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1

For the Federal Columbia River Power System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

its products and services . BPA markets wholesale electrical power from 31 federal hydro projects in the Columbia River Basin, one nonfederal nuclear plant and several small...

2

A Brief History of the Federal Columbia River Power System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tributaries. Investor-owned and publicly owned utilities also built a major system of dams and generating, navigation, recreation, and other river uses. From the beginning, the federal government has played a major Columbia River Treaty with Canada* As demand for power grew, the United States and Canadian governments

3

Columbia River System Operation Review on Selecting an Operating Strategy for the Federal Columbia River Power System; 21Feb1997  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Columbia River System Operation Review on Selecting an Operating Strategy for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Record of Decision (ROD) SUMMARY: The Columbia River System Operation Review (SOR) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assessed operations at the 14 Federal dams and reservoirs on the Columbia and lower Snake Rivers that have a major influence on the multiple purpose system operation, and for which power production is coordinated under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement. Lead agencies for this six-year process were the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

4

Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose ofthis document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision-making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows. 1. Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. 2. Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. 3. Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. 4. Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. 5. Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. In conclusion, the estuary RME effort is designed to meet the research and monitoring needs of the estuary Program using an adaptive management process. Estuary RME's success and usefulness will depend on the actual conduct of adaptive management, as embodied in the objectives, implrementation, data, reporting, and synthesis, evaluation, and decision-making described herein.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Tortorici, Cathy; Yerxa, Tracey; Leary, J.; Skalski, John R.

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

5

Columbia River Treaty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an understanding of the implications for post-2024 Treaty planning and Columbia River operations. The joint effort by the Entities to conduct initial post-2024 modeling and...

6

Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program, hereafter called 'the Estuary Program'. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows: (1) Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. (2) Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. (3) Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. (4) Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. (5) Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. The goal leads to three primary management questions pertaining to the main focus of the Estuary Program: estuary habitat conservation and restoration. (1) Are the estuary habitat actions achieving the expected biological and environmental performance targets? (2) Are the offsite habitat actions in the estuary improving juvenile salmonid performance and which actions are most effective at addressing the limiting factors preventing achievement of habitat, fish, or wildlife performance objectives? (3) What are the limiting factors or threats in the estuary/ocean preventing the achievement of desired habitat or fish performance objectives? Performance measures for the estuary are monitored indicators that reflect the status of habitat conditions and fish performance, e.g., habitat connectivity, survival, and life history diversity. Performance measures also pertain to implementation and compliance. Such measures are part of the monitoring, research, and action plans in this estuary RME document. Performance targets specific to the estuary were not included in the 2007 draft Biological Opinion.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

7

EIS-0170: Columbia River System Operation Review, BPA Area  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Columbia River System Operation Review Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) evaluates the potential impacts of four alternatives that represent the likely range of allocations between the Federal and non-Federal projects.

8

The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" fish and wildlife in the Columbia River as affected by development and operation of the hydroelectric modified in terms of physical and biological processes. The development and operation of the hydroelectric

9

Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

10

Atlas of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Atlas of the Columbia River Basin Oregon State University Computer-Assisted Cartography Course & GEOVISUALIZATION GROUP UNIVERSITY #12;2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin FOREWORDAtlas, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. 2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin

Jenny, Bernhard

11

Information retrieval system: impacts of water-level changes on uses of federal storage reservoirs of the Columbia River.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project undertaken to provide the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with information needed to conduct environmental assessments and meet requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Regional Act) is described. Access to information on environmental effects would help BPA fulfill its responsibilities to coordinate power generation on the Columbia River system, protect uses of the river system (e.g., irrigation, recreation, navigation), and enhance fish and wildlife production. Staff members at BPA identified the need to compile and index information resources that would help answer environmental impact questions. A computer retrieval system that would provide ready access to the information was envisioned. This project was supported by BPA to provide an initial step toward a compilation of environmental impact information. Scientists at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) identified, gathered, and evaluated information related to environmental effects of water level on uses of five study reservoirs and developed and implemented and environmental data retrieval system, which provides for automated storage and retrieval of annotated citations to published and unpublished information. The data retrieval system is operating on BPA's computer facility and includes the reservoir water-level environmental data. This project was divided into several tasks, some of which were conducted simultaneously to meet project deadlines. The tasks were to identify uses of the five study reservoirs, compile and evaluate reservoir information, develop a data entry and retrieval system, identify and analyze research needs, and document the data retrieval system and train users. Additional details of the project are described in several appendixes.

Fickeisen, D.H.; Cowley, P.J.; Neitzel, D.A.; Simmons, M.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership. The  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

located just downstream of Longview, Wash. Vegetation is typical for disturbed tidal wetlands along the Columbia River; on-site vegetation is a mix of native and non-native...

16

Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

L. C. Hulstrom

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Columbia River System Inside Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

none,

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment columbia river Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: assessment columbia river Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 352000 Columbia river Basin Fish and Wildlife Program "...the Council is adopting Summary: 352000 Columbia river Basin...

19

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The State of the Columbia River Basin in 2012 07 Northwest Energy Efficiency Achievements, 1978-2011 10 Council undertakes mid-term review of Sixth Power Plan 11 Energy Efficiency met most of the new and Commerce United states House of representatives and Committee on Natural resources United states House

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Washington. The Act authorized the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish Overview 11 Sixth Northwest Power Plan boosts energy efficiency, renewable energy, Energy efficiency

22

Federally-Recognized Tribes of the Columbia-Snake Basin.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an omnibus publication about the federally-recognized Indian tribes of the Columbia-Snake river basin, as presented by themselves. It showcases several figurative and literal snapshots of each tribe, bits and pieces of each tribe`s story. Each individual tribe or tribal confederation either submitted its own section to this publication, or developed its own section with the assistance of the writer-editor. A federally-recognized tribe is an individual Indian group, or confederation of Indian groups, officially acknowledged by the US government for purposes of legislation, consultation and benefits. This publication is designed to be used both as a resource and as an introduction to the tribes. Taken together, the sections present a rich picture of regional indian culture and history, as told by the tribes.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Columbia River Treaty 2014/2024 Review • Phase 1 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Columbia River Treaty (Treaty or CRT) of 1964, Canada and the United States (U.S.) jointly regulate and manage the Columbia River as it flows from British Columbia into the U.S. The Treaty has provided substantial flood control and power generation benefits to both nations. The Treaty established Canadian and U.S. Entities as implementing agents for each government. British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority (BC Hydro) was designated as the Canadian Entity. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Administrator and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Division Engineer, Northwestern Division, were designated as the U.S. Entity. The Canadian and U.S. Entities are empowered by their respective governments with broad discretion to implement the existing Columbia River Treaty. They are not, however, authorized to terminate, renegotiate, or otherwise modify the Treaty. In the U.S., authority over international treaties rests with the President, assisted in foreign relations and international negotiations by the Department of State and subject in certain cases to the advice and consent of the U.S. Senate. In Canada, international treaties are within the prerogative of the executive branch of the federal government. Under current policy, treaties are tabled in the House of Commons, and are subject to a waiting period before the executive branch brings the treaty into effect. In the case of the Columbia River Treaty, Canada has assigned certain rights and obligations relating to the Treaty to British Columbia pursuant to the Canada-B.C. Agreement. The Phase 1 report is provided to those respective governmental bodies to support possible independent and/or joint decisions that may be made with respect to the future of the Treaty. The Treaty contains two important provisions that take effect on and after September 16, 2024, that could impact the current power and flood control benefits: 1. Canadian flood control obligations automatically change from a pre-determined annual operation to a “Called Upon” operation. 2. The year 2024 is the earliest date that either Canada or the U.S. can terminate most of the provisions of the Treaty, with a minimum 10-years advance written notice. Hence, September 16, 2014, is the latest date that either nation could provide notice of intent to terminate and still have the termination effective at its earliest possible date in 2024. While termination would end most Treaty obligations, Called Upon flood control and Libby coordination provisions will continue regardless of termination. However, it is important to note that the Treaty has no end date and absent either country using the termination option will continue indefinitely.

none,

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES -Part VII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES - Part VII I ^^^^'fie^BkJioJS SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC, Director Special Scientific Report - Fisheries No. UO SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES PART these have been divided for con- venience into four sub-areas. On the Idaho side of the Snake River

25

Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

27

Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q; Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Clark, D.R. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Species for the screening assessment. Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of past nuclear production operations along the Columbia River, there is intense public and tribal interest in assessing any residual Hanford Site related contamination along the river from the Hanford Reach to the Pacific Ocean. The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment was proposed to address these concerns. The assessment of the Columbia River is being conducted in phases. The initial phase is a screening assessment of the risk, which addresses current environmental conditions for a range of potential uses. One component of the screening assessment estimates the risk from contaminants in the Columbia River to the environment. The objective of the ecological risk assessment is to determine whether contaminants from the Columbia River pose a significant threat to selected receptor species that exist in the river and riparian communities of the study area. This report (1) identifies the receptor species selected for the screening assessment of ecological risk and (2) describes the selection process. The species selection process consisted of two tiers. In Tier 1, a master species list was developed that included many plant and animal species known to occur in the aquatic and riparian systems of the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and the Columbia River estuary. This master list was reduced to 368 species that occur in the study area (Priest Rapids Dam to McNary Dam). In Tier 2, the 181 Tier 1 species were qualitatively ranked based on a scoring of their potential exposure and sensitivity to contaminants using a conceptual exposure model for the study area.

Becker, J.M.; Brandt, C.A.; Dauble, D.D.; Maughan, A.D.; O`Neil, T.K.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Potential Economic Impacts of Zebra Mussels on the Hydropower Facilities in the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was to estimate costs to the Federal Columbia River Power System hydroelectric projects in the event of a zebra found that the one-time cost for installing zebra mussel control systems at hydroelectric projects could hypochlorite (NaOCl) injection system and anti-fouling paint), at 13 select hydroelectric projects, was $23

30

Columbia River Treaty History and 2014/2024 Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River, the fourth largest river on the continent as measured by average annual ?ow, generates more power than any other river in North America. While its headwaters originate in British Columbia, only about 15 percent of the 259,500 square miles of the Columbia River Basin is actually located in Canada. Yet the Canadian waters account for about 38 percent of the average annual volume, and up to 50 percent of the peak ?ood waters, that ?ow by The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River between Oregon and Washington. In the 1940s, of?cials from the United States and Canada began a long process to seek a joint solution to the ?ooding caused by the unregulated Columbia River and to the postwar demand for greater energy resources. That effort culminated in the Columbia River Treaty, an international agreement between Canada and the United States for the cooperative development of water resources regulation in the upper Columbia River Basin. It was signed in 1961 and implemented in 1964.

None

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

Hillson, Todd D. [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

33

EIS-0163: 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Walla Walla District prepared this statement to analyze four general alternatives to modify the flow of water in the lower Columbia-Snake River in order to help anadromous fish migrate past eight multipurpose Federal dams. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement on February 10, 1992.

34

100 Area Columbia River sediment sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forty-four sediment samples were collected from 28 locations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to assess the presence of metals and man-made radionuclides in the near shore and shoreline settings of the Hanford Site. Three locations were sampled upriver of the Hanford Site plutonium production reactors. Twenty-two locations were sampled near the reactors. Three locations were sampled downstream of the reactors near the Hanford Townsite. Sediment was collected from depths of 0 to 6 in. and between 12 to 24 in. below the surface. Samples containing concentrations of metals exceeding the 95 % upper threshold limit values (DOE-RL 1993b) are considered contaminated. Contamination by arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc was found. Man-made radionuclides occur in all samples except four collected opposite the Hanford Townsite. Man-made radionuclide concentrations were generally less than 1 pCi/g.

Weiss, S.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

35

Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization Measures: rebate amounts cannot exceed 50% of the total project cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Clothes Washers: $50 Gas, Oil or Propane Clothes Washers: $20 Refrigerators/Freezers: $15 Duct Sealing: $400 Ductless Heat Pumps: $1,000 Air-source Heat Pumps: $700 - $1,100

36

White Sturgeon Mitigation & Restoration in the Columbia & Snake River Upstream from Bonneville Dam  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

29, 2003 29, 2003 To: People Interested in the Project to Mitigate and Restore White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has prepared the Final Environmental Assessment (EA), which includes a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), for the White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Project. The document is enclosed for your information. Background: Since 1986, State, Federal, and Tribal fisheries agencies have been gathering data and studying habitats, movements, population dynamics, feeding, and distribution of white sturgeon in the Columbia River system. With the decline in anadromous salmonid runs there has been an increase in the importance of the white sturgeon fisheries. The Oregon Department of

37

Supplement to the Mainstem Lower Columbia River and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recovery Board LCREP Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership LF limiting factor NOAA National Oceanic Subbasin and Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board Subbasin 2 Focal Species Selection Figure 1 Distribution Mainstem SUPPLEMENT TEXT.DOC III #12;#12;Acronyms and Abbreviations APRE Artificial Production Review

38

Modeling the System: How Computers are Used in Columbia River Planning.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication describes the three computer models Federal agencies and the Northwest Power Pool use regularly to help plan hydro operations in the Columbia River Basin: HYSSR, HYDROSIM, and HYDREG. It is one of a series of booklets written for participants in the System Operation Review (SOR) being conducted jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), the US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and theBonneville Power Administration (BPA). A list of the other publications appears on the inside front cover. The SOR is the environmental analysis required to consider changes in Columbia River system operations related contract arrangements. Over the next few years, the agencies will develop a new multiple-use operation for the Columbia River. At the time, the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) and other contracts related to the Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada will be renegotiated and renewed. Many alternative ways of operating individual projects and the river system as a whole will be considered in the SOR. To analyze how these changes would affect the system's ability to meet its multiple-use goals, various operating scenarios will be thoroughly evaluated. The three computer models, HYSSR, HYDROSIM, and HYDREG, will play an important role in this evaluation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army Corps of Engineers; United States. Bureau of Reclamation

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

Columbia River System Operations Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Columbia River Peoples Ut Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbia River Peoples Ut Dist Columbia River Peoples Ut Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Columbia River Peoples Ut Dist Place Oregon Utility Id 40438 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Drainage Pumping and Farm Irrigation Service Commercial Experimental Rate Schedule - General Service - Greater than 400 Amp Service Industrial General Service - Greater Than 400 Amp Service Commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Columbia River PUD - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Columbia River PUD - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate General: Rebate amounts cannot exceed 50% of the total project cost Lighting: Rebate amounts cannot exceed 70% of the total project cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: Varies greatly Wall/Floor Insulation: $0.25 per sq ft Attic Insulation: $0.45 per sq ft

42

Northwest Power and Conservation Council's1 Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwest Power and Conservation Council's1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife .................................................................................................5 A. The Northwest Power and Conservation Council and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife. Ocean

43

Brochure: Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in powerhouse engineering and mechanics, as well as computer software for optimizing hydro operations and extracting small efficiency increases that translate into big gains....

44

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix R: Pacific Northwest Coordination agreement (PNCA).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, the Federal government coordinates the planning and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) with projects owned and operated by the region`s non-Federal hydrogenerating utilities pursuant to the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), the Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are parties to the PNCA on behalf of the government of the United States. The PNCA is a complex agreement that provides an opportunity for the region`s power producers to maximize the power system`s reliability and economy while meeting their multiple-use objectives. The PNCA does not dictate the operation of the resources it coordinates. It is essentially an accounting mechanism that exchanges the power produced among the parties in order to improve the reliability of the system and reduce regional power costs. Project owners retain complete autonomy to operate as needed to meet their multiple-use requirements. The PNCA was executed in 1964 as an important component of regional plans to maximize the Northwest`s hydro resource capability. Maximization also included the development of storage projects on the Columbia River in Canada pursuant to the terms of the 1964 Columbia River Treaty. Because of the link between power coordination and Treaty issues, the current parties to the PNCA, currently are contemplating entering into a replacement or renewed power coordination agreement. Because the power coordination agreement is a consensual arrangement, its ultimate provisions must be acceptable to all of its signatories. This Appendix R to the Final Environmental Impact Statement of the Columbia River System is a presentation of the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Council Document ISRP 98-1A Review of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Council Document ISRP 98-1A Review of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program for Fiscal .......................................................................... 23 Umbrella Wildlife Proposals .................................................................................................. 31 WIND RIVER SUBBASIN ....................................................

46

Spatial Distribution of Juvenile Salmonids in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Distribution of Juvenile Salmonids in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River Dennis D. Dauble salmon, sockeye salmon. and steelhead was determined in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River from July field studies conducted in the Hanford Reach ofthe mid-Columbia River in 1983 and 1984. The Hanford

47

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Columbia River : Terminal Fisheries Research Report : Annual Report 1994.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin.

Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

50

SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES -Part VIII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES - Part VIII SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT: FISHERIES Falls By Zell E. Parkhurst Fishery Research Biologist Special Scientific Report Fisheries No. 57 #12 for a distance of approximate- ly 600 miles to the impassable Augur Falls opposite the town of Jerome, Idaho

51

The Columbia River System: Inside Story  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Falls Little Wood Reservoir Idaho Falls (City Plant) Idaho Falls (Lower Plant) Idaho Falls (Upper Plant) Ponds Lodge Ashton St. Anthony Felt Gem State Portneuf River Billingsley...

52

1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS : Appendices.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described. The document concludes with an evaluation of the potential effects that could result from implementing proposed actions. The conclusions are based on evaluation of existing data, utilization of numerical models, and application of logical inference. This volume contains the appendices.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled “Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River.” Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

54

New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products capable of removing contaminants from the groundwater. Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products

55

Radionuclide concentrations in white sturgeon from the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although radioactive releases from the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site have been monitored in the environment since the reactors began operating in 1945, recent information regarding historical releases of radionuclides has led to renewed interest in estimating human exposure to radionuclides at Hanford. Knowledge of the fate of radionuclides in some fish species may be important because of the potential for food-chain transfer to humans. White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were selected for study because they are long-lived, reside year-round in the Hanford Reach, are benthic, and are an important commercial and sport species in the Columbia River. They also have a greater potential for accumulating persistent radionuclides than shorter-lived species with pelagic and/or anadromous life histories. The purpose of our study was to summarize data on historical concentrations of industrial radionuclides in white sturgeon and to collect additional data on current body burdens in the Columbia River.

Dauble, D.D.; Price, K.R.; Poston, T.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Radionuclide concentrations in white sturgeon from the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although radioactive releases from the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site have been monitored in the environment since the reactors began operating in 1945, recent information regarding historical releases of radionuclides has led to renewed interest in estimating human exposure to radionuclides at Hanford. Knowledge of the fate of radionuclides in some fish species may be important because of the potential for food-chain transfer to humans. White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were selected for study because they are long-lived, reside year-round in the Hanford Reach, are benthic, and are an important commercial and sport species in the Columbia River. They also have a greater potential for accumulating persistent radionuclides than shorter-lived species with pelagic and/or anadromous life histories. The purpose of our study was to summarize data on historical concentrations of industrial radionuclides in white sturgeon and to collect additional data on current body burdens in the Columbia River.

Dauble, D.D.; Price, K.R.; Poston, T.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers are working on the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project. This project is a U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies, and technologies for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Technologies Project staff.

Fix, N. J.

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

58

SUPPLEMENTAL COLUMBIA RIVER PROTECTION ACTIVITIES AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE: 2006 TECHNICAL PEER REVIEW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prompted by a $10 million Congressional allocation to identify supplemental actions to protect the Columbia River from groundwater contamination beneath the Hanford Reservation, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Clean-up Technology identified twenty-three potential technical projects and then down-selected ten of these for further evaluation. An independent expert peer review was conducted for the ten down-selected proposals. The review panel consisted of twenty-three recognized subject matter experts that broadly represented academia, industry, and federal laboratories. Of the initial ten proposals reviewed, one was given unconditional support, six were given conditional support, and three were not supported as proposed. Three additional proposals were then submitted by DOE for review--these proposals were structured, in part, to respond to the initial round of technical peer review comments. Peer reviews of these additional proposals provided conditional support. For those proposals that received conditional support, DOE requested specific implementation and work plans and assessed whether the plans adequately addressed the technical conditions identified by the review panel. The final list of technology proposals receiving support, or conditional support, primarily focused on understanding and reducing the potential impacts of uranium, chromium, and strontium from facilities adjacent to the Columbia River, with a secondary focus on understanding and limiting the future Columbia River impacts from the large carbon tetrachloride groundwater plume underlying and downgradient of the Hanford Central Plateau facilities. The results and recommendations of the peer reviews informed the final DOE project selections and supported implementation of the selected projects to protect the Columbia River and address groundwater contamination at Hanford.

Looney, B; Dawn Kaback; Gene Leboeuf; Jason Mulvihill-Kuntz; Lynn Lefkoff

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Analysis of potential impacts to resident fish from Columbia River System Operation alternatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The US Army Corps of Engineers, the US Bureau of Reclamation, and the Bonneville Power Administration initiated the Columbia River System Operation Review...

David R. Geist; Lance W. Vail; Daniel J. Epstein

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix T (Second Continued Volume): Comments & Responses.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Appendix T (second continued volume) giving public comments and responses to the final environmental impact statement for the Columbia River System.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 200880000 ISRP FAN1B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Accords) are ten-year agreements between the federal action agencies and states and tribes. The Accords supplement the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program and are intended substantial biological benefits for Columbia Basin fish. The Accords also acknowledge the tribes' and states

63

Columbia River: Terminal fisheries research project. 1994 Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Columbia River terminal fisheries have been conducted in Youngs Bay, Oregon, since the early 1960`s targeting coho salmon produced at the state facility on the North Fork Klaskanine River. In 1977 the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s (CEDC) Fisheries Project began augmenting the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife production efforts. Together ODFW and CEDC smolt releases totaled 5,060,000 coho and 411,300 spring chinook in 1993 with most of the releases from the net pen acclimation program. During 1980-82 fall commercial terminal fisheries were conducted adjacent to the mouth of Big Creek in Oregon. All past terminal fisheries were successful in harvesting surplus hatchery fish with minimal impact on nonlocal weak stocks. In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its` Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin. The findings of the initial year of the study are included in this report. The geographic area considered for study extends from Bonneville Dam to the river mouth. The initial year`s work is the beginning of a 2-year research stage to investigate potential sites, salmon stocks, and methodologies; a second 3-year stage will focus on expansion in Youngs Bay and experimental releases into sites with greatest potential; and a final 5-year phase establishing programs at full capacity at all acceptable sites. After ranking all possible sites using five harvest and five rearing criteria, four sites in Oregon (Tongue Point, Blind Slough, Clifton Channel and Wallace Slough) and three in Washington (Deep River, Steamboat Slough and Cathlamet Channel) were chosen for study.

Hirose, P.; Miller, M.; Hill, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Columbia River Plume andColumbia River Plume and California Current Ecosystem:California Current Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Understand processes and develop tools (models and ocean indices) for forecasting salmonid survival and returns #12;EggEgg--smolt Potentialsmolt Potential-- Snake RiverSnake River Spring ChinookSpring Chinook 0 Recent `good' ocean 100 yr ave ocean `Poor' ocean #12;CHART OF SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE · Note: warm water

65

Human scenarios for the screening assessment. Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of past nuclear production operations along the Columbia River, there is intense public and tribal interest in assessing any residual Hanford Site related contamination along the river from the Hanford Reach to the Pacific Ocean. The Columbia River Impact Assessment (CRCIA) was proposed to address these concerns. The assessment of the Columbia River is being conducted in phases. The initial phase is a screening assessment of risk, which addresses current environmental conditions for a range of potential uses. One component of the screening assessment estimates the risk from contaminants in the Columbia River to humans. Because humans affected by the Columbia river are involved in a wide range of activities, various scenarios have been developed on which to base the risk assessments. The scenarios illustrate the range of activities possible by members of the public coming in contact with the Columbia River so that the impact of contaminants in the river on human health can be assessed. Each scenario illustrates particular activity patterns by a specific group. Risk will be assessed at the screening level for each scenario. This report defines the scenarios and the exposure factors that will be the basis for estimating the potential range of risk to human health from Hanford-derived radioactive as well as non-radioactive contaminants associated with the Columbia River.

Napier, B.A.; Harper, B.L.; Lane, N.K.; Strenge, D.L.; Spivey, R.B.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Columbia River Pathway Dosimetry Report, 1944-1992. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. One objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate doses to individuals who were exposed to the radionuclides released to the Columbia River (the river pathway). This report documents the last in a series of dose calculations conducted on the Columbia River pathway. The report summarizes the technical approach used to estimate radiation doses to three classes of representative individuals who may have used the Columbia River as a source of drinking water, food, or for recreational or occupational purposes. In addition, the report briefly explains the approaches used to estimate the radioactivity released to the river, the development of the parameters used to model the uptake and movement of radioactive materials in aquatic systems such as the Columbia River, and the method of calculating the Columbia River`s transport of radioactive materials. Potential Columbia River doses have been determined for representative individuals since the initiation of site activities in 1944. For this report, dose calculations were performed using conceptual models and computer codes developed for the purpose of estimating doses. All doses were estimated for representative individuals who share similar characteristics with segments of the general population.

Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Snyder, S.F.; Shipler, D.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

EIS-0163-S: Supplemental EIS/1993 Interim Columbia and Snake Rivers Flow Improvement Measures for Salmon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Walla Walla District has prepared this statement to assess alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency in developing this supplement due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement in March of 1993. This statement supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis Environmental Impact Statement, which evaluated ways to alter water management operations in 1992 on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers to enhance the survival of wild Snake River salmon.

68

Seasonal Juvenile Salmonid Presence and Migratory Behavior in the Lower Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To facilitate preparing Biological Assessments of proposed channel maintenance projects, the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to consolidate and synthesize available information about the use of the lower Columbia River and estuary by juvenile anadromous salmonids. The information to be synthesized included existing published documents as well as data from five years (2004-2008) of acoustic telemetry studies conducted in the Columbia River estuary using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System. For this synthesis, the Columbia River estuary includes the section of the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam at river kilometer (Rkm) 235 downstream to the mouth where it enters the Pacific Ocean. In this report, we summarize the seasonal salmonid presence and migration patterns in the Columbia River estuary based on information from published studies as well as relevant data from acoustic telemetry studies conducted by NOAA Fisheries and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) between 2004 and 2008. Recent acoustic telemetry studies, conducted using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS; developed by the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), provided information on the migratory behavior of juvenile steelhead (O. mykiss) and Chinook salmon in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the Pacific Ocean. In this report, Section 2 provides a summary of information from published literature on the seasonal presence and migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River estuary and plume. Section 3 presents a detailed synthesis of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead migratory behavior based on use of the JSATS between 2004 and 2008. Section 4 provides a discussion of the information summarized in the report as well as information drawn from literature reviews on potential effects of channel maintenance activities to juvenile salmonids rearing in or migrating through the Columbia River estuary and plume.

Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Welch, Ian D.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Dissolved Gas in the Snake and Columbia Rivers Modeled by CRiSP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissolved Gas in the Snake and Columbia Rivers 1969-1984 Modeled by CRiSP Pamela Shaw Columbia Basin Research School of Fisheries, UW #12;Introduction These dissolved gas profiles for 1969-1984 were created using CRiSP and historic spill and flow data. In CRiSP the gas going into the tailwater

Washington at Seattle, University of

70

Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 200852400 CRITFC Lamprey Passage Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and conservation initiatives is imperative if this valuable resource is to be maintained and the cultural legacy Restoration Plan for the Columbia River Basin (CRITFC 2008). Province(s) Intermountain and Lower Columbia in abundance over the last few decades and the need to acquire information to inform management

71

Transport of Atmospheric Aerosol by Gap Winds in the Columbia River Gorge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Typical diurnal wind patterns and their relationship to transport of atmospheric aerosol in the Columbia River gorge of Oregon and Washington are addressed in this paper. The measurement program included measurements of light scattering by ...

Mark C. Green; Jin Xu; Narendra Adhikari

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Columbia River Treaty 2014/2024 Review: Phase 1 Technical Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1964, the Columbia River Treaty has provided signi?cant bene?ts to the United States and Canada through coordinated river management by the two countries. It remains the standard against which other international water coordination agreements around the world are compared. When the Treaty was negotiated, its goals were to provide signi?cant ?ood control and power generation bene?ts to both countries. However, the Treaty contains two provisions that may signi?cantly change these bene?ts as early as the year 2024. First, in 2024 the 60 years of purchased ?ood control space in Canadian Treaty projects expires. Instead of a coordinated and managed plan to regulate both Canadian and U.S. projects for ?ood control, the Treaty calls for a shift to a Canadian operation under which the United States can call upon Canada for ?ood control assistance. The United States can request this “called upon” assistance as needed but only to the extent necessary to meet forecast ?ood control needs in the United States that cannot adequately be met by U.S. projects. When called upon is requested, the United States will then have to pay Canada for its operational costs and any economic losses resulting from the called upon ?ood control operation. Second, while the Treaty has no speci?ed end date, it does allow either Canada or the United States the option to terminate most of the provisions of the Treaty on or after Sept. 16, 2024, with a minimum of 10 years advance written notice. Thus, the year 2024 is the ?rst year a notice of termination would take effect assuming written notice of termination is given by the Canadian or U.S. governments by 2014. Unless the Treaty is terminated or the federal governments elect to modify the Treaty, its provisions continue inde?nitely, except for the changes in ?ood control discussed above. Given the signi?cance of both of these provisions, it is important that the parties to the Treaty understand the implications for post-2024 Treaty planning and Columbia River operations. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bonneville Power Administration, the agencies that implement the Treaty in the United States on behalf of the U.S. Entity (see Treaty Governance sidebar), are conducting a multi-year effort to understand these implications. This effort is called the 2014/2024 Columbia River Treaty Review.

none,

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Monitoring groundwater and river interaction along the Hanford reach of the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an adjunct to efficient Hanford Site characterization and remediation of groundwater contamination, an automatic monitor network has been used to measure Columbia River and adjacent groundwater levels in several areas of the Hanford Site since 1991. Water levels, temperatures, and electrical conductivity measured by the automatic monitor network provided an initial database with which to calibrate models and from which to infer ground and river water interactions for site characterization and remediation activities. Measurements of the dynamic river/aquifer system have been simultaneous at 1-hr intervals, with a quality suitable for hydrologic modeling and for computer model calibration and testing. This report describes the equipment, procedures, and results from measurements done in 1993.

Campbell, M.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

White Sturgeon Mitigation & Restoration in the Columbia & Snake River Upstream from Bonneville Dam  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Project. The project proposes to continue to carry out harvest monitoring and stock status updates coordinated with fisheries management planning, annual young-of-the year recruitment indexing, research, experimental artificial propagation, and transport of white sturgeon to less densely populated areas of the river(s). Additionally, release of hatchery-reared juveniles is proposed to evaluate release

75

Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our objectives in this study are to quantify the discharge rate of uranium (U) to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site's 300 Area, and to follow that U down river to constrain its fate. Uranium from the Hanford Site has variable isotopic composition due to nuclear industrial processes carried out at the site. This characteristic makes it possible to use high-precision isotopic measurements of U in environmental samples to identify even trace levels of contaminant U, determine its sources, and estimate discharge rates. Our data on river water samples indicate that as much as 3.2 kg/day can enter the Columbia River from the 300 Area, which is only a small fraction of the total load of dissolved natural background U carried by the Columbia River. This very low-level of Hanford derived U can be discerned, despite dilution to < 1 percent of natural background U, 350 km downstream from the Hanford Site. These results indicate that isotopic methods can allow the amounts of U from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site entering the Columbia River to be measured accurately to ascertain whether they are an environmental concern, or are insignificant relative to natural uranium background in the Columbia River.

Christensen, John N.; Dresel, P. Evan; Conrad, Mark E.; Patton, Gregory W.; DePaolo, Donald J.

2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

The Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted interim groundwater remedial activities on the Hanford Site since the mid-1990s for several groundwater contamination plumes. DOE established the Columbia River Protection Supplemental Technologies Project (Technologies Project) in 2006 to evaluate alternative treatment technologies. The objectives for the technology project are as follows: develop a 300 Area polyphosphate treatability test to immobilize uranium, design and test infiltration of a phosphate/apatite technology for Sr-90 at 100-N, perform carbon tetrachloride and chloroform attenuation parameter studies, perform vadose zone chromium characterization and geochemistry studies, perform in situ biostimulation of chromium studies for a reducing barrier at 100-D, and perform a treatability test for phytoremediation for Sr-90 at 100-N. This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the Technologies Project. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is based on the quality assurance requirements of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830, Subpart A--Quality Assurance Requirements as delineated in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Standards-Based Management System. In addition, the technology project is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA/240/B-01/003, QA/R-5). The Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68) apply to portions of this project and to the subcontractors. HASQARD requirements are discussed within applicable sections of this plan.

Fix, N. J.

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

78

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

L. C. Hulstrom

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

COLUMBIA RIVER INTER-TRIBAL FISH COMMISSION 700 NE Multnomah Street, Suite 1200  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLUMBIA RIVER INTER-TRIBAL FISH COMMISSION 700 NE Multnomah Street, Suite 1200 Portland, Oregon 97232 F (503) 235-4228 (503) 238-0667 F (503) 235-4228 www.critfc.org Putting fish back in the rivers and protecting the watersheds where fish live September 17, 2013 Bill Bradbury, Chairman Northwest Power

80

Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Potomac River Power Plant" Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Re: District of Columbia Public Service Commission Emergency...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Underwater noise generated by Columbia River hydroelectric dams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low?frequency (10–1000 Hz) underwater noise measurements have been made in water within and upstream from four Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The motivation for these measurements was to map out the sound field within and upstream from the power dams as a first step in understanding the effect of this field on the behavior of migrating salmonids that must choose between the bypass system or intakes to the turbines. Eventually sound may be used to guide the juvenile fish safely past the turbine intakes and into the bypass system. Thus far single hydrophonemeasurements have been made in the bypass slots within the dam and at a number of locations upstream from the dam. The noise level varies with location decreasing as the hydrophone is moved upsteam from the dam and as the hydrophone is moved closer to the water surface immediately upstream of the dam as well as in the bypass slot. The noise spectra below 200 Hz are highly modulated displaying one or more sharp peaks which indicates resonances in the structural generating mechanism or propagation path. The spectrum level and modulation vary significantly from one dam to another and sometimes from one configuration to another (e.g. when one of the turbines is on or off). A final set of measurements will be made at the Bonneville Dam using several hydrophones placed at a number of locations in the vicinity of the intake channel and these may help identify sources and propagation paths to the hydrophone. [Work sponsored by U. S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Robert T. Miyamoto; Steven O. McConnell; James J. Anderson; Blake E. Feist

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

83

Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River, Estuary, and Plume in 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty regarding the migratory behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids passing through the lower Columbia River and estuary after negotiating dams on the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) prompted the development and application of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS). The JSATS has been used to investigate the survival of juvenile salmonid smolts between Bonneville Dam (river kilometer (rkm) 236) and the mouth of the Columbia River annually since 2004. In 2010, a total of 12,214 juvenile salmonids were implanted with both a passive integrated transponder (PIT) and a JSATS acoustic transmitter. Using detection information from JSATS receiver arrays deployed on dams and in the river, estuary, and plume, the survival probability of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts tagged at John Day Dam was estimated form multiple reaches between rkm 153 and 8.3 during the spring. During summer, the survival probability of subyearling Chinook salmon was estimated for the same reaches. In addition, the influence of routes of passage (e.g., surface spill, deep spill, turbine, juvenile bypass system) through the lower three dams on the Columbia River (John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville) on juvenile salmonid smolt survival probability from the dams to rkm 153 and then between rkm 153 and 8.3 was examined to increase understanding of the immediate and latent effects of dam passage on juvenile salmon survival. Similar to previous findings, survival probability was relatively high (>0.95) for most groups of juvenile salmonids from the Bonneville Dam tailrace to about rkm 50. Downstream of rkm 50 the survival probability of all species and run types we examined decreased markedly. Steelhead smolts suffered the highest mortality in this lower portion of the Columbia River estuary, with only an estimated 60% of the tagged fish surviving to the mouth of the river. In contrast, yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts survived to the mouth of the river at higher rates, with estimated survival probabilities of 84% and 86%, respectively. The influence of route of passage at the lower three dams in the FCRPS on juvenile salmonid survival appeared to be relatively direct and immediate. Significant differences in estimated survival probabilities of juvenile salmonid smolts among groups with different dam passage experiences were often detected between the dams and rkm 153. In contrast, the influence of route of passage on survival to the mouth of the Columbia River was not apparent among the groups of tagged juvenile salmonids with different FCRPS passage experiences after they had already survived to a point about 80 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. Yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts that migrated through the lower estuary in off-channel habitats took two to three times longer to travel through these lower reaches and their estimated survival probabilities were not significantly different from that of their cohorts which migrated in or near the navigation channel. A large proportion of the tagged juvenile salmonids migrating in or near the navigation channel in the lower estuary crossed from the south side of the estuary near Astoria, Oregon and passed through relatively shallow expansive sand flats (Taylor Sands) to the North Channel along the Washington shore of the estuary. This migratory behavior may contribute to the avian predation losses observed on for fish (2 to 12% of fish in this study).

McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Skalski, John R.; Deters, Katherine A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Richard L.; Titzler, P. Scott; Hughes, Michael S.; Kim, Jin A.; Trott, Donna M.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Genetic and otolith isotopic markers identify salmon populations in the Columbia River at broad and fine geographic scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Priest Rapids Hatchery (PRH) 12. Hanford Reach (HAN) MethowColumbia River in the Hanford Reach area (Waknitz et al.except for adults sampled at Hanford Reach River drain the

Barnett-Johnson, Rachel; Teel, David J; Casillas, Edmundo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Managing hydroclimatic risks in federal rivers: a diagnostic assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...including flood plain forest death, salinization, thermal pollution, acidification, invasion of exotic species...character. 9 For example, in the Nile river basin, South Sudan, Sudan and Ethiopia are federal countries whose internal...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

US Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration US Army Corps of Engineers, North Pacific Division Columbia River System Operation Review Canadian Entitlement Allocation Extension Agreements Record of Decision; April 29, 1997  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Columbia River System Operation Review Columbia River System Operation Review Final Environmental Impact Statement Canadian Entitlement Allocation Extension Agreements Record of Decision Summary The Administrator and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), acting for BPA, and, as Chairman of the United States Entity (the Administrator and the Division Engineer, North Pacific Division of the United States Army Corps of Engineers), acting on behalf of the United States Entity, has decided to adopt for the Canadian Entitlement Allocation Extension Agreements (CEAEA) a federal hydroelectric projects allocation of 72.5 percent and a non-Federal hydroelectric projects allocation of 27.5 percent. The Columbia River Treaty (Treaty), ratified in 1964, required the construction of three

87

Columbia-Snake River Irrigators Association Eastern Oregon Irrigators Association  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to river flows, reservoir elevations and hydroelectric power production. Its results are currently being

88

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Laboratory Assessment of Potential Impacts to Dungeness Crabs from Disposal of Dredged Material from the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dredging of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about dredging-related impacts on Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) in the estuary, mouth of the estuary, and nearshore ocean areas adjacent to the Columbia River. The Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers engaged the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to review the state of knowledge and conduct studies concerning impacts on Dungeness crabs resulting from disposal during the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and annual maintenance dredging in the mouth of the Columbia River. The present study concerns potential effects on Dungeness crabs from dredged material disposal specific to the mouth of the Columbia River.

Vavrinec, John; Pearson, Walter H.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, J. R.; Lee, Cheegwan; Hall, Kathleen D.; Romano, Brett A.; Miller, Martin C.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

90

Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River - 13603  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In south-central Washington State, the Columbia River flows through the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. A primary objective of the Hanford Site cleanup mission is protection of the Columbia River, through remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater that resulted from its weapons production mission. Within the Columbia River system, surface water, sediment, and biota samples related to potential Hanford Site hazardous substance releases have been collected since the start of Hanford operations. The impacts from release of Hanford Site radioactive substances to the Columbia River in areas upstream, within, and downstream of the Hanford Site boundary have been previously investigated as mandated by the U.S. Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act. The Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River [1] was issued in 2008 to initiate assessment of the impacts under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 [2]. The work plan established a phased approach to characterize contaminants, assess current risks, and determine whether or not there is a need for any cleanup actions. Field investigation activities over a 120-mile stretch of the Columbia River began in October 2008 and were completed in 2010. Sampled media included surface water, pore water, surface and core sediment, island soil, and fish (carp, walleye, whitefish, sucker, small-mouth bass, and sturgeon). Information and sample results from the field investigation were used to characterize current conditions within the Columbia River and assess whether current conditions posed a risk to ecological or human receptors that would merit additional study or response actions under CERCLA. The human health and ecological risk assessments are documented in reports that were published in 2012 [3, 4]. Conclusions from the risk assessment reports are being summarized and integrated with remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) reports developed for upland areas, riparian areas, and groundwater in the Hanford Site River Corridor. The RI/FS reports will evaluate the impacts to soil, groundwater, and river sediments and lead to proposed cleanup actions and records of decision to address releases from the Hanford Site reactor operations. (authors)

Lerch, J.A.; Hulstrom, L.C. [Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Sands, J.P. [U.S Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [U.S Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

92

Columbia River Gorge Vegetation Management Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1162  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COLUMBIA COLUMBIA RIVER MANAGEMENT PR GORGE OJECT VEGETAT ON Final Environmental Assessment DO E/EA-l 162 BONNEVILLE row,. ..", ",,,,.,,0. W x ? -- -- ------ .- .-- b I . , (, I I I ( t ,1 ,0 , . ,' I , ,- , !" 1 , I I ,; ,, 1 1 I .1 . . COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE VEGETATION MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (Hanford-Ostrander and North BonnevilI&Midway Transmission Line Rights-of-Way) Table of Contents Page . 2 3 pqose and Need Background hbfic evolvement Swq ' ' Decbions to Be Made PROPOSED A~ON AND ~~RNA~S Mtemative k No Action " Manual, Mechnical, and Biological Metbh - Ntemative W. Proposed Action- htegrated Vegetation Management ~) tih Herbicides Herbici& Meth& -. PhedActions Comparison of Mtematives ~ . . . . . . ti~D E~OW~ ~ E_O_~m .. CONSEQ~N~S Affmd Environment . Environment Consquen~ hti Use Soils Vegetation Water Resources WildlfeResources Air Quali@lGlobal Warning

93

Particle resuspension in the Columbia River plume near field Emily Y. Spahn,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle resuspension in the Columbia River plume near field Emily Y. Spahn,1 Alexander R. Horner are used to investigate the mechanisms of sediment resuspension and entrainment into the plume. An east, the plume is much less stratified during low-discharge conditions, and large resuspension events

94

Protocols for Monitoring Habitat Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protocols for monitoring salmon habitat restoration projects are essential for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' environmental efforts in the Columbia River estuary. This manual provides state-of-the science data collection and analysis methods for landscape features, water quality, and fish species composition, among others.

Roegner, G. Curtis; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Johnson, Gary E.

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

95

Coastal Upwelling Supplies Oxygen-Depleted Water to the Columbia River Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extent and duration of exposure to low DO water. Strong upwelling during neap tides produced the largestCoastal Upwelling Supplies Oxygen-Depleted Water to the Columbia River Estuary G. Curtis Roegner1 States of America Abstract Low dissolved oxygen (DO) is a common feature of many estuarine and shallow-water

96

Supplemental Groundwater Remediation Technologies to Protect the Columbia River at the Hanford Site, Washington - An Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an update on supplemental groundwater remediation technologies to protect the Columbia River at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Major groundwater contaminants at the Hanford Site are described, along with the technologies and remedial activities that will address these environmental challenges.

Thompson, K. M.; Rowley, R. B.; Petersen, Scott W.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ocean conditions and Columbia River salmon Testimony provided for the House Subcommittee on Power and Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean conditions and Columbia River salmon Testimony provided for the House Subcommittee on Power Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Oceans/School of Marine Affairs Climate Impacts Group Box controlling salmon marine survival in the Pacific Northwest, several ocean-climate events have been linked

Mantua, Nathan

98

Ocean and Plume Science Workshop Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Plume Science Workshop Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program February 14, 2013 8:30am ­ 4pm Northwest Power and Conservation Council #12;Workshop Objectives Prepare for the upcoming current Program language Indentify Fish and Wildlife Program priorities for ocean, plume and estuary

99

Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected by Hydropower Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Hydropower Production Total Dissolved Gas Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation often occurs during periods of high runoff and spill at hydropower projects and can be harmful to fish. Supersaturation occurs of hydropower projects on Columbia River water temperature has been to delay the time when thermal maximums

100

Stream periphyton and coal mining: Comparative Effects in the Elk Flathead Rivers of Southeastern British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream periphyton and coal mining: Comparative Effects in the Elk Flathead Rivers of Southeastern British Columbia Jessica Thompson and F.R. Hauer Coal mining can have a variety of effects on surrounding nutrients into surrounding streams. We examined the potential effects of coal mining by comparing adjacent

Renn, Susan C.P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Review of Monitoring Plans for Gas Bubble Disease Signs and Gas Supersaturation Levels on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Montgomery Watson was retained by the Bonneville Power Administration to evaluate the monitoring program for gas bubble disease signs and dissolved gas supersaturation levels on the Columbia and Snake rivers. The results of this evaluation will provide the basis for improving protocols and procedures for future monitoring efforts. Key study team members were Dr. John Colt, Dr. Larry Fidler, and Dr. Ralph Elston. On the week of June 6 through 10, 1994 the study team visited eight monitoring sites (smolt, adult, and resident fish) on the Columbia and Snake rivers. Additional protocol evaluations were conducted at the Willard Field Station (National Biological Survey) and Pacific Northwest Laboratories at Richland (Battelle). On June 13 and 14, 1994, the study team visited the North Pacific Division office of the U.S. Corps of Engineers and the Fish Passage Center to collect additional information and data on the monitoring programs. Considering the speed at which the Gas Bubble Trauma Monitoring Program was implemented this year, the Fish Passage Center and cooperating Federal, State, and Tribal Agencies have been doing an incredible job. Thirty-one specific recommendations are presented in this report and are summarized in Section 14.

Fidler, Larry; Elston, Ralph; Colt, John

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Stock Assessment of Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids : Final Report, Volume I, Chinook, Coho, Chum and Sockeye Salmon Summaries.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose was to identify and characterize the wild and hatchery stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River Basin on the basis of currently available information. This report provides a comprehensive compilation of data on the status and life histories of Columbia Basin salmonid stocks.

Howell, Philip J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Savannah River Site Federal Facility Agreement, January 15, 1993 Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Site Agreement Name Savannah River Site Federal Facility Agreement Under Section 120 of CERCLA, January 15, 1993 State South Carolina Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Scope Summary Ensure that the environmental impacts associated with past and present activities at the Savannah River Site are thoroughly investigated and that appropriate response actions are taken to protect the public health, welfare, and the environment. Parties DOE; US EPA; South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Date 1/15/1993 SCOPE * Ensure that the environmental impacts associated with past and present activities at the Savannah River Site are thoroughly investigated and that appropriate response actions are taken to protect the public health, welfare, and the environment.

104

Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

References for radioactive releases to the Columbia River from Hanford Operations, 1944--1957  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search was made for published documents related to discharges of radioactive material from Hanford Site facilities to the Columbia River from 1944--1957. The purpose was to list documents that contain data that might be useful in developing a source term for waterborne releases. Source term development work will take place in FY 1992, and FY 1993. This tabulation of published summaries of release data shows the type of measurements that were being made from 1944--1957 and the magnitude of discharges to the Columbia River. In the early years, very little data were collected that related to specific radionuclides. However, most of the key radionuclides were known to be present in effluents from occasional specific radionuclide analyses.

Hall, R.B.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study reported herein was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), University of Washington (UW), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The goal of the study was to evaluate the ecological benefits of restoration actions for juvenile salmon in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; rkm 0–234).

Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Jeff; Skalski, J. R.; Teel, D. J.; Brewer, Taylor; Bryson, Amanda J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Kuligowski, D. R.; Whitesel, T.; Mallette, Christine

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Climate-change scenario for the Columbia River basin. Forest Service research paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work describes the method used to generate a climate-change scenario for the Columbia River basin. The scenario considers climate patterns that may change if the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2), or its greenhouse gas equivalent, were to double over pre-Industrial Revolution values. A composite approach was taken to generate a climate scenario that considers knowledge of current regional climate controls, available output from general circulation and regional climate models, and observed changes in climate.

Ferguson, S.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Factors affecting stranding of juvenile salmonids by wakes from ship passage in the Lower Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of deep-draft vessel traffic in confined riverine channels on shorelines and fish are of widespread concern. In the Pacific Northwest of the United States, wakes and subsequent beach run-up from ships transiting the Lower Columbia River have been observed to strand juvenile salmon and other fish. As part of a before-and-after study to assess stranding effects that may be associated with channel deepening, we measured 19 co-variables from observations of 126 vessel passages at three low-slope beaches and used multiple logistic regression to discern the significant factors influencing the frequency of stranding. Subyearling Chinook salmon were 82% of the fish stranded over all sites and seasons. Given a low-slope beach, stranding frequencies for juvenile salmon were significantly related to river location, salmon density in the shallows, a proxy for ship kinetic energy, tidal height, and two interactions. The beach types selected for our study do not include all the beach types along the Lower Columbia River so that the stranding probabilities described here cannot be extrapolated river-wide. A more sophisticated modeling effort, informed by additional field data, is needed to assess salmon losses by stranding for the entire lower river. Such modeling needs to include river-scale factors such as beach type, berms, proximity to navigation channel, and perhaps, proximity to tributaries that act as sources of out-migrating juvenile salmon. At both river and beach scales, no one factor produces stranding; rather interactions among several conditions produce a stranding event and give stranding its episodic nature.

Pearson, Walter H.; Skalski, John R.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Screening assessment and requirements for a comprehensive assessment: Volume 1, Draft. Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the impact to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site-derived contaminants, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology initiated a study referred to as the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). To address concerns about the scope and direction of CRCIA as well as enhance regulator, tribal, stockholder, and public involvement, the CRCIA Management Team was formed in August 1995. The Team agreed to conduct CRCIA using a phased approach. The initial phase, includes two components: 1) a screening assessment to evaluate the potential impact to the river, resulting from current levels of Hanford-derived contaminants in order to support decisions on Interim Remedial Measures, and 2) a definition of the essential work remaining to provide an acceptable comprehensive river impact assessment. The screening assessment is described in Part I of this report. The essential work remaining is Part II of this report. The objective of the screening assessment is to identify areas where the greatest potential exists for adverse effects on humans or the environment. Part I of this report discusses the scope, technical approach, and results of the screening assessment. Part II defines a new paradigm for predecisional participation by those affected by Hanford cleanup decisions.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Of Willamette River Basin Dams Volume Nine, Number Four Fall 2010 (Continued on page 2) Notes From the Chair Columbia River Treaty Deadline Approaches 3 4 5 8 11 WHAT'S INSIDE he state of Oregon and the Bonneville Program. Under terms of the agreement, Bonneville will provide funding through 2025 for the state

111

A model study of tide-and wind-induced mixing in the Columbia River Estuary and plume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model study of tide- and wind-induced mixing in the Columbia River Estuary and plume Parker Mac Article history: Received 5 April 2007 Received in revised form 30 January 2008 Accepted 10 March 2008 Keywords: Mathematical models River plumes Estuarine dynamics Energy budget a b s t r a c t A numerical

Hickey, Barbara

112

Response of winter birds to soil remediation along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River at the Hanford Site, located in south-central Washington State, USA, is a regionally important refugium for overwintering birds. Some of the river shoreline has been designated by the U.S. Department of Energy for environmental clean-up following past production of materials for nuclear weapons. We evaluated the effects of soil remediation on winter birds at six inactive nuclear reactor areas. Remediation activities consisted of daily excavation and removal of approximately 1,035 t of contaminated soil from previously herbicided and denuded areas located between 30 m and 400 m and mostly in line-of-sight of the river shoreline. Remediation activities had no apparent effect on numbers of riverine or terrestrial birds using adjacent undisturbed shoreline and riparian habitat.

Becker, James M.; McKinstry, Craig A.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Daily/Hourly Hydrosystem Operation : How the Columbia River System Responds to Short-Term Needs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Operation Review, being conducted by the Bonneville Power Administration, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the US Bureau of Reclamation, is analyzing current and potential future operations of the Columbia River System. One goal of the System Operations Review is to develop a new System Operation Strategy. The strategy will be designed to balance the many regionally and nationally important uses of the Columbia River system. Short-term operations address the dynamics that affect the Northwest hydro system and its multiple uses. Demands for electrical power and natural streamflows change constantly and thus are not precisely predictable. Other uses of the hydro system have constantly changing needs, too, many of which can interfere with other uses. Project operators must address various river needs, physical limitations, weather, and streamflow conditions while maintaining the stability of the electric system and keeping your lights on. It takes staffing around the clock to manage the hour-to-hour changes that occur and the challenges that face project operators all the time.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix C: Anadromous Fish and Juvenile Fish Transportation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Developing a broader scientific foundation for river restoration: Columbia River food webs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Northwest Indian Tribes while meeting fundamental needs for improved...always as effective in meeting stated goals and objectives...reports, conducting public briefings, and receiving...web structure in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia...Northwest Indian Tribes while meeting fundamental needs for...

Robert J. Naiman; J. Richard Alldredge; David A. Beauchamp; Peter A. Bisson; James Congleton; Charles J. Henny; Nancy Huntly; Roland Lamberson; Colin Levings; Erik N. Merrill; William G. Pearcy; Bruce E. Rieman; Gregory T. Ruggerone; Dennis Scarnecchia; Peter E. Smouse; Chris C. Wood

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Lower Columbia River Salmon Business Plan for Terminal Fisheries : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salmon fishing in the Northwest requires a public-private partnership. The public through its decision-makers, agencies, and laws states it will do all that is necessary to protect and preserve the valuable salmon resource. Yet, the public side of the partnership is broken. The Columbia River salmon fishing industry, with over 140 years of documented history, is at a crossroads. This report explores a variety of issues, concerns, and ideas related to terminal fishery development. In some cases recommendations are made. In addition, options are explored with an understanding that those designated as decision-makers must make decisions following considerable discussion and reflection.

Salmon For All

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary in 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study reported herein was funded as part of the Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program, which is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program study code is EST P 02 01: A Study of Salmonid Survival and Behavior through the Columbia River Estuary Using Acoustic Tags. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries for the USACE Portland District. Estimated survival of acoustic-tagged juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead through the lower Columbia River and estuary in 2009 was lowest in the final 50 km of the estuary. Probability of survival was relatively high (>0.90) for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon from the Bonneville Dam forebay (rkm 236) to Three-tree Point (rkm 49.6). Survival of juvenile Chinook salmon declined sharply through the lower 50 km of the estuary. Acoustic-tagged steelhead smolts did not survive as well as juvenile Chinook salmon between Bonneville Dam and the mouth of the Columbia River. Steelhead survival began to decline farther upstream (at rkm 86) relative to that of the Chinook salmon stocks. Subyearling Chinook salmon survival decreased markedly as the season progressed. It remains to be determined whether later migrating subyearling Chinook salmon are suffering increasing mortality as the season progresses or whether some portion of the apparent loss is due to fish extending their freshwater residence. This study provided the first glimpse into what promises to be a very informative way to learn more about how juvenile salmonid passage experiences through the FCRPS may influence their subsequent survival after passing Bonneville Dam. New information regarding the influence of migration pathway through the lower 50 km of the Columbia River estuary on probability of survival of juvenile salmonids, combined with increased understanding regarding the foraging distances and time periods of avian predators should prove useful in developing or assessing management actions to reduce losses of juvenile salmonid smolts that attempt to pass through the estuary on their seaward migration.

McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.; Carter, Jessica A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Hughes, Michael S.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Technical Appendix for Development for Modified Streamflows 1928-1989 : Columbia River & Coastal Basin.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report ``Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989`` contains listings of historical flows for the sites in the Columbia River and Coastal Basins. This section of the Technical Appendix provides for the site specific procedures used to determine those historical flows. The study purpose, authority, and definitions are given in the main report. The purpose of this section of the Technical Appendix is to document the computational procedures used at each of the project sites to develop historical flows for the period July 1928--September 1989.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; A.G. Crook Company

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Immobilization of U(VI) from Oxic Groundwater by Hanford 300 Area Sediments and Effects of Columbia River Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regions within the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300 A) site experience periodic hydrologic influences from the nearby Columbia River as a result of changing river stage, which causes changes in groundwater elevation, flow direction and water chemistry. An important question is the extent to which the mixing of Columbia River water and groundwater impacts the speciation and mobility of uranium (U). In this study, we designed experiments to mimic interactions among U, oxic groundwater or Columbia River water, and 300 A sediments in the subsurface environment of Hanford 300 A. The goals were to investigate mechanisms of: 1) U immobilization in 300 A sediments under bulk oxic conditions and 2) U remobilization from U-immobilized 300 A sediments exposed to oxic Columbia River water. Initially, 300 A sediments in column reactors were fed with U(VI)-containing oxic 1) synthetic groundwater (SGW), 2) organic-amended SGW (OA-SGW), and 3) de-ionized (DI) water to investigate U immobilization processes. After that, the sediments were exposed to oxic Columbia River water for U remobilization studies. The results reveal that U was immobilized by 300 A sediments predominantly through reduction (80-85%) when the column reactor was fed with oxic OA-SGW. However, U was immobilized by 300 A sediments through adsorption (100%) when the column reactors were fed with oxic SGW or DI water. The reduced U in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW was relatively resistant to remobilization by oxic Columbia River water. Oxic Columbia River water resulted in U remobilization (?7%) through desorption, and most of the U that remained in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW (?93%) was in the form of uraninite nanoparticles. These results reveal that: 1) the reductive immobilization of U through OA-SGW stimulation of indigenous 300 A sediment microorganisms may be viable in the relatively oxic Hanford 300 A subsurface environments and 2) with the intrusion of Columbia River water, desorption may be the primary process resulting in U remobilization from OA-SGW-stimulated 300 A sediments at the subsurface of the Hanford 300 A site.

Ahmed, B.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1993.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery efforts for the endangered fall chinook salmon necessitates knowledge of the factors limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which affect spawning of the fish in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing seward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs. The spawning was generally a November event in 1993, with some activity in late Oct. and early Dec. Spawning habitat availability was assessed by applying hydraulic and habitat models to known fall chinook salmon spawning sites. Juveniles were seined and PIT tagged in the free-flowing Snake River, and in the Columbia River in he Hanford Reach and in McNary Reservoir. Subyearling fish were marked at McNary Dam to relate river flow and migration patterns of juveniles to adult returns. Hydroacoustic surveys were conducted on McNary and John Day reservoirs and in net pens.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Dissolved and particulate aluminum in the Columbia River and coastal waters of Oregon and Washington: behavior in near-field and far-field plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Dissolved and particulate aluminum in the Columbia River and coastal waters of Oregon) and particulate (leachable and total) aluminum was examined in the Columbia River and estuary, in near Influence on Shelf Ecosystems (RISE) cruise of May/June 2006. Dissolved and particulate aluminum (Al

Hickey, Barbara

123

Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

124

White Sturgeon Mitgation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2003 through March 2004 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Rein, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effects of Marine Mammals on Columbia River Salmon Listed under the Endangered Species Act : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 3 of 11.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most research on the Columbia and Snake Rivers in recent years has been directed to downstream migrant salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) losses at dams. Comparatively little attentions has been given to adult losses. Recently an estimated 378,4000 adult salmon and steelhead (O. mykiss) were unaccounted-for from Bonneville Dam to terminal areas upstream. It is now apparent that some of this loss was due to delayed mortality from wounded by marine mammals. This report reviews the recent literature to define predatory effects of marine mammals on Columbia River salmon.

Park, Donn L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Developing a broader scientific foundation for river restoration: Columbia River food webs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...838 . 32 Malison RL Baxter CV ( 2010 ) The fire pulse: Wildfire stimulates flux of aquatic prey to terrestrial habitats driving...2003 ) A conservation plan for native fishes of the lower Colorado River . Bioscience 53 : 219 – 233 . 45 Fausch KD ( 2009...

Robert J. Naiman; J. Richard Alldredge; David A. Beauchamp; Peter A. Bisson; James Congleton; Charles J. Henny; Nancy Huntly; Roland Lamberson; Colin Levings; Erik N. Merrill; William G. Pearcy; Bruce E. Rieman; Gregory T. Ruggerone; Dennis Scarnecchia; Peter E. Smouse; Chris C. Wood

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.

Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Blaine, Jennifer; Kuligowski, D. R.; Kropp, Roy K.; Dawley, Earl M.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the Columbia River Gorge : Annual Report 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We summarized existing knowledge regarding the known distribution of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) across four sub-basins in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington. The Wind River, Little White Salmon River, White Salmon River, and the Klickitat River sub-basins were analyzed. Cold water is essential to the survival, spawning, and rearing of bull trout. We analyzed existing temperature data, installed Onset temperature loggers in the areas of the four sub-basins where data was not available, and determined that mean daily water temperatures were <15 C and appropriate for spawning and rearing of bull trout. We snorkel surveyed more than 74 km (46.25 mi.) of rivers and streams in the four sub-basins (13.8 km at night and 60.2 km during the day) and found that night snorkeling was superior to day snorkeling for locating bull trout. Surveys incorporated the Draft Interim Protocol for Determining Bull Trout Presence (Peterson et al. In Press). However, due to access and safety issues, we were unable to randomly select sample sites nor use block nets as recommended. Additionally, we also implemented the Bull Trout/Dolly Varden sampling methodology described in Bonar et al. (1997). No bull trout were found in the Wind River, Little White Salmon, or White Salmon River sub-basins. We found bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat drainage of the Klickitat River Sub-basin. Bull trout averaged 6.7 fish/100m{sup 2} in Trappers Creek, 2.6 fish/100m{sup 2} on Clearwater Creek, and 0.4 fish/100m{sup 2} in Little Muddy Creek. Bull trout was the only species of salmonid encountered in Trappers Creek and dominated in Clearwater Creek. Little Muddy Creek was the only creek where bull trout and introduced brook trout occurred together. We found bull trout only at night and typically in low flow regimes. A single fish, believed to be a bull trout x brook trout hybrid, was observed in the Little Muddy Creek. Additional surveys are needed in the West Fork Klickitat and mainstem Klickitat to determine the distribution of bull trout throughout the drainage and to determine the extent of hybridization with brook trout.

Byrne, Jim; McPeak, Ron

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Population Estimates for Chum Salmon Spawning in the Mainstem Columbia River, 2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate and precise population estimates of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) spawning in the mainstem Columbia River are needed to provide a basis for informed water allocation decisions, to determine the status of chum salmon listed under the Endangered Species Act, and to evaluate the contribution of the Duncan Creek re-introduction program to mainstem spawners. Currently, mark-recapture experiments using the Jolly-Seber model provide the only framework for this type of estimation. In 2002, a study was initiated to estimate mainstem Columbia River chum salmon populations using seining data collected while capturing broodstock as part of the Duncan Creek re-introduction. The five assumptions of the Jolly-Seber model were examined using hypothesis testing within a statistical framework, including goodness of fit tests and secondary experiments. We used POPAN 6, an integrated computer system for the analysis of capture-recapture data, to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of standard model parameters, derived estimates, and their precision. A more parsimonious final model was selected using Akaike Information Criteria. Final chum salmon escapement estimates and (standard error) from seining data for the Ives Island, Multnomah, and I-205 sites are 3,179 (150), 1,269 (216), and 3,468 (180), respectively. The Ives Island estimate is likely lower than the total escapement because only the largest two of four spawning sites were sampled. The accuracy and precision of these estimates would improve if seining was conducted twice per week instead of weekly, and by incorporating carcass recoveries into the analysis. Population estimates derived from seining mark-recapture data were compared to those obtained using the current mainstem Columbia River salmon escapement methodologies. The Jolly-Seber population estimate from carcass tagging in the Ives Island area was 4,232 adults with a standard error of 79. This population estimate appears reasonable and precise but batch marks and lack of secondary studies made it difficult to test Jolly-Seber assumptions, necessary for unbiased estimates. We recommend that individual tags be applied to carcasses to provide a statistical basis for goodness of fit tests and ultimately model selection. Secondary or double marks should be applied to assess tag loss and male and female chum salmon carcasses should be enumerated separately. Carcass tagging population estimates at the two other sites were biased low due to limited sampling. The Area-Under-the-Curve escapement estimates at all three sites were 36% to 76% of Jolly-Seber estimates. Area-Under-the Curve estimates are likely biased low because previous assumptions that observer efficiency is 100% and residence time is 10 days proved incorrect. If managers continue to rely on Area-Under-the-Curve to estimate mainstem Columbia River spawners, a methodology is provided to develop annual estimates of observer efficiency and residence time, and to incorporate uncertainty into the Area-Under-the-Curve escapement estimate.

Rawding, Dan; Hillson, Todd D. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

DOE/EA-1374-SA-01: Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids In the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (March 2002)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration DATE: March 21, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Avian Predation On Juvenile Salmonids In The Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-1374-SA-01) Bill Maslen Project Manager - KEWR-4 Proposed Action: Avian Predation On Juvenile Salmonids In The Lower Columbia River Research Project-Modifications to originial proposal. Project No.: 199702400 Location: Columbia and Snake Rivers Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and USGS-Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University. Introduction: The Bonneville Power Administration prepared a multi-year Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on this project in April of

133

Effects of Total Dissolved Gas on Chum Salmon Fry Incubating in the Lower Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 2007 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to characterize the effects of total dissolved gas (TDG) on the incubating fry of chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) in the lower Columbia River. The tasks conducted and results obtained in pursuit of three objectives are summarized: * to conduct a field monitoring program at the Ives Island and Multnomah Falls study sites, collecting empirical data on TDG to obtain a more thorough understanding of TDG levels during different river stage scenarios (i.e., high-water year versus low-water year) * to conduct laboratory toxicity tests on hatchery chum salmon fry at gas levels likely to occur downstream from Bonneville Dam * to sample chum salmon sac fry during Bonneville Dam spill operations to determine if there is a physiological response to TDG levels. Chapter 1 discusses the field monitoring, Chapter 2 reports the findings of the laboratory toxicity tests, and Chapter 3 describes the field-sampling task. Each chapter contains an objective-specific introduction, description of the study site and methods, results of research, and discussion of findings. Literature cited throughout this report is listed in Chapter 4. Additional details on the study methdology and results are provided in Appendixes A through D.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Hand, Kristine D.; Geist, David R.; Murray, Katherine J.; Panther, Jenny; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Dawley, Earl M.; Elston, Ralph A.

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia River Gorge. Photo: C. Bruce Forster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia and wildlife recovery. At a conceptual level, the Act aimed for a power system that would meet energy demands pressure off Columbia River fish and wildlife. For the power system, moving ahead would require modified

135

Radionuclides, Trace Metals, and Organic Compounds in Shells of Native Freshwater Mussels Along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River: 6000 Years Before Present to Current Times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents concentrations of radionuclides, trace metals, and semivolatile organic compounds measured in shell samples of the western pearl shell mussel collected along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River.

B. L. Tiller; T. E. Marceau

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

136

Re-Introduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River chum as threatened under the auspices of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March of 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than half a million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present day spawners. Harvest, loss of habitat, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for the decline of Columbia River chum salmon. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Currently, only two main populations are recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning has been documented in most lower Columbia River tributaries. The first is located in the Grays River (RKm 34) (Grays population), a tributary of the Columbia, and the second is a group of spawners that utilize the Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks (Lower Gorge population). A possible third population of mainstem spawners, found in the fall of 1999, were located spawning above the I-205 bridge (approximately RKm 182), this aggregation is referred to as the Woods Landing/Rivershore population or the I-205 group. The recovery strategy for Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum as outlined in Hatchery Genetic Management Plans (HGMP) has three main tasks. First, determine if remnant populations of LCR chum salmon exist in LCR tributaries. Second, if such populations exist, develop stock-specific recovery plans involving habitat restoration including the creation of spawning refugias, supplementation if necessary and a habitat and fish monitoring and evaluation plan. If chum have been extirpated from previously utilized streams, develop re-introduction plans that utilize appropriate genetic donor stock(s) of LCR chum salmon and integrate habitat improvement and fry-to-adult survival evaluations. Third, reduce extinction risks to the Grays River chum salmon population by randomly capturing adults in the basin for use in a supplementation program and reintroduction into the Chinook River basin. The Duncan Creek project was developed using the same recovery strategy implemented for LCR chum. Biologists with the WDFW and Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) identified Duncan Creek as an ideal upriver location below Bonneville Dam for chum re-introduction. It has several attributes that make it a viable location for a re-introduction project: historically chum salmon were present, the creek is low gradient, has numerous springs/seeps, has a low potential for future development and is located close to a donor population of Lower Gorge chum. The Duncan Creek project has two goals: (1) re-introduction of chum into Duncan Creek by providing off channel high-quality spawning and incubation areas, and (2) to simultaneously evaluate natural recolonization and a supplementation strategy where adults are collected and spawned artificially at a hatchery. For supplementation, eggs are incubated and the fry reared at the Washougal Hatchery to be released back into Duncan Creek. The tasks associated with re-establishing a naturally self-sustaining population include: (1) removing mud, sand and organics present in four of the creek branches and replace with gravels expected to provide maximum egg-to-fry survival rates to a depth of at least two feet; (2) armoring the sides of these channels to reduce importation of sediment by fish spawning on the margins; (3) planting native vegetation adjacent to the channels to stabilize the banks, trap silt and provide shade; (4) annual sampling of gravel in the spawning channels to detect cha

Hillson, Todd D. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-1374-SA-03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 29, 2004 March 29, 2004 In reply refer to: KEC-4 To: People Interested in the Project to Conduct Research on Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Background: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on this project in April of 2001. The project involves multi- year research begun in 1996 on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and glaucous-winged gulls. The activities examined in the EA focused on measuring the salmonid smolt consumption rate of tern, cormorant, and gull populations in the lower Columbia River. Additionally, this project measured the impacts of this research on brown pelicans roosting in the area. Action: In 2002 and 2003, BPA prepared modifications to the original proposal in a Supplement

139

A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2000 through March 2001 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report D), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Oregon State University (OSU; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 2000 through March 2001 are listed.

Kern, J. Chris; Ward, David L.; Farr, Ruth A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Columbia River Coordinated Information System (CIS); Data Catalog, 1992 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River Coordinated Information system (CIS) Project started in 1989 to address regional data sharing. Coordinated exchange and dissemination of any data must begin with dissemination of information about those data, such as: what is available; where the data are stored; what form they exist in; who to contact for further information or access to these data. In Phase II of this Project (1991), a Data Catalog describing the contents of regional datasets and less formal data collections useful for system monitoring and evaluation projects was built to improve awareness of their existence. Formal datasets are described in a `Dataset Directory,` while collections of data are Used to those that collect such information in the `Data Item Directory.` The Data Catalog will serve regional workers as a useful reference which centralizes the institutional knowledge of many data contacts into a single source. Recommendations for improvement of the Catalog during Phase III of this Project include addressing gaps in coverage, establishing an annual maintenance schedule, and loading the contents into a PC-based electronic database for easier searching and cross-referencing.

O'Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fisheries, Olympia, WA); Allen, Stan; Reece, Doug (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Sluiceway Operations to Pass Juvenile Salmonids at The Dalles Dam, Columbia River, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing ice and trash sluiceways are commonly used to pass juvenile salmonids downstream at hydropower dams through a benign, non-turbine route. At The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River, managers undertook optimizing operations of sluiceway weirs to maximize survival of juvenile salmonids at the powerhouse. We applied fixed-location hydroacoustic methods to compare fish passage rates and sluiceway efficiencies for two weir configurations during 2004 and 2005: three weirs versus six weirs, located at the mid- versus east powerhouse, respectively. We also analyzed horizontal distributions of passage at the sluiceway and turbines and the effects of operating turbines beneath open sluiceway gates to provide supporting data relevant to operations optimization. Based on the findings, we recommend the following for long-term operations for the sluiceway at The Dalles Dam: open six rather than three sluiceway weirs to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway; open the three weirs above the western-most operating main turbine unit (MU) and the three weirs at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high; operate the turbine units below open sluiceway weirs as a standard procedure; operate the sluiceway 24 h/d year-round to maximize its benefits to juvenile salmonids; and use the same operations for spring and summer emigrants. These operational concepts are transferable to dams where sluiceway surface flow outlets are used protect downstream migrating fishes.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Skalski, J. R.; Klatte, Bernard A.

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

143

Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled “Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary.” The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as “Salmonid Benefits,” was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Emergency Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public Service  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public Emergency Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public Service Commission Emergency Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No. EO-05-01: Pursuant to Sections 202(c), 207 and 309 of the Federal Power Act ("FPA"), 16 U.S.C. §§ 824a(c), 824f and 825h, the District of Columbia Public Service Commission ("DCPSC") hereby submits this Emergency Petition and Complaint to avert the impending shutdown of the Potomac River Generating Station power plant ("Potomac River Plant" or "Plant") owned and operated by Mirant Corporation and its public utility subsidiaries (collectively, "Mirant") in Alexandria, Virginia. Emergency Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public Service

145

EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of DOE's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of a coho salmon restoration program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to help mitigate impacts to fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Proposed Action would involve building a new, small, in-basin adult holding/spawning, incubation and rearing facility on the Wenatchee River at one of two potential sites; and constructing and improving several sites in both the Wenatchee and Methow river basins in north central Washington State.

146

EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

25: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington 25: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of DOE's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of a coho salmon restoration program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to help mitigate impacts to fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Proposed Action would involve building a new, small, in-basin adult holding/spawning, incubation and rearing facility on the Wenatchee River at one of two potential sites; and constructing and improving several sites in both the Wenatchee and Methow river basins in north central Washington State.

147

Quality and Behavior of Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary and Nearshore Ocean and Effects of the Ocean Environment on the Survival of Columbia River Juvenile Salmonids, 1989-1994 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to this limited understanding of the factors responsible for the continuing decline of spring chinook salmon in the Columbia River, this research plan was developed. The overall goal of the proposed research is to investigate and identify relationships among smolt quality (measured in the hatchery and after recovery in the estuary and nearshore ocean), environmental conditions in the estuary and nearshore ocean during smolt migration, and long-term survival (as measured by adult returns to the hatchery of origin and contributions to the recreational, commercial, and tribal fisheries). 16 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Francis, R.C.; Schiewe, Michael H.; Fisher, J.P.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Redd Site Selection and Spawning Habitat Use by Fall Chinook Salmon, Hanford Reach, Columbia River : Final Report 1995 - 1998.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1995 through 1998 on identifying the spawning habitat requirements of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The project investigated whether traditional spawning habitat models could be improved in order to make better predictions of available habitat for fall chinook salmon in the Snake River. Results suggest models could be improved if they used spawning area-specific, rather than river-specific, spawning characteristics; incorporated hyporheic discharge measurements; and gave further consideration to the geomorphic features that are present in the unconstrained segments of large alluvial rivers. Ultimately the recovery of endangered fall chinook salmon will depend on how well we are able to recreate the characteristics once common in alluvial floodplains of large rivers. The results from this research can be used to better define the relationship between these physical habitat characteristics and fall chinook salmon spawning site selection, and provide more efficient use of limited recovery resources. This report is divided into four chapters which were presented in the author's doctoral dissertation which he completed through the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. Each of the chapters has been published in peer reviewed journals or is currently under review. Chapter one is a conceptual spawning habitat model that describes how geomorphic features of river channels create hydraulic processes, including hyporheic flows, that influence where salmon spawn in unconstrained reaches of large mainstem alluvial rivers. Chapter two describes the comparison of the physical factors associated with fall chinook salmon redd clusters located at two sites within the Reach. Spatial point pattern analysis of redds showed that redd clusters averaged approximately 10 hectares in area and their locations were consistent from year to year. The tendency to spawn in clusters suggests fall chinook salmon's use of spawning habitat is highly selective. Hydraulic characteristics of the redd clusters were significantly different than the habitat surrounding them. Velocity and lateral slope of the river bottom were the most important habitat variables in predicting redd site selection. While these variables explained a large proportion of the variance in redd site selection (86 to 96%), some unmeasured factors still accounted for a small percentage of actual spawning site selection. Chapter three describes the results from an investigation into the hyporheic characteristics of the two spawning areas studied in chapter two. This investigation showed that the magnitude and chemical characteristics of hyporheic discharge were different between and within two spawning areas. Apparently, fall chinook salmon used chemical and physical cues from the discharge to locate spawning areas. Finally, chapter four describes a unique method that was developed to install piezometers into the cobble bed of the Columbia River.

Geist, David R.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists requested data analysis to determine the project hydraulic extent based on the following criteria: 1) For areas where the mean velocities are less than 4 ft/s, the water velocity differences between operations are not greater than 0.5 ft/sec and /or the differences in water flow direction are not greater than 10 degrees, 2) If mean water velocity is 4.0 ft/second or greater the boundary is determined using the differences in water flow direction (i.e., not greater than 10 degrees). Based on these criteria, and excluding areas with a mean velocity of less than 0.1 ft/s (within the error of the model), a final set of graphics were developed that included data from all flows and all operations. Although each hydroelectric project has a different physical setting, there were some common results. The downstream hydraulic extent tended to be greater than the hydraulic extent in the forebay. The hydraulic extent of the projects tended to be larger at the mid-range flows. At higher flows, the channel geometry tends to reduce the impact of project operations.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

DOE/EA-1374-SA-05: Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (03/20/06)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0, 2006 0, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-1374-SA-05) Dorie Welch - KEWU-4 Project Manager Proposed Action: Avian Predation On Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project - Modifications to Original Proposal Project No: 1997-02-400 Location: Columbia and Snake Rivers Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), USGS-Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University, and U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. Introduction: The Bonneville Power Administration prepared a multi-year Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on this project in April of 2001

152

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; Annual Progress Report, April 2007 - March 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2007 through March 2008 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report C), and Montana State University (MSU; Report D). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Mallette, Christine [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

Recommendations to the Technical Steering Panel regarding approach for estimating individual radiation doses resulting from releases of radionuclides to the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the direction of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle staff have reviewed and analyzed available data regarding possible historical radiation doses to individuals resulting from radionuclide releases to the Columbia River. The objective of this review was to recommend to the TSP the spatial and temporal scope and level of effort on Columbia River work to most effectively extend work performed in Phase I of the project (PNL 1991a, PNL 1991b) to meet the project objectives. A number of options were analyzed. Four stretches of the Columbia River and adjacent Pacific coastal waters were defined and investigated for four time periods. Radiation doses arising from ten potentially major exposure pathways were evaluated for each of the time/location combinations, and several alternative methods were defined for estimating the doses from each pathway. Preliminary cost estimates were also developed for implementing dose estimation activities for each of the possible combinations.

Napier, B.A.; Brothers, A.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Recommendations to the Technical Steering Panel regarding approach for estimating individual radiation doses resulting from releases of radionuclides to the Columbia River. Volume 1, Recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the direction of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle staff have reviewed and analyzed available data regarding possible historical radiation doses to individuals resulting from radionuclide releases to the Columbia River. The objective of this review was to recommend to the TSP the spatial and temporal scope and level of effort on Columbia River work to most effectively extend work performed in Phase I of the project (PNL 1991a, PNL 1991b) to meet the project objectives. A number of options were analyzed. Four stretches of the Columbia River and adjacent Pacific coastal waters were defined and investigated for four time periods. Radiation doses arising from ten potentially major exposure pathways were evaluated for each of the time/location combinations, and several alternative methods were defined for estimating the doses from each pathway. Preliminary cost estimates were also developed for implementing dose estimation activities for each of the possible combinations.

Napier, B.A.; Brothers, A.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

SUPPLEMENTAL COLUMBIA RIVER PROTECTION ACTIVITIES AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE 2008 TECHNICAL REVIEW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in 2006, the US Department of Energy (DOE) supported nine applied research projects to improve the protection of the Columbia River and mitigate the impacts of Hanford Site groundwater. These projects were funded through a supplemental Congressional budget allocation, and are now in various stages of completion in accordance with the research plans. The DOE Office of Environmental Management Groundwater and Soil Cleanup Technologies (EM-22) sponsored a technical peer review meeting for these projects in Richland WA, July 28-31, 2008. The overall objective of the peer review is to provide information to support DOE decisions about the status and potential future application of the various technologies. The charge for the peer review panel was to develop recommendations for each of the nine 'technologies'. Team members for the July 2008 review were Brian Looney, Gene LeBoeuf, Dawn Kaback, Karen Skubal, Joe Rossabi, Paul Deutsch, and David Cocke. Previous project reviews were held in May 2007 and March-May of 2006. The team used the following four rating categories for projects: (a) Incorporate the technology/strategy in ongoing and future EM activities; (b) Finish existing scope of applied research and determine potential for EM activities when research program is finished; (c) Discontinue current development activities and do not incorporate technology/strategy into ongoing and future EM activities unless a significant and compelling change in potential viability is documented; and (d) Supplement original funded work to obtain the data needed to support a DOE decision to incorporate the technology into ongoing and future EM activities. The supplemental funding portfolio included two projects that addressed strontium, five projects that addressed chromium, one project that addressed uranium and one project that addressed carbon tetrachloride. The projects ranged from in situ treatment methods for immobilizing contaminants using chemical-based methods such as phosphate addition, to innovative surface treatment technologies such as electrocoagulation. Total funding for the nine projects was $9,900,000 in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and $2,000,000 in FY 2007. At the Richland meeting, the peer reviewers provided a generally neutral assessment of the projects and overall progress, and a generally positive assessment with regard to the principal investigators meeting their stated research objectives and performing the planned laboratory research and limited field work. Only one project, the Electrocoagulation Treatability Test, received a rating of 'discontinue' from the team because the project goals had not been met. Because this particular project has already ended, no action with respect to funding withdrawal is necessary. All other projects were recommended to be finished and/or incorporated into field efforts at Hanford. Specific technical comments and recommendations were provided by the team for each project.

Looney, B; Dawn S. Kaback, D; Eugene L. LeBoeuf, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Karen L. Skubal, K; David L. Cocke, D; Paul C. Deutsch, P

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

DOE/EA-1374: Environmental Assessment for the Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project (04/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Final Environmental Assessment Bonneville Power Administration April 2001 Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Final Environmental Assessment B o n n e v i l l e P o w e r A d m i n i s t r a t i o n i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION .....................................................................1 1.1 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Need for Action .................................................................................................................................................... 2 1.3 Purposes

157

MONITORING AND EVALUATION OF SMOLT MIGRATION IN THE COLUMBIA BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Environment, Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box 3621 Portland, OR 97208 Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime Prepared by: Richard Testing Framework for RPA Improvement as Stated in the 2000 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS

Washington at Seattle, University of

158

MONITORING AND EVALUATION OF SMOLT MIGRATION IN THE COLUMBIA BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Environment, Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box 3621 Portland, OR 97208 Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime Prepared by: Richard as Stated in the 2000 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion. Technical Report

Washington at Seattle, University of

159

Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

160

Factors Affecting the Survival of Upstream Migrant Adult Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 9 of 11.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is developing conservation planning documentation to support the National Marine Fisheries Service`s (NMFS) recovery plan for Columbia Basin salmonid stocks that are currently listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Information from the conservation planning documentation will be used as a partial scientific basis for identifying alternative conservation strategies and to make recommendations toward conserving, rebuilding, and ultimately removing these salmon stocks from the list of endangered species. This report describes the adult upstream survival study, a synthesis of biological analyses related to conditions affecting the survival of adult upstream migrant salmonids in the Columbia River system. The objective of the adult upstream survival study was to analyze existing data related to increasing the survival of adult migrant salmonids returning to the Snake River system. The fate and accountability of each stock during its upstream migration period and the uncertainties associated with measurements of escapement and survival were evaluated. Operational measures that affected the survival of adult salmon were evaluated including existing conditions, augmented flows from upstream storage release, and drawdown of mainstem reservoirs. The potential impacts and benefits of these measures to each ESA stock were, also described based on considerations of species behavior and run timing.

Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Managing hydroclimatic risks in federal rivers: a diagnostic assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Difficult hydrology in the Colorado, Ebro and Murray-Darling...Australia, Spain and the Western USA-are a distinct...storage (RS4). The Colorado and Murray-Darling...priority under the 1968 Colorado River Basin Project...the adaptability of western water compacts. Public...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Historic Habitat Opportunities and Food-Web Linkages of Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report of Research.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2002 with support from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), an interagency research team began investigating salmon life histories and habitat use in the lower Columbia River estuary to fill significant data gaps about the estuary's potential role in salmon decline and recovery . The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided additional funding in 2004 to reconstruct historical changes in estuarine habitat opportunities and food web linkages of Columbia River salmon (Onchorhynchus spp.). Together these studies constitute the estuary's first comprehensive investigation of shallow-water habitats, including selected emergent, forested, and scrub-shrub wetlands. Among other findings, this research documented the importance of wetlands as nursery areas for juvenile salmon; quantified historical changes in the amounts and distributions of diverse habitat types in the lower estuary; documented estuarine residence times, ranging from weeks to months for many juvenile Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha); and provided new evidence that contemporary salmonid food webs are supported disproportionately by wetland-derived prey resources. The results of these lower-estuary investigations also raised many new questions about habitat functions, historical habitat distributions, and salmon life histories in other areas of the Columbia River estuary that have not been adequately investigated. For example, quantitative estimates of historical habitat changes are available only for the lower 75 km of the estuary, although tidal influence extends 217 km upriver to Bonneville Dam. Because the otolith techniques used to reconstruct salmon life histories rely on detection of a chemical signature (strontium) for salt water, the estuarine residency information we have collected to date applies only to the lower 30 or 35 km of the estuary, where fish first encounter ocean water. We lack information about salmon habitat use, life histories, and growth within the long tidal-fresh reaches of the main-stem river and many tidally-influenced estuary tributaries. Finally, our surveys to date characterize wetland habitats within island complexes distributed in the main channel of the lower estuary. Yet some of the most significant wetland losses have occurred along the estuary's periphery, including shoreline areas and tributary junctions. These habitats may or may not function similarly as the island complexes that we have surveyed to date. In 2007 we initiated a second phase of the BPA estuary study (Phase II) to address specific uncertainties about salmon in tidal-fresh and tributary habitats of the Columbia River estuary. This report summarizes 2007 and 2008 Phase II results and addresses three principal research questions: (1) What was the historic distribution of estuarine and floodplain habitats from Astoria to Bonneville Dam? (2) Do individual patterns of estuarine residency and growth of juvenile Chinook salmon vary among wetland habitat types along the estuarine tidal gradient? (3) Are salmon rearing opportunities and life histories in the restoring wetland landscape of lower Grays River similar to those documented for island complexes of the main-stem estuary? Phase II extended our analysis of historical habitat distribution in the estuary above Rkm 75 to near Bonneville Dam. For this analysis we digitized the original nineteenth-century topographic (T-sheets) and hydrographic (H-sheets) survey maps for the entire estuary. Although all T-sheets (Rkm 0 to Rkm 206) were converted to GIS in 2005 with support for the USACE estuary project, final reconstruction of historical habitats throughout the estuary requires completion of the remaining H-sheet GIS maps above Rkm 75 and their integration with the T-sheets. This report summarizes progress to date on compiling the upper estuary H-sheets above Rkm 75. For the USACE estuary project, we analyzed otoliths from Chinook salmon collected near the estuary mouth in 2003-05 to estimate variability in estuary residence times among juvenile out migrants. In Phase II we expanded these analyses to comp

Bottom, Daniel L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; Campbell, Lance [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Analysis of Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River from an Ecosystem Perspective. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology was applied to the analysis of chinook salmon in the mid-Columbia subbasins which flow through the steppe and steppe-shrub vegetation zones. The EDT examines historical changes in life history diversity related to changes in habitat. The emphasis on life history, habitat and historical context is consistent with and ecosystem perspective. This study is based on the working hypothesis that the decline in chinook salmon was at least in part due to a loss of biodiversity defined as the intrapopulation life history diversity. The mid Columbia subbasins included in the study are the Deschutes, John Day, Umatilla, Tucannon and Yakima.

Lichatowich, James A.; Mobrand, Lars E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2000, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the eight year of a study to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A total of 20,313 hatchery steelhead were tagged with passive integrated transpoder (PIT) tags and released at Lower Granite Dam for reach survival estimation. They did not PIT tag any yearlying chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) for reach survival estimates in 2000 because sufficient numbers for these estimates were available from other studies. Primary research objectives in 2000 were (1) to estimate reach and project survival in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations, and (2) to evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. In addition, they estimated survival from point of release to Lower Granite Dam and below for chinook salmon, steelhead, and sockeye salmon (O.nerka) PIT tagged and released at Snake River basin hatcheries and chinook salmon and steelhead PIT tagged and released at Snake River basin hatcheries and chinook salmon and steelhead PIT tagged and released at Snake River basin smolt traps. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2000 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures. Further details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited in the text.

Zabel, Richard; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

QuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Spring 2013 STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of natural gas-fired generation, as well as an emphasis on energy efficiency and development of renewableQuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Spring 2013 STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN In March, the Northwest Power and Conservation

167

Report of the Independent Scientific Advisory Board Regarding a Research Proposal for Inclusion in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recovery Project Independent Scientific Advisory Board Northwest Power Planning Council National MarineISAB 97-4 Report of the Independent Scientific Advisory Board Regarding a Research Proposal for Inclusion in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Proposal Reviewed: Lake Pend Oreille Fishery

168

WILLAMETTE RIVER AND COLUMBIA RIVER WASTE LOAD ALLOCATION Christopher J. Berger, Research Associate, Department of Civil and Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was developed to evaluate management alternatives designed to improve water quality. The Lower Willamette River Associate, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon Robert L. Annear, Jr., Research Assistant, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland

Wells, Scott A.

169

Columbia River White Sturgeon (Acipenser Transmontanus) Early Life History and Genertics Study, August 1, 1984 to December 31, 1985 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research on Columbia River white sturgeon has been directed at their early life history as it may apply to production and enhancement strategies for management of the species. The river environment in which sturgeon historically migrated, spawned, and reared has changed through development. Habitat changes are expected to precipitate genetic changes in the fish, as well as reduce the fitness in populations. Genetic analysis of samples taken from various locations over the length of the Columbia River have indicated that observed gene frequencies in all areas sampled were not in Hardy-Weinburg equilibrium, which could suggest that the general population is experiencing perturbation in the system. Analysis thus far has exposed few differences between samples from the lower, middle, and upper portions of the system. Allelic differences were identified in fish from the Roosevelt Lake, which may be evidence of unique characteristics among fish from that general area.

Brannon, Ernest L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary/plume variability, the role of the estuary and plume on salmon survival, and functional changes in the estuary-plume system in response to climate and human activities.

Baptista, António M. [Oregon Health & Science University, Science and Technology Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction

2009-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

171

Eelgrass Enhancement and Restoration in the Lower Columbia River Estuary, Period of Performance: Feb 2008-Sep 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability to enhance distribution of eelgrass (Zostera marina) in the Columbia River Estuary to serve as refuge and feeding habitat for juvenile salmon, Dungeness crab, and other fish and wildlife. We strongly suspected that limited eelgrass seed dispersal has resulted in the present distribution of eelgrass meadows, and that there are other suitable places for eelgrass to survive and form functional meadows. Funded as part of the Bonneville Power Administration's call for Innovative Projects, we initiated a multistage study in 2008 that combined modeling, remote sensing, and field experimentation to: (1) Spatially predict habitat quality for eelgrass; (2) Conduct experimental plantings; and (3) Evaluate restoration potential. Baseline in-situ measurements and remote satellite observations were acquired for locations in the Lower Columbia River Estuary (LCRE) to determine ambient habitat conditions. These were used to create a habitat site-selection model, using data on salinity, temperature, current velocity, light availability, wave energy, and desiccation to predict the suitability of nearshore areas for eelgrass. Based on this model and observations in the field, five sites that contained no eelgrass but appeared to have suitable environmental conditions were transplanted with eelgrass in June 2008 to test the appropriateness of these sites for eelgrass growth. We returned one year after the initial planting to monitor the success rate of the transplants. During the year after transplanting, we carried out a concurrent study on crab distribution inside and outside eelgrass meadows to study crab usage of the habitat. One year after the initial transplant, two sites, one in Baker Bay and one in Young's Bay, had good survival or expansion rates with healthy eelgrass. Two sites had poor survival rates, and one site had a total loss of the transplanted eelgrass. For submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) restoration projects, these are reasonable success results and represent a small net gain in eelgrass in the LCRE. Crabs used both the eelgrass and unvegetated substrate, though in neither were there great abundance of the young-of-the-year crabs. During the field assessment of 12 potential transplant sites, divers discovered one site in southern Young's Bay that contained a previously undocumented eelgrass bed. This integrated project developed the first predictive maps of sites suitable for eelgrass and other SAV in the lower estuary. In addition, techniques developed for this project to assess light levels in existing and potential submerged habitats have great potential to be used in other regions for nearshore and coastal monitoring of SAV. Based on these preliminary results, we conclude that eelgrass distribution could likely be expanded in the estuary, though additional information on current eelgrass locations, usage by species of interest, and monitoring of current conditions would help develop a baseline and verify benefit. Our recommendations for future studies include: (1) Site Monitoring. Continued monitoring of restoration sites along with physical metrics of light, temperature and salinity within beds. Continued monitoring will both assist managers in understanding the longevity and expansion rate of planted sites and inform practical guidance on the minimum planted eelgrass required to develop a resilient meadow. (2) Natural bed documentation and monitoring. Document current eelgrass habitat conditions in the Columbia River by mapping eelgrass and other SAV species and monitoring physical metrics in natural beds. This will assist by better defining the factors that control the annual and spatial variation in eelgrass in the estuary, and thus lead to improved management. Improved information on conditions will help refine a habitat suitability model that can more accurately predict where eelgrass can be restored or areas under duress. (3) Monitor Species Use. Expanded monitoring of Dungeness crab and salmon use and benefit from eelgrass in the estuary to evaluate how

Judd, C.; Thom, R; Borde, A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

172

DOE/EA-1374-SA-02: Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (April 2003)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2003 8, 2003 In reply refer to: KEC-4 To: People Interested in the Project to Conduct Research on Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Background: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on this project in April of 2001. The project involves multi-year research begun in 1996 on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and glaucous-winged gulls. The activities examined in the EA focused on measuring the salmonid smolt consumption rate of tern, cormorant, and gull populations in the lower Columbia River. Additionally, this project measured the impacts of this research on brown pelicans roosting in the area. Action: In 2002, BPA prepared modifications to the original proposal in a Supplement Analysis

173

References for radioactive releases to the Columbia River from Hanford Operations, 1944--1957. Letter report: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search was made for published documents related to discharges of radioactive material from Hanford Site facilities to the Columbia River from 1944--1957. The purpose was to list documents that contain data that might be useful in developing a source term for waterborne releases. Source term development work will take place in FY 1992, and FY 1993. This tabulation of published summaries of release data shows the type of measurements that were being made from 1944--1957 and the magnitude of discharges to the Columbia River. In the early years, very little data were collected that related to specific radionuclides. However, most of the key radionuclides were known to be present in effluents from occasional specific radionuclide analyses.

Hall, R.B.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Session III: Estuary Columbia River Estuary overview of physical features and habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Research Department of Fisheries and Oceans 4160 Marine Drive West Vancouver, BC, Canada (use home to that of the lower estuary. In recent times ocean water has been detected under the fresh water of the river (the, distance from the ocean, season, and year. Median surface temperature at Warrendale, well upstream from

175

Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 FY 2008-2009 F&W Program Accords (MOA) Proposal Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nation Tribal Council, the Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board and the Bonneville Power Administration Columbia Salmon Recovery Board, Washington State Salmon Recovery Office, NOAA Fisheries and other fisheries but not limited to Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board, the State of Washington, NOAA Fisheries, U.S. Fish

176

Genetic and Phenotype [Phenotypic] Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-99 Report : Populations of the Pend Oreille, Kettle, and Sanpoil River Basins of Colville National Forest.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-99 was year two of a five-year project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-99 we worked in collaboration with the Colville National Forest and Kalispel Indian Tribe to catalog populations in the northeastern corner of Washington State.

Trotter, Patrick C.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Investigation of the Strontium-90 Contaminant Plume along the Shoreline of the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts are underway to remediate strontium-laden groundwater to the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site. Past practices of the 100-N reactor liquid waste disposal sites has left strontium-90 sorbed onto sediments which is a continuing source of contaminant discharge to the river. The Remediation Task of the Science and Technology Project assessed the interaction of groundwater and river water at the hyporheic zone. Limited data have been obtained at this interface of contaminant concentrations, geology, groundwater chemistry, affects of river stage and other variables that may affect strontium-90 release. Efforts were also undertaken to determine the extent, both laterally and horizontally, of the strontium-90 plume along the shoreline and to potentially find an alternative constituent to monitor strontium-90 that would be more cost effective and could possibly be done under real time conditions. A baseline of strontium-90 concentrations along the shoreline was developed to help assess remediation technologies.

Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Patton, Gregory W.; Hartman, Mary J.; Spane, Frank A.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mackley, Rob D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Clayton, Ray E.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Population Structure of Columbia River Basin Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, Technical Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead trout is presented as an assimilation of the life history forms that have evolved in synchrony with diverse and complex environments over their Pacific range. As poikilotherms, temperature is described as the overwhelming environmental influence that determines what life history options occur and where they are distributed. The different populations represent ecological types referred to as spring-, summer-, fall, and winter-run segments, as well as stream- and ocean-type, or stream- and ocean-maturing life history forms. However, they are more correctly described as a continuum of forms that fall along a temporal cline related to incubation and rearing temperatures that determine spawn timing and juvenile residence patterns. Once new habitats are colonized, members of the founding populations spread through adaptive evolution to assume complementary life history strategies. The related population units are collectively referred to as a metapopulation, and members most closely associated within common temporal and geographic boundaries are designated as first-order metapopulations. Population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin, therefore, is the reflection of the genetic composition of the founding source or sources within the respective region, shaped by the environment, principally temperature, that defines life history evolutionary strategy to maximize fitness under the conditions delineated. The complexity of structure rests with the diversity of opportunities over the elevations that exist within the Basin. Consistent with natural selection, rather than simply attempting to preserve populations, the challenge is to provide opportunities to expand their range to new or restored habitat that can accommodate genetic adaptation as directional environmental changes are elaborated. Artificial propagation can have a critical role in this process, and the emphasis must be placed on promoting the ability for anadromous salmonids to respond to change by assuring that the genetic diversity to facilitate such responses is present. The key in developing an effective recovery program for chinook salmon and steelhead is to recognize that multiple life history forms associated with temperature characterize the species in the Columbia Basin, and recovery measures taken must address the biological requirements of the population unit within the environmental template identified. Unless such measures are given first and highest priority, establishment of biologically self-sustaining populations will be restrained.

Brannon, E.L.; National Science Foundation (U.S.)

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Energy - Water Nexus -- Meeting the Energy and Water Needs of the Snake/Columbia River Basin in the 21st CenturyScience and Technology SummitConference Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 2007, representatives from federal, state, and academic institutions met to discuss the role of innovative science, technology, and policy in meeting future energy and water demands in the Snake-Columbia River Basin. Conference members assessed the state-of-the-science, technology, and associated research to develop cost-effective and environmentally sound methodologies and technologies to maximize the production of energy and availability of water and to minimize the consumption of both water and energy in the Snake-Columbia River system. Information on all phases of science and technology development, theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, pilot tests, and field applications were relevant topics for discussion. An overview of current management needs was presented the first day. On the second day, five focus groups were created: ? Energy Generation and Use ? Water Allocation and Use ? Energy/Water Storage ? Environmental Considerations ? Social, Economic, Political, and Regulatory Considerations. Each group started with a list of status items and trends, and discussed the future challenges and research needed to reach four goals: ? Balance energy production and resource consumption ? Balance water availability and competing needs ? Balance water consumption/energy production and competing needs ? Balance environmental impacts and water use/energy production ? Balance costs and benefits of water use. The resulting initiatives were further broken down into three categories of importance: critical, important, and nice to do but could be delayed. Each initiative was assigned a number of dots to show a more refined ranking. The results of each focus group are given in the pages that follow. These results are intended to help local and regional researchers 1. Develop a technical strategy for developing cost-effective science and technology to predict, measure, monitor, purify, conserve, and store water and to maximize power generation, storage, and efficiency in the region 2. Evaluate methods and technologies for reducing the impacts of energy and water development and use on the environment.

Paul L. Wichlacz; Gerald Sehlke

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Geological controls on matrix permeability of Devonian Gas Shales in the Horn River and Liard basins, northeastern British Columbia, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Controls of matrix permeability are investigated for Devonian Gas Shales from the Horn River and Liard basins in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. Mineralogy is varied with high carbonate, high quartz and moderate quartz, carbonate and clay rich strata. Quartz content varies between 2 and 73%, carbonate varies between 1 and 93% and clay varies between 3 and 33%. The TOC content ranges between 0.3 and 6 wt.% and porosity varies between about 1 and 7%. For Horn River basin samples, quartz is mainly biogenic in origin derived from radiolarians. TOC content increases with the quartz content suggesting the TOC and quartz both are derived from siliceous phytoplankton. A positive relationship between porosity and quartz content is due to the positive relationship between quartz and TOC. Matrix permeability parallel to bedding varies between 7.5E? 02 and 7.1E? 07 mD at an effective stress of 15 MPa. Variation in permeability is due to a complex combination of factors that includes origin and distribution of minerals, pore?size distribution and fabric. Mercury intrusion capillary curves indicate that the higher matrix permeability values (> 2E? 03 mD) occurs in samples that contain interconnected pore apertures greater than 16 ?m even when these samples may contain less macropores than low permeability samples. The fabric of high permeability samples can be either isotropic or anisotropic; however permeability of anisotropic samples is more sensitive to changes in effective stress than isotropic samples. More highly anisotropic samples contain moderate amounts of quartz, carbonate and in some, clay. High permeability samples that contain a more balanced ratio between micro-, meso- and macroporosity would not only have faster flow rates but also greater access to sorbed gas within the microporosity compared to samples that lack mesopores. Several Muskwa samples compared to Evie and Besa River samples contain higher quartz, moderate clay and high TOC content coupled with high permeability, less sensitivity to effective stress and balanced ratios between micro-, meso- and macroporosity would be a lower exploration risk due a greater propensity to fracture, the ability to produce and store hydrocarbons due to higher TOC contents and greater communication between macropores and micropores in the organic and clay fractions.

Gareth R.L. Chalmers; Daniel J.K. Ross; R. Marc Bustin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY10 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. The EOS is one of multiple work groups in the federal research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the FCRPS. The EOS is tasked by NOAA Fisheries and the Action Agencies to design and coordinate implementation of the federal RME plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary, including the plume.

Johnson, Gary E.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Operations Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume IV of IV; Washington: Rocky Reach Hatchery Addendum, 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rocky Reach Hatchery is located along the Columbia Paver, just downstream from Rocky Reach Dam. Site elevation is 800 feet above sea level. The Turtle Rock Island facility, located 2 miles upstream, is operated as a satellite facility (shared with the Washington Department of Wildlife). The facility is staffed with 2.75 FTE`S. The hatchery was originally designed as a mile-long spawning channel at Turtle Rock Island. Rearing units consist of eight vinyl raceways at Rocky Reach and four rearing ponds at Turtle Rock. Water rights are held by Chelan County PUD and total 3,613 gpm from the Columbia River. Water available for use in the Turtle Rock rearing ponds averages 12,000 gpm from the Columbia River. Rocky Reach Hatchery and the Turtle Rock satellite facility are owned by Chelan County PUD. They are operated as mitigation facilities for the fishery impacts caused by the construction and operation of Rocky Reach Dam. Rocky Reach Hatchery is used for incubation and early rearing of upriver bright (URB) fall chinook. Fingerlings are later transferred to the Turtle Rock facility for final rearing and release.

Peck, Larry

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Pre-and post-Missoula flood geomorphology of the Pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley in the Portland forearc basin, Oregon and Washington, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geomorphic landscape development in the pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley (1–5 km width) in the Portland forearc basin (~ 50 km length) is established from depositional sequences, which pre-date and post-date the glacial Lake Missoula floods. The sequences are observed from selected borehole logs (150 in number) and intact terrace soil profiles (56 in number) in backhoe trenches. Four sequences are widespread, including (1) a vertically aggraded Pleistocene alluvial plain, (2) a steep sided valley that is incised (125–150 m) into the Pleistocene gravel plain, (3) Missoula flood terraces (19–13 ka) abandoned on the sides of the ancestral valley, and (4) Holocene flooding surfaces (11–8 ka) buried at 70–30 m depth in the axial Columbia River Valley. Weathering rims and cementation are used for relative dating of incised Pleistocene gravel units. Soil development on the abandoned Missoula flood terraces is directly related to terrace deposit lithology, including thin Bw horizons in gravel, irregular podzols in sand, and multiple Bw horizons in thicker loess-capping layers. Radiocarbon dating of sand and mud alluvium in the submerged axial valley ties Holocene flooding surfaces to a local sea level curve and establishes Holocene sedimentation rates of 1.5 cm year? 1 during 11–9 ka and 0.3 cm year? 1 during 9–0 ka. The sequences of Pleistocene gravel aggradation, river valley incision, cataclysmic Missoula flooding, and Holocene submergence yield complex geomorphic landscapes in the ancestral lower Columbia River Valley.

Curt D. Peterson; Rick Minor; Gary L. Peterson; Edward B. Gates

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Emergency Petition and Complaint of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AND AND FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Emergency Petition and Complaint of ) Docket No. EL05-145-000 District of Columbia Public Service ) Commission ) EMERGENCY PETITION AND COMPLAINT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION Pursuant to Sections 202(c), 207 and 309 of the Federal Power Act ("FPA"), 16 U.S.C. §§ 824a(c), 824f and 825h, the District of Columbia Public Service Commission ("DCPSC") hereby submits this Emergency Petition and Complaint to avert the impending shutdown of the Potomac River Generating Station power plant ("Potomac River Plant" or "Plant") owned and operated by Mirant Corporation and its public utility subsidiaries (collectively, "Mirant") in Alexandria, Virginia.

186

Hanford Site environmental data for calendar year 1993--surface and Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division, as part of its contract to operate the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy. The data collected provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford operations. Data are also collected to monitor several chemicals. Pacific Northwest Laboratory publishes an annual environmental report for the Hanford Site each calendar year. The Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1993 describes the Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, and environmental monitoring activities and results. The report includes a summary of offsite and onsite environmental monitoring data collected during 1993 by PNL`s Environmental Monitoring Program. Appendix A of that report contains data summaries created from raw surface and river monitoring data. This volume contains the actual raw data used to create the summaries.

Bisping, L.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume 1; Oregon Subbasins Below Bonneville Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports follows. This report (Roger 1992) summarizes and integrates the results of the next five reports and relates them to deliverables identified in the Phase II cooperative agreement. Broader issues of organization and operation which are not appropriate for the more focused reports are also discussed. This report should be viewed as an executive summary for the CIS project to date. If one wants a quick overview of the CIS project, this report and the project plan will provide that perspective.

Olsen, Eric; Pierce, Paige (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Assessment of the Species Composition, Densities, and Distribution of Native Freshwater Mussels along the Benton County Shoreline of the Hanford Reach, Columbia River, 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River is the last unimpounded section of the river and contains substrate characteristics (cobble, gravel, sand/silt) suitable for many of the native freshwater mussels known to exist in the Pacific Northwest. Information concerning the native mussel species composition, densities, and distributions in the mainstem of the Columbia River is limited. Under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an assessment of the near-shore habitat on the Hanford Reach. Surveys conducted in 2004 as part of the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance project documented several species of native mussels inhabiting the near-shore habitat of the Hanford Reach. Findings reported here may be useful to resource biologists, ecologists, and DOE-RL to determine possible negative impacts to native mussels from ongoing near-shore remediation activities associated with Hanford Site cleanup. The objective of this study was to provide an initial assessment of the species composition, densities, and distribution of the freshwater mussels (Margaritiferidae and Unionidae families) that exist in the Hanford Reach. Researchers observed and measured 201 live native mussel specimens. Mussel density estimated from these surveys is summarized in this report with respect to near-shore habitat characteristics including substrate size, substrate embeddedness, relative abundance of aquatic vegetation, and large-scale geomorphic/hydrologic characteristics of the Hanford Reach.

Mueller, Robert P.; Tiller, Brett L.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Turner, Gerald; Welch, Ian D.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Survival of Seaward-Migrating PIT and Acoustic-Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Columbia Rivers: An Evaluation of Length-Specific Tagging Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies examining the survival of juvenile salmon as they emigrate to the ocean provide important information regarding the management of regulated river systems. Acoustic telemetry is a widely used tool for evaluating the behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Thus, it is important to understand how the surgical tagging process and the presence of a transmitter affect survival so any biases can be accounted for or eliminated. This study evaluated the effects of fish length and tag type on the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon during their seaward migrations through the Snake and Columbia rivers during 2006, 2007, and 2008. Fish were collected at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River (river kilometer 695) and implanted with either only a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag (PIT fish) or both a PIT tag and an acoustic transmitter (AT fish). Survival was estimated from release at Lower Granite Dam to multiple downstream locations (dams) using the Cormack–Jolly–Seber single release model, and analysis of variance was used to test for differences among length-classes and between tag types. No length-specific tag effect was detected between PIT and AT fish (i.e., length affected the survival of PIT fish in a manner similar to which it affected the survival of AT fish). Survival among the smallest length class (i.e., 80–89 mm) of both PIT and AT subyearling Chinook salmon was markedly low (i.e., 4%). Fish length was positively correlated with the survival of both PIT and AT fish. Significant differences in survival were detected between tag types; the survival of PIT fish was generally greater than that of AT fish. However, confounding variables warrant caution in making strong inferences regarding this factor. Further, results suggest that tag effects may be due to the process of surgically implanting the transmitter rather than the presence of the transmitter.

Brown, Richard S.; Oldenburg, Eric W.; Seaburg, Adam; Cook, Katrina V.; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, M. B.; Deters, Katherine A.

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

190

Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1986 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the status of resident fish projects currently funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). The report provides a brief synopsis, review and discussion of 13 resident fish projects funded during September 1985 to May 1986. The resident fish section of the Program addresses measures which are intended to protect resident fish, mitigate fishery losses caused by hydroelectric projects, and compensate for past losses through enhancement measures. These measures include, but are not limited to: flow requirements, drawdown requirements, temperature control, and streambed protection.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989 : with Listings of Historical Streamflow, Summation of Storage Change and Adjusted Streamflow : Columbia River and Coastal Basins.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of irrigation projects since the 1830's and the construction of major dams and reservoirs since the early 1900's have altered substantially the natural streamflow regimen of the Columbia River and its tributaries. As development expanded a multipurpose approach to streamflow regulation evolved to provide flood control, irrigation, hydropower generation, navigation, recreation, water quality enhancement, fish and wildlife, and instream flow maintenance. The responsible agencies use computer programs to determine the effects of various alternative system regulations. This report describes the development of the streamflow data that these computer programs use.

A.G. Crook Company

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

Porter, Russell [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission].

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam: Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on their progress from April 1997 through March 1998 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS; Report D), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete. Therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of the work from April 1997 through March 1998 listed.

Ward, David L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Annual Report to the Bonneville Power Administration, Reporting Period: April 2008 - February 2009 [re: "Survival and Growth in the Columbia River Plume and north California Current"].  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have made substantial progress toward our objectives outlined in our BPA supported proposal entitled 'Columbia River Basin Juvenile Salmonids: Survival and Growth in the Columbia River Plume and northern California Current' which we report on herein. During 2008, we were able to successfully conduct 3 mesoscale cruises. We also were able to conduct 7 biweekly predator cruises, along with substantial shore-based visual observations of seabirds. Detailed results of the mesoscale cruises are available in the Cruise Reports and summarized in the next section. We have taken a proactive approach to getting the results of our research to fisheries managers and the general public. We have begun to make annual predictions based on ocean conditions of the relative survival of juvenile coho and Chinook salmon well before they return as adults. This is based on both biological and physical indicators that we measure during our surveys or collect from outside data sources. Examples of our predictions for 2009 and 2010 are available on the following web site: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/research/divisions/fed/oeip/a-ecinhome.cfm.

Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries; Cooperative Institute for Marine Resources Studies, Oregon State University; OGI School of Science & Engineering, Oregon Health Sciences University.

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

197

Columbia River Treaty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of interconnection (i.e., imports and exports) 3. Miscellaneous resources including some small hydro and other renewables (Step I firm load is reduced by these resources)...

198

EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Hood River Fisheries Program 1: Hood River Fisheries Program EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program SUMMARY This EIS evaluates a BPA proposal to protect and improve anadromous salmonid populations in the Hood River Basin. These actions are proposed in an attempt to mitigate the losses of fish and wildlife associated with the construction and operation of Federal hydro-power facilities in the Columbia River Basin. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 4, 2008 EIS-0241-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project May 16, 2005 EIS-0241-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project, Hood River County, Oregon Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project

199

Pair-Trawl Detection of PIT-Tagged Juvenile Salmonids Migrating in the Columbia River Estuary, 2008 Report of Research.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, we sampled migrating juvenile Pacific salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags using a surface pair trawl in the upper Columbia River estuary (rkm 61-83). The cod-end of the trawl was replaced with a cylindrical PIT-tag detection antenna with an 86-cm-diameter fish-passage opening and two detection coils connected in series. The pair trawl was 105 m long with a 91.5-m opening between the wings and a sample depth of 4.9 m. Also during 2008, we finalized the development of a prototype 'matrix' antenna, which was larger than previous antennas by a considerable magnitude. The matrix antenna consisted of 6 coils: a 3-coil front component and a 3-coil rear component, which were separated by 1.5-m of net mesh. The fish-passage opening was 2.5 m wide by 3.0 m tall and was attached to a standard-size pair trawl net. Intermittent sampling with a single crew began on 7 March and targeted yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. Daily sampling using two crews began on 30 April and continued through 14 June; during this period we detected 2.7% of all juvenile salmonids previously detected at Bonneville Dam--a measure of sample efficiency. Sampling with a single crew continued through 20 August and targeted subyearling Chinook salmon. We detected 7,397 yearling Chinook salmon, 2,735 subyearling Chinook salmon, 291 coho salmon O. kisutch, 5,950 steelhead, and 122 sockeye salmon O. nerka in the upper estuary. We deployed the matrix antenna system and the older, cylindrical antenna system (86-cm-diameter fish-passage opening) simultaneously in mid-May 2008 to test matrix detection efficiency. The cylindrical antenna system had been used successfully in 2007 and early 2008. Because distribution of migrating salmonids in the estuary changes rapidly, we felt that a tandem sampling effort between the two systems was the only way to truly evaluate comparative detection efficiency. We deployed both systems within 1 km of each other during a period of high fish densities on 13, 14, and 15 May. Detections of the matrix system surpassed those of the cylindrical system by 53% in 14 h of simultaneous sampling (total detections 716 and 339, respectively). We believe that the higher detection rate observed with the matrix system was due to fewer smolts escaping the trawl entrance and to more smolts readily passing through the larger fish-passage opening. After tandem sampling, we continued exclusive use of the matrix system for the remainder of the 2008 juvenile migration season. Mean survival rates from Lower Granite to Bonneville Dam for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead were 42% (SE = 3.7%) and 46% (SE = 1.5%), respectively. Over 358,000 PIT-tagged salmonids were transported, and we detected 4,619 of these fish.

Magie, Robert J.; Morris, Matthew S.; Ledgerwood, Richard D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 FY 2008-2009 F&W Program Accords (MOA) Proposal Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will work closely and in collaboration with the Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board, BPA, Washington State&W Program Accords (MOA) Proposal Review Narrative Table 1. Proposal Metadata Project Number 2009-002-00 Proposer Bob Rose; Yakama Nation Fisheries Resources Program Short Description A Status and Trend Annual

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201

Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, 1988-1989 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 1988 through March 1989 on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam. Highlights of results of our work in the Dalles and Bonneville reservoirs are: using setlines, we caught 1,586 sturgeon in The Dalles Reservoir and 484 sturgeon in Bonneville Reservoir in 1988. Fork length of fish caught ranged from 34 cm to 274 cm. Of the fish caught we marked 1,248 in The Dalles Reservoir and 341 in Bonneville Reservoir. Of the fish marked in 1988, we recaptured 82 in The Dalles Reservoir and none in Bonneville Reservoir. We recaptured 89 fish marked in 1987 in The Dalles Reservoir. Anglers recaptured 35 fish marked in 1988 and 16 fish marked in 1987 in The Dalles Reservoir. Anglers recaptured 2 sturgeon marked in 1988 in Bonneville Reservoir. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Quantifying the Behavioral Response of Spawning Chum Salmon to Elevated Discharges from Bonneville Dam, Columbia River : Annual Report 2005-2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In unimpounded rivers, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) typically spawn under relatively stable stream flows, with exceptions occurring during periodic precipitation events. In contrast, hydroelectric development has often resulted in an artificial hydrograph characterized by rapid changes in discharge and tailwater elevation that occur on a daily, or even an hourly basis, due to power generation (Cushman 1985; Moog 1993). Consequently, populations of Pacific salmon that are known to spawn in main-stem habitats below hydroelectric dams face the risks of changing habitat suitability, potential redd dewatering, and uncertain spawning success (Hamilton and Buell 1976; Chapman et al. 1986; Dauble et al. 1999; Garland et al. 2003; Connor and Pflug 2004; McMichael et al. 2005). Although the direct effects of a variable hydrograph, such as redd dewatering are apparent, specific effects on spawning behavior remain largely unexplored. Chum salmon (O. keta) that spawn below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are particularly vulnerable to the effects of water level fluctuations. Although chum salmon generally spawn in smaller tributaries (Johnson et al. 1997), many fish spawn in main-stem habitats below Bonneville Dam near Ives Island (Tomaro et al. 2007; Figure 1). The primary spawning area near Ives Island is shallow and sensitive to changes in water level caused by hydroelectric power generation at Bonneville Dam. In the past, fluctuating water levels have dewatered redds and changed the amount of available spawning habitat (Garland et al. 2003). To minimize these effects, fishery managers attempt to maintain a stable tailwater elevation at Bonneville Dam of 3.5 m (above mean sea level) during spawning, which ensures adequate water is provided to the primary chum salmon spawning area below the mouth of Hamilton Creek (Figure 1). Given the uncertainty of winter precipitation and water supply, this strategy has been effective at restricting spawning to a specific riverbed elevation and providing minimum spawning flows that have the greatest chance of being maintained through egg incubation and fry emergence. However, managing the lower Columbia River for a stable tailwater elevation does not provide much operational flexibility at Bonneville Dam, which has little storage capacity. When river discharges increase due to rain events, the traditional approach has been to pass excess water at night to maintain stable tailwater elevations during the daytime. The underlying assumption of this strategy, referred to as reverse load following, is that fish do not spawn at night. However, Tiffan et al. (2005) showed that this assumption is false by documenting nighttime spawning by chum salmon in the Ives Island area. Similarly, McMichael et al. (2005) reported nighttime spawning by Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in the Columbia River, indicating that diel spawning may be a common occurrence in Pacific salmon. During the latter portion of the chum spawning period in December 2003 and 2004, discharges from Bonneville Dam increased from an average of 3,398 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 3.5 m above mean sea level) during the day to over 5,664 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 5.1 m) at night, with peak discharges of 7,080 m{sup 3}/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 6.1 m). This caused concern among fishery managers regarding the potential effects of these high discharges on this population of spawning chum salmon, which is listed under the Endangered Species Act (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 1999). We hypothesized that increased water velocities associated with elevated tailwaters might alter chum salmon spawning behavior if water velocities at redd locations increased beyond the range of suitability (>0.8 m/s; Salo 1991). In 2005, we investigated the movement and behavioral responses of spawning chum salmon at Ives Island to increased tailwater elevations at Bonneville Dam. We used acoustic telemetry to determine if the higher velocities associated with increased tailwater elevations caused fish to leave their re

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Haskell, Craig A.; Kock, Tobias J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Study of Stranding of Juvenile Salmon by Ship Wakes Along the Lower Columbia River Using a Before-and-After Design: Before-Phase Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ship wakes produced by deep-draft vessels transiting the lower Columbia River have been observed to cause stranding of juvenile salmon. Proposed deepening of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about the potential impact of the deepening project on juvenile salmon stranding. The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory design and conduct a study to assess stranding impacts that may be associated with channel deepening. The basic study design was a multivariate analysis of covariance of field observations and measurements under a statistical design for a before and after impact comparison. We have summarized field activities and statistical analyses for the ?before? component of the study here. Stranding occurred at all three sampling sites and during all three sampling seasons (Summer 2004, Winter 2005, and Spring 2005), for a total of 46 stranding events during 126 observed vessel passages. The highest occurrence of stranding occurred at Barlow Point, WA, where 53% of the observed events resulted in stranding. Other sites included Sauvie Island, OR (37%) and County Line Park, WA (15%). To develop an appropriate impact assessment model that accounted for relevant covariates, regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationships between stranding probability and other factors. Nineteen independent variables were considered as potential factors affecting the incidence of juvenile salmon stranding, including tidal stage, tidal height, river flow, current velocity, ship type, ship direction, ship condition (loaded/unloaded), ship speed, ship size, and a proxy variable for ship kinetic energy. In addition to the ambient and ship characteristics listed above, site, season, and fish density were also considered. Although no single factor appears as the primary factor for stranding, statistical analyses of the covariates resulted in the following equations: (1) Stranding Probability {approx} Location + Kinetic Energy Proxy + Tidal Height + Salmonid Density + Kinetic energy proxy ? Tidal Height + Tidal Height x Salmonid Density. (2) Stranding Probability {approx} Location + Total Wave Distance + Salmonid Density Index. (3) Log(Total Wave Height) {approx} Ship Block + Tidal Height + Location + Ship Speed. (4) Log(Total Wave Excursion Across the Beach) {approx} Location + Kinetic Energy Proxy + Tidal Height The above equations form the basis for a conceptual model of the factors leading to salmon stranding. The equations also form the basis for an approach for assessing impacts of dredging under the before/after study design.

Pearson, Walter H.; Skalski, J R.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Miller, Martin C.; Johnson, Gary E.; Williams, Greg D.; Southard, John A.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

LOWER COLUMBIA SALMON AND STEELHEAD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and wildlife species of interest to recovery and subbasin planning Vol. IV Existing Programs Descriptions Recovery Board, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, S.P. Cramer and Associates, and The White.0 WASHOUGAL RIVER SUBBASIN 16.0 WIND RIVER SUBBASIN 17.0 LITTLE WHITE SALMON SUBBASIN 18.0 COLUMBIA GORGE

205

Historic Habitat Opportunities and Food-Web Linkages of Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River Estuary and Their Implications for Managing River Flows and Restoring Estuarine Habitat, Physical Sciences Component, Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term changes and fluctuations in river flow, water properties, tides, and sediment transport in the Columbia River and its estuary have had a profound effect on Columbia River salmonids and their habitat. Understanding the river-flow, temperature, tidal, and sediment-supply regimes of the Lower Columbia River (LCR) and how they interact with habitat is, therefore, critical to development of system management and restoration strategies. It is also useful to separate management and climate impacts on hydrologic properties and habitat. This contract, part of a larger project led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), consists of three work elements, one with five tasks. The first work element relates to reconstruction of historic conditions in a broad sense. The second and third elements consist, respectively, of participation in project-wide integration efforts, and reporting. This report focuses on the five tasks within the historic reconstruction work element. It in part satisfies the reporting requirement, and it forms the basis for our participation in the project integration effort. The first task consists of several topics related to historic changes in river stage and tide. Within this task, the chart datum levels of 14 historic bathymetric surveys completed before definition of Columbia River Datum (CRD) were related to CRD, to enable analysis of these surveys by other project scientists. We have also modeled tidal datums and properties (lower low water or LLW, higher high water or HHW, mean water level or MWL, and greater diurnal tidal range or GDTR) as a function of river flow and tidal range at Astoria. These calculations have been carried for 10 year intervals (1940-date) for 21 stations, though most stations have data for only a few time intervals. Longer-term analyses involve the records at Astoria (1925-date) and Vancouver (1902-date). Water levels for any given river flow have decreased substantially (0.3-1.8 m, depending on river flow and tidal range), and tidal ranges have increased considerably (by a factor of 1.5 to 4 for most river-flow levels) since the 1900-1940 period at most stations, with the largest percentage changes occurring at upriver stations. These changes have been caused by a combination of changes in channel roughness, shape and alignment, changes in coastal tides, and (possibly) bed degradation. Tides are growing throughout the Northeast Pacific, and Astoria (Tongue Pt) has one of the most rapid rates of increase in tidal range in the entire Eastern Pacific, about 0.3m per century. More than half of this change appears to result from changes within the system, the rest from larger scale changes in coastal tides. Regression models of HHW have been used to estimate daily shallow water habitat (SWHA) available in a {approx}25 mile long reach of the system from Eagle Cliff to Kalama for 1925-2004 under four different scenarios (the four possible combinations of diked/undiked and observed flow/ virgin flow). More than 70% of the habitat in this reach has been lost (modern conditions vs. virgin flow with not dikes). In contrast, however, to the reach between Skamokawa and Beaver, selective dike removal (instead of a combination of dike removal and flow restoration) would suffice to increase spring SWHA. The second task consists of reconstruction of the hydrologic cycle before 1878, based on historic documents and inversion of tidal data collected before the onset of the historic flow record in 1878. We have a complete list of freshet times and peak flows for 1858-1877, and scattered freshet information for 1841-1857. Based on tidal data, we have reconstructed the annual flow cycles for 1870 and 1871; other time periods between 1854 and 1867 are under analysis. The three remaining tasks relate to post-1878 hydrologic conditions (flows, sediment supply and water temperature), and separation of the human and climate influences thereon. Estimated ob-served (sometimes routed), adjusted (corrected for reservoir manipulation) and virgin (corrected also for irrigation div

Jay, David A. [Portland State University

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

206

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

American Rivers * Friends of the Earth * Idaho Rivers United *Institute for Fisheries Resources * National Wildlife Federation * Northwest Sportfishing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and investor-owned utilities. Most importantly, it presents an opportunity to make energy choices. Public and investor-owned utilities have submitted to BPA a proposal (the "Allocation Proposal" or "Perma) have requested public input regarding how the federal government should market the power and distribute

208

Federal Power Act section 202(c) - Mirant Corporation, August 2005 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Power Act section 202(c) - Mirant Corporation, August 2005 Federal Power Act section 202(c) - Mirant Corporation, August 2005 Federal Power Act section 202(c) - Mirant Corporation, August 2005 On August 24, 2005 in response to a decision by Mirant Corporation to cease generation of electricity at its Potomac River generating station, the District of Columbia Public Service Commission requested that the Secretary of Energy issue a 202(c) emergency order requiring the operation of the Potomac River generating station in order to ensure compliance with reliability standards for the central D.C. area. After investigation, the Secretary made a determination that without the operation of the Potomac River generating station there was a reasonable possibility an outage would occur that would cause a blackout in the central D.C. area. Therefore, on

209

Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the 2010 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) project EST-P-09-1, titled Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, and known as the 'Salmon Benefits' study. The primary goal of the study is to establish scientific methods to quantify habitat restoration benefits to listed salmon and trout in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) in three required areas: habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival (Figure ES.1). The general study approach was to first evaluate the state of the science regarding the ability to quantify benefits to listed salmon and trout from habitat restoration actions in the LCRE in the 2009 project year, and then, if feasible, in subsequent project years to develop quantitative indices of habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival. Based on the 2009 literature review, the following definitions are used in this study. Habitat connectivity is defined as a landscape descriptor concerning the ability of organisms to move among habitat patches, including the spatial arrangement of habitats (structural connectivity) and how the perception and behavior of salmon affect the potential for movement among habitats (functional connectivity). Life history is defined as the combination of traits exhibited by an organism throughout its life cycle, and for the purposes of this investigation, a life history strategy refers to the body size and temporal patterns of estuarine usage exhibited by migrating juvenile salmon. Survival is defined as the probability of fish remaining alive over a defined amount of space and/or time. The objectives of the 4-year study are as follows: (1) develop and test a quantitative index of juvenile salmon habitat connectivity in the LCRE incorporating structural, functional, and hydrologic components; (2) develop and test a quantitative index of the early life history diversity of juvenile salmon in the LCRE; (3) assess and, if feasible, develop and test a quantitative index of the survival benefits of tidal wetland habitat restoration (hydrologic reconnection) in the LCRE; and (4) synthesize the results of investigations into the indices for habitat connectivity, early life history diversity, and survival benefits.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, J. R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ostrand, Kenneth G.; Hanson, Kyle C.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Donley, Erin E.; Ke, Yinghai; Buenau, Kate E.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Townsend, Richard L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

DRAFT Lower Columbia Salmon and Steelhead Recovery Plan GRAYS II, 3-1 May 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

counties. The river enters the Columbia at RM 21, near the town of Oneida, Washington. Tidal influence

211

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1994.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spawning ground surveys were conducted in 1994 as part of a five year study of Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawyacha begun in 1991. Observations of fall chinook salmon spawning in the Snake River were limited to infrequent aerial red counts in the years prior to 1987. From 1987-1990, red counts were made on a limited basis by an interagency team and reported by the Washington Department of Fisheries. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and other cooperating agencies and organizations, expanded the scope of spawning ground surveys to include: (1) additional aerial surveys to improve red counts and provide data on the timing of spawning; (2) the validation (ground truthing) of red counts from aerial surveys to improve count accuracy; (3) underwater searches to locate reds in water too deep to allow detection from the air; and (4) bathymetric mapping of spawning sites for characterizing spawning habitat. This document is the 1994 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon. The studies were undertaken because of the growing concern about the declining salmon population in the Snake River basin.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, 1989-1990 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 1989 through March 1990 on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Study objectives addressed by each agency are to describe the life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults between Bonneville and McNary dams and evaluate the need and identify potential methods for protecting, mitigating and enhancing populations downstream from McNary Dam, to describe the white sturgeon recreational fishery between Bonneville and McNary dams, describe reproductive and early life history characteristics downstream from Bonneville Dam and describe life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults downstream from Bonneville Dam, to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available between Bonneville and McNary dams, and to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available downstream from Bonneville Dam. Our approach is to work concurrently downstream and upstream from Bonneville Dam. Upstream from Bonneville Dam we began work in the Dalles Reservoir in 1987 and expanded efforts to Bonneville Reservoir in 1988 and John Day Reservoir in 1989. Highlights from this work is also included. 47 refs., 33 figs., 66 tabs.

Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume IV; Washington Subbasin Above McNary Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

Hymer, Joe (Washington Department of Fishereis, Battleground, WA); Wastel, Mike (Washington Department of Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume III; Washington Subbasin Below McNary Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Hymer, Joe (Washington Department of Fisheries, Battleground, WA); Wastel, Mike (Washington Department of Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 3, 2002 December 3, 2002 AUDIT REPORT: OAS-L-03-03 Follow-Up Audit on the Department's Managment of Field Contractor Employees Assigned to Headquarters and Other Federal Agencies November 6, 2002 EA-1412: Finding of No Significant Impact Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington April 15, 2002 Meeting Materials: April 15 - 16, 2002 April 15-16, 2002 Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting Marriott Crystal City Hotel Arlington, Virginia March 21, 2002 EA-1374-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Avian Predation On Juvenile Salmonids In The Lower Columbia River Research Project November 5, 2001 Meeting Materials: November 5-6, 2001 NEAC Meeting, DoubleTree Hotel, Arlington, Virginia

216

EA-2003: Sandy River Delta Section 536 Ecosystem Restoration Project, Multnomah County, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assessed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed removal of a dam from the east channel of the Sandy River. The proposal would help fulfill a portion of the 2010-2013 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan to improve estuary habitat for salmon and steelhead species listed under the Endangered Species Act.

217

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results for year twelve in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale.

Porter, Russell G.; Winther, Eric C.; Fox, Lyle G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Non-Federal Participation Federal Marketing and Joint Ventures : Administrator`s Record of Decision.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By this Record of Decision, the Bonneville Power Administrtion (BPA) adopts the Federal Marketing and Joint Ventures alternative to guide future BPA contract negotiations involving use of the Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest AC Intertie (Intertie). To implement this concept, BPa intends to negotiate an array of flexible, market-oriented contracts, expanded Intertie access for non-BPA parties, efficient use of Federal Columbia River resources, and facilitation of efficient, coordinated west coast development of generating resources. Federal Marketing and Joint Ventures meets need and serves purposes to a better degree than No Action. BPA considers Federal Marketing and Joint Ventures to be the environmentally preferable alternative in that it encourages long-term coordination of west coast generating resource development and operation. This provides the greatest opportunity to decrease generation of more environmentally harmful plants which would otherwise have greater effects on air, land, and water, and to avoid construction of new generation plants.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BEFORE THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION ) Emergency Petition and Complaint of ) Docket No. EL05-145-000 District of Columbia Public Service Comm'n ) ) POTOMAC ELECTRIC POWER COMPANY'S MOTION FOR LEAVE TO ANSWER AND ANSWER TO COMMENTS AND PROTESTS Pursuant to Rules 212 and 213 of the Rules of Practice and Procedure of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC" or the "Commission"), 18 C.F.R. §§ 385.212 and 385.213 (2005), Potomac Electric Power Company ("Pepco") hereby (i) moves for leave to answer and (ii) answers certain of the comments and protests filed in the above-captioned proceeding. 1 I. BACKGROUND 2 On August 24, 2005, Mirant 3 shut down the Potomac River generating station in Alexandria, Virginia (the "Potomac River Plant" or the "Plant") without authority from any court

220

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Of teapot dome, Wind river and Fort chaffee: Federal oil and gas resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The move from a location system to a leasing system for the development of federally owned oil and gas was a controversial and hard fought step. Like most programs for commercial use of public lands, the oil and gas leasing system has been the target of criticism for fraud. A review of the decisions of the US DOI disclose that DOI`s role has evolved from one largely developed to resolving disputes between competing applicants for a lease to one more concerned with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act. This article presents a review of decisions.

Lindley, L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

223

South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Points of Contact  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Dist. of Columbia Dist. of Columbia Points of Contact to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Points of Contact on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Points of Contact on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Points of Contact on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Points of Contact on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Points of Contact on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Points of Contact on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Dist. of Columbia Points of Contact The following people or agencies can help you find more information about

226

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Dist. of Columbia Laws Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

227

Status and Habitat Requirements of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam Volume II; Supplemental Papers and Data Documentation, 1986-1992 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for research on white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus from 1986--92 and conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF). Findings are presented as a series of papers, each detailing objectives, methods, results, and conclusions for a portion of this research. This volume includes supplemental papers which provide background information needed to support results of the primary investigations addressed in Volume 1. This study addresses measure 903(e)(1) of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Fish and Wildlife Program that calls for ''research to determine the impact of development and operation of the hydropower system on sturgeon in the Columbia River Basin.'' Study objectives correspond to those of the ''White Sturgeon Research Program Implementation Plan'' developed by BPA and approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1985. Work was conducted on the Columbia River from McNary Dam to the estuary.

Beamesderfer, Raymond C.; Nigro, Anthony A. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR (US)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results for year ten in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trapnets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report under Section I, Implementation. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Section II of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed under Section II.

Porter, Russell G.; Glaser, Bryce G.; Amren, Jennifer

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives Listed below are the summaries of all current Dist. of Columbia laws,

230

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

231

Columbia University Biotechnology Association  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia University Biotechnology Association Biotechnology Career Conference Friday, April 20th for members, Non-members fee $10 Sponsored by Columbia University GSAC and MA Biotechnology Program, Dept

Tong, Liang

232

Hood River Production Program Review, Final Report 1991-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a comprehensive review of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded activities within the Hood River Basin from 1991 to 2001. These activities, known as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP), are intended to mitigate for fish losses related to operation of federal dams in the Columbia River Basin, and to contribute to recovery of endangered and/or threatened salmon and steelhead, as directed by Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries). The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HRPP, which authorized BPA to fund salmon and steelhead enhancement activities in the Hood River Basin, was completed in 1996 (BPA 1996). The EIS specified seven years of monitoring and evaluation (1996-2002) after program implementation to determine if program actions needed modification to meet program objectives. The EIS also called for a program review after 2002, that review is reported here.

Underwood, Keith; Chapman, Colin; Ackerman, Nicklaus

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF THE INTERACTION OF GROUNDWATER WITH THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE 100-D AREA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater beneath much of Hanford's 100 Areas is contaminated with hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) as a consequence of treating reactor cooling water to prevent corrosion. Several treatment systems are in place to remove Cr{sup +6} from the groundwater; however, these systems currently do not reduce Cr{sup +6} to concentrations below aquatic standards. Of concern is the transport of Cr{sup +6} to areas within the channel of the river, as sensitive species inhabit the river and its associated transition zone. The aquatic standard for Cr{sup +6} is currently 11 ug/l under the Record of Decision (ROD) for Interim Action and Department of Energy (DOE) currently plans to pursue remediation of the groundwater to achieve the 11 ug/l standard. Because the compliance wells used to monitor the current remediation systems are located some distance from the river, they may not provide an accurate indication of Cr{sup +6} concentrations in the water that reaches the riverbed. In addition, because salmon spawning areas are considered a high priority for protection from Hanford contaminants, it would be advantageous to understand (1) to what extent Cr{sup +6} discharged to the near-shore or river ecosystems is diluted or attenuated and (2) mechanisms that could mitigate the exposure of the river ecosystems to the discharging Cr{sup +6}. The current concentration target for Cr{sup +6} at near-river groundwater monitoring locations is 20 {micro}g/L; it is assumed that this groundwater mixes with river water that contains virtually no chromium to meet Washington Department of Ecology's (Ecology) water quality standard of 10 {micro}g/L in the river environment. This dynamic mixing process is believed to be driven by daily and seasonal changes in river stage and groundwater remediation system operations, and has been validated using analytical data from numerous groundwater samples obtained adjacent to and within the banks of the river. Although the mean mixing factor of river water and site groundwater in this zone has been estimated to be equal parts of groundwater and river water, a wide range of mixing ratios likely occurs at various times of the day and year. The degree of mixing and dilution appears to be greatly influenced by the river stage and other groundwater/surface water interaction. The extent of mixing, thus, has implications for the design and operation of the groundwater remediation systems. Improved understanding of this 'dilution' mechanism is needed to design an optimum 'systems approach' to accelerate remediation of the near-shore contaminant plumes. More information on the pathway from near-river mapped plumes to riverbed receptor locations is also needed to develop a defensible proposed plan for a future ROD for final remedial action of contaminated groundwater. In April 2008, an expert panel of scientists was convened to review existing information and provide observations and suggestions to improve the current understanding of groundwater surface water interactions in the 100 Areas (primarily focusing on 100-D Area), and to identify what additional analyses or approaches may provide critical information needed to design and implement remediation systems that will minimize impacts to river aquatic systems. Specific objectives provided to the panel included: (1) comment on approaches and methods to improve the current understanding of groundwater-surface water interactions, specifically how contaminated groundwater enters the riverbed and how this relates to remediation of chromate in the groundwater in the 100 Areas; (2) evaluate past and current data collection methods, data analysis techniques, assumptions, and groundwater transport and mixing mechanisms; (3) evaluate the current monitoring network (monitoring wells, aquifer tubes, and shoreline/river monitoring); (4) evaluate the role played by modeling; and (5) suggest additional research to fill data gaps and perform modeling.

PETERSEN SW

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

234

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Mission of the Office of River Protection is to safely retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River.

235

Survival of Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Free-flowing Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs in 2003 and from McNary Dam Tailrace to John Day Dam Tailrace in the Columbia River from 1999 to 2002, 1999-2003 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report results from an ongoing study of survival and travel time of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Snake River during 2003 and in the Columbia River during 1999-2002. Earlier years of the study included serial releases of PIT-tagged hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon upstream from Lower Granite Dam, but these were discontinued in 2003. Instead, we estimated survival from a large number of PIT-tagged fish released upstream from Lower Granite Dam to evaluate transportation from Snake River Dams. During late May and early June 2003, 68,572 hatchery-reared subyearling fall Chinook salmon were PIT tagged at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, trucked upstream, acclimated, and released at Couse Creek and Pittsburg Landing in the free-flowing Snake River. We estimated survival for these fish from release to Lower Granite Dam tailrace. In comparison to wild subyearling fall Chinook salmon PIT tagged and released in the free-flowing Snake River, the hatchery fish we released traveled faster and had higher survival to Lower Granite Dam, likely because of their larger size at release. For fish left in the river to migrate we estimated survival from Lower Granite Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace. Each year, a small proportion of fish released are not detected until the following spring. However, the number of fish released in 2003 that overwintered in the river and were detected as they migrated seaward as yearlings in 2004 was small (<1.0%) and had minimal effect on survival estimates. We evaluated a prototype floating PIT-tag detector deployed upstream from Lower Granite reservoir to collect data for use in partitioning travel time and survival between free-flowing and reservoir habitats. The floating detector performed poorly, detecting only 27 PIT tags in 340 h of operation from a targeted release of 68,572; far too few to partition travel time and survival between habitats. We collected river-run subyearling Chinook salmon (mostly wild fish from the Hanford Reach) at McNary Dam, PIT tagged them, and released them to the tailrace as part of an evaluation of transportation from McNary Dam in 2002. Estimated survival in 2002 from the tailrace of McNary Dam to the tailrace of John Day Dam was 0.746 (s.e. 0.036). For migration years 1999-2002, we found that in the reach from McNary to John Day Dam reach, travel time was shorter (migration rate was greater) and survival probabilities were greater when flow volume was greater. Survival was also correlated with water temperature: warmer water was associated with decreased survival, and there was an apparent survival threshold at about 19.3 C (above this temperature survival decreased substantially).

Muir, William D.; Axel, Gordon A.; Smith, Steven G. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

before the Commission. Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Re: District of Columbia Public Service Commission Emergency...

237

Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hertel to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Re: District of Columbia Public Service Commission Emergency Petition and Complaint Docket No. EL05-145-000 More Documents &...

238

Natural Gas Storage in Basalt Aquifers of the Columbia Basin, Pacific Northwest USA: A Guide to Site Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the technical background and a guide to characterizing a site for storing natural gas in the Columbia River Basalt

Reidel, Steve P.; Spane, Frank A.; Johnson, Vernon G.

2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

239

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Home Office Expenses Submitted by Fluor Federal Services, Inc., on Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC's U.S. Department of Energy Management & Operating (M&O) Contract No. DE-AC09-08SR22470  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Home Office Expenses Submitted by Fluor Home Office Expenses Submitted by Fluor Federal Services, Inc., on Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC's U.S. Department of Energy Management & Operating (M&O) Contract No. DE-AC09-08SR22470 OAS-L-13-08 April 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 19, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Home Office Expenses Submitted by Fluor Federal Services, Inc., on Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC's U.S. Department of Energy Management & Operating (M&O) Contract No. DE-AC09-08SR22470" BACKGROUND The attached report presents the results of an audit of home office expenses submitted by Fluor

242

Federal Memorandum of Understanding for Hydropower/Federal Inland  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Federal Memorandum of Understanding for Hydropower/Federal Inland Hydropower Working Group < Federal Memorandum of Understanding for Hydropower Jump to: navigation, search Federal Memorandum of Understanding for Hydropower Hydroelectric-collage2.jpg Home Federal Inland Hydropower Working Group Participating Agencies Resources Federal Inland Hydropower Working Group The Federal Inland Hydropower Working Group is made up of 15 federal entities involved in the regulation, management, or development of hydropower resources (including hydrokinetics) in rivers and streams of the

243

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

EVs to someone by E-mail EVs to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for EVs on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for EVs on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for EVs on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for EVs on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for EVs on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for EVs on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for EVs The list below contains summaries of all Dist. of Columbia laws and

244

The Need for Ichthyological Surveys of the Major Rivers of Western North America  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...system, is restricted to Klamath Lake, along with close...5 Now extinct in the Klamath basin. 6 Perhaps introduced...constitutes the only group of spined minnows in...Columatilla Whitley therefore falls as a synonym of Columbia...River Sacramento River Klamath River Columbia River...

Robert R. Miller

1946-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

245

ROD AND MAP for Mid-Columbia Coho  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program RECORD OF DECISION Summary. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action of the Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program as described in the Mid- Columbia Coho Restoration Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0425) issued in March of 2012. The Proposed Action is for BPA to fund the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation (Yakama Nation) to transition the current Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program from its feasibility phase to a comprehensive program to restore naturally spawning populations of coho salmon in harvestable numbers to the Wenatchee and Methow river basins in north central Washington State. Construction of a new small hatchery on the Wenatchee River in Chelan

246

Re: Potomac River Generating Station Department of Energy, Case...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the downtown area of the District of Columbia. Earlier scheduled maintenance on these lines was postponed because of the shutdown of Mirant's Potomac River Generating Plant, but...

247

PP-369 British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PP-369 British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British PP-369 British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority PP-369 British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Presidential Permit authorizing British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority to construct, operate,a dn maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PP-369 British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority More Documents & Publications PP-369 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-369 British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Application to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British

248

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project The Mission of the Office of River Protection is to safely retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Office of River Protection Consent Order, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - NCO-2011-01

249

Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation Application from British Columbia Transmission Corporation to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation More Documents & Publications Application to Amend Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-022-4 British Columbia Transmission Corporation: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 78 - Apr. 24, 2007 Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-369 British Columbia Transmission Corporation and British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority

250

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol

251

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel

252

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Other to someone by E-mail Other to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Other on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Other on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Other on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Other on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Other on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Other on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Other

253

Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring and Evaluation FY08 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In fiscal year 2008 (FY08), EOS project accomplishments included (1) subgroup meetings; (2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; (3) project management via BPA's project tracking system, Pisces; (4) quarterly project status reports; and (5) a major revision to the Estuary RME document and its subsequent regional release (new version January 2008). Many of the estuary RME recommendations in this document were incorporated into the Biological Opinion on FCRPS operations (May 2008). In summary, the FY08 EOS project resulted in expanded, substantive coordination with other regional RME forums, a new version of the federal Estuary RME program document, and implementation coordination. This annual report is a FY08 deliverable for the project titled Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup.

Johnson, GE; Diefenderfer, HL [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY08 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In fiscal year 2008 (FY08), EOS project accomplishments included 1) subgroup meetings; 2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; 3) project management via the project tracking system, Pisces; 4) quarterly project status reports; and 5) a major revision to the Estuary RME document and its subsequent regional release (new version January 2008). Many of the estuary RME recommendations in this document were incorporated into the Biological Opinion on hydrosystem operations (May 2008). In summary, the FY08 EOS project resulted in expanded, substantive coordination with other regional RME forums, a new version of the federal Estuary RME program document, and implementation coordination. This annual report is a FY08 deliverable for the project titled Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

255

FY 2007 Progress Report for Upper Columbia United Tribes' Regional Coordination.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of activities conducted over the fiscal year 2007 contract period to fulfill requirements to coordinate Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) interests within the Columbia River Basin. This coordination was specific to the implementation of portions of the Integrated Fish and Wildlife Program within the purview of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and Bonneville Power Administration.

Michel, D.R.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY09 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the annual report for fiscal year 2009 (FY09) for the project called Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Corps or USACE], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS).

Johnson, Gary E.

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

257

Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

N /A

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Act. The Council's bylaws, which include its organizational structure, practices, and procedures.......................................................................... 10 Energy efficiency................................................................................. 13 Energy efficiency funding

260

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) of the Northwest Power Act. The Council's bylaws, which include its organizational structure, practices................................................... 7 Energy Efficiency met most of the new electricity demand in 2010 and 2011 .................... 7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) of the Northwest Power Act. The Council's bylaws, which include its organizational structure, practices............................................................................................................. 9 Proving new energy-efficiency technologies.......................................................................... 9 Television energy efficiency

262

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Section 4(h)(12)(A) of the Northwest Power Act. The Council's bylaws, which include its organizational first-year energy-efficiency goals in the Plan, which challenges the Northwest to meet most of the new demand for electricity over the 20-year horizon of the Plan with energy efficiency improvements

263

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................................ 8 Energy Efficiency Achievements States House of Representatives and Committee on Natural Resources United States House of Representatives

264

United States Entity Columbia River Treaty  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that reflects the actual value of coordinated power operations with Canada, maintains an acceptable level of flood risk and supports a resilient and healthy ecosystem-based...

265

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Propane (LPG) to someone by E-mail Propane (LPG) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

266

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Exemptions to someone by E-mail Exemptions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Exemptions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Exemptions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Exemptions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Exemptions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Exemptions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Exemptions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

267

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

268

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Hydrogen Fuel Cells to someone by E-mail Hydrogen Fuel Cells to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen Fuel Cells on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

269

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

270

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

271

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

HEVs / PHEVs to someone by E-mail HEVs / PHEVs to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for HEVs / PHEVs on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for HEVs / PHEVs on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for HEVs / PHEVs on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for HEVs / PHEVs on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for HEVs / PHEVs on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for HEVs / PHEVs on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

272

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Tax Incentives to someone by E-mail Tax Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives for Tax Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

273

Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for bull trout within sub basins of the Columbia River. Also, this project provides information to develop native fish recovery plans such as the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Bull Trout Recovery Plan.

Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

ColumbiaGrid Forum  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2012 National Electric 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop Marv Landauer December 13, 2011 2 Northwest Congestion 2006 DOE Congestion Study identified: * "Seattle to Portland" as a Congestion area of Concern * Montana-Wyoming as a Conditional Congestion Area due to potential for coal and wind resource development * Projects are being pursued to relieve Seattle to Portland congestion (Castle Rock-Troutdale line) and Montana-NW congestion (Colstrip Upgrades) 3 Northwest Congestion 2011 WECC Ten Year Regional Transmission Plan identified congestion on: * Montana to NW Path * Pacific Ties (COI and PDCI) Studies included Castle Rock-Troutdale project and potential wind development in Montana and Northwest 4 ColumbiaGrid Perspective * ColumbiaGrid members energized $400

275

N O R T H W E S T P O W E R A N D C O N S E R VAT I O N C O U N C I L COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, improved ocean conditions likely are one cause. Ocean conditions today are similar to conditions to the increased success. Beginning in 2000, above-average returns of salmon to the river were sustained for three

276

Flathead River Creel Report, 1992-1993. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A roving creel survey was conducted on the Flathead River system, May 1992 through May 1993, as part of Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, funded by Bonneville Power Administration. The Flathead River system is a tributary to the Clarks Fork of the Columbia River originating in northwest Montana and southern British Columbia. The river creel survey was conducted in conjunction with a Flathead Lake creel survey. This document summarizes the creel survey on the river system. The purpose of these creel surveys was to quantify fishery status prior to mitigation efforts and provide replicative survey methodology to measure success of future mitigation activities. 4 figs., 21 tabs.

Hanzel, Delano

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Growth and Survival of Columbia River basin juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Morgan, J. Miller, D. Daly, J. Lamb, J. Peterson, M. Litz, J. Losee, A. Claxton, A. Claiborne, T. Sandell

278

Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 Genetic Assessment of Columbia River Stocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These polymorphisms represent the most abundant variation in the genome of most organisms, and are spread throughout the entire genome at high density (Morin et al. 2004). Thus SNPs can be discovered through sequencing known

279

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (Steelhead; Oncorhynchus mykiss) Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon from 5 October 2006 to 21 June 2007, Annual Report 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) Department of Fisheries Resources Management (DFRM) results for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Hatchery Evaluation studies and the Imnaha River Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP) for the 2007 smolt migration from the Imnaha River, Oregon. These studies are closely coordinated and provide information about juvenile natural and hatchery spring/summer Naco x (Chinook Salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (steelhead; O. mykiss) biological characteristics, emigrant timing, survival, arrival timing and travel time to the Snake River dams and McNary Dam (MCD) on the Columbia River. These studies provide information on listed Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000). The Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program's goal is to maintain a hatchery production program of 490,000 Naco x (Chinook salmon) and 330,000 Heeyey (steelhead) for annual release in the Imnaha River (Carmichael et al. 1998, Whitesel et al. 1998). These hatchery releases occur to compensate for fish losses due to the construction and operation of the four lower Snake River hydroelectric facilities. One of the aspects of the LSRCP hatchery evaluation studies in the Imnaha River is to determine natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolt performance, emigration characteristics and survival (Kucera and Blenden 1998). A long term monitoring effort was established to document smolt emigrant timing and post release survival within the Imnaha River, estimate smolt survival downstream to McNary Dam, compare natural and hatchery smolt performance, and collect smolt-to-adult return information. This project collects information for, and is part of, a larger effort entitled Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Agencies (BPA Project No. 198712700). This larger project provides data on movement of smolts out of major drainages and past dams on the Snake River and Columbia River. In season indices of migration strength and migration timing are provided for the run-at large at key monitoring sites. Marked smolts are utilized to measure travel time and estimate survival through key index reaches. Fish quality and descaling measures are recorded at each monitoring site and provide indicators of the health of the run. Co-managers in the Imnaha River subbasin (Ecovista 2004) have identified the need to collect information on life history, migration patterns, juvenile emigrant abundance, reach specific smolt survivals, and Smolt-to-Adult Return rates (SAR's) for both Heeyey (steelhead) and Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts. The current study provides information related to the majority of the high priority data needs. Current funding does not allow for determination of a total (annual) juvenile emigrant abundance and lack of adult passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag detectors at the mouth of the Imnaha River results in the inability to calculate tributary specific SAR's. Information is shared with the Fish Passage Center (FPC) on a real time basis during the spring emigration period. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted the NPT to monitor emigration timing and tag up to 19,000 emigrating natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolts from the Imnaha River with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. The completion of trapping in the spring of 2007 marked the 16th year of emigration studies on the Imnaha River, and the 14th year of participating in the FPC smolt monitoring program. Monitoring and evaluation objectives were to: (1) Evaluate effects of flow, temperature and other environmental factors on juvenile migration timing. (2) Determine emigration timing, travel time, and in-river survival of PIT tagged hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts released at the Imnaha River acclimation facility to the Imnaha River juvenile migration trap. (3) Monitor the daily catch and biological cha

Michaels, Brian; Espinosa, Neal (Nez Perce Tribe)

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL 25 October 2006 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood damage reduction and restores the original degree of protection of the Wood River Levee-federal sponsor is the Wood River Drainage and Levee District. The Wood River Levee System was authorized

US Army Corps of Engineers

282

Columbia University | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Columbia University Columbia University Professor Michael Mauel PPPL Engineer Steve Raftopoulos assisted Professor Mike Mauel with the upgrade of the HBT-EP experiment. The upgrade...

283

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater than observed in the past ten years averaged together. In 2002, about 87 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, Tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This represents an increase over the past season, when only 71 million juvenile fish were released into the same area.

DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 15, 2002 April 15, 2002 Meeting Materials: April 15 - 16, 2002 April 15-16, 2002 Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting Marriott Crystal City Hotel Arlington, Virginia March 21, 2002 EA-1374-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Avian Predation On Juvenile Salmonids In The Lower Columbia River Research Project November 5, 2001 Meeting Materials: November 5-6, 2001 NEAC Meeting, DoubleTree Hotel, Arlington, Virginia October 31, 2001 A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report The objective of this document is to provide the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry with the basis for a plan to ensure the availability of near-term nuclear energy options that can be in operation in the U.S. by 2010. This document identifies the technological,

285

District of Columbia County, District of Columbia: Energy Resources | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbia County, District of Columbia: Energy Resources Columbia County, District of Columbia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.9059849°, -77.0334179° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9059849,"lon":-77.0334179,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

286

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment

288

Federal Energy Management Program: Sustainable Federal Fleets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sustainable Sustainable Federal Fleets to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Sustainable Federal Fleets on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Sustainable Federal Fleets on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Sustainable Federal Fleets on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Sustainable Federal Fleets on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Sustainable Federal Fleets on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Sustainable Federal Fleets on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Data Center Energy Efficiency Industrial Facilities Sustainable Federal Fleets Laboratories for the 21st Century Institutional Change

289

Federal Flood Assessment Conference Recommendations and Proceedings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Emergency Response Bureau of Reclamation Water Operations Coordination of River/Storage Releases American Canal diversion Federal Flood Assessment Conference Page 6 Proceedings and Recommendations Upstream diversion operation... Federal Flood Assessment Conference Page 20 Proceedings and Recommendations who is in charge during a response. The OSC determines the status of the local response and monitors the situation to determine whether, or how much, federal...

Reyes, Silvestre; Brock, Peter; Michelsen, Ari

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

290

An Inside Look at River Corridor | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

An Inside Look at River Corridor An Inside Look at River Corridor An Inside Look at River Corridor July 16, 2012 - 1:04pm Addthis "River Corridor" provides viewers with a look at the cleanup of hundreds of contaminated buildings and more than one thousand areas where soil was contaminated along the 50-mile stretch of the Columbia River that flows through the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov In the seventh chapter of The Handford Story, the Energy Department takes a look at the River Corridor -- a 50-mile stretch of the Columbia River that flows through the Hanford site in southeast Washington State. This video provides you with an insiders look at the cleanup of contaminated buildings and soil. Watch the video above to get a look inside the Energy

291

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

09 09 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 99 / Thursday, May 22, 1997 / Notices collection on the respondents, including through the use of information technology. Dated: May 16, 1997. Gloria Parker, Director, Information Resources Management Group. Office of Management Type of Review: New. Title: Department of Education Federal Cash Award Certification Statement and Department of Education Federal Cash Quarterly Confirmation Statement. Frequency: Annually. Affected Public: Business or other for- profit; Not for Profit institutions; Federal Government; State, Local or Tribal Government, SEAs or LEAs. Annual Reporting and Recordkeeping Hour Burden: Responses: 12,000. Burden Hours: 38,160. Abstract: The collection of the Federal Cash Award Statement is necessary for the Agency to monitor cash advanced to

292

Federal Register  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

151 151 Rules and Regulations Federal Register Vol. 60, No. 203 Friday, October 20, 1995 This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains regulatory documents having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed to and codified in the Code of Federal IRegulations, which is published under 50 titles pursuant to 44 U.S.C. 1610. The Code of Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each week. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration 10 CFR Part 905 Energy Planning and Management Program AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration, DOE. A cmoN: Final rule. summARv: The Western Area Power Administration is publishing this final rule to adopt an Energy Planning and

293

Columbia - Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Columbia - Renewables Portfolio Standard Columbia - Renewables Portfolio Standard Columbia - Renewables Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Columbia Water and Light In November 2004, voters in Columbia, Missouri approved a proposal to adopt a local renewables portfolio standard (RPS).* The initiative requires the city's municipal utility, Columbia Water and Light, to generate or purchase electricity generated from eligible renewable-energy resources at the following levels: * 2% by December 31, 2007 * 5% by December 31, 2012 * 10% by December 31, 2017 * 15% by December 31, 2022

294

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through regional and interstate

295

RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Return to Table of Contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impacts from development of the river's hydroelectric potential. The most recent fishery recovery program from the Columbia River hydroelectric system, contained important provisions regarding mitigation for the impacts of hydroelectric development on fish and wildlife in the basin. The act authorized the states of M

296

COLUMBIA STARTUP LAB, THE IDEAS KEEP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alumni include John Stevens 1768KC, who pioneered the steam-engine locomotive; Edwin Armstrong 1913SEAS, Columbia Engineering, SIPA, and the business school cut the ribbon for the Columbia Startup Lab, a 5

Qian, Ning

297

Columbia University http://www.columbia.edu/~mem4/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is fusion primer · Fusion: "Green" nuclear power · Magnetic fusion energy primer · ITER: Fusion at the scale of a power plant · Columbia University's plasma physics experiments 2Tuesday, March 1, 2011 #12;Energy from the Forces of Nature Gravity Tidal Energy Electromagnetic/ Molecular Combustion, Batteries,"Everyday" Energy

Mauel, Michael E.

298

Letter from the Department of Energy to the District of Columbia Public  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with respect to the Emergency Petition and with respect to the Emergency Petition and Complaint Letter from the Department of Energy to the District of Columbia Public Service Commission with respect to the Emergency Petition and Complaint Docket No. EO-05-01: We have received the Petition and Complaint that you filed with the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on August 24, 2005, on behalf of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission. The Petition requests DOE to provide emergency relief under section 202(c) of the Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 824(a), to require continued operation ofthe Mirant Power Plant. DOE, in consultation with other Federal agencies, is examining this matter expeditiously to determine the facts necessary to render an appropriate decision.

299

South Columbia Street (Main Hospital)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W est N ew Mason Farm R oad di M anning Drive Drive Deck Cardinal Hospital NC Neuro- Infirmary NC 2 East Wing Patient Support Wing Parking Dogwood Deck UNC HOSPITALS Children's NC Memorial NC Women's cal South Columbia Street wood Dri Pit D rive Drive West ve (Main Hospital) Old Tarrson Brauer Dental

Whitton, Mary C.

300

South Columbia Street (Main Hospital)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W est N ew Mason Farm R oad di M anning Drive Drive Deck Cardinal Hospital NC Neuro- Infirmary NC 2 Wing Patient Support Wing Parking Dogwood Deck UNC HOSPITALS Children's NC Memorial NC Women's cal South Columbia Street wood Dri Pit D rive Drive West ve (Main Hospital) Old Brauer Tarrson Koury Oral

Doyle, Martin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

South Columbia Street (Main Hospital)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W est New Mason Farm Road M anning Drive Drive Deck Cardinal Hospital NC Neuro- Infirmary NC 2nd Wing Patient Support Wing Parking Dogwood Deck UNC HOSPITALS Children's NC Memorial NC Women's cal South Columbia Street wood Dri P Drive Drive West ve (Main Hospital) Old Tarrson Brauer Dental Research

Whitton, Mary C.

302

FIRE HISTORY AT THE EASTERN GREAT PLAINS MARGIN, MISSOURI RIVER LOESS HILLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRE HISTORY AT THE EASTERN GREAT PLAINS MARGIN, MISSOURI RIVER LOESS HILLS Michael C. Stambaugh-Columbia Columbia, MO 65211 stambaughm@missouri.edu and Daniel C. Dey United States Forest Service, North Central Hills of northwest Missouri. We sampled 33 bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.), chinkapin oak (Q

Stambaugh, Michael C

303

Environmental audit, Bonneville Power Administration, lower Columbia area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Audit conducted by the DOE Headquarters Office of Environmental Audit within the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) Lower Columbia Area. The BPA facilities included in the Audit are the Ross Complex in Vancouver, Washington; the substations of North Bonneville, North Bonneville Annex, Camas, and Longview within the state of Washington; and the Acton and Troutdale Substations within the state of Oregon. The independent Audit was conducted by a team of professionals from DOE and contractors. The purpose of the Audit is to provide the Secretary of Energy, Admiral James D. Watkins, Ret., with the status of environmental programs within BPA's Lower Columbia Area. The Environmental Audit team identified 25 findings dealing with the lack of conformance with federal and state laws and regulations and DOE Orders, and 7 findings in which BMPs were not attained. Although all findings require corrective action, none required cessation of operations or reflect situations that present an immediate risk to public health or the environment. The Audit team noted inadequacies in PCB management included storage, labeling, reporting, and spill control. The most significant causal factors for the findings include lack of policy implementation throughout the Lower Columbia Area, inadequate training of personnel charged with environmental protection, lack of standard operating procedures for many programs, lack of reviews and appraisals, and an inaccurate perception of low risk for environmental concerns.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Strengthening Federal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Jan. 24 Jan. 24 / Administration of George W. Bush, 2007 Executive Order 13423- Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management January 24, 2007 By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and to strengthen the environmental, energy, and transpor- tation management of Federal agencies, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. It is the policy of the United States that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and en- ergy-related activities under the law in sup- port of their respective missions in an envi- ronmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continuously improving, efficient, and sustainable manner. Sec. 2. Goals for Agencies. In imple-

305

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

44 44 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 114 / Wednesday, June 12, 1996 / Notices will be issued this fall in accordance with the reallocation procedures contained in the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA). Under section 442(e) of the HEA, unexpended FWS funds returned to the Secretary must be reallocated to eligible institutions that used at least 10 percent of the total FWS Federal funds granted to the institution to compensate students employed in community services. Because reallocated FWS funds will be distributed on the basis of fair share shortfall criteria, institutions must also have a fair share shortfall to receive these funds. Institutions must use all the reallocated FWS Federal funds to compensate students employed in community services. To ensure

306

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Kent House Penge East Lower Sydenham Forest Hill Honor Oak Park Crofton Park Nunhead New CrossC BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Harrow- on-the-Hill Northwick Park Harrow & Wealdstone Headstone Lane Pinner Kenton Stanmore Canons Park

Delmotte, Nausicaa

307

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

River Thames River Thames Du Cane Road Wood Lane Wood Lane North Pole Road Barlby Road Highlever Street Acton Market Place Acton Horn Lane Wood Lane Du Cane Road Wood Lane South Africa Road White City for BBC Television Centre Wood Lane Ariel Way Wood Lane Shepherd's Bush Green Shepherd's Bush Green

308

Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Re: District of Columbia Public Service Commission Emergency Petition and Complaint Docket No. EL05-145-000 Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Re: District of Columbia Public Service Commission Emergency Petition and Complaint Docket No. EL05-145-000 Docket No. EO-05-01: Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Re: District of Columbia Public Service Commission Emergency Petition and Complaint Docket No. EL05-145-000 Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and Poul Hertel, Sullivan Environmental Consultants Review of Mirant Unit 1 Plan More Documents & Publications Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling

309

Request for Extension of Order No. 202-05-3 of the District of Columbia  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Extension of Order No. 202-05-3 of the District of Extension of Order No. 202-05-3 of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Request for Extension of Order No. 202-05-3 of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No. EO-05-01. Order No. 202-05-3: Pursuant to Section 202(c) of the Federal Power Act ("FPA"),1 16 U.S.C. § 824a(c), the District of Columbia Public Service Commission ("DCPSC") hereby requests that the Secretary of Energy ("Secretary") extend Order No. 202-05-3, dated December 20,2005,2 and all the terms and conditions thereof, until certain transmission upgrades currently being constructed by the Potomac Electric Power Company ("PEP CO") become operational, or such other date when the electric power supply situation in the Nation's Capital is deemed to be secure.

310

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford River Corridor Contract To Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC March 23, 2005 - 10:56am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced that Washington Closure, LLC has been awarded the contract to manage the clean up and remediation of the Columbia River Corridor at the Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. The five-member team includes the Washington Group International Inc., Bechtel National Inc., CH2M Hill Inc., Eberline Services Inc., and Integrated Logistics Services Inc. The Columbia River Corridor is composed of roughly 210 square miles along the outer edge of the Hanford Site. The contract calls for cleaning up and

311

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC March 23, 2005 - 10:56am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced that Washington Closure, LLC has been awarded the contract to manage the clean up and remediation of the Columbia River Corridor at the Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. The five-member team includes the Washington Group International Inc., Bechtel National Inc., CH2M Hill Inc., Eberline Services Inc., and Integrated Logistics Services Inc. The Columbia River Corridor is composed of roughly 210 square miles along the outer edge of the Hanford Site. The contract calls for cleaning up and

312

New Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead New Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead May 24, 2010 - 1:23pm Addthis Voith Hydro installed machines at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, located about 40 miles east of Portland, Ore., that are meant to save more fish. The next-generation machines at Ice Harbor will be even more advanced. | Photo Courtesy of Voith Hydro Voith Hydro installed machines at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, located about 40 miles east of Portland, Ore., that are meant to save more fish. The next-generation machines at Ice Harbor will be even more advanced. | Photo Courtesy of Voith Hydro Joshua DeLung Hydropower harnesses water power to create reliable, clean and plentiful renewable energy, but dams can have an unintended impact on wildlife --

313

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 1, 2000 October 1, 2000 EA-1301: Final Environmental Assessment Idaho Department of Fish and Game Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon June 2, 2000 Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan This document constitutes the first edition of a long-term research and development (R&D) plan for nuclear technology in the United States. The federally-sponsored nuclear technology programs of the United States are almost exclusively the province of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The nuclear energy areas in DOE include, but are not limited to, R&D related to power reactors and the responsibility for the waste management system for final disposition of the spent fuel resulting from nuclear power reactors. May 23, 2000

314

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

09 09 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 93 / Friday, May 14, 1999 / Notices technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Burden Statement: The annual public reporting and recordkeeping burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 3.03 hours per response. It is estimated that any individual may respond to synopses or market research questions 5 times per year. EPA anticipates publicizing approximately 260 contract actions per year, and conducting 3790 market research inquiries. Burden means the total time, effort, or financial resources expended by persons to generate, maintain, retain, or disclose or provide information to or for a Federal agency. This includes the time needed to review

315

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

901 901 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 230 / Wednesday, December 1, 2004 / Notices As a result of this dispute, the SLA requested the Secretary of Education to convene a Federal arbitration panel to hear this complaint. A panel was convened, and a hearing on this matter was held on May 13, 2002. Arbitration Panel Decision The arbitration panel heard the following issue: whether the Army's alleged failure to negotiate with the SLA in good faith for the full food services and dining facility attendant services contract at Ft. Campbell, Kentucky, constituted a violation of the Act (20 U.S.C. 107 et seq.) and the implementing regulations in 34 CFR part 395. After considering the evidence presented, the majority of the panel ruled that the Act clearly covers all

316

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

32 32 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 114 / Tuesday, June 15, 1999 / Notices that the original selection list would remain in effect. The complainant requested review of the SLA's stipulated decision by a Federal arbitration panel. The panel was convened on April 17, 1998. Arbitration Panel Decision The issue before the arbitration panel was whether the SLA's stipulated decision to make a determination concerning the continuation of the special assignment process at the time a military base became available was inconsistent with the ALJ's determination. The arbitration panel ruled that, at the time a military base contract became available, there may be a compelling reason that would benefit both the program and the complainant that would justify not assigning complainant

317

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

25 25 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 224 / Thursday, November 20, 1997 / Notices implementation from 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. For the rest of the day, the Council will meet with representatives from the State School-to-Work Implementation Grantees in small groups to discuss and determine strategies for addressing State sustainability issues. The meeting will close with a summary of the day's meeting and a discussion of future actions. Public Participation: The meeting on Tuesday, December 2, 1997, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Renaissance Mayflower Hotel, will be open to the public. Seats will be reserved for the media. Individuals with disabilities in need of special accommodations should contact the Designated Federal Official (DFO), listed below, at least seven (7)

318

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

66 66 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 142 / Friday, July 24, 1998 / Notices Dated: July 16, 1998. Richard D. Wilson, Acting Assistant Administrator. [FR Doc. 98-19832 Filed 7-23-98; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560-50-P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-5494-1] Environmental Impact Statements and Regulations; Availability of EPA Comments Availability of EPA comments prepared July 6, 1998 Through July 10, 1998 pursuant to the Environmental Review Process (ERP), under Section 309 of the Clean Air Act and Section 102(2)(c) of the National Environmental Policy Act as amended. Requests for copies of EPA comments can be directed to the Office of Federal Activities AT (202) 564-5076. An explanation of the ratings assigned to draft environmental impact statements (EISs) was published

319

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 47 / Friday, March 8, 1996 / Notices Comment date: March 18, 1996, in accordance with Standard Paragraph E at the end of this notice. 13. Benjamin F. Montoya [Docket No. ID-2945-000] Take notice that on February 23, 1996, Benjamin F. Montoya (Applicant) tendered for filing an application under Section 305(b) of the Federal Power Act to hold the following positions: President, Chief Executive Officer and Director, Public Service Company of New Mexico, a New Mexico corporation Director, Northwest Corporation Comment date: March 15, 1996, in accordance with Standard Paragraph E at the end of this notice. 14. Montana Power Company [Docket No. TX96-6-000] Take notice that on February 26, 1996, Montana Power Company (MPC) tendered for filing an application

320

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BEFORE THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION ) Emergency Petition and Complaint of ) Docket No. EL05-145-000 District of Columbia Public Service Comm'n ) ) POTOMAC ELECTRIC POWER COMPANY'S MOTION TO INTERVENE AND COMMENT IN SUPPORT OF EMERGENCY PETITION AND COMPLAINT Pursuant to Rules 211 and 214 of the Rules of Practice and Procedure of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC" or the "Commission"), 18 C.F.R. §§ 385.211 and 385.214 (2004), Potomac Electric Power Company ("Pepco") hereby moves to intervene in the above-captioned proceeding and supports the August 24, 2005 Emergency Petition and Complaint filed by the District of Columbia Public Service Commission ("DC PSC"). As discussed below, Mirant Corporation and its public utility subsidiaries (collectively, "Mirant")

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Columbia Energy Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Partners Energy Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Columbia Energy Partners Place Washington State Zip WA 98629 Sector Wind energy Product Columbia Energy Partners LLC (CEP) is an independent developer of wind power projects in Washington and Oregon. References Columbia Energy Partners[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Columbia Energy Partners is a company located in Washington State . References ↑ "Columbia Energy Partners" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Columbia_Energy_Partners&oldid=343782" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages

322

Feasibility and Risks of Coho Reintroduction in Mid-Columbia [Tributaries] Monitoring and Evaluation, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term vision for the coho re-introduction project is to reestablish naturally reproducing coho salmon populations in mid-Columbia river basins, with numbers at or near carrying capacity that provide opportunities for significant harvest for Tribal and non-Tribal fishers.

Dunnigan, James L. (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Federal Energy Management Program: Sustainable Federal Fleets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Fleets Federal Fleets The Federal Fleet Program Overview outlines FEMP services and assistance available to Federal fleet managers to increase the use of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. FEMP's Sustainable Federal Fleets website provides guidance and assistance to help implement Federal legislative and regulatory requirements mandating reduced petroleum consumption and increased alternative fuel use. FEMP's efforts include assisting agencies with implementing and managing energy-efficient and alternative fuel vehicles and facilitating a coordinated effort to reduce petroleum consumption and increase alternative fuel use annually. Content on Sustainable Federal Fleets spans Federal requirements and reporting compliance, alternative fuels and advanced vehicles, fleet performance data, analysis services, information resources, and FEMP contacts.

324

Two-dimensional river modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flow conditions. This thesis investigates the application of a recently developed two- dimensional river model system. The microcomputer version of FESWMS-2DH was developed for the Federal Highway Administration by the U. S. Geological Survey. Four... simulations are used to examine the performance of the two- dimensional river modeling system: flow in a simple channel, flow in a strongly curved channel bend, flow in a meandering creek, and flow in Buckhorn Creek, a single opening bridge crossing of a...

Thompson, James Cameron

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sustainable Energy Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Sustainable Energy Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Program (District of Columbia) The District of Columbia Sustainable Energy Utility currently offers the Residential Energy Efficiency Program. The program provides incentives to residents who complete qualifying home energy upgrades. Qualifying items include refrigerators, clothes washers, LED lighting and CFL lighting upgrades. Appliances and lighting equipment must be Energy Star rated. More information on program requirements can be found on the program website. October 16, 2013 Sustainable Energy Utility - D.C. Home Performance (District of Columbia) The District of Columbia Sustainable Energy Utility currently offers the D.C. Home Performance program (DCHP). DCHP provides a $500 incentive to

326

British Columbia UILO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Academic Research foundation ) References: British Columbia UILO1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

327

Non-Federal Participation In Ac Intertie Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Federal Participation In Ac Intertie Non-Federal Participation In Ac Intertie Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume 1: Environmental Analysis Bonneville DOE/eis-0145 POWER ADMINISTRATION January 1994 Non-Federal Participation in AC Intertie Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS - 0145) Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Title of Proposed Action: Non-Federal Participation in AC Intertie States and Other Areas Involved: Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, California, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Wyoming, British Columbia Abstract: BPA is considering action in two areas: (1) non-Federal access to

328

Response of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Response of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No. EO-05-01: Response of the District of Columbia...

329

Columbia River Salmon Passage Model Theory and Calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for their support and suggestions in the development of this model. David Askren - Bonneville Power Administration James Geiselman - Bonneville Power Administration Albert E. Giorgi - Bioanalysts, Inc. Dale Johnson - Bureau of Land Management Funding Model development was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration

Washington at Seattle, University of

330

Polychlorinated Biphenyl Presence in the Columbia River Corridor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 regulations to develop a conceptual understanding of potential contaminant releases from the Hanford Site based on an evaluation of existing data and known historical practices. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are one environmental contaminant potentially released through leaks, spills, or disposal. This document presents a summary of selected relevant existing information, including environmental studies and Hanford Site analytical data.

R. M. Hermann

2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Power of Water Renegotiating the Columbia River Treaty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and release: - Agriculture and food security (THE BIGGEST ISSUE) - Hydroelectric power - Other nonagricultural

332

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

893 893 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 158 / Friday, August 15, 2003 / Notices Title: Comprehensive Program Annual Performance Report. Frequency: One time. Affected Public: Not-for-profit institutions. Reporting and Recordkeeping Hour Burden: Responses: 140. Burden Hours: 2,800. Abstract: The Comprehensive Program is a discretionary grant program that makes competitive awards to support reform and innovations through projects that improve educational practice at the postsecondary level. Grantees annually submit a performance report to demonstrate that substantial progress is being made toward meeting the objectives of their projects. Reporting requirements are currently based on broad criteria from the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR). This request is to

333

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion measures resulted in very poor in-river migration conditions in 2001. Up to 99% of Snake River yearling chinook and steelhead were transported from the Snake River collection projects. Approximately 96% of Snake River juvenile sub-yearling fall chinook were transported. Of Mid-Columbia origin yearling chinook, 35% were transported, of steelhead 30% were transported and of sub yearling chinook, 59% were transported. Based upon data collected on the run-at-large, the juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam of wild and hatchery yearling chinook and wild and hatchery steelhead were the lowest observed in the last four years. In 2001, as the result of the lowest observed flows in recent years, travel times through the hydro system for spring chinook yearlings and steelhead was approximately twice as long as has been observed historically. Juvenile survival estimates through each index reach of the hydro system for steelhead and chinook juveniles was the lowest observed since the use of PIT tag technology began for estimating survival.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

COMMERCIAL RECREATION PROPERTY RIGHTS AND SECURITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMERCIAL RECREATION PROPERTY RIGHTS AND SECURITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA by Aaron Heidt Bachelor recreation property rights and security in British Columbia Author: Aaron Heidt (Date Signed) #12;SIMON

335

Emergency Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public Service Commission Emergency Petition and Complaint of District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No. EO-05-01:...

336

Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Microsoft Word - district_of_columbia.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia District of Columbia NERC Region(s) ....................................................................................................... RFC Primary Energy Source........................................................................................... Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) ....................................................................... 790 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power ................................ 790 46 Net Generation (megawatthours) ........................................................................... 199,858 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power ................................ 199,858 51 Emissions (thousand metric tons) ..........................................................................

338

Microsoft Word - district_of_columbia.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District of Columbia District of Columbia NERC Region(s) ....................................................................................................... RFC Primary Energy Source........................................................................................... Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) ....................................................................... 790 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power ................................ 790 46 Net Generation (megawatthours) ........................................................................... 199,858 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power ................................ 199,858 51 Emissions (thousand metric tons) ..........................................................................

339

Columbia University Libraries/ Information Services is a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the semester. Library hours by location and real-time study space information are available online: library, Lehman Social Sciences Library , or the Science & Engineering Library: library.columbia.edu/study-spacesWelcome Columbia University Libraries/ Information Services is a system of 21 libraries, including

Qian, Ning

340

Favourability Map of British Columbia Geothermal Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Favourability Map of British Columbia Geothermal Resources by Sarah Kimball A THESIS SUBMITTED carbon economy stipulates that power supply must be from renewable and low emission sources. Geothermal energy offers significant benefits to British Columbia which hosts Canadas best geothermal resources

Pedersen, Tom

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Western Pond Turtle Recovery Columbia Gorge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Western Pond Turtle Recovery in the Columbia Gorge Project ID 200102700 Submitted by: 4 March 2009 species of concern Western Pond Turtle Washington Status #12;Columbia Mainstem Goals · Maintain;Western Pond Turtle Recovery Current Efforts · Head Start · Population Reintroduction · Predator Control

342

spring 2010 Columbia EnginEEring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spring 2010 Columbia EnginEEring Michael MassiMino, Bs '84, nasa astronaut--page 15 ursula Burns an impaCt leaders making an impact flight #12;coluMBia engineering | spring 2010 | 1 contentsSpring 2010 West 120th street, Mc 4714 new York, nY 10027 #12;2 | engineering neWs | spring 2010 colu

Hone, James

343

New MOX Conservation Garden Features Federally Endangered Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is located, has been certified as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold buildingNew MOX Conservation Garden Features Federally Endangered Plant Linda Lee, botanist for the Savannah River Ecology Lab (from left), Clay Ramsey , federal project director of the Mixed Oxide Fuel

Georgia, University of

344

District of Columbia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbia: Energy Resources Columbia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 4138106 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The District of Columbia is the capital of the United States of America. Contents 1 State Energy Program Funding 2 Related Information 2.1 US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in District of Columbia 2.2 Registered Research Institutions in District of Columbia 2.3 Registered Networking Organizations in District of Columbia 2.4 Registered Policy Organizations in District of Columbia 2.5 Registered Energy Companies in District of Columbia 2.6 Registered Financial Organizations in District of Columbia 2.7 Energy Incentives for District of Columbia 2.8 Utility Companies in District of Columbia 3 References

345

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

21 21 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 226 / Friday, November 23, 2001 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Energy Technology Laboratory; Notice of Availability of a Financial Assistance Solicitation AGENCY: National Energy Technology Laboratory, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of availability of a financial assistance solicitation. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the intent to issue Financial Assistance Solicitation No. DE-PS26-02NT41423 entitled ''Black Liquor/Biomass Gasification Technology Support Research and Development.'' It is the intent of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, to solicit the submission of

346

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 220 / Friday, November 14, 2003 / Notices 1 Because the plants' refueling schedules determine the availability for lead assembly use, Duke Power Company has submitted a license amendment request to the NRC to allow irradiation of MOX lead assemblies at Catawba. The SA also analyzes the use of the McGuire Nuclear Station (McGuire) in North Carolina, which could be used in lieu of Catawba, if a license amendment request were submitted and approved. SUMMARY: The Leader, Regulatory Information Management Group, Office of the Chief Information Officer, invites comments on the proposed information collection requests as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. DATES: Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before January

347

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

57 57 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 54 / Tuesday, March 22, 2005 / Notices shall include a detailed explanation of the dispute. Upon the other Manager's receipt of such notice, that Manager shall have 15 working days to provide to the disputing Party a written answer to the notice and explanation. The notice and answer, including any exhibits thereto, shall be the Record of Dispute. After such 15-day period has expired, the Managers shall make their best efforts to resolve the dispute within 20 working days. C. If the Managers do not resolve the dispute within 20 days, the dispute will be elevated to FWS's Regional Director and DOE's Rocky Flats Manager or successor. Within 30 working days of receiving the Record of Dispute, they shall confer and attempt to resolve the

348

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

13 13 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 223 / Friday, November 19, 1999 / Notices numbers for EPA's regulations are listed in 40 CFR part 9 and 48 CFR Chapter 15. The EPA would like to solicit comments to: (i) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (ii) Evaluate the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (iii) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (iv) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated electronic,

349

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

09 09 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 182 / Friday, September 19, 1997 / Notices Information Officer, publishes this notice containing proposed information collection requests at the beginning of the Departmental review of the information collection. Each proposed information collection, grouped by office, contains the following: (1) Type of review requested, e.g., new, revision, extension, existing or reinstatement; (2) Title; (3) Summary of the collection; (4) Description of the need for, and proposed use of, the information; (5) Respondents and frequency of collection; and (6) Reporting and/or Recordkeeping burden. ED invites public comment at the address specified above. Copies of the requests are available from Patrick J. Sherrill at the address specified above. The Department of Education is

350

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 51 / Tuesday, March 16, 2004 / Notices meeting and will be provided opportunities to speak following previously scheduled speakers. Speakers will be requested to limit their initial comments to about five minutes. Speakers who need more than five minutes should indicate the length of time desired in their request. Depending on the number of speakers, DOE may need to limit speakers to five minutes initially but will provide additional opportunities as time permits. Speakers may also provide written materials to supplement their presentations. Oral and written comments will be given equal consideration. DOE will begin the meeting with an overview of the proposed Low-Emission Boiler System Project. The meeting will not be conducted as an evidentiary

351

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

146 146 Federal Register / Vol. 65, No. 122 / Friday, June 23, 2000 / Notices instructions; develop, acquire, install, and utilize technology and systems for the purposes of collecting, validating, and verifying information, processing and maintaining information, and disclosing and providing information; adjust the existing ways to comply with any previously applicable instructions and requirements; train personnel to be able to respond to a collection of information; search data sources; complete and review the collection of information; and transmit or otherwise disclose the information. EPA estimates that the changes discussed today, when implemented, will reduce burden by 23,000 hours and an insignificant number of dollars. Dated: June 14, 2000. Elizabeth Cotsworth, Director, Office of Solid Waste.

352

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

139 139 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 225 / Tuesday, November 23, 2004 / Notices EIS until March 31, 2004. Once scoping ended, BPA revised the Scoping Summary to reflect all comments received, and republished the summary on April 7, 2004. Based on the results of the public scoping conducted for the Transmission Policy-Level EIS and internal considerations such as the current and most recently projected activities of BPA's Transmission Business Line and budget issues, BPA has decided that continued consideration of a comprehensive policy for BPA's transmission business is not in the best interests of the agency at this time. As a result, it is no longer necessary to proceed with preparation of the Transmission Policy-Level EIS. Therefore, BPA is issuing this notice of

353

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

78 78 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 158 / Wednesday, August 17, 2005 / Notices requirements and practices for institutions participating in the Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) programs. The public is alerted that this package is a request for an extension of a currently approved collection. Until the anticipated reauthorization of the Higher Education Act and any resulting changes to the implementing regulations, the existing paperwork collection is simply extended, rather than revised. Requests for copies of the proposed information collection request may be accessed from http://edicsweb.ed.gov, by selecting the ''Browse Pending Collections'' link and by clicking on link number 2853. When you access the information collection, click on ''Download Attachments'' to view.

354

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

87 87 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 173 / Thursday, September 5, 1996 / Notices of burden accurate, (4) how might the Department enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected, and (5) how might the Department minimize the burden of this collection on the respondents, including through the use of information technology. Dated: August 29, 1996. Gloria Parker, Director, Information Resources Group. Office of Elementary and Secondary Education Type of Review: New. Title: Guidance on the Goals 2000 Amendments (Draft). Frequency: One-time submission. Affected Public: State, local or Tribal Gov't, SEAs or LEAs. Reporting and Recordkeeping Hour Burden: Responses: 30 Burden Hours: 3,000 Abstract: The Omnibus Consolidated Rescissions and Appropriations Act of

355

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

04 04 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 130 / Monday, July 8, 2002 / Notices Background The claim in question arose when the Department's Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education (Assistant Secretary) issued a program determination letter (PDL) on March 26, 1997. The PDL demanded a refund of $1,846,718 of funds provided to the PRDE for school years 1991-92 and 1992-93 under Chapter 1 of Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 2701 et seq. (1988)). Specifically, the Assistant Secretary found that the PRDE had used Chapter 1 funds to assess the educational needs of all public and private school children in violation of statutory and regulatory requirements that permitted the use of those funds only for programs designed to meet the

356

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

90 90 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 173 / Thursday, September 5, 1996 / Notices written comments concerning (1) the scope of the EIS, (2) the issues the EIS should address, and (3) the alternatives the EIS should analyze. Please address written comments to Mr. Grainger at the address indicated above. These comments should be postmarked by November 1, 1996 to ensure full consideration. Organizations and individuals wishing to participate in the public meeting can call 1-800-242-8269 between 8:30 AM and 5:00 PM Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, or submit their requests to Mr. Grainger at the address indicated above. DOE requests that anyone who wishes to speak at the scoping meeting preregister by contacting Mr. Grainger, either by phone or in writing. Preregistration

357

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

30 30 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 214 / Friday, November 5, 1999 / Notices natural or human environment. Because no significant environmental impacts will result from implementation of the proposed action, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and will not be prepared. The Army will not initiate the proposed action for 15 days following the completion of the EA and FNSI and publication of a public notice in a local newspaper. This EA is available for review at the following repositories: Lassen Community College Library, Highway 139, P.O. Box 3000, Susanville, CA 96130; Lassen County Public Works, 707 Nevada Street, Suite 2, Susanville, CA 96130; and the Washoe County Library, Downtown Branch, 301 South Center Street, Reno NV 89501. Dated: November 1, 1999.

358

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2266 2266 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 86 / Thursday, May 3, 2001 / Notices The States eligible to apply for incentive grant awards, and the amount they are eligible to receive are Florida, $2,645,125; Indiana, $1,308,726; Kentucky, $1,400,631; Texas, $3,000,000; Utah, $882,167; and Vermont $843,351. The six eligible States must submit their applications for incentive funding to the Department of Labor by June 18, 2001. As set forth in the provisions of WIA section 503(b)(2), and 20 CFR 666.220(b), the application must include assurances that: A. The legislature of the State was consulted with respect to the development of the application. B. The application was approved by the Governor, the eligible agency for adult education (as defined in section 203 of WIA), and the State agency

359

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

07 07 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 146 / Friday, July 30, 2004 / Notices assessment; and (f) environmental statistics. Process and Deadline for Submitting Nominations Any interested person or organization may nominate individuals qualified in the areas of expertise described above to serve on the Subcommittee. Nominations should be submitted in electronic format through the Form for Nominating Individuals to Panels of the EPA Science Advisory Board provided on the SAB Web site, http:// www.epa.gov/sab. The form can be accessed through a link on the blue navigational bar on the SAB Web site, http://www.epa.gov/sab. To be considered, all nominations must include the information required on that form. Anyone who is unable to submit nominations using this form, and any

360

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 17 / Thursday, January 25, 1996 / Notices Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91), and rules and regulations issued in implementation of those Acts. Further information regarding this Advisory Board may be obtained from Rachel Murphy Samuel at (202) 586- 3279. Issued in Washington, DC, on January 18, 1996. JoAnne Whitman, Deputy Advisory Committee Management Officer. [FR Doc. 96-1197 Filed 1-24-96; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6450-01-P Alternative Strategies for the Long- Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Notice of Intent (NOI). SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Federal Register  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

247 247 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 138 / Wednesday, July 17, 1996 / Notices by the Secretary of Commerce. The purpose of this meeting is to review the 1996 Award applications and to select applications to be considered in the site visit stage of the evaluation. The applications under review contain trade secrets and proprietary commercial information submitted to the Government in confidence. DATES: The meeting will convene August 7, 1996, at 8:00 a.m. and adjourn at 5:00 p.m. on August 7, 1996. The entire meeting will be closed. ADDRESS: The meeting will be held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Administration Building, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Harry Hertz, Director for Quality Programs, National Institute of

362

Savannah River Site Homepage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7/2014 7/2014 SEARCH GO News Releases Video Releases Upcoming Events 12.31.13 Dr. Sam Fink Earns Donald Orth Lifetime Achievement Award 12.31.13 Savannah River Remediation Issues Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Report 12.18.13 Prototype System Brings Advantages of Wireless Technology to Secure Environment CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL NEWS RELEASES CLICK HERE for our email news service, govDELIVERY 2013 PMI Project of the Year Award - Click to play on YouTube 2013 PMI Project of the Year Award Finalist: SRS Recovery Act Project PLAY VIDEO CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL VIDEO RELEASES Enterprise.SRS - Safety and Security begin with me! SRS Status & Emergency Information * Cold War Patriot's Resource Fair - Aiken, SC (04.25.13) * 3rd Annual Small Modular Reactor Conference - Columbia, SC (04.16-17.13)

363

RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 2 The Existing Conceptual Foundation19  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RETURN TO THE RIVER - 2000 Chapter 2 The Existing Conceptual Foundation19 Return to Table of Contents Go to Next Chapter CHAPTER 2. THE EXISTING CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATION AND THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN FISH Conceptual Foundation20 idea of replacing what was viewed as a wasteful desert with a productive garden

364

RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 6 Hydroelectric System Development187  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RETURN TO THE RIVER - 2000 Chapter 6 Hydroelectric System Development187 Return to Table of Contents Go to Next Chapter CHAPTER 6. HYDROELECTRIC SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT: EFFECTS ON JUVENILE AND ADULT of the Hydroelectric System Development of the hydropower system in the Columbia River basin began in the late

365

River Data Package for Hanford Assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and hydraulic parameters and input values that will be used in river modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by PNNL for DOE. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. The module is based on the legacy code for the Modular Aquatic Simulation System II (MASS2), which is a two-dimensional, depth-averaged model that provides the capability to simulate the lateral (bank-to-bank) variation of flow and contaminants. It simulates river hydrodynamics (water velocities and surface elevations), sediment transport, contaminant transport, biotic transport, and sediment-contaminant interaction, including both suspended sediments and bed sediments. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River. MASS2 requires data on the river flow rate, downstream water surface elevation, groundwater influx and contaminants flux, background concentrations of contaminants, channel bathymetry, and the bed and suspended sediment properties. Stochastic variability for some input parameters such as partition coefficient (kd) values and background radionuclide concentrations is generated by the Environmental Stochastic Preprocessor. River flow is randomized on a yearly basis. At this time, the conceptual model does not incorporate extreme flooding (for example, 50 to 100 years) or dam removal scenarios.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Edward M. Henderson, Jr. 407 Smith Street  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Pacific Northwest. This consist chiefly of the hydroelectric power from the Federal Columbia River Power great responsibility. The Columbia - Snake River hydroelectric system is a public resource. It derives

367

EIS-0425: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to help mitigate impacts to fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The...

368

Nevis Cyclotron Laboratories Columbia University  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

'i 'i ~ . 0 p 4 Nevis Cyclotron Laboratories Columbia University Department of Physics New York, New York THEORY OF MULTIPLE COULOMB SCATTERING FROM EXTENDED NUCLEI Leon N. Cooper and James Rainwater z , I i -- Joint ONR-AEC Program Office of Naval Research Contract Contract N6-ori-110-Task No. 1 Nevis - 4 - cu - 7 0 P-" This report has been photostated to fill your request as our sup- ply of copies w a s exhausted. If you should find that you do not need to retain this copy permanently in your files, we would greatly appreciate your returning it to TIS so that i t may be used to fill future requests from other AEC installations. t ? DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

369

FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 2004 FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 199, STANDARDS FOR SECURITY Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology A new Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS), recently approved by the Secretary of Commerce, will help federal agencies

370

Columbia Earth Engineering Center http://www.seas.columbia.edu/earth/Chan.html[8/19/2009 3:16:12 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia Earth Engineering Center http://www.seas.columbia.edu/earth/Chan.html[8/19/2009 3:16:12 PM Woman Scientist Award 1997 #12;Columbia Earth Engineering Center http://www.seas.columbia.edu/earth

371

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Information  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Dist. of Columbia Dist. of Columbia Information to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Information on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Information on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Information on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Information on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Information on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Information on AddThis.com... Dist. of Columbia Information This state page compiles information related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles in Dist. of Columbia and includes new incentives and laws, alternative fueling station locations, truck stop electrification

372

RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 9 Harvest Management343343  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irrigation withdrawals, during land development operations such as road and real estate building, and during of fishing mortality (Ricker and Smith 1975), is not sufficient to provide for the sustainable production of the Columbia River basin's salmon. However the principles of sustainable harvest management (Beverton and Holt

373

Federal Aviation Administration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aviation Administration Aviation Administration Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Federal Aviation Administration Name Federal Aviation Administration Address 800 Independence Ave., SW Place Washington, District of Columbia Zip 20591 Year founded 1958 Website http://www.faa.gov/ Coordinates 38.8872756°, -77.0230138° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8872756,"lon":-77.0230138,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

374

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Regulatory Commission Energy Regulatory Commission Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Name Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Address 888 First Street, N.E. Place Washington, District of Columbia Zip 20426 Phone number 1-866-208-3676 Website http://www.ferc.gov/contact-us Coordinates 38.90145°, -77.006248° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.90145,"lon":-77.006248,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

375

Federal Emergency Management Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emergency Management Agency Emergency Management Agency Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Federal Emergency Management Agency Name Federal Emergency Management Agency Address 500 C Street SW Place Washington, District of Columbia Zip 20472 Year founded 1979 Website http://www.fema.gov/ Coordinates 38.8858427°, -77.0182049° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8858427,"lon":-77.0182049,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

376

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Sustainable  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Federal Requirements for Sustainable Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Sustainable Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Sustainable Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Sustainable Buildings on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Sustainable Buildings on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Sustainable Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Sustainable Buildings on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Basics Federal Requirements By Regulation

377

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Renewable  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Federal Requirements for Renewable Energy to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Renewable Energy on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Renewable Energy on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Renewable Energy on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Renewable Energy on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Renewable Energy on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Renewable Energy on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies

378

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 17, 2010 March 17, 2010 Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman's Remarks to the Washington Institute for Near East Policy March 17, 2010 March 15, 2010 District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in the District of Columbia reflect a broad range of clean energy projects, from energy efficiency and the smart grid to renewable energy and advanced battery manufacturing. Through these investments, the District of Columbia's businesses, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning the District of Columbia to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. March 1, 2010

379

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States » District of Columbia United States » District of Columbia District of Columbia October 16, 2013 Vera Irrigation District #15 - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Vera Irrigation District #15 offers rebates to electric customers who improve energy efficiency. Rebates are available for water heaters, windows, heat pumps, clothes washer, duct sealing and appliance recycling. Certain efficiency standards must be met in order to receive a rebate for water heaters or windows. Vera Irrigation District also provides a $450 rebate for the installation of energy-efficient heat pumps; ductless heat pumps are eligible incentives of up to $1,500. See the program web site or contact the utility for more information about this program. October 16, 2013 Underground Storage Tank Management (District of Columbia)

380

Columbia Water and Light- Solar Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Columbia Water and Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and residential customers for the purchase of solar water heaters and solar photovoltaic systems. These rebates are available for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

British Columbia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

British Columbia: Energy Resources British Columbia: Energy Resources (Redirected from British Columbia, Canada) Jump to: navigation, search Name British Columbia Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 5909050 Coordinates 55°, -125° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55,"lon":-125,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

382

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Facility Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject

383

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products September 2011 Update to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products September 2011 Update on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products September 2011 Update on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products September 2011 Update on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products September 2011 Update on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products September 2011 Update on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal

384

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products November 2011 Update to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products November 2011 Update on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products November 2011 Update on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products November 2011 Update on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products November 2011 Update on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products November 2011 Update on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal

385

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy-Efficient  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Federal Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products February 2012 Update to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products February 2012 Update on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products February 2012 Update on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products February 2012 Update on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products February 2012 Update on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products February 2012 Update on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal

386

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for the Procurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Federal Requirements for the Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for the Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for the Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for the Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for the Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for the Procurement of Energy-Efficient Products on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal

387

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Requirements for Water Efficiency on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Basics

388

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Utility Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners on AddThis.com...

389

Microsoft Word - CX-RiverCrossingSeismicTesting_FY12_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

23, 2012 23, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Kerry Cook Supervisory Civil Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Columbia and Willamette River Crossings Liquefaction Hazard Assessment PP&A Project No.: 2359 Categorical Exclusions Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B3.1, Site characterization and environmental monitoring Location: Project activities would take place at four transmission line river crossings in Columbia and Multnomah counties, Oregon, and Clark and Cowlitz counties, Washington. The Townships, Ranges, and Sections are listed below: State County Township Range Section(s) Oregon Columbia 7N 3W 2,3 Oregon Columbia 8N 3W 35 Oregon Multnomah 1N 3E 14,23 Oregon Multnomah 2N 1E 29,30

390

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2007 Prepared by: National Institute to present to the President and the Congress this Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Report summarizing the achievements of Federal technology transfer and partnering programs of the Federal research and development

Perkins, Richard A.

391

Federal Aviation Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transportation systems FAA's RDT&E Organization: Federal Laboratory for R&D of aviation systems IndependentFederal Aviation Administration Federal Aviation AdministrationNextGen: Primer, Challenges. Wilson N. Felder Director, FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center Date: 6 February 2012 #12;2Federal

392

Federal Resume Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Learning Module will offer helpful tips and suggestions on the development of a federal resume.

393

Commissioning for Federal Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Guide describes building commissioning, recommissioning, retrocommissioning, and continuous commissioning for federal facilities.

394

Supplement Analysis for the Mid-Columbia Coho Reintroduction Feasibility Project EA - New Acclimation Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 18, 2002 November 18, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Mid-Columbia Coho Reintroduction Feasibility Project EA (DOE/EA-1282/SA-03) L. Hermeston - KEWL-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: New acclimation sites Project No: 1996-040-00 Location: Upper Wenatchee watershed, Chelan County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow river basins. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of these activities in the Mid-Columbia Coho Reintroduction Feasibility Project Final EA, completed in April 1999 (DOE/EA-1282). Supplemental Analyses (DOE/EA-

395

Federal Financial Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FEDERAL FINANCIAL REPORT FEDERAL FINANCIAL REPORT (Follow form instructions) 1. Federal Agency and Organizational Element 2. Federal Grant or Other Identifying Number Assigned by Federal Agency Page of to Which Report is Submitted (To report multiple grants, use FFR Attachment) 1 pages 3. Recipient Organization (Name and complete address including Zip code) 4a. DUNS Number 4b. EIN 5. Recipient Account Number or Identifying Number 6. Report Type 7. Basis of Accounting

396

Study of Wild Spring Chinook Salmon in the John Day River System, 1985 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of wild spring chinook salmon was conducted in the John Day River, Oregon: (1) recommend harvest regulations to achieve escapement goals in the John Day River; (2) recommend adtustments in timing of fish passage operations at Columbia River dams that will increase survival of John Day migrants; (3) recommend habitat or environmental improvements that will increase production of spring chinook salmon; (4) determine escapement goals for wild spring chinook salmon in the John Day River; and (5) recommend procedures for hatchery supplementation in the John Day River in the event it becomes necessary to artificially maintain the run of spring chinook salmon. Juveniles were captured as smolts during migration and as fingerlings during summer rearing. Juveniles were coded-wire tagged, and recoveries of tagged adults were used to assess contribution to ocean and Columbia River fisheries, timing of adult migrations through the Columbia River in relation to fishing seasons, and age and size of fish in fisheries. Scoop traps and seines were used to determine timing of smolt migrations through the John Day River. In addition, recoveries of tagged smolts at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Jones Beach were used to determine migration timing through the Columbia River. We examined freshwater life history of spring chinook salmon in the John Day River and related it to environmental factors. We looked at adult holding areas, spawning, incubation and emergence, fingerling rearing distribution, size and growth of juveniles and scales. Escapement goals fo the John Day River as well as reasons for declines in John Day stocks were determiend by using stock-recruitment analyses. Recommendations for hatchery supplementation in the John Day were based on results from other study objectives.

Lindsay, Robert B.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Wind River Watershed Restoration, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work completed by U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) in the Wind River subbasin during the period April 2005 through March 2006 under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract 22095. During this period, we collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. We also conducted electrofishing and snorkeling surveys to determine juvenile salmonid populations within select study areas throughout the subbasin. Portions of this work were completed with additional funding from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group (LCFEG). A statement of work (SOW) was submitted to BPA in March 2005 that outlined work to be performed by USGS-CRRL. The SOW was organized by work elements, with each describing a research task. This report summarizes the progress completed under each work element.

Jezorek, Ian G.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Munz, Carrie [U.S. Geological Survey

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

398

Federal Compensation to Idaho for Public Domain Federal Lands, 1988-99 FederalCompensationtoIdaho  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................................ 9 Figure 7. Bingham County Federal Payments........................................................................................................ 12 Figure 15. Canyon County Federal Payments

O'Laughlin, Jay

399

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL serves DOE and the nation by providing innovative solutions for DOE and other federal agencies across the country and around the...

400

Richland/Office of River Protection | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Richland/Office of River Protection Richland/Office of River Protection Richland/Office of River Protection Below are compliance agreements and accompanying summaries for the Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection at the Hanford site. Settlement Agreement re: Washington v. Bodman, January 6, 2006 Administrative Order, June 13, 2000 Administrative Order, June 13, 2000 Summary Federal Facility Compliance Agreement on Storage of Polychlorinated Biphenyls, August 8, 1996 Federal Facility Compliance Agreement on Storage of Polychlorinated Biphenyls, August 8, 1996 Summary Tank Stabilization September 30, 1999 Tank Stabilization September 30, 1999 Summary U.S. Federal Facility Compliance Agreement for the Hanford Site, February 7, 1994 U.S. Federal Facility Compliance Agreement for the Hanford Site, February

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

PRESERVATION OF FEDERAL RECORDS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PRESERVATION OF FEDERAL RECORDS PRESERVATION OF FEDERAL RECORDS The Federal Records Act requires the Department of Energy (DOE) Records Officer to remind departing Federal and contractor employees that Federal records may not be removed from Government custody nor may they be destroyed except in accordance with a records disposition schedule that has been approved by the Archivist of the United States. The creation of adequate documentation and the preservation of Federal records are required by law and regulation (contained in 36 CFR Chapter XII). As Federal and contractor employees, you have Federal record-keeping responsibilities that are regulated by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) to ensure the retention and preservation of Federal records. PURPOSE The purpose of this brochure is to provide records exit procedures for

402

Supplementation in the Columbia Basin : Summary Report Series : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report broadly defines the scope of supplementation plans and activities in the Columbia Basin. It provides the foundation for more detailed analysis of supplementation in subsequent reports in this series. Topics included in this report are: definition of supplementation, project diversity, objectives and performance standards, uncertainties and theory. Since this is a progress report, the content is subject to modification with new information. The supplementation theory will continue to evolve throughout the duration of RASP and beyond. The other topics in this report are essentially complete and are not expected to change significantly. This is the first of a series of four reports which will summarize information contained in the larger, RASP progress and completion reports. Our goal is to make the findings of RASP more accessible by grouping related topics into smaller but complete narratives on important aspects of supplementation. We are planning to publish the following reports under the general title Supplementation in the Columbia River Basin: Part 1, Background, Description, Performance Measures, Uncertainty and Theory; Part 2, Theoretical Framework and Models; Part 3, Planning Guidelines; and Part 4, Regional Coordination of Research and Monitoring. Supplementation is expected to be a major contributor to the planned increase in salmon and steelhead production in the Columbia Basin. The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) uses three approaches to protect and enhance salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin: (1) enhance fish production; (2) improve passage in the mainstem rivers; and (3) revise harvest management to support the rebuilding of fish runs (NPPC 1987). The fish production segment calls for a three-part approach focused on natural production, hatchery production, and supplementation. Supplementation is planned to provide over half of the total production increases. The Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated as a result of a request by NPPC to address long-standing concerns about the need to coordinate supplementation research, monitoring and evaluation. Such coordination was also recommended by the Supplementation Technical Work Group. In August 1990, the NPPC gave conditional approval to proceed with the final design of the Yakima Production Project. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund immediately a supplementation assessment to reevaluate, prioritize and coordinate all existing and planned supplementation monitoring and evaluation activities in the basin. Providing for the participation of the fishery agencies and tribes and others having expertise in this area. RASP addresses four principal objectives: (1) provide an overview of ongoing and planned supplementation activities and identify critical uncertainties associated with supplementation, (2) construct a conceptual framework and model which estimates the potential benefits and risks of supplementation and prioritizes uncertainties, (3) provide guidelines for the development of supplementation projects, (4) develop a plan for regional coordination of research and monitoring. These objectives, once attained, will provide the technical tools fishery managers need to carry out the Council's direction to protect and enhance salmon and steelhead. RASP has further divided the four broad objectives into 12 technical topics: (1) definition of supplementation; (2) description of the diversity of supplementation projects; (3) objectives and performance standards; (4) identification of uncertainties; (5) supplementation theory; (6) development of a conceptual model of supplemented populations; (7) development of spreadsheet model of risks and benefits of supplementation; (8) classification of stocks, streams, and supplementation strategies; (9) regional design of supplementation evaluation and monitoring; (10) guidelines for planning supplementation projects (11) application of the spreadsheet model to supplementation planning; and (12)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at Savannah River Site Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at Savannah River Site December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shelly Wilson, third from right, participates in a roundtable discussion at the Intergovernmental Meeting with the DOE in New Orleans this month. Also pictured are Maryland Delegate Sally Jameson, left to right, Office of River Protection Deputy Manager Stacy Charboneau, Willie Preacher, Director of DOE-related projects for Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and Eddy County, N.M., Commissioner Roxanne Lara. Shelly Wilson, third from right, participates in a roundtable discussion at the Intergovernmental Meeting with the DOE in New Orleans this month. Also

404

Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at Savannah River Site Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at Savannah River Site December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shelly Wilson, third from right, participates in a roundtable discussion at the Intergovernmental Meeting with the DOE in New Orleans this month. Also pictured are Maryland Delegate Sally Jameson, left to right, Office of River Protection Deputy Manager Stacy Charboneau, Willie Preacher, Director of DOE-related projects for Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and Eddy County, N.M., Commissioner Roxanne Lara. Shelly Wilson, third from right, participates in a roundtable discussion at the Intergovernmental Meeting with the DOE in New Orleans this month. Also

405

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inventories and Performance to someone by E-mail Inventories and Performance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

406

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industry Commitment to someone by E-mail Industry Commitment to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts

407

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy Efficiency Acquisition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Energy Federal Energy Efficiency Acquisition Guidance and Requirements for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy Efficiency Acquisition Guidance and Requirements for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy Efficiency Acquisition Guidance and Requirements for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy Efficiency Acquisition Guidance and Requirements for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy Efficiency Acquisition Guidance and Requirements for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Energy Efficiency

408

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Participants to someone by E-mail Participants to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE Utility Energy Service Contracts

409

State Petitions for Exemption from Federal Preemption | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Petitions for Exemption from Federal Preemption State Petitions for Exemption from Federal Preemption State Petitions for Exemption from Federal Preemption Federal energy efficiency requirements for residential products generally preempt state laws or regulations concerning energy conservation testing, labeling, and standards. (42 U.S.C. 6297(a)-(c)) However, the Department of Energy (DOE) can grant waivers of federal preemption for particular state laws or regulations. In particular, any state or river basin commission with a state regulation regarding energy use, energy efficiency, or water use requirements for products regulated by DOE may petition for an exemption from federal preemption to apply its own state regulation. (42 U.S.C. 6297(d)(1)(A)) Certain state procurement standards and building code

410

BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND USE PLANNING: BACKCOUNTRY TOURISM PERSPECTIVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND USE PLANNING: BACKCOUNTRY TOURISM PERSPECTIVES by Rebekah Edwards-Craig B of Research Project: British Columbia Land Use Planning: Backcountry Tourism Perspectives Supervisory, including the backcountry tourism and outdoor recreation sectors, at a disadvantage in such planning

411

Three Pacific Coast States Join British Columbia to Combat Climate...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Three Pacific Coast States Join British Columbia to Combat Climate Change Three Pacific Coast States Join British Columbia to Combat Climate Change November 6, 2013 - 12:00am...

412

Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy April 9, 2013 - 12:00am...

413

British Columbia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

British Columbia: Energy Resources British Columbia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name British Columbia Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 5909050 Coordinates 55°, -125° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55,"lon":-125,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

414

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States » District of Columbia United States » District of Columbia District of Columbia October 16, 2013 Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express Pacific Power's FinAnswer Express Program includes incentives and technical assistance for lighting, HVAC and other equipment upgrades that increase energy efficiency and exceed code requirements in commercial and industrial facilities. Both retrofits of existing equipment and new construction projects are eligible for incentives. For retrofits, the utility may need to verify existing equipment. Prescriptive rebates and custom incentives calculated from energy savings are available. October 16, 2013 Pacific Power - Energy FinAnswer Pacific Power's Energy FinAnswer program provides cash incentives to help its commercial and industrial customers improve their heating, cooling,

415

Federal Acquisition Regulation; Federal Acquisition Circular  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Federal Acquisition Circular (FAC) 2005-40 Federal Register /Vol. 75, No. 55 /Tuesday, March 23, 2010 /page 14059 A summary for the FAR rule follows. Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS) (FAR case 2008-027) Effective Date: April 22, 2010. This final rule amends the FAR to implement section 872 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009. Section 872 requires the establishment of a data system, Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS), containing specific information on the integrity and performance of covered Federal agency contractors and grantees. FAPIIS is available for use in award decisions at www.ppirs.gov. Government input to FAPIIS is accomplished at www.cpars.csd.disa.mil.

416

Federal Agency NEPA Procedures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Each Federal agency is required to develop NEPA procedures that supplement the CEQ Regulations. Developed in consultation with CEQ, Federal agency NEPA procedures must meet the standards in the CEQ...

417

Better Buildings Federal Award  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Federal Award recognizes the Federal Government's highest-performing buildings through a competition to reduce annual energy use intensity (Btu per square foot of facility space) on a year-over-year basis.

418

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan Volume II ­ Subbasin Plan Chapter J ­ Wind Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board December 15, 2004 #12;Preface This is one in a series Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White

419

Columbia Earth Engineering Center -Benjamin Miller http://www.seas.columbia.edu/earth/miller.html[8/19/2009 4:38:39 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Columbia Earth Engineering Center - Benjamin Miller http://www.seas.columbia.edu/earth Earth Engineering Center - Benjamin Miller http://www.seas.columbia.edu/earth/miller.html[8/19/2009 4 - present #12;Columbia Earth Engineering Center - Benjamin Miller http://www.seas.columbia.edu/earth

420

Federal Employee Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Chief Human Capital Officer the Chief Human Capital Officer Office of Learning and Workforce Development July 26, 2011 Federal Employee Training Desk Reference Federal Employee Training Federal Employee Training Page 2 of 53 July 26, 2011 Desk Reference Contents CHAPTER I. TRAINING REQUESTs, APPROVALs, AUTHORIZATIONS AND ALLOWABLE COSTs ........................................................................................................................................................... 3 1. TRAINING REQUESTS. ................................................................................................................. 3 2. TRAINING APPROVALS. .............................................................................................................. 3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "federal columbia river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.