important for maintaining consistency and agreement between testing results obtained at different testing facilities. Several characteristics in the manufacture and the decay of the source need to be understood and accounted for in order to make an accurate measurement of the performance of the neutron detection instrument. Additionally, neutron response characteristics of the particular instrument need to be known and taken into account as well as neutron scattering in the testing environment.

  5. 1997 DOE technical standards program workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The Department of Energy held its annual Technical Standards Program Workshop on July 8--10, 1997, at the Loews L`Enfant Plaza Hotel in Washington, DC. The workshop focused on aspects of implementation of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 [Public Law (PL) 104-113] and the related revision (still pending) to OMB Circular A119 (OMB A119), Federal Participation in the Development and Use of Voluntary Standards. It also addressed DOE`s efforts in transitioning to a standards-based operating culture, and, through this transition, to change from a developer of internal technical standards to a customer of external technical standards. The workshop was designed to provide a forum to better understand how the new law is affecting Department activities. Panel topics such as ``Public Law 104-113 and Its Influence on Federal Agency Standards Activities`` and ``Update on Global Standards Issues`` provided insight on both the internal and external effects of the new law. Keynote speaker Richard Meier of Meadowbrook International (and formerly the Deputy Assistant US Trade Representative) addressed the subject of international trade balance statistics. He pointed out that increases in US export figures do not necessarily indicate increases in employment. Rather, increased employment results from product growth. Mr Meier also discussed issues such as the US migration to the sue of the metric system, the impact of budget limitations on Government participation in voluntary standards organizations, international standards ISO 9000 and ISO 14000, and DOE`s role in the worldwide transition from weapons production to cleanup.

  6. Federal Facility Agreement progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The (SRS) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) was made effective by the US. Environmental Protection Agency Region IV (EPA) on August 16, 1993. To meet the reporting requirements in Section XXV of the Agreement, the FFA Progress Report was developed. The FFA Progress Report is the first of a series of quarterly progress reports to be prepared by the SRS. As such this report describes the information and action taken to September 30, 1993 on the SRS units identified for investigation and remediation in the Agreement. This includes; rubble pits, runoff basins, retention basin, seepage basin, burning pits, H-Area Tank 16, and spill areas.

  7. Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zia Haq, Department of Energy Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy 2 DOE Joins Farm to Fly 2.0 * We appreciate the hard work in approving alternative fuels and commitment to sustainable growth made by the aviation industry. * DOE is actively committed to accelerating the adoption of alternative fuels by this market. * In 2013, USDA and FAA made a commitment to the aviation industry to help meet their goals with the Farm to Fly 2.0 agreement. This effort seeks to enable the use of commercially

  8. Format for Federal Register Notice

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Format for Federal Register Notice Billing Code must appear at the top of the document. This code (6450-01-P) is the same for all Departmental submissions. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 ESTABLISHMENT OF A NEW SYSTEM OF RECORDS AGENCY United States Department of Energy. ACTION Proposed Establishment a New Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY The summary paragraph should state briefly what action is being proposed in the notice, why the action is necessary, and the intended

  9. DOE Federal Aviation Professional Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Federal Aviation Professional Awards DOE Federal Aviation Professional Awards PDF icon DOE Federal Aviation Professional Awards More Documents & Publications DOE Federal Aviation Professional Awards DOE Federal Aviation Program Awards LopezPersonalProfile

  10. Federal Energy Administration Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Federal Energy Administration Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Federal Energy Administration ActLegal Abstract...

  11. Guide on Federal Employee Assistance Programs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-12-01

    This Guide supplements the requirements and responsibilities specified in DOE O 341.1, Federal Employee Health Services, dated 12-1-03, and applies only to Federal employees. Canceled by DOE G 341.1-2A.

  12. Federal Digital Strategy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Federal Digital Strategy Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 19 September, 2012 - 14:32 OpenEI part of the Federal Digital Strategy data...

  13. Federal Buildings Personnel Training Act of 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 14, 2010, President Obama signed the Federal Buildings Personnel Training Act of 2010 into law. This legislation will have an important impact on Federal agency training programs geared...

  14. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-23

    The Order promotes DOE's use of Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCS) as the primary method for application of technical standards and establishes and manages the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP) including technical standards development, information, activities, issues, and interactions. Admin Chg 1 dated 3-12-13.

  15. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-19

    The Technical Standards Program (TSP) promotes the use of voluntary consensus standards by the Department of Energy (DOE), provides DOE with the means to develop needed technical standards, and manages overall technical standards information, activities, issues, and interactions. Cancels DOE O 1300.2A. Canceled by DOE O 252.1A

  16. Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Landscaped Grounds This Environmental Protection Agency report contains recommendations for a series of...

  17. Competing Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Opening utility energy service contracts to competing franchised utility companies ensures federal agencies get the best value for their projects.

  18. Federal Energy and Water Management Awards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet for the Federal Energy and Water Management Awards, including history, legislative drivers, goals and objectives, and event details.

  19. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) Home Energy Score Assessor Training Materials Federal Energy and Water Management Awards:...

  20. Federal Incentives for Water Power (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-05-01

    This fact sheet describes the federal incentives available as of April 2013 for the development of water power technologies.

  1. FEMP Federal Fleet Files - May 2009 Issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-04

    May 2009 issue of the monthly FEMP newsletter highlighting the latest news and developments impacting Federal fleets.

  2. Executive Order 13423- Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management Executive Order 13423- Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management It is the policy of ...

  3. Federal Utility Energy Service Contract Case Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These case studies feature examples of federal projects made possible by the use of utility energy service contracts (UESCs).

  4. GSA Solutions for Federally Recognized Tribes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Service U.S. General Services Administration GSA Solutions for Federally- Recognized Tribes Federal Acquisition Service U.S. General Services Administration 2 Overview  Customer Service Office Alaska  Support to Federally-Recognized Tribes  Additional Resources  Questions Federal Acquisition Service U.S. General Services Administration 3 GSA - Our Mission GSA's mission is to use expertise to provide innovative solutions for our customers in support of their missions and by so doing

  5. Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy and Guidance » Human Capital Management » Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey The Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FedView survey) is a tool that measures employees' perceptions of whether, and to what extent, conditions characterizing successful organizations are present in their agencies. Survey results provide valuable insight into the challenges agency leaders face in ensuring the Federal Government has an effective civilian workforce and how well

  6. Federal Energy Management Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tools Federal Energy Management Tools logo_femp.png The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers links to tools that can help agencies reduce energy use and meet federal laws and requirements. Tools include software, calculators, data sets, and databases created by the U.S. Department of Energy and other federal organizations. To find a tool, browse by title, description, topic, or type. Click a column heading to sort the table. Title Description Type Category Building Life Cycle Cost

  7. Federal Register Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Register Notices Federal Register Notices December 16, 2015 Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-82-4 The Joint Owners of the Highgate Project: Federal Register Notice, Volume 80, No. 241 - December 16, 2015 Amended application from Vermont Electric Power Company, Inc. as agent for the Joint Owners of the Highgate Project requesting that DOE remove certain operating conditions in the Permit that are no longer necessary. Federal Register Notice. September 3, 2015

  8. Metering in Federal Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Maintenance » Metering in Federal Buildings Metering in Federal Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy is required by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Executive Order 13693 to establish guidelines for agencies to meter their federal buildings for energy (electricity, natural gas, and steam) and water use. To help agencies meet these metering requirements, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance materials, an implementation plan template, and a best practices

  9. Commissioning in Federal Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Facilities » Operations & Maintenance » Commissioning in Federal Buildings Commissioning in Federal Buildings Commissioning in Federal Buildings Commissioning is a quality-assurance process used to verify that a building performs according to the original design and intent, and meets the needs of the owners and occupants. The commissioning process also prepares building staff to operate and maintain the building. Federal agencies are required to make sure building systems and equipment are

  10. Southeastern Federal Power Alliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southeastern Federal Power Alliance Southeastern Federal Power Alliance Southeastern Federal Power Alliance logo Partners Advancing Clean, Reliable Hydropower Sensing a need for a shared vision to accomplish Southeastern's mission, Southeastern formed a partnership with the South Atlantic Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina preference customers in July 1991 - the Southeastern Federal Power Alliance. The Alliance's theme - "Partners Advancing Clean,

  11. Federal Digital Strategy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Digital Strategy Federal Digital Strategy New expectations require the Federal Government to be ready to deliver and receive digital information and services anytime, anywhere and on any device. It must do so safely, securely, and with fewer resources. To build for the future, the Federal Government has developed a Digital Strategy that embraces the opportunity to innovate more with less, and enables entrepreneurs to better leverage government data to improve the quality of services to

  12. DOE Publishes Notice of Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document for General Service Lamps Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy has published a Federal Register notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document regarding energy conservation standards for general service lamps.

  13. 2014-02-28 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refrigeration Equipment; Final Rule | Department of Energy 8 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment; Final Rule 2014-02-28 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment; Final Rule This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding energy conservation standards for commercial refrigeration equipment, as issued by the Assistant Secretary on February 28, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected,

  14. Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard May 1, 2015 - 10:30am Addthis The upcoming implementation date for the new Hazard Communication Standard requires all Federal and Contractor employees with hazardous chemicals in their workplace must be in compliance with all modified revisions of this final rule, except: The distributors shall not ship containers labeled by the chemical

  15. Enforcement Policy Statement: Compliance Period for Regional Standards

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Compliance Period for Regional Standards Applicable to Central Air Conditioners April 24, 2014 On June 27, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published in the Federal Register a direct final rule (DFR) under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), 42 U.S.C. §§ 6291-6309, which set forth amended energy conservation standards for residential furnaces, central air conditioners, and heat pumps, including regional standards for different product types in indicated States. 76 FR 37408.

  16. EERE Communication Standards and Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EERE Communication Standards and Guidelines The Communication Standards website includes all of the requirements and best practices for creating publications, exhibits, and websites for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). We walk you through every requirement for every EERE product, whether it's required by the federal government, the Department of Energy, or EERE's Communications Team. If you've never used this site before, you can contact the Communications Standards

  17. Commissioning for Federal Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Federal Facilities Commissioning for Federal Facilities Guide describes building commissioning, recommissioning, retrocommissioning, and continuous commissioning for federal facilities. PDF icon commissioning_fed_facilities.pdf More Documents & Publications Chapter 9: Commissioning the Building Guide to Operating and Maintaining EnergySmart Schools Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC Investment-Grade Audit

  18. The Federal Energy Administration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Federal Energy Administration The Federal Energy Administration The Federal Energy Administration - written by Roger Anders Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy, November 1980. 15 pp. PDF icon FEA History.pdf More Documents & Publications A History of the Energy Research and Development Administration EIS-0002: Final Environmental Impact Statement A History of the Atomic Energy Commission

  19. Program management assessment of Federal Facility Compliance Agreement regarding CAA-40 C.F.R. Part 61, Subpart H at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    An assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s management system related to facility compliance with an element of the Clean Air Act was performed under contract by a team from Northern Arizona University. More specifically, a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was established in 1996 to bring the Laboratory into compliance with emissions standards of radionuclides, commonly referred to as Rad/NESHAP. In the fall of 1996, the four-person team of experienced environmental managers evaluated the adequacy of relevant management systems to implement the FFCA provisions. The assessment process utilized multiple procedures including document review, personnel interviews and re-interviews, and facility observations. The management system assessment was completed with a meeting among team members, Laboratory officials and others on November 1, 1996 and preparation of an assessment report.

  20. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction 241-SY-101 crust growth near term mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOMAN, N.A.

    1999-04-12

    The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health, Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of the information listed in Appendix A.'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-110), lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 mrem/year total effective dose equivalent to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual, and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1) notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2), will be provided at a later date.

  1. NETL Focused Standards List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24/08 Contact: Paul Lauterbach Reviewed: 10/28/08 Janet Lambert Page 1 of 15 This Focused Standards List has been primarily derived from selected standard references contained in NETL issued directives. All standards shall reference the most current edition/ version of that standard. DOE and other Government Standards and Requirements DOE DIRECTIVES Note: The following DOE directives can be found at http://www.directives.doe.gov DOE Policy 141.1, DOE Management of Cultural Resources DOE Order

  2. NETL Focused Standards List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1/6/14 Contact: Janet Lambert Reviewed: 3/5/14 Page 1 of 17 The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Focused Standards List is primarily derived from standard references contained in the requirements section of NETL's environment, safety, security, and health (ESS&H) and cyber security directives. All standards shall reference the most current edition/version of that standard. 1. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) AND OTHER GOVERNMENT STANDARDS AND REQUIREMENTS a. DOE Directives The

  3. NETL Focused Standards List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6/26/15 Contact: Janet Lambert Reviewed: 6/26/15 Page 1 of 18 The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Focused Standards List is primarily derived from standard references contained in the requirements section of NETL's environment, safety, security, and health (ESS&H) and cyber security directives. All standards shall reference the most current edition/version of that standard. 1. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) AND OTHER GOVERNMENT STANDARDS AND REQUIREMENTS a. DOE Directives The

  4. Development of a Consensus Standard for Verification and Validation of Nuclear System Thermal-Fluids Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; Richard R. Schultz; Ryan L. Crane

    2011-12-01

    With the resurgence of nuclear power and increased interest in advanced nuclear reactors as an option to supply abundant energy without the associated greenhouse gas emissions of the more conventional fossil fuel energy sources, there is a need to establish internationally recognized standards for the verification and validation (V&V) of software used to calculate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of advanced reactor designs for both normal operation and hypothetical accident conditions. To address this need, ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Standards and Certification has established the V&V 30 Committee, under the jurisdiction of the V&V Standards Committee, to develop a consensus standard for verification and validation of software used for design and analysis of advanced reactor systems. The initial focus of this committee will be on the V&V of system analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for nuclear applications. To limit the scope of the effort, the committee will further limit its focus to software to be used in the licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. In this framework, the Standard should conform to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other regulatory practices, procedures and methods for licensing of nuclear power plants as embodied in the United States (U.S.) Code of Federal Regulations and other pertinent documents such as Regulatory Guide 1.203, 'Transient and Accident Analysis Methods' and NUREG-0800, 'NRC Standard Review Plan'. In addition, the Standard should be consistent with applicable sections of ASME NQA-1-2008 'Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Facility Applications (QA)'. This paper describes the general requirements for the proposed V&V 30 Standard, which includes; (a) applicable NRC and other regulatory requirements for defining the operational and accident domain of a nuclear system that must be considered if the system is to be licensed, (b) the corresponding calculation domain of the software that should encompass the nuclear operational and accident domain to be used to study the system behavior for licensing purposes, (c) the definition of the scaled experimental data set required to provide the basis for validating the software, (d) the ensemble of experimental data sets required to populate the validation matrix for the software in question, and (e) the practices and procedures to be used when applying a validation standard. Although this initial effort will focus on software for licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors, it is anticipated that the practices and procedures developed for this Standard can eventually be extended to other nuclear and non-nuclear applications.

  5. Executive Order 13514: Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance; Comprehensive Federal Fleet Management Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-17

    Comprehensive Federal fleet management guide offered as a companion to Executive Order 13514 Section 12 guidance.

  6. Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitze, Arnold

    2011-04-11

    The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­‐year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-­‐burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-­‐fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

  7. 30-Day Federal Register Notice - Extension | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    30-Day Federal Register Notice - Extension 30-Day Federal Register Notice - Extension Record Extension-30 Day Federal Register Notice PDF icon 30-Day Federal Register Notice - Extension More Documents & Publications 30 Day Federal Register Notice Extension - FINAL 30-Day Federal Register Notice - Proposed 30 Day Federal Register Notice Proposed - FINAL

  8. Measurement and verifiction (M&V) guidelines for federal energy projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    This document provides procedures and guidelines for quantifying the savings resulting from the installation of Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) implemented with federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs) or task orders implemented under a federal IDIQ contract. The first section of this document provides an overview of measurement and verification (M&V) options and procedures. The second, third, and fourth sections provide standardized measurement and verification (M&V) methods for common types of ECMs.

  9. Fuel Reformer, LNT and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CyclesMeets Off-Road Final Tier 4 and HD On-road Emission Standards PDF icon deer09mccarthy.pdf More Documents & Publications Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a...

  10. Marine Fuel Choice for Ocean- Going Vessels within Emissions...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... meets Tier III standards while producing minimal additional CO 2 emissions down to a ... LNG storage tanks on the deck with no or minimal cargo losses. 62 Maintenance costs for ...

  11. Guidance for Federal Agencies on E.O. 13514 Section 12, Federal Fleet

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Management | Department of Energy Guidance for Federal Agencies on E.O. 13514 Section 12, Federal Fleet Management Guidance for Federal Agencies on E.O. 13514 Section 12, Federal Fleet Management Document provides guidance on planning-the first step in a recommended process for Federal agency fleet managers to select optimal petroleum reduction strategies as required under Executive Order (E.O.) 13514. PDF icon fleetguidance_13514.pdf More Documents & Publications Executive Order 13514:

  12. Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2004 the Energy Efficiency Standards Act (EESA of 2004) became law in the State of Maryland. The General Assembly passed the EESA to establish minimum energy efficiency standards on nine...

  13. Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 2015, the NY PSC issued an order extending the Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) and Customer-Sited Tier (CST) of the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) till Feb 29, 2016...

  14. August 2006 Standards Actions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http:www.eh.doe.gov techstds ... on the Technical Standards Program (TSP) web page at http:www.eh.doe.govtechstds. ...

  15. TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure describes the responsibilities of persons who are charged with implementing the DOE Technical Standards Program.

  16. Appliance and Equipment Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance and Equipment Standards April 22, 2014 John Cymbalsky Program Manager 1 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Appliance & Equipment Standards Mission The Appliance and Equipment Standards Program's Mission to Fulfill its Statutory Obligation to: * Develop and amend energy conservation standards that achieve the maximum energy efficiency that is technologically feasible and economically justified. * Develop and amend test procedures that are repeatable,

  17. TECHNICAL STANDARDS COMMENT RESOLUTION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure provides guidance for resolving comments on DOE Technical Standards that are received during the coordination process.

  18. Carbon Emissions: Food Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct....

  19. Community-Based Federal Environmental Justice Resource Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community-Based Federal Environmental Justice Resource Guide (EJ IWG, 2015) Community-Based Federal Environmental Justice Resource Guide (EJ IWG, 2015) The Federal Interagency ...

  20. GSA Federal Advisory Committee Management; Final Rule -- 41CFR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Regulations (FPMR) coverage on federal advisory committee management and moving it into the Federal Management Regulation (FMR). PDF icon Federal Advisory Committee...