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1

Submeter bathymetric mapping of volcanic and hydrothermal features on the East Pacific Rise crest at 9500  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of bathymetric changes associated with active volcanic, hydrothermal and tectonic processes. Components: 15Submeter bathymetric mapping of volcanic and hydrothermal features on the East Pacific Rise crest to produce submeter resolution bathymetric maps of five hydrothermal vent areas at the East Pacific Rise (EPR

Whitcomb, Louis L.

2

Microstructural Features in Aged Erbium Tritide Foils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aged erbium tritide foil specimens are found to contain five distinctly different microstructural features. The general structure was of large columnar grains of ErT2. But on a fine scale, precipitates believed to be erbium oxy-tritides and helium bubbles could be identified. The precipitate size was in the range of ~10 nm and the bubbles were of an unusual planar shape on {111} planes with an invariant thickness of ~1 nm and a diameter on the order of 10 nm. Also, an outer layer containing no fine precipitate structure and only a few helium bubbles was present on foils. This layer is best described as a denuded zone which probably grew during aging in air. Finally, large embedded Er2O3 particles were found at low density and non-uniformly distributed, but sometimes extending through the thickness of the foil. A failure mechanism allowing the helium to escape is suggested by observed cracking between bubbles closer to end of life.

Gelles, David S.; Brewer, L. N.; Kotula, Paul G.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Busick, C. C.; Snow, C. S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

E-Print Network 3.0 - active volcanic features Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the active volcanic centers are complexes... active and closely spaced Central American ... Source: Carr, Michael J.- Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Rutgers...

4

Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI Home It isGasERPSpun Off FromFeatures

6

SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

FV PERRY, GA CROWE, GA VALENTINE AND LM BOWKER

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

7

DETECTING VOLCANISM ON EXTRASOLAR PLANETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The search for extrasolar rocky planets has already found the first transiting rocky super-Earth, Corot 7b, with a surface temperature that allows for magma oceans. Here, we investigate whether we could distinguish rocky planets with recent major volcanism by remote observation. We develop a model for volcanic eruptions on an Earth-like exoplanet based on the present-day Earth and derive the observable features in emergent and transmission spectra for multiple scenarios of gas distribution and cloud cover. We calculate the observation time needed to detect explosive volcanism on exoplanets in primary as well as secondary eclipse and discuss the likelihood of observing volcanism on transiting Earth-sized to super-Earth-sized exoplanets. We find that sulfur dioxide from large explosive eruptions does present a spectral signal that is remotely detectable especially for secondary eclipse measurements around the closest stars and ground-based telescopes, and report the frequency and magnitude of the expected signatures. The transit probability of a planet in the habitable zone decreases with distance from the host star, making small, nearby host stars the best targets.

Kaltenegger, L.; Sasselov, D. D. [Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Henning, W. G., E-mail: lkaltene@cfa.harvard.ed [Harvard University, EPS, 20 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

"Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park--Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park-- Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots U, ydrothermal (hot water) and steaming ground. These features are re- lated to active volcanism, the largest fumarole (steam and volcanic-gas vent) in the park. The temperature of the high-velocity steam

Torgersen, Christian

9

Volcanic, erosional, tectonic, and biogenic peaks on Guyot Summit Plains in the Louisville Seamount Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vol. 23, p. 125-138. Sinton, J.M. 2009. Volcanic Islands. inAustral-Cook Islands [Sinton, 2009]. While these features

Ebuna, Daniel R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Temporal and petrogenetic constraints on volcanic accretionary processes at 9-10 degrees North East Pacific Rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volcanic accretion at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) occurs over a ~2-4 km wide neo-volcanic zone on either side of the axial summit trough (AST). Eruption ages are critical for understanding the distribution ...

Waters, Christopher L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Modeling volcanic ash dispersal  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the EyjafjŲll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

12

Jasper Seamount: Seven million years of volcanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jasper Seamount is a young, mid-sized (690 km{sup 3}) oceanic intraplate volcano located about 500 km west-southwest of San Diego, California. Reliable {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age data were obtained for several milligram-sized samples of 4 to 10 Ma plagioclase by using a defocused laser beam to clean the samples before fusion. Gee and Staudigel suggested that Jasper Seamount consists of a transitional to tholeiitic shield volcano formed by flank transitional series lavas, overlain by flank alkalic series lavas and summit alkalic series lavas. Twenty-nine individual {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar laser fusion analyses on nine samples confirm the stratigraphy: 10.3-10.0 Ma for the flank transitonal series, 8.7-7.5 Ma for the flank alkalic series, and 4.8-4.1 Ma for the summit alkalic series. The alkalinity of the lavas clearly increases with time, and there appear to be 1 to 3 m.y. hiatuses between each series. The age data are consistent with the complex magnetic anomaly of Jasper; however the dominant reversed polarity inferred from the anomaly suggests that most of the seamount formed at ca. 11 Ma, prior to the onset of Chron C5N. The duration of volcanism of Jasper Seamount is slightly longer than the duration of volcanism at Hawaiian volcanoes, suggesting that individual age data from seamounts may constrain the age of a seamount only to within about 7 m.y. unless the stage of volcanism can be unambiguously determined. Extrapolating from the results of our study, similar precision in age determinations should be possible on 50 mg of 1 Ma plagioclase from mid-ocean ridge basalt, opening new possibilities in the geochronology of young, low-potassium volcanic rocks.

Pringle, M.S. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California (USA)); Staudigel, H.; Gee, J. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, LaJolla, California (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Red Mountain is one of several hundred cinder cones within a swath of volcanic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time to expose their internal features. Although human quarrying creates frequently changing glimpses into a few of the cones in the volcanic field, quarries generally are unsafe for tourists and public access

Torgersen, Christian

14

Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro-Mu~noz , Isneri Talavera, Robert P.W. Duin, Mauricio Orozco-Alzate and John Makario Londo~no-Bonilla  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro in a natural way. As an example, the classification of seismic volcanic events is used. It is shown features. Keywords-volcanic seismic data, three-way representation, dissimilarity representation

Duin, Robert P.W.

16

Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

Crowe, B.M.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanic explosions act to release the energy transferred from magma or volcanic fluids. Measurement of the subsurface electrical resistivity is a promising method in...

18

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt & Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii & Maui Blind...

19

ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS, AND PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. This analysis report describes the development of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the volcanic ash exposure scenario, and the development of dose factors for calculating inhalation dose during volcanic eruption. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1 - 1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and provides an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This report is one of two reports that develop biosphere BDCFs, which are input parameters for the TSPA model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the ERMYN conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters, their development and the relationship between the parameters and specific features, events and processes (FEPs). This report describes biosphere model calculations and their output, the BDCFs, for the volcanic ash exposure scenario. This analysis receives direct input from the outputs of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) and from the five analyses that develop parameter values for the biosphere model (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172827]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169672]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169673]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169458]; and BSC 2004 [DIRS 169459]). The results of this report are further analyzed in the ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis'' (Figure 1 - 1). The objective of this analysis was to develop the BDCFs for the volcanic ash exposure scenario and the dose factors for calculating inhalation doses during volcanic eruption (eruption phase of the volcanic event). For the volcanic ash exposure scenario, the mode of radionuclide release into the biosphere is a volcanic eruption through the repository with the resulting entrainment of contaminated waste in the tephra and the subsequent atmospheric transport and dispersion of contaminated material in the biosphere. The biosphere process model for this scenario uses the surface deposition of contaminated ash as the source of radionuclides in the biosphere. The initial atmospheric transport and dispersion of the ash as well as its subsequent redistribution by fluvial and aeolian processes are not addressed within the biosphere model. These processes influence the value of the source term that is calculated elsewhere and then combined with the BDCFs in the TSPA model to calculate expected dose to the receptor.

na

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Characterization of Io's volcanic activity by infrared polarimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal emission from Io's volcanic hot spots is linearly polarized.Infrared measurements at 4.76 micrometers show disk-integrated polarization as large as 1.6 percent. The degree and position angle of linear polarization vary with Io's rotation in a manner characteristic of emission from a small number of hot spots. A model incorporating three hot spots best fits the data. The largest of these hot spots lies to the northeast of Loki Patera, as mapped from Voyager, and the other spot on the trailing hemisphere is near Ra Patera. The hot spot on the leading hemisphere corresponds to no named feature on the Voyager maps. The value determined for the index of refraction of the emitting surface is a lower bound; it is similar to that of terrestrial basalts and is somewhat less than that of sulfur. 25 references.

Goguen, J.D.; Sinton, W.M.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity...

22

Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Colorado. collaborativeprojectchilepeer2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical...

23

Evidence for explosive silicic volcanism on the Moon from the extended distribution of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reconstruct the abundance of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex on the Moon, using data from the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. We enhance the resolution via a pixon image reconstruction technique, and find that the thorium is distributed over a larger (40 km $\\times$ 75 km) area than the (25 km $\\times$ 35 km) high albedo region normally associated with Compton-Belkovich. Our reconstructions show that inside this region, the thorium concentration is 15 - 33 ppm. We also find additional thorium, spread up to 300 km eastward of the complex at $\\sim$2 ppm. The thorium must have been deposited during the formation of the volcanic complex, because subsequent lateral transport mechanisms, such as small impacts, are unable to move sufficient material. The morphology of the feature is consistent with pyroclastic dispersal and we conclude that the present distribution of thorium was likely created by the explosive eruption of silicic magma.

Wilson, J T; Massey, R J; Elphic, R C; Jolliff, B L; Lawrence, D J; Llewellin, E W; McElwaine, J N; Teodoro, L F A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

TESTING MODELS FOR BASALTIC VOLCANISM: IMPLICATIONS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TESTING MODELS FOR BASALTIC VOLCANISM: IMPLICATIONS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Eugene Smith 1 The determination of volcanic risk to the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain requires, then volcanism in the future may not be a significant threat to Yucca Mountain. On the other hand, if melting

Conrad, Clint

25

ARM - Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosionAnnouncements Media ContactCenterFeature Stories

26

Revised isotopic (40 Ar) age for the lamproite volcano of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revised isotopic (40 Ar/39 Ar) age for the lamproite volcano of Cabezos Negros, Fortuna Basin (lamproites) of the Fortuna Basin in southeast Spain. This age is significantly older than earlier reported K. Because the volcanic rocks are intercalated in the stratigraphic sequence of the Fortuna Basin directly

Utrecht, Universiteit

27

Monday, March 12, 2007 MARS VOLCANISM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monday, March 12, 2007 MARS VOLCANISM 2:30 p.m. Crystal Ballroom B Chairs: J. E. Bleacher M. H to the northeast. 2:45 p.m. Baloga S. M. * Glaze L. S. Time-Dependent Levee Growth for Mars Lava Flows [#1276, for very cold climate, sulfur dioxide glaciers and liquid sulfur dioxide runoff. 4:00 p.m. Johnson S. S

Rathbun, Julie A.

28

Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

29

Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic Region, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Groundwater in the...

30

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

82) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982)...

31

anatolian volcanic province: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Volcanic Province Geosciences Websites Summary: the Lonar crater. Chondrite-normalized Rare Earth Element (REE) patterns in the target basalts and brecciaTrace element and...

32

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration...

33

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration...

34

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,...

35

Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

associated with current hot-spring activity and the youngest pulses of volcanism. > Oxygen-isotope data from illitesmectite clays in the Cochiti district are zonally...

36

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. Michael Thompson (1985) Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park...

37

Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Exploration...

38

archean volcanic hosted: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

greenstone pile Sandiford, Mike 23 Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and...

39

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title...

40

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - american volcanic arc Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: american volcanic arc Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Project: EARTH-12-TM2: Volcanic volatile fluxes and the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA) Summary:...

42

Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

43

Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volcanic rifting at Martian grabens Daniel Me`ge,1 Anthony C. Cook,2,3 Erwan Garel,4 Yves: Solar System Objects: Mars; 8121 Tectonophysics: Dynamics, convection currents and mantle plumes; 8010: Me`ge, D., A. C. Cook, E. Garel, Y. Lagabrielle, and M.-H. Cormier, Volcanic rifting at Martian

Mege, Daniel

44

The volcanic acidification of glacial Lake Caviahue, Province of Neuquen, Argentina Johan C. Varekamp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The volcanic acidification of glacial Lake Caviahue, Province of Neuquen, Argentina Johan C (northern Patagonia, Argentina) is a large glacial lake acidified by volcanic fluids from Copahue volcano

Royer, Dana

45

Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

46

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and 15N-N2 values indicate a contribution from the mantle and a subducted sediment source in an arc volcanic setting. Authors Cathy J. Janik and Marcia K. McLaren...

47

Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic Area Of Mt Etna (Sicily) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Application Of...

48

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The...

49

Aging gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

Betts, Robert E. (Huntsville, AL); Crawford, John F. (Huntsville, AL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Computation of probabilistic hazard maps and source parameter estimation for volcanic ash transport and dispersion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volcanic ash advisory centers are charged with forecasting the movement of volcanic ash plumes, for aviation, health and safety preparation. Deterministic mathematical equations model the advection and dispersion of these plumes. However initial plume conditions Ė height, profile of particle location, volcanic vent parameters Ė are known only approximately at best, and other features of the governing system such as the windfield are stochastic. These uncertainties make forecasting plume motion difficult. As a result of these uncertainties, ash advisories based on a deterministic approach tend to be conservative, and many times over/under estimate the extent of a plume. This paper presents an end-to-end framework for generating a probabilistic approach to ash plume forecasting. This framework uses an ensemble of solutions, guided by Conjugate Unscented Transform (CUT) method for evaluating expectation integrals. This ensemble is used to construct a polynomial chaos expansion that can be sampled cheaply, to provide a probabilistic model forecast. The CUT method is then combined with a minimum variance condition, to provide a full posterior pdf of the uncertain source parameters, based on observed satellite imagery. The April 2010 eruption of the EyjafjallajŲkull volcano in Iceland is employed as a test example. The puff advection/dispersion model is used to hindcast the motion of the ash plume through time, concentrating on the period 14Ė16 April 2010. Variability in the height and particle loading of that eruption is introduced through a volcano column model called bent. Output uncertainty due to the assumed uncertain input parameter probability distributions, and a probabilistic spatial-temporal estimate of ash presence are computed.

Madankan, R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pouget, S. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Singla, P., E-mail: psingla@buffalo.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Bursik, M. [Department of Geology, University at Buffalo (United States); Dehn, J. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States); Jones, M. [Center for Computational Research, University at Buffalo (United States); Patra, A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Pavolonis, M. [NOAA-NESDIS, Center for Satellite Applications and Research (United States); Pitman, E.B. [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo (United States); Singh, T. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo (United States); Webley, P. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

features Utility Generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;#12;#12;features function utility Training Pool Utility Generator Per-frame function content utility classes utility classes utility Tree Decision Generator Module Utility Clustering Adaptive Content Classification Loop features content VO selection & Utility Selector content features Real

Chang, Shih-Fu

52

A model simulation of Pinatubo volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-dimensional, time-dependent model is used to study the chemical, microphysical, and radiative properties of volcanic aerosols produced by the Mount Pinatubo eruption on June 15, 1991. The authors` model treats gas-phase sulfur photochemistry, gas-to-particle conversion of sulfur, and the microphysics of sulfate aerosols and ash particles under stratospheric conditions. The dilution and diffusion of the volcanic eruption clouds are also accounted for in these conditions. Heteromolecular homogeneous and heterogeneous binary H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O nucleation, acid and water condensational growth, coagulation, and gravitational sedimentation are treated in detail in the model. Simulations suggested that after several weeks, the volcanic cloud was composed mainly of sulfuric acid/water droplets produced in situ from the SO{sub 2} emissions. The large amounts of SO{sub 2} (around 20 Mt) injected into the stratosphere by the Pinatubo eruption initiated homogeneous nucleation which generated a high concentration of small H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O droplets. These newly formed particles grew rapidly by condensation and coagulation in the first few months and then reached their stabilized sizes with effective radii in a range between 0.3 and 0.5 {mu}m approximately one-half year after the eruption. The predicted volcanic cloud parameters reasonably agree with measurements in term of the vertical distribution and lifetime of the volcanic aerosols, their basic microphysical structures (e.g., size distribution, concentration, mass ratio, and surface area) and radiative properties. The persistent volcanic aerosols can produce significant anomalies in the radiation field, which have important climatic consequences. The large enhancement in aerosol surface area can result in measurable global stratospheric ozone depletion. 57 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Zhao, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Turco, R.P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Toon, O.B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)] [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING 3:00 p.m. Waterway. The Geological History of Venus: Constraints from Buffered Crater Densities [#1096] We apply buffered crater density technique to a new global geological map of Venus (Ivanov, 2008) and obtain robust constraints

Rathbun, Julie A.

54

Measurement of the Optical Proper-ties of Volcanic Ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ­ Scattering solar radiation. ­ Absorption in the infrared. For chemical reactions: ­ Particles become coatedMeasurement of the Optical Proper- ties of Volcanic Ash Daniel M. Peters and R. G. Grainger@atm.ox.ac.uk http://www.atm.ox.ac.uk 1 Abstract We have just commenced a laboratory project, the "Optical Properties

Oxford, University of

55

SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC Youxue Zhang,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SILICATE MELT PROPERTIES AND VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS Youxue Zhang,1,2 Zhengjiu Xu,2 Mengfan Zhu,1 2007. [1] Knowledge about the properties of silicate melts is needed by volcanologists and petrologists and diffusivity of volatile components in silicate melts, silicate melt viscosity, and the fragmentation condition

Zhang, Youxue

56

Visualizing the Aftermath of Volcanic Eruptions Tobias Gunther  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Magdeburg ABSTRACT Volcanic eruptions are not only hazardous in the vicinity of a vol- cano, but also affect to reconstruct and assess the movement of ash clouds. In particular, we shed light on the Gr¬īimsv¬®otn, Puyehue or temperature. Combining individual satellite data into one visual- ization also allows to locate and judge

57

DVU Featured Training & Events ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Featured Training & Events Form Please complete this form in its entirety and email to AskTheDvu@hq.doe.gov 1. Course Title: 2. Course StartEnd Date: 3. StartEnd Time (Time zone...

58

Materials compatibility with the volcanic environment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attempts were made to run materials compatibility, volcanic gas collection, and heat transfer experiments during the 1977 Kilauea eruption. Preliminary results from the recovered samples showed that Fe, Ni, and Fe-Ni alloys were the most heavily oxidized. The Mo and W alloys showed some attack and only neglible reaction was seen on 310 stainless, Hastelloy C, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Rene 41, and Nichrome. Results are qualitative only. (DLC)

Htun, K.M.

1984-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

59

FEATURE ARTICLE Pipeline Corrosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F FEATURE ARTICLE Pipeline Corrosion Issues Related to Carbon Capture, Transportation, and Storage Capture, Transportation, and Storage--Aspects of Corrosion and Materials. "Until these new technologies are developed and applied, corrosion engineers are focusing on how to best design pipelines for CO2 transport

Botte, Gerardine G.

60

Visual Navigation Visual Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ß translation ß rotation ß scale, and ß illumination 6 #12;2 Many detectors and descriptors ß Detectors ß Harris directions. ß Such points can be detected by examining the structure tensor (2x2 matrix of local intensity: Scale-Invariant Feature Transform ß SIFT Keypoints ≠ local intensity extrema (minima or maxima) in both

Zhang, Hong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity beneath non-volcanic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tectonics 7, 1-21 (1988). 9. Abers, G. A. in Non-Volcanic Rifting of Continental... @iac.unibe.ch). ... Mantle...

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - altered volcanic ash Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences, University of British Columbia Collection: Geosciences 44 Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period Summary:...

63

sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar age calibration of the litho- and paleomagnetic stratigraphies of the Ngorora Formation, Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precise eruptive ages have been determined by the laser-fusion, single-crystal {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar method for juvenile volcanic feldspars from reworked and contaminated volcaniclastic rocks of the middle Miocene Ngorora Formation, Kenya Rift Valley. These ages range from 13.06 Ma at the base to 10.51 Ma toward the top of the type section near Kabarsero. Correlation of the local paleomagnetic stratigraphies with the geomagnetic reversal time scale yields magnetochronologic age estimates that are younger than the isotopic ages by an average of 0.18 Ma. Much of the discrepancy can be eliminated if an inferred change in sea-floor spreading rate occurred at 13 Ma or earlier, rather than at 10.42 Ma as previously suggested. Sedimentation rates at Kabarsero calculated from the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results decrease from initial values of {approximately}25 cm/1,000 yr to {approximately}5 cm/1,000 yr toward the top of the section. The initial rapid sedimentation rates characterize the first 0.1 to 0.3 m.y. following emplacement of the underlying, voluminous, basin-filling Tiim Phonolites, indicating that the Baringo Basin at this time may not have existed as a rift valley created by extensional tectonics, but instead may have been a subsidence feature formed in response to removal of large volumes of magma from the lithosphere. A premolar tentatively identified as Proconsul sp. indet. found in the Ngorora Formation near the village of Bartabwa has been dated at {approximately}12.42 Ma, representing perhaps the last known occurrence of this genus in the fossil record.

Deino, A.; Drake, R. (Institute of Human Origins, Berkeley, CA (USA)); Tauxe, L. (Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA)); Monaghan, M. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analysis and correlation of volcanic ash in marine sediments from the Peru Margin, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201: explosive volcanic cycles of the north-central Andes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed investigation of cores from three Peru Margin sites drilled during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 201 has been conducted to determine the occurrence of volcanic ash layers and ash accumulations within marine sediments along the Peru...

Hart, Shirley Dawn

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

65

Feature Stories | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFORFALL NEWS ROCKY MOUNTAINFastFeature Stories News

66

Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds A. J. Durant,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that such ``overseeded'' volcanic clouds will exhibit enhanced ice crystal concentrations and smaller average ice crystal nucleation in volcanic plumes and clouds affects dynamics [Glaze et al., 1997; Herzog et al., 1998; Mastin- porting water to the stratosphere [Glaze et al., 1997] and these fluxes depend in part on the microphysics

Rose, William I.

67

Ensemble Forecasting of Volcanic Sulfur Emissions in Hawai'i Andre Pattantyus and Steven Businger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Hawai'i. The probabilistic forecast products show uncertainty in pollutant concentrations of pollution known as "vog" after volcanic smog. Prevailing northeast trade winds in Hawaii advectEnsemble Forecasting of Volcanic Sulfur Emissions in Hawai'i Andre Pattantyus and Steven Businger

Businger, Steven

68

Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period R (2006), Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period histories from ice coring of Greenland and Antarctica over the period 2 to 45 ka, using SO4 anomalies

Price, P. Buford

69

Measurement of the Optical Proper-ties of Volcanic Ash: Current status.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of the Optical Proper- ties of Volcanic Ash: Current status. Daniel M. Peters and R. G is to allow further assessment of the role of volcanic ash in atmospheric chem- istry, and radiative transfer. Applications of the measurements include: · Radiative transfer from: ­ Scattering solar radiation. ­ Absorption

Oxford, University of

70

Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetotelluric images of the crustal structure of Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya V. Sakkas volcanic chain on the eastern flank of the Kenya Rift in East Africa. Transient electromagnetic (TEM flank of the Kenya Rift deduced from wide-angle P-wave data. In: Fuchs, K., Altherr, R., Muller, B

Meju, Max

71

Deep explosive volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and seismological constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seafloor digital imagery and bathymetric data are used to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85įE segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-Ļ). Imagery reveals that ridges and volcanic cones in the ...

Pontbriand, Claire Willis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Chachil Limestone (Pliensbachianeearliest Toarcian) Neuqun Basin, Argentina: UePb age calibration and its significance on the Early Jurassic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Chachil Limestone (Pliensbachianeearliest Toarcian) Neuquén Basin, Argentina: UePb age Geológico Minero Argentino and CONICET, Av. Julio A. Roca 651, 1322 Buenos Aires, Argentina b Physics Geológicas, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, Calle 1 - # 644, 1900 La Plata, Argentina e Volcanic Basin

Mazzini, Adriano

73

SciFeatureSciFeature SEA-MONKEYS AND ALIENS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SciFeatureSciFeature MSU SEA-MONKEYS¬ģ AND ALIENS? What is the connection between Sea-Monkeys¬ģ and aliens? Believe it or not NASA scientists think it is possible that some alien life might resemble Sea

74

The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

Jackson, M.R. Jr.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Applications of the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigation (100 m); and (3) the azimuths to two of the usable transmitters (NLK and NPM) are aligned favorably with most of the principal geologic features. Measurements of...

76

Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50Ė100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

78

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

79

Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

80

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

82

Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies: 1992--1993 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual report of the Center for Volcanic Studies (CVTS) contains a series of papers, reprints and a Master of Science thesis that review the progress made by the CVTS between October 1, 1992 and February 1, 1994. During this period CVTS staff focused on several topics that have direct relevance to volcanic hazards related to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These topics include: (1) polygenetic/polycyclic volcanism in Crater Flat, Nevada; (2) the role of the mantle during crustal extension; (3) the detailed geology of Crater Flat, Nevada; (4) Pliocene volcanoes in the Reveille Range, south-central Nevada; (5) estimating the probability of disruption of the proposed repository by volcanic eruptions. This topic is being studied by Dr. C.H. Ho at UNLV. The report contains copies of these individual papers as they were presented in various conference proceedings.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Direct numerical simulations of multiphase flow with applications to basaltic volcanism and planetary evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiphase flows are an essential component of natural systems: They affect the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, shape the landscape of terrestrial planets, and govern subsurface flow in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advancing ...

Suckale, Jenny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Quaternary Science Reviews 26 (2007) 15291546 Glacial and volcanic history of Icelandic table mountains from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Table mountains, also widely known as tuyas of these distinctive landforms in the Tuya Butte volcanic field in northwestern British Columbia were described

Licciardi, Joseph M.

85

Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

Graham, David W. (David William)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

Burton, B.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Geologic origin of magnetic volcanic glasses in the KBS tuff  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volcanic glass shards and banded pumice from the KBS tuff of northern Kenya exhibit marked variations in magnetic susceptibility and color (colorless to dark brown). The darker glass shards exhibit superparamagnetism, which they now know to be carried by a population of tiny microcrystals of Fe-rich cubic oxide, approx. 20 to approx. 100 A in size, thought to be magnetite. A theory for their origin is one of nucleation and growth (precipitation) in quenched homogeneous glass (colorless) at temperatures of approx. 700-1000/sup 0/C during and immediately subsequent to eruption. Results from high-temperature heating experiments on KBS shards support this idea. The precipitate appears in the KBS shards as a consequence of their cooling history and is the origin of their coloring; the origin cannot lie in negligible compositional differences between the colorless and darkest shards. On the other hand, banded pumice from the KBS tuff has both dark and colorless glasses of differing compositions. The pumice appears banded because precipitation occurred preferentially in the Fe-rich glass. Although magma mixing may have played a role in the eruption of these materials, on the basis of their survey of distal eruptive products, it would appear that the volumetric amount of the mafic end member (dark pumice) was insubstantial.

Schlinger, C.M.; Smith, R.M.; Veblen, D.R.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

NEW MEXICO BUREAU OF GEOLOGY & MINERAL RESOURCES, BULLETIN 160, 2004 Cosmogenic 36Cl ages of lava flows in the ZuniBandera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

309 NEW MEXICO BUREAU OF GEOLOGY & MINERAL RESOURCES, BULLETIN 160, 2004 Cosmogenic 36Cl ages of lava flows in the Zuni­Bandera volcanic field, northcentral New Mexico, U.S.A. Nelia W. Dunbar1 and Fred M. Phillips2 1New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, New Mexico Institute of Mining

Dunbar, Nelia W.

90

Effects of Volcanism on Climate Paul Withers The effects of subaerial volcanism extend far from their source. Long-distance effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at ground level. Mafic volcanic gases can be roughly described as 80% H2O, 10% CO2, 5% SO2, and traces, 1980), El Chichon (Mexico, 1982), Mt. Hudson (Chile, 1991), and Mt. Pinatubo (Philippines, 1991 of the eruption column, having been transported less than 1000 km for any eruptions in the Holocene, or past 8000

Withers, Paul

91

Entangled topological features of light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the entanglement of topological features, namely, isolated, linked optical vortex loops in the light from spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC). In three dimensions, optical vortices are lines of phase singularity and vortices of energy flow which percolate through all optical fields. This example of entanglement is between features that extend over macroscopic and finite volumes, furthermore, topological features are robust to perturbation . The entanglement of photons in complex three-dimensional(3D) topological states suggests the possibility of entanglement of similar structures in other quantum systems describable by complex scalar functions, such as superconductors, superfluids and Bose-Einstein condensates.

J. Romero; J. Leach; B. Jack; M. R. Dennis; S. Franke-Arnold; S. M. Barnett; M. J. Padgett

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

92

Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nature Climate Change features Los  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research February 27, 2013 New print edition of journal tags tree-stress project for cover story LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 27, 2013-The print...

94

__---I--*---Science Service Feature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ice lying upon its w r f a c e , such a6 are nom found in the polar regions and on high mountains as ice ages, during which such ice deposits formed. Each of these is s'ppo5ed to have lasted only from a few hundred thousand t o a million Years Or so* There have been at l e a s t four major ice ages

95

The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have a lower ash fall hazard. Information is based on data during the past 10,000 years. Bottom, from left

Torgersen, Christian

96

Image-based Prediction of Landmark Features for Mobile Robot Navigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based prediction of point and line features for a mobile system operating on a planar surface. Preliminary-based navigation system. The central idea in this design is to constantly track im- age features used as landmarks. This pro- vides constant and accurate control of position, yet avoids the overhead of computing an explicit

Jaffe, Jules

97

Bull. Soc. gol. Fr., 2008, no The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey): a Late  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull. Soc. géol. Fr., 2008, no 4 The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey-words. ­ Alkali basalt, Intraplate volcanism, Triassic (Upper), Neotethys, Turkey, Geochemistry. Abstract. ­ Late belonging to the Kara Dere ­ Sayrun unit of the Middle Antalya nappes, southwestern Turkey. New

Demouchy, Sylvie

98

Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Breitenmoser a,b,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Climate variability Tree-ring proxies DeVries solar cycle Volcanic activity Past two millennia The Sun cli- mate forcings to continuing global warming. To properly address long-term fingerprints of solar

Wehrli, Bernhard

99

Exploring links between physical and probabilistic models of volcanic eruptions: The Soufrie`re Hills Volcano, Montserrat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] Probabilistic methods play an increasingly important role in volcanic hazards forecasts. Here we show stiffening and gas exsolution, and depressurization due to development of permeability and gas escape. Our experience with the Soufrie`re Hills Volcano eruption sequence suggests that volcanic eruption forecasts

Connor, Charles

100

Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility of SF 6 Gas-Insulated TransformersFeatureFeature

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Features, Events, and Processes in SZ Flow and Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report evaluates and documents the inclusion or exclusion of the saturated zone (SZ) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) of a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for the decision. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.11(d), (e), (f) [DIRS 173273]. This scientific report focuses on FEP analysis of flow and transport issues relevant to the SZ (e.g., fracture flow in volcanic units, anisotropy, radionuclide transport on colloids, etc.) to be considered in the TSPA model for the LA. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded).

S. Kuzio

2005-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

102

Features, Events, and Processes in SZ Flow and Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis report evaluates and documents the inclusion or exclusion of the saturated zone (SZ) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) of a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded'', is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for the decision. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), (f) (DIRS 156605). This scientific report focuses on FEP analysis of flow and transport issues relevant to the SZ (e.g., fracture flow in volcanic units, anisotropy, radionuclide transport on colloids, etc.) to be considered in the TSPA model for the LA. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded).

K. Economy

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

FCLib: The Feature Characterization Library.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Feature Characterization Library (FCLib) is a software library that simplifies the process of interrogating, analyzing, and understanding complex data sets generated by finite element applications. This document provides an overview of the library, a description of both the design philosophy and implementation of the library, and examples of how the library can be utilized to extract understanding from raw datasets.

Gentile, Ann C.; Doyle, Wendy S. K.; Kegelmeyer, W. Philip [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Ulmer, Craig D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

NIF featured on BBC "Horizon"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was featured in the BBC broadcast "Horizon" hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Here is the NIF portion of the program, which was entitled "Can We Make A Star On Earth?" This video is used with the express permission of the BBC.

Brian Cox

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

105

NIF featured on BBC "Horizon"  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was featured in the BBC broadcast "Horizon" hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Here is the NIF portion of the program, which was entitled "Can We Make A Star On Earth?" This video is used with the express permission of the BBC.

Brian Cox

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Parylene C Aging Studies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parylene C is used in a device because of its conformable deposition and other advantages. Techniques to study Parylene C aging were developed, and %22lessons learned%22 that could be utilized for future studies are the result of this initial study. Differential Scanning Calorimetry yielded temperature ranges for Parylene C aging as well as post-deposition treatment. Post-deposition techniques are suggested to improve Parylene C performance. Sample preparation was critical to aging regimen. Short-term (~40 days) aging experiments with free standing and ceramic-supported Parylene C films highlighted %22lessons learned%22 which stressed further investigations in order to refine sample preparation (film thickness, single sided uniform coating, machine versus laser cutting, annealing time, temperature) and testing issues (%22necking%22) for robust accelerated aging of Parylene C.

Achyuthan, Komandoor; Sawyer, Patricia Sue.; Mata, Guillermo Adrian; White II, Gregory Von; Bernstein, Robert

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

COOEE bitumen: chemical aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study chemical aging in "COOEE bitumen" using molecular dynamic simulations. The model bitumen is composed of four realistic molecule types: saturated hydrocarbon, resinous oil, resin, and asphaltene. The aging reaction is modelled by the chemical reaction: "2 resins $\\rightarrow$ 1 asphaltene". Molecular dynamic simulations of four bitumen compositions, obtained by a repeated application of the aging reaction, are performed. The stress autocorrelation function, the fluid structure, the rotational dynamics of the plane aromatic molecules, and the diffusivity of each molecule, are determined for the four different compositions. The aging reaction causes a significant dynamics slowdown, which is correlated to the aggregation of asphaltene molecules in larger and dynamically slower nanoaggregates. Finally, a detailed description of the role of each molecule types in the aggregation and aging processes is given.

Lemarchand, Claire A; Dyre, Jeppe C; Hansen, Jesper S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li basins and have strong remanent magnetization. The appli- cation arises in exploration of natural gas identify the volcanic units at large depths. INTRODUCTION Exploration for natural gas hosted in volcanics

109

RESEARCH ARTICLE Apparent downwind depletion of volcanic SO2 flux--lessons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Volcano monitoring . FLYSPEC Introduction Volcanic gas emissions play an important role indicate that dry deposition of sulfur from the plume and conversion of SO2 to sulfate aerosols within 5km downwind, and is responsible for the apparent loss of SO2. Due to the importance of SO2 emission

Williams-Jones, Glyn

110

Journal of Geodynamics Offshore Oligo-Miocene volcanic fields within the Corsica-Liguria Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Journal of Geodynamics Offshore Oligo-Miocene volcanic fields within the Corsica-Liguria Basin Mediterranean) have been affected by a geochemically diverse igneous activity, offshore and onshore, since to our initial project. Key-Words: Mediterranean, Ligurian margins and Basin, Offshore Corsica, Miocene

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

111

Using hydraulic equivalences to discriminate transport processes1 of volcanic flows1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G21942 Using hydraulic equivalences to discriminate transport processes1 of volcanic flows1 2 Alain of hydraulic equivalence, we determined that deposits resulted from a combination of suspended-12 load fallout between transport mechanisms, hydraulic18 equivalences have a general applicability in geophysical flows

Boyer, Edmond

112

Effects of Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption on the hydrological cycle as an analog of geoengineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geoengineering Kevin E. Trenberth1 and Aiguo Dai1 Received 27 April 2007; revised 4 June 2007; accepted 26 June the composition of the atmosphere and alter outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). One geoengineering solution being geoengineering solutions. Citation: Trenberth, K. E., and A. Dai (2007), Effects of Mount Pinatubo volcanic

Dai, Aiguo

113

Did the Toba volcanic eruption of $74 ka B.P. produce widespread glaciation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the Toba volcanic eruption, approximately 74 ka B.P., was responsible for the extended cooling period and ice sheet advance immediately following it, but previous climate model simulations, using 100 times a maximum global cooling of 10 K and ModelE runs produced 8­17 K of cooling within the first years

Robock, Alan

114

Impacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in diameter caused significant species extinctions. This includes the 170 km-diameter Chicxulub impact crater or even significant species extinctions. The K/T mass extinction may have been caused by the coincidenceImpacts, volcanism and mass extinction: random coincidence or cause and effect? G. KELLER

115

Geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source of geothermal energy, is ulti- 0024-4937/$ - see front matter D 2005 Published by Elsevier BGeochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges Axel K Potsdam, Germany c Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati, Philippines Received 1 May 2004; accepted 25 May

116

Geologic constraints on the existence and distribution of West Antarctic subglacial volcanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal heat associated with their em- placement and cooling could play a crucial role in basal melt water [2] Geophysical studies suggest that subglacial volcanic activity and geothermal phenomena may help production. For instance, the geothermal flux estimate in the vicinity of a (potential) recently active

Hemming, Sidney R

117

Mt. Etna volcanic aerosol and ash retrievals using MERIS and AATSR data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation. Explosive plume particles component optical characteristics has been retrieved as a spatial calculating the optical properties of the volcanic ash a radiative transfer model has been used to simulated visible and near infrared channels we have estimated the optical depth (at 550nm) and the effective radius

Oxford, University of

118

Hydrogeochemistry and rare earth element behavior in a volcanically acidified watershed in Patagonia, Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogeochemistry and rare earth element behavior in a volcanically acidified watershed and analyzed for major ions, trace metals, and rare earth elements (REE). The concentrations of REE in the Rio to oxidation of sulfide minerals. D 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Rare earth elements

Royer, Dana

119

New ice core evidence for a volcanic cause of the A.D. 536 dust veil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New ice core evidence for a volcanic cause of the A.D. 536 dust veil L. B. Larsen,1 B. M. Vinther,1. [1] New and well-dated evidence of sulphate deposits in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores indicate a substantial and extensive atmospheric acidic dust veil at A.D. 533¬≠534 ¬Ī 2 years. This was likely produced

Nicolussi, Kurt

120

Automated volcanic eruption detection using MODIS Robert Wright *, Luke Flynn, Harold Garbeil, Andrew Harris, Eric Pilger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automated volcanic eruption detection using MODIS Robert Wright *, Luke Flynn, Harold Garbeil, Harris, & Wright, 2001). Initial research was concerned with the use of high-spatial-, low.g. Flynn Mouginis-Mark, & Horton, 1994; Wright, Flynn, & Harris, 2001), lava domes (e.g. Oppenheimer

Wright, Robert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions--What's in Yellowstone's Future?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions-- What's in Yellowstone's Future? U. In the background, steam vigorously rises from the hot Each year, millions of visitors come to admire the hot, such as geysers. Steam and hot water carry huge quantities of thermal en- ergy to the surface from the magma cham

Torgersen, Christian

122

American Journal of Science UTURUNCU VOLCANO, BOLIVIA: VOLCANIC UNREST DUE TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

American Journal of Science JUNE 2008 UTURUNCU VOLCANO, BOLIVIA: VOLCANIC UNREST DUE TO MID. Uturuncu volcano, SW Bolivia, is a dormant stratovolcano ( 85 km3 ) dominated by dacitic lava domes ßßß Empresa Minera Unificada S.A., La Paz, Bolivia; Mayelsuco@hotmail.com Institute of Geophysics, University

Pritchard, Matthew

123

Globular Cluster Ages and Stromgren CCD Photometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stromgren uvby CCD photometry can be used in a variety of ways to constrain the absolute and relative ages of globular clusters. The reddening corrected (v-y, c1) diagram offers the means to derive ages that are completely independent of distance. Very precise differential ages for clusters of the same chemical composition may also be determined from such 2-color plots, or from measurements of the magnitude difference, Delta_u, between the subgiant and horizontal branches on the $u-y, u$ plane (where both of these features are flat and well-defined, even for clusters like M13 that have extremely blue HBs on the (B-V, V) diagram). Based on high-quality photometry we find that: (1) M92 is 15 Gyr old, (2) M3 and M13 differ in age by < 1 Gyr, and (3) NGC 288, NGC 362, and NGC 1851 are coeval to within ~1.5 Gyr. These results strongly suggest that age cannot be the only ``second parameter''. Finally, we suggest that the observed variations in c1 among giant branch stars in all the metal-poor clusters that we have studied so far are likely due to star-to-star C and N abundance variations, and potentially indicate that most (if not all) globular clusters have ``primordial'' variations in at least these elements.

Frank Grundahl

1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

ARM - Features and Releases Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosionAnnouncements Media ContactCenterFeature

125

Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility of SF 6 Gas-Insulated Transformers BrandonFeature

126

Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility of SF 6 Gas-Insulated TransformersFeature Stories

127

Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility of SF 6 Gas-Insulated TransformersFeature

128

Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFORFALL NEWS ROCKY MOUNTAINFastFeature Stories

129

Features 2010 | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFORFALL NEWS ROCKY MOUNTAINFastFeature Stories0

130

Features 2011 | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFORFALL NEWS ROCKY MOUNTAINFastFeature Stories01

131

Features 2012 | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFORFALL NEWS ROCKY MOUNTAINFastFeature Stories012

132

Features 2013 | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFORFALL NEWS ROCKY MOUNTAINFastFeature Stories0123

133

Features | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFORFALL NEWS ROCKY MOUNTAINFastFeature

134

New Age Teaching: Beyond Didactics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Age Teaching: Beyond Didactics TheScientificWorldJOURNAL (New age teaching: beyond didactics. TSW Urology 1, 75Ė85.New Age Teaching: Beyond Didactics Peter D. Vlaovic and

Vlaovic, Peter D; McDougall, Elspeth M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Weathering and genesis of volcanic ash-influenced vertisols and vertic-like soils of El Salvador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

weathered Vertisol. Many studies have been done on the clay mineralogy of volcanic ash-derived soils. These soils have considerable amounts of amorphous materials in the clay fraction resulting in properties different from other mineral soils. Literature... on the mineralogy of Vertisols derived from or influenced by pyroclastic deposits, however, remain sparse. The mineralogical composition of volcanic ash depends on the conditions existing at the time of eruptions, the stage of soil 13 formation, the thickness...

Yerima, Bernard Palmer Kfuban

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Aging in community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Baby Boomers are on the brink of retirement. According to U.S. Census Bureau projections, the number of people aged 65 and over will more than double in the coming decades, growing from 35 million in 2000 to 72 million in ...

Fay, Justin (Justin Thomas)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

@ work' video segment features Robotic Software Engineer  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

@ work highlights Idaho National Laboratory employees and the jobs they perform.This segment features Robotic Software Engineer Miles Walton.

Idaho National Laboratory

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

CHAPTER FIVE Impacts of Anthropogenic Features on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clustering these features to maximize available habitats. Key Words: avoidance behavior, energy develop- ment Prairie-Chicken avoidance behavior of anthropogenic features be quantified for impact assessment and con of monthly home ranges (95% fixed kernels, n 539) and estimated the likelihood that anthropogenic features (i

Sandercock, Brett K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Discriminant Absorption Feature Learning for Material Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Discriminant Absorption Feature Learning for Material Classification Zhouyu Fu, Antonio Robles in spectral imaging by combining the use of invariant spectral absorption features and statistical machine learning techniques. Our method hinges in the relevance of spectral absorption features for material

Robles-Kelly, Antonio

142

Aging and Top-Down Attentional Control in Visual Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems that bias the gating of this featural information to later processing stages such as objectApril 2010 Aging and Top-Down Attentional Control in Visual Search Project Leads David J. Madden Security (DHS) to be able to assess and maintain this skill set in those employed as baggage screeners

McShea, Daniel W.

143

Concrete containment aging study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989, IAEA initiated a pilot study on the management of aging of nuclear power plant components. The Phase I and II studies of concrete containment are discussed. With the data base, plant owners will be able to review and enhance their existing programs. IAEA will analyze data provided by participating plants and the report is scheduled to be released by late 1994 (final report release mid-1995).

Pachner, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Tai, T.M. [Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Naus, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

MA et al.: SKETCH RETRIEVAL VIA STROKE FEATURES 1 Sketch Retrieval via Dense Stroke Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA et al.: SKETCH RETRIEVAL VIA STROKE FEATURES 1 Sketch Retrieval via Dense Stroke Features Chao search method. In this paper, we propose a representation scheme which takes sketch strokes into account with local features, thereby facilitat- ing efficient retrieval with codebooks. Stroke features are detected

Yang, Ming-Hsuan

145

Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region in Japan using multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, under contract to Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), is performing research on regional classification of given sites in Japan with respect to potential volcanic disruption using multivariate statistics and geo-statistical interpolation techniques. This report provides results obtained for hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for the Sengan region in Japan by applying multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques on the geologic data provided by NUMO. A workshop report produced in September 2003 by Sandia National Laboratories (Arnold et al., 2003) on volcanism lists a set of most important geologic variables as well as some secondary information related to volcanism. Geologic data extracted for the Sengan region in Japan from the data provided by NUMO revealed that data are not available at the same locations for all the important geologic variables. In other words, the geologic variable vectors were found to be incomplete spatially. However, it is necessary to have complete geologic variable vectors to perform multivariate statistical analyses. As a first step towards constructing complete geologic variable vectors, the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) zone 54 projected coordinate system and a 1 km square regular grid system were selected. The data available for each geologic variable on a geographic coordinate system were transferred to the aforementioned grid system. Also the recorded data on volcanic activity for Sengan region were produced on the same grid system. Each geologic variable map was compared with the recorded volcanic activity map to determine the geologic variables that are most important for volcanism. In the regionalized classification procedure, this step is known as the variable selection step. The following variables were determined as most important for volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate values for each variable at 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system that represents the Sengan region. These values formed complete geologic variable vectors at each of the 23,949 one km cell centers.

Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Balasingham, P. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Volcanic ash in feed coal and its influence on coal combustion products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana Utility to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a coal-fired power plant. The plant utilizes a low-sulfur (.23--.47 weight percent S) coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of feed coal samples identified two mineral suites. A primary suite (not authigenic) consisting of quartz (detrital and volcanic beta-form grains), biotite, and minor zircon and a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing calcite, alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The authigenic minerals are attributed to air-fall and reworked volcanic ash that was deposited in peat-forming mires. The Powder River Basin feed coals contain higher amounts of Ba, Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, and P compared to other analyzed eastern coals. These elements are associated with alumino-phosphate, biotite, calcite, and clay minerals. The element associations are indicative of coal that incorporated volcanic ash during deposition. XRD analysis of CCPs revealed a predominance of glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals in the fly ash; and quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite in the bottom ash. Microprobe and SEM analysis of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, and rounded grains of wollastonite with periclase. The abundant Ca and Mg mineral phases in the fly ashes are related to the presence of carbonate, clay, and phosphate minerals in the feed coal. The Ca- and Mg-rich mineral phases in the CCPs can be attributed to volcanic minerals deposited in the peat-forming mire. Dissolution and alteration of these minerals occurred either in the peat-forming sate or during coalification/diagenesis contributing to the authigenic mineral suite. Additionally, detrital mineral input and epigenetic ground-water flow may have affected the geochemistry of the feed coal.

Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.; Hower, J.C.; Stricker, G.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Novel Virtual Age Reliability Model for Time-to-Failure Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

counts, devices approaching physical feature size limits and nuclear plant comparable power densityA Novel Virtual Age Reliability Model for Time-to-Failure Prediction Yao Wang, Sorin Cotofana their relatively short operating lifetime. To overcome the MTTF weakness, this paper proposes a novel virtual age

Kuzmanov, Georgi

150

Glassy dynamics, aging in mobility, and structural relaxation of strongly adsorbed polymer films: Corrugation or confinement?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glassy dynamics, aging in mobility, and structural relaxation of strongly adsorbed polymer films of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada Abstract. A molecular dynamics simulation (MD. The model reproduces many experimentally observed features such as logarithmic aging of structural

Mueser, Martin

151

Oxygen buffering of Kilauea volcanic gases and the oxygen fugacity of Kilauea basalt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volcanic gases collected during episode 1 of the Puu Oo eruption along the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, have uniform C-O-H-S-Cl-F compositions that are sharply depleted in CO[sub 2]. The CO[sub 2]-poor gases are typical of Type II volcanic gases (GERLACH and GRAEBER, 1985) and were emitted from evolved magma stored for a prolonged period of time in the east rift zone after releasing CO[sub 2]-rich gases during an earlier period of temporary residence in the summit magma chamber. The samples are remarkably free of contamination by atmospheric gases and meteoric water. Thermodynamic evaluation of the analytical data shows that the episode 1 gases have equilibrium compositions appropriate for temperatures between 935 and 1032[degrees]C. Open- and closed-system equilibrium models of species distributions for the episode 1 gases show unequivocally that coexisting lavas buffered the gas oxygen fugacities during cooling. These models indicate that the F[sub o[sub 2

Gerlach, T.M. (Geological Survey, Vancouver, WA (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Data Foundations Data Attributes and Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Data Foundations Data Attributes and Features Data Pre-processing Data Storage Data Analysis Data Sources 1 Data Attributes Describing data content and characteristics Representing data Data Sortable Data Numerical Attributes 4 Discrete vs. Continuous #12;3 Statistical Features of Data 5

Fang, Shiaofen

153

Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

154

California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water source location. Interpreted together, and in the context of existing water quality and hydrogeologic data, these observable parameters help define the flow field of a groundwater basin, and indicate the degree of vertical communication between near-surface sources (or potential sources) of contamination, and deeper groundwater pumped at high capacity production wells.

Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

155

Aging and functional brain networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aging is associated with changes in human brain anatomy and function and cognitive decline. Recent studies suggest the aging decline of major functional connectivity hubs in the 'default-mode' network (DMN). Aging effects on other networks, however, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that aging would be associated with a decline of short- and long-range functional connectivity density (FCD) hubs in the DMN. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated resting-state data sets corresponding to 913 healthy subjects from a public magnetic resonance imaging database using functional connectivity density mapping (FCDM), a voxelwise and data-driven approach, together with parallel computing. Aging was associated with pronounced long-range FCD decreases in DMN and dorsal attention network (DAN) and with increases in somatosensory and subcortical networks. Aging effects in these networks were stronger for long-range than for short-range FCD and were also detected at the level of the main functional hubs. Females had higher short- and long-range FCD in DMN and lower FCD in the somatosensory network than males, but the gender by age interaction effects were not significant for any of the networks or hubs. These findings suggest that long-range connections may be more vulnerable to aging effects than short-range connections and that, in addition to the DMN, the DAN is also sensitive to aging effects, which could underlie the deterioration of attention processes that occurs with aging.

Tomasi D.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.

2011-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

156

Passive Safety Features for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rapid growth in the size and complexity of commercial nuclear power plants in the 1970s spawned an interest in smaller, simpler designs that are inherently or intrinsically safe through the use of passive design features. Several designs were developed, but none were ever built, although some of their passive safety features were incorporated into large commercial plant designs that are being planned or built today. In recent years, several reactor vendors are actively redeveloping small modular reactor (SMR) designs with even greater use of passive features. Several designs incorporate the ultimate in passive safety they completely eliminate specific accident initiators from the design. Other design features help to reduce the likelihood of an accident or help to mitigate the accident s consequences, should one occur. While some passive safety features are common to most SMR designs, irrespective of the coolant technology, other features are specific to water, gas, or liquid-metal cooled SMR designs. The extensive use of passive safety features in SMRs promise to make these plants highly robust, protecting both the general public and the owner/investor. Once demonstrated, these plants should allow nuclear power to be used confidently for a broader range of customers and applications than will be possible with large plants alone.

Ingersoll, Daniel T [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Relative Ages of Globular Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ages of extragalactic globular clusters can provide valuable insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies. In this contribution the photometric methods of age dating old globular cluster systems are summarised. The spectroscopic approach is reviewed with an emphasis of the right choice of age diagnostics. We present a new method of quantifying the relatively best age-sensitive spectroscopic index given the quality of a data set and a certain theoretical stellar synthesis model. The relatively best diagnostic plot is constructed from the set of Lick indices and used to age date globular clusters in several early-type galaxies which are part of a large spectroscopic survey of extragalactic globular cluster systems. We find that, independently of host galaxy, metal-poor ([Fe/H] 8 Gyr) and coeval. Metal-rich clusters show a wide range of ages from ~15 down to a few Gyr.

Thomas H. Puzia

2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

158

ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSAL AND DEPOSITION OF TEPHRA FROM A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (Ashplume) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. These aspects of volcanism-related dose calculation are described in the context of the entire igneous disruptive events conceptual model in ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169989], Section 6.1.1). The Ashplume conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The Ashplume mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report update the previous documentation of the Ashplume mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model. In this report, ''Ashplume'' is used when referring to the atmospheric dispersal model and ''ASHPLUME'' is used when referencing the code of that model. Two analysis and model reports provide direct inputs to this model report, namely ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion''. This model report provides direct inputs to the TSPA, which uses the ASHPLUME software described and used in this model report. Thus, ASHPLUME software inputs are inputs to this model report for ASHPLUME runs in this model report. However, ASHPLUME software inputs are outputs of this model report for ASHPLUME runs by TSPA.

C. Harrington

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

159

Ageing of Natural Rubber under Stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a dynamical-mechanical study of stress relaxation at small deformation in a natural (polyisoprene) rubber well above its glass transition temperature Tg. We find that an almost complete relaxation of stress takes place over very long periods of time, even though the elastic network integrity is fully retained. The relaxation rate and the long-time equilibrium modulus are sensitive functions of temperature which do not follow time-temperature superposition. Many characteristic features of non-ergodic ageing response are apparent at both short and very long times. We interpret the observed behaviour in terms of the properties of rubber crosslinks, capable of isomerisation under stress, and relate the results to recent models of soft glassy rheology.

S. M. Clarke; F. Elias; E. M. Terentjev

2000-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

160

AGING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Aging Facility performing operations to transfer aging casks to the aging pads for thermal and logistical management, stage empty aging casks, and retrieve aging casks from the aging pads for further processing in other site facilities. Doses received by workers due to aging cask surveillance and maintenance operations are also included. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation. There are no Category 1 event sequences associated with the Aging Facility (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7.2.1). The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Aging Facility and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Environmental and Nuclear Engineering.

R.L. Thacker

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Volcanic activity can have a profound effect on the Earth's atmosphere and environment across many spatial and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Fink (Eds.) 117 Earth's Deep Interior: Mineral Physics and Tomography From the Atomic to the Global and the atmosphere will find this work an important resource. Volcanism and the Earth's Atmosphere Alan Robock IUGG Volumes Maurice Ewing Volumes Mineral Physics Volumes #12;105 New Perspectives on the Earth

Robock, Alan

162

Atmospheric chemistry of a 3334 hour old volcanic cloud from Hekla Volcano (Iceland): Insights from direct sampling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, USA. 2 Department and nitric acid promoted polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation at 201≠203 K, yielding ice, nitric acid) particles. We show that these volcanically induced PSCs, especially the ice and NAT particles, activated

Rose, William I.

163

Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA d Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol imply that volcanic particles are active as condensation nuclei for water and ice formation. Ash can: Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, UK. 2 Present address: NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

Rose, William I.

164

NAME M/YEAR MASTERS THESES TITLES SCOPEL, ROBERT B Jun49 The Volcanic History of Jackson Hole, Wyoming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Park County, Wyoming GOSSER, CHARLES F. Jun60 Petrography and Metamorphism of the Star Lake Area of the Keewatin Province, Ontario RUBEL, DANIEL N Apr59 Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Cooke city - pilot peak, Montana BRUEHL, DONALD H. Jun61 The Petrography and Structure of an area North of Cooke City, Montana #12

Baskaran, Mark

165

Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes characterization2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes 13 In this study, we report chemical and isotope data for 23 geothermal water samples collected geothermal waters collected from deep boreholes16 in different geothermal fields (Ohaaki, Wairakei, Mokai

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

166

Blind teen-age students' expectations Focus: school-age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blind teen-age students' expectations Focus: school-age Topic: What are the changing demands disabled pupils, inclusion increased significantly, particularly in high schools. Blind learners, who used. For this lecture, I will present a few blind students' opinions, which will help building the items for the case

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

167

Feature identification framework and applications (FIFA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collections that provides a general framework for applications while allowing decisions about the details of document representation and features identification to be deferred to domain specific implementations of that framework. These deferred decisions...

Audenaert, Michael Neal

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

Feature Binding and the Hebb Repetition Effect†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous studies have found no evidence that long-term learning of integrated objects and individual features benefit visual short term memory tasks (Logie, Brockmole, & Vandenbroucke, in press; Olson & Jiang, 2004; Treisman, ...

Barrett, Maeve

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hybrid Solutions to the Feature Interaction Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calder,M. Kolberg,M. Magill,E. Marples,D. Reiff-Marganiec,S. Feature Interactions in Telecommunications and Software Systems VII pp 295-312 IOS Press

Calder, M.

170

ECG Feature Extraction Techniques - A Survey Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECG Feature Extraction plays a significant role in diagnosing most of the cardiac diseases. One cardiac cycle in an ECG signal consists of the P-QRS-T waves. This feature extraction scheme determines the amplitudes and intervals in the ECG signal for subsequent analysis. The amplitudes and intervals value of P-QRS-T segment determines the functioning of heart of every human. Recently, numerous research and techniques have been developed for analyzing the ECG signal. The proposed schemes were mostly based on Fuzzy Logic Methods, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), Genetic Algorithm (GA), Support Vector Machines (SVM), and other Signal Analysis techniques. All these techniques and algorithms have their advantages and limitations. This proposed paper discusses various techniques and transformations proposed earlier in literature for extracting feature from an ECG signal. In addition this paper also provides a comparative study of various methods proposed by researchers in extracting the feature from ECG signal.

Karpagachelvi, S; Sivakumar, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [UNIV OF TOKYO; Worden, Keith [UNIV OF SHEFFIELD; Takeda, Nobuo [UNIV OF TOKYO

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

172

Design Evolution Study - Aging Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to identify options and issues for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel received for disposal at the Yucca Mountain Mined Geologic Repository. Some early shipments of commercial spent nuclear fuel to the repository may be received with high-heat-output (younger) fuel assemblies that will need to be managed to meet thermal goals for emplacement. The capability to age as much as 40,000 metric tons of heavy metal of commercial spent nuclear he1 would provide more flexibility in the design to manage this younger fuel and to decouple waste receipt and waste emplacement. The following potential aging location options are evaluated: (1) Surface aging at four locations near the North Portal; (2) Subsurface aging in the permanent emplacement drifts; and (3) Subsurface aging in a new subsurface area. The following aging container options are evaluated: (1) Complete Waste Package; (2) Stainless Steel inner liner of the waste package; (3) Dual Purpose Canisters; (4) Multi-Purpose Canisters; and (5) New disposable canister for uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel. Each option is compared to a ''Base Case,'' which is the expected normal waste packaging process without aging. A Value Engineering approach is used to score each option against nine technical criteria and rank the options. Open issues with each of the options and suggested future actions are also presented. Costs for aging containers and aging locations are evaluated separately. Capital costs are developed for direct costs and distributable field costs. To the extent practical, unit costs are presented. Indirect costs, operating costs, and total system life cycle costs will be evaluated outside of this study. Three recommendations for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel--subsurface, surface, and combined surface and subsurface are presented for further review in the overall design re-evaluation effort. Options that were evaluated but not recommended are: subsurface aging in a new subsurface area (high cost); surface aging in the complete waste package (risk to the waste package and impact on the Waste Handling Facility); and aging in the stainless steel liner (impact on the waste package design and new high risk operations added to the waste packaging process). The selection of a design basis for aging will be made in conjunction with the other design re-evaluation studies.

P. McDaniel

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

173

Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

Dean, Cynthia A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

LIGA microsystems aging : evaluation and mitigation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deployment of LIGA structures in DP applications requires a thorough understanding of potential long term physical and chemical changes that may occur during service. While these components are generally fabricated from simple metallic systems such as copper, nickel and nickel alloys, the electroplating process used to form them creates microstructural features which differ from those found in conventional (e.g. ingot metallurgy) processing of such materials. Physical changes in non-equilibrium microstructures may occur due to long term exposure to temperatures sufficient to permit atomic and vacancy mobility. Chemical changes, particularly at the surfaces of LIGA parts, may occur in the presence of gaseous chemical species (e.g. water vapor, HE off-gassing compounds) and contact with other metallic structures. In this study, we have characterized the baseline microstructure of several nickel-based materials that are used to fabricate LIGA structures. Solute content and distribution was found to have a major effect on the electroplated microstructures. Microstructural features were correlated to measurements of hardness and tensile strength. Dormancy testing was conducted on one of the baseline compositions, nickel-sulfamate. Groups of specimens were exposed to controlled thermal cycles; subsequent examinations compared properties of 'aged' specimens to the baseline conditions. Results of our testing indicate that exposure to ambient temperatures (-54 C to 71 C) do not result in microstructural changes that might be expected to significantly effect mechanical performance. Additionally, no localized changes in surface appearance were found as a result of contact between electroplated parts.

Cadden, Charles H.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

AGING SYSTEM DESIGN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides an overview, work to date, and the path forward for the design development strategy of the Aging cask for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) repository site. Waste for subsurface emplacement at the repository includes US Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (HLW), DOE SNF, commercial fuel in dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), uncanistered bare fuel, naval fuel, and other waste types. Table 1-1 lists the types of radioactive materials that may be aged at YMP, and those materials that will not be placed in an aging cask or module. This plan presents the strategy for design development of the Aging system. The Aging system will not handle naval fuel, DOE HLW, MCOs, or DOE SNF since those materials will be delivered to the repository in a state and sequence that allows them to be placed into waste packages for emplacement. Some CSNF from nuclear reactors, especially CSNF that is thermally too hot for emplacement underground, will need to be aged at the repository.

J. Beesley

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Feature recognition applications in mesh generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of feature recognition as part of an overall decomposition-based hexahedral meshing approach is described in this paper. The meshing approach consists of feature recognition, using a c-loop or hybrid c-loop method, and the use of cutting surfaces to decompose the solid model. These steps are part of an iterative process, which proceeds either until no more features can be recognized or until the model has been completely decomposed into meshable sub-volumes. This method can greatly reduce the time required to generate an all-hexahedral mesh, either through the use of more efficient meshing algorithms on more of the geometry or by reducing the amount of manual decomposition required to mesh a volume.

Tautges, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liu, S.S.; Lu, Y.; Kraftcheck, J.; Gadh, R. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

Campisi, Judith

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Malcolm Guite Poets in Age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Malcolm Guite Poets in Age or A Study of Reading Habits At first I used to wish that I were Keats passing bell is rung. But now I need the poets who grew old And wore the bottoms of their trousers rolled of pure gold. I need the poets now, who match my age, Like Coleridge I could become a sage, And I bet I

Robertson, Stephen

179

Center for volcanic and tectonic studies, Department of Geoscience, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV. Annual report No. 69, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual report of the Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies (CVTS) contains a series of papers, maps, and reprints that review the progress made by the CVTS between October 1, 1991 and December 31, 1992. During this period CVTS staff focused on several topics that had direct relevance to volcanic hazards related to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These topics included: (1) The role of the mantle during regional extension. (2) The structural controls and emplacement mechanisms of Pliocene/Quaternary basaltic centers and dikes. (3) The detailed geochemistry of individual volcanic centers in Crater Flat, Nevada. (4) Estimating the probability of disruption of the proposed repository by volcanic eruption (this topic is being studied by Dr. C-H. Ho at UNLV).

Smith, E.I.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Abstract The Holocene Parinacota Volcanic Debris Av-alanche (ca. 8,000 years B.P.) is located in the central An-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that material that travelled further broke up and had an initial greater kinetic energy. Keywords Debris Andes Volcanic Zone of northern Chile (Figs. 1 and 2). Parinacota Volcano is located on the Chile≠Bolivia

Huppert, Herbert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mobile Communities Requirements and Features for Success  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobile Communities ­ Requirements and Features for Success Sarah Denis Heldt Media Informatics LMU.broll@ifi.lmu.de Philipp Lehmann Burda Wireless GmbH philipp.lehmann@burda.com ABSTRACT Advancements in mobile technologies and decreasing charges are starting to leverage the mobile usage of the internet and its applications. This paper

182

Convex Principal Feature Selection Mahdokht Masaeli1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advertising Sciences, Yahoo! Labs, Silicon Valley, CA, USA 3 Computer Aided Diagnosis and Therapy, Siemens Medical Solutions, USA {masaeli.m, yan.y, cui.yi}@neu.edu, glenn.fung@siemens.com, jdy transformation is achieved. However, true feature selection may not be achieved as non-sparse coefficients may

Dy, Jennifer G.

183

Feature-oriented Runtime Adaptation Mario Pukall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QuickSort (dark-gray background). Figure 1: Feature Evolution in a DBMS SPL. Having recreated of a DBMS1 SPL, is replaced by fea- ture QuickSort) does not aect the running program. Usu- ally, applying (according to the modi#12;cations made in the SPL). For in- stance, the changes within the DBMS SPL require

Cazzola, Walter

184

FEATURE ARTICLE 2 Kunde Hospital: Nepal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEATURE ARTICLE 2 Kunde Hospital: Nepal WORK IN PROGRESS 4 Public Health in Ceylon Medical research of the Mt Everest area in Nepal who have played such an important role in Himalayan mountaineering century the region became incorporated into the Gorkha kingdom that now forms the modern nation of Nepal

Rambaut, Andrew

185

ADVANCED DIRECT MANIPULATION OF FEATURE MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCED DIRECT MANIPULATION OF FEATURE MODELS Rafael Bidarra, Alex Noort Faculty of Electrical validity maintenance. In particular, it offers a powerful combination of various 3D handles for real and are functionally signifi- cant for some product life-cycle phase" (Bidarra and Bronsvoort, 2000). In contrast

Bidarra, Rafael

186

Features . . . Cover Crop Value to Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Features . . . Cotton Cover Crop Value to Cotton Cotton Price and Rotation 32:12 December 2008 #12;Cotton Price and Rotation Agronomy Notes Page 2 Cotton price has been low. Either peanut or soybean should be rotated with cotton, corn, or other grasses. However, with cotton

Watson, Craig A.

187

Representing mechanical assemblies with features and mating conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-level product representation has been developed and implemented, using design features for part description and mating conditions between features for the relationships among parts. The underlying ideas are that features are necessary...

Qamar, Sayyad Zahid

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

THE AGE OF PLASTIC INGENUITY + RESPONSIBILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE AGE OF PLASTIC INGENUITY + RESPONSIBILITY An Interdisciplinary Symposium Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age...and now the Age of Plastic. The Smithsonian Institution is leveraging its collections--arguably the world's greatest repository of plastic material culture--to investigate the significance of plastic, its

Mathis, Wayne N.

189

Events & Topics in Renewable Energy & the Environment featuring...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Events & Topics in Renewable Energy & the Environment featuring Chenyang Lu Events & Topics in Renewable Energy & the Environment featuring Chenyang Lu Smart Buildings with...

190

automatic archaeological feature: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nancy2 University NASA Ames robots to automatically detect features. Hid- den Markov Models have been used for a long time in pattern 28 Adaptive Automatic Facial Feature...

191

algorithm based feature: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

feature level fusion framework using two well- known biometric cryptosystems, namely, fuzzy vault 60 A stochastic algorithm for feature selection in pattern recognition...

192

Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Soft Multiple Winners for Sparse Feature Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple and computationally inexpensive neural network method for generating sparse representations is presented. The network has a single layer of linear neurons and, on top of it, a mechanism, which assigns a winning strength for each neuron. Both input and output are real valued in contrast to many earlier methods, where either input or output must have been binary valued. Also, the sum of winning strengths does not have to be normalized as in some other approaches. The ability of the algorithm to find meaningful features is demonstrated in a simulation with images of handwritten numerals. 1. Introduction The objective of a feature extraction system is to refine data in such a way that further processing becomes easier. In classification, such a system has two basic goals. One is to remove redundancies from the data. This helps cutting down computational costs later on. Another, contradictory goal is to discriminate data, which helps in distinguishing between similar inputs. A fe...

194

LEDSGP/tools/features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 ThrottledInformationparticipants < LEDSGP‚Äé |features < LEDSGP‚Äé |

195

Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of the DOC Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of...

196

Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance...

197

Visual Text Features for Image Matching Sam S. Tsai1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visual Text Features for Image Matching Sam S. Tsai1 , Huizhong Chen1 , David Chen1 , Vasu features that are based on text in cameraphone images. A robust text detection algorithm locates individual the visual text features in a way that resembles image features. We calculate their location, scale

Girod, Bernd

198

!anspace age esa SP-1150  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2 Solar Wind 3.3 Role of Europe 3.4 Conclusions and Recommendations 4. High-Energy Physics 4.8 Role of Europe 5.9 Conclusions and Recommendations 6. Exploitation of the Moon 6.1 Power Generation!anspace age #12;esa SP-1150 June 1992 MISSIONto the MOON Europe's Priorities

Rathbun, Julie A.

199

Kentucky Cheese: Coming of Age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i The FoodIssue Kentucky Cheese: Coming of Age pg. 7 Kentucky is Apple-icious A Taste for Success and does not imply approval to the exclusion of other suitable products or firms. Kentucky Cheese: Coming, and approved by UK's Food Systems Innovation Center. Kentucky is Apple-icious Let those northern and western

Hayes, Jane E.

200

4/22/08 4:15 PMCientficos estudian origen de los volcanes costarricenses -ALDEA GLOBAL -nacion.com Page 1 of 2http://nacion.com/ln_ee/2008/abril/22/aldea1502437.html  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volcanes y los sismos aquí PABLO FONSECA Q. | pfonseca@nacion.com Un grupo de científicos estadounidenses y

Holbrook, W. Steven

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) administrative procedures as they pertain to this report; the current procedures are addressed in Section 2. This revision also addresses updates to the technical basis in supporting analysis and model reports and corroborative documentation, as presented in Sections 4 and 6 of this report. Finally, Sections 4, 5, and 6 of this report provide additional information pertaining to the relevant FEPs-related Acceptance Criteria presented in ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (YMRP) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274], Sections 2.2.1.2.1.3 and 2.2.1.3.3.3).

Jaros, W.

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Quantum features of consciousness, computers and brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many people believe that mysterious phenomenon of consciousness may be connected with quantum features of our world. The present author proposed so-called Extended Everett's Concept (EEC) that allowed to explain consciousness and super-consciousness (intuitive knowledge). Brain, according to EEC, is an interface between consciousness and super-consciousness on the one part and body on the other part. Relations between all these components of the human cognitive system are analyzed in the framework of EEC. It is concluded that technical devices improving usage of super-consciousness (intuition) may exist.

Michael B. Mensky

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

203

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosionAnnouncements Media ContactCenterFeature Stories and

204

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final RecoveryNovemberJanuaryFeature

205

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] FinalSeptember 28,8, 2011 [Feature

206

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]January 18, 2006 [Feature Stories and

207

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]January 18, 2006 [Feature Stories

208

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]January 18, 2006 [Feature Stories7,

209

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]January 18, 2006 [Feature Stories7,4,

210

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]January 18, 2006 [Feature

211

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]January 18, 2006 [FeatureAugust 27,

212

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]January 18, 2006 [FeatureAugust 27,May

213

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]January 18, 2006 [FeatureAugust

214

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]January 18, 2006 [FeatureAugustJanuary

215

Featured Licensing Professional - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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216

Featured Technical Reports | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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217

Category:Topographic Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascadeJumpInformationcontainingTerritories ofFeatures

218

Satellite stories featured in Lab lecture series  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted for USMaterialstheterahertz sourcesSatellite stories featured

219

June 17, 2013 Symposium on Aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to forestall and treat diseases of aging such as diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease. Today

Church, George M.

220

Redeeming features of in situ combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ combustion remains the most tantalizing enhanced oil recovery method. It has been tested extensively - in over 150 field tests - in both heavy and light oil reservoirs. What we have learned from this experience is that in situ combustion works under most conditions, but the nature of the problems is such that it is seldom profitable. Also, looking at many previous in situ combustion tests, steam injection, and even waterflooding, would have been a better choice. Yet in situ combustion has unique features not found in any other EOR method. These must be weighed against its shortcomings to evaluate a potential application. This paper discusses the redeeming features of in situ combustion, in particular the reservoir conditions under which in situ combustion may be superior to other EOR methods are outlined. All variations of in situ combustion - forward, reverse, wet, dry - as well as combinations with other EOR methods are considered. The conclusions is that in situ combustion still has a place, and its future application would depend on research on certain crucial aspects of the process.

Farouq Ali, S.M. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

advancing paternal age: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In most animals, advancing age is accompanied by the deteriorative process of aging (senescence). Aging is the main cause of severe illness and death in humans aging is...

222

advanced paternal age: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In most animals, advancing age is accompanied by the deteriorative process of aging (senescence). Aging is the main cause of severe illness and death in humans aging is...

223

Chelation: A Fundamental Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors, AGE Breakers, and Other Inhibitors of Diabetes Complications. Chelation: A Fundamental Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors, AGE...

224

Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.

J. King

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Component with inspection-facilitating features  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine airfoil can be formed with features to facilitate measurement of its wall thickness. An outer wall of the airfoil can include an outer surface and an inner surface. The outer surface of the airfoil can have an outer inspection target surface, and the inner surface of the airfoil can have an inner inspection target surface. The inner and outer target surfaces can define substantially flat regions in surfaces that are otherwise highly contoured. The inner and outer inspection target surfaces can be substantially aligned with each other. The inner and outer target surfaces can be substantially parallel to each other. As a result of these arrangements, a highly accurate measurement of wall thickness can be obtained. In one embodiment, the outer inspection target surface can be defined by an innermost surface of a groove formed in the outer surface of the outer wall of the airfoil.

Marra, John J; Zombo, Paul J

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

Multiplicity features of adiabatic autothermal reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper singularity theory, large activation energy asymptotic, and numerical methods are used to present a comprehensive study of the steady-state multiplicity features of three classical adiabatic autothermal reactor models: tubular reactor with internal heat exchange, tubular reactor with external heat exchange, and the CSTR with external heat exchange. Specifically, the authors derive the exact uniqueness-multiplicity boundary, determine typical cross-sections of the bifurcation set, and classify the different types of bifurcation diagrams of conversion vs. residence time. Asymptotic (limiting) models are used to determine analytical expressions for the uniqueness boundary and the ignition and extinction points. The analytical results are used to present simple, explicit and accurate expressions defining the boundary of the region of autothermal operation in the physical parameter space.

Lovo, M.; Balakotaiah, V. (Houston Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Innovative safety features of the modular HTGR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is an advanced reactor concept under development through a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry, and the utilities. Near-term development is focused on electricity generation. The top-level safety requirement is that the plant's operation not disturb the normal day-to-day activities of the public. Quantitatively, this requires that the design meet the US Environmental Protection Agency's Protective Action Guides at the site boundary and hence preclude the need for sheltering or evacuation of the public. To meet these stringent safety requirements and at the same time provide a cost competitive design requires the innovative use of the basic high temperature gas-cooled reactor features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. The specific fuel composition and core size and configuration have been selected to the use the natural characteristics of these materials to develop significantly higher margins of safety. In this document the innovative safety features of the MHTGR are reviewed by examining the safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles. A broad range of challenges to core heat removal are examined, including a loss of helium pressure of a simultaneous loss of forced cooling of the core. The challenges to control of heat generation consider not only the failure to insert the reactivity control systems but also the withdrawal of control rods. Finally, challenges to control of chemical attack of the ceramic-coated fuel are considered, including catastrophic failure of the steam generator, which allows water ingress, or failure of the pressure vessels, which allows air ingress. The plant's response to these extreme challenges is not dependent on operator action, and the events considered encompass conceivable operator errors.

Silady, F.A.; Simon, W.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Innovative safety features of the modular HTGR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is an advanced reactor concept under development through a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry, and the utilities. Near-term development is focused on electricity generation. The top-level safety requirement is that the plant`s operation not disturb the normal day-to-day activities of the public. Quantitatively, this requires that the design meet the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Protective Action Guides at the site boundary and hence preclude the need for sheltering or evacuation of the public. To meet these stringent safety requirements and at the same time provide a cost competitive design requires the innovative use of the basic high temperature gas-cooled reactor features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. The specific fuel composition and core size and configuration have been selected to the use the natural characteristics of these materials to develop significantly higher margins of safety. In this document the innovative safety features of the MHTGR are reviewed by examining the safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles. A broad range of challenges to core heat removal are examined, including a loss of helium pressure of a simultaneous loss of forced cooling of the core. The challenges to control of heat generation consider not only the failure to insert the reactivity control systems but also the withdrawal of control rods. Finally, challenges to control of chemical attack of the ceramic-coated fuel are considered, including catastrophic failure of the steam generator, which allows water ingress, or failure of the pressure vessels, which allows air ingress. The plant`s response to these extreme challenges is not dependent on operator action, and the events considered encompass conceivable operator errors.

Silady, F.A.; Simon, W.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Evaluation of Features, Events, and Processes (FEP) for the Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of biosphere features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded'', is given for each FEP along with the corresponding technical basis for the excluded FEPs and the descriptions of how the included FEPs were incorporated in the biosphere model. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report concern characteristics of the reference biosphere, the receptor, and the environmental transport and receptor exposure pathways for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios considered in biosphere modeling. This revision provides the summary of the implementation of included FEPs in TSPA-LA, (i.e., how the FEP is included); for excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report is one of the 10 documents constituting the biosphere model documentation suite. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' describes in detail the biosphere conceptual model and mathematical model. The input parameter reports shown to the right of the ''Biosphere Model Report'' contain detailed descriptions of the model input parameters and their development. Outputs from these six reports are used in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis and Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' to generate the biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs), which are input parameters for the TSPA-LA model. The ''Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Importance and Sensitivity Analysis'' analyzes the output of these two BDCF reports.

M. Wasiolek; P. Rogers

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

230

Aging of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is a relatively sensitive explosive used in many electroexplosive devices as well as in medicine. Of primary interest to LLNL is its use in items such as exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonators and exploding bridge foil initiators (EFI). In these devices the crystalline powder is pressed into a granular, low-density compact that can be initiated by an exploding wire or foil. The long-term stability of this pressed compact is of interest to weapon stockpile lifetime prediction studies. Key points about potential aging mechanisms can be summarized as follows: (1) There are a number of factors that can contribute to PETN instability. These include particle size, polymorphic phase transitions, crystal structure, impurities, moisture, occlusions, chemical incompatibility and biological (microorganism) action. of these factors the most important for long-term aging of high surface area powders used in detonators appears to be that of particle size growth. (2) There is a great deal of literature on the thermal degradation kinetics of PETN, unfortunately much of it with little bearing on ambient temperature aging during long-term storage. PETN is very stable with respect to thermal decomposition. Low-temperature thermal studies have not revealed evidence of chemical degradation products in archived PETN. Data extrapolated to 30 C predicts a half-life of 12 million years. (3) Moisture seems to lower the activation energy for and accelerate the decomposition of PETN. (4) External drivers affecting stability include temperature, moisture, radiation fields, and stress, while internal drivers include residual solvents, and impurities. Temperature affects kinetic processes of crystal growth such as adsorption, desorption, and diffusion rates of molecules on the surface of PETN crystals. A low-level radiation field may induce unexpected changes in the chemical makeup of PETN and its homologue impurities. Stress at high pressure points caused by crystalline surface irregularities may cause a decrease in surface area over time due to smoothing of contact points and sintering. PETN has been found to contain a number of impurities, including homologues, pentaerythryl ethers with a mixture of hydroxyl and nitrate functional groups, and organic salts, that can alter its physical and chemical properties. (5) The processes of sublimation/recrystallization and surface diffusion are important processes that can cause changes in PETN crystal morphology, particle size distribution and specific surface area. Sublimation feeds a process called Ostwald ripening, which involves the spontaneous growth of larger crystals from those of smaller size. This process proceeds with age regardless of storage conditions unless the crystals are treated to retard growth. The coarsening mechanisms include Ostwald ripening, 'sintering', and surface diffusion. The latter has not been experimentally observed, but a molecular modeling approach has attempted to investigate this phenomenon theoretically. (6) Threshold test fire, particle size distribution, specific surface area, thermal analysis, chemical analysis, powder compact specific surface area and density are approaches that have been used in the attempt to assess changes attributable to aging of PETN, with varying results. The biggest problem lies in the aging mechanism itself, which likely influences small changes in morphology, both internal and external, and particle size distribution changes on a scale too small to reliably monitor. Other aspects, such as subtle changes in density profiles within pressed powder compacts, may be beyond the capability of current technology to assess. Crystal growth significant enough to affect the PETN particle size distribution is expected to impact detonator performance. (7) Factors relevant to stabilizing particle size growth include crystal morphology, powder surface area and particle size distribution; crystal density and internal defects; and powder compact density and density gradients.

Foltz, M F

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

231

SNF AGING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this system description document (SDD) is to establish requirements that drive the design of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) aging system and associated bases, which will allow the design effort to proceed. This SDD will be revised at strategic points as the design matures. This SDD identifies the requirements and describes the system design, as it currently exists, with emphasis on attributes of the design provided to meet the requirements. This SDD is an engineering tool for design control; accordingly, the primary audience and users are design engineers. This SDD is part of an iterative design process. It leads the design process with regard to the flow down of upper tier requirements onto the system. Knowledge of these requirements is essential in performing the design process. The SDD follows the design with regard to the description of the system. The description provided in the SDD reflects the current results of the design process. Throughout this SDD, the term aging cask applies to vertical site-specific casks and to horizontal aging modules. The term overpack is a vertical site-specific cask that contains a dual-purpose canister (DPC) or a disposable canister. Functional and operational requirements applicable to this system were obtained from ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' (F&OR) (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557]). Other requirements that support the design process were taken from documents such as ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (PDC) (BSC 2004 [DES 171599]), ''Site Fire Hazards Analyses'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172174]), and ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171512]). The documents address requirements in the ''Project Requirements Document'' (PRD) (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275]). This SDD includes several appendices. Appendix A is a Glossary; Appendix B is a list of key system charts, diagrams, drawings, lists and additional supporting information; and Appendix C is a list of procedures that will be used to operate the system.

L.L. Swanson

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

232

Classification and Feature Extraction in Man and Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classification and Feature Extraction in Man and Machine Dissertation zur Erlangung des Grades stimuli and for their subsequent classification. A methodology combining human psychophysics and machine learning is introduced, where feature extractors are modeled using methods from unsupervised machine

233

A hybrid ANN/DBN approach to articulatory feature recognition†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial neural networks (ANN) have proven to be well suited to the task of articulatory feature (AF) recognition. Previous studies have taken a cascaded approach where separate ANNs are trained for each feature group, making the assumption...

Frankel, Joe; King, Simon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

New Features of the Edison XC30 - Differences from Hopper  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Features of the Edison XC30 New Features of the Edison XC30 While the Edison and Hopper systems have similar programming environments and software, there are some key...

235

37th World Energy Engineering Congress / Featuring GreenStreet...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Congress Featuring GreenStreet 37th World Energy Engineering Congress Featuring GreenStreet October 1, 2014 2:00PM EDT to October 2, 2014 10:00PM EDT Washington, DC http:...

236

Feature-based design of solids with local composition control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a parametric and feature-based methodology for the design of solids with local composition control (LCC). A suite of composition design features are conceptualized and implemented. The designer can use ...

Liu, Hongye, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Feb. 9 Event at Jefferson Lab Features Chemistry Demonstrations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feb. 9 Event at Jefferson Lab Features Chemistry Demonstrations Set to Pop Music NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 2, 2010 - Jefferson Lab's Feb. 9 Science Series event will feature members...

238

ARPA-E Announces 2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill Gates, Fred Smith and Lee Scott ARPA-E Announces 2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill Gates, Fred Smith and Lee Scott September...

239

Advertiser retains sole responsibility for content ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advertiser retains sole responsibility for content ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE T okyo University to combat global food shortages, monitoring air pollution in East Asia and safeguarding the world's energy abilitiesinyoungresearchers." #12;Advertiser retains sole responsibility for content ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE and then use

Cai, Long

240

Contributed article Neuro-fuzzy feature evaluation with theoretical analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Fuzzy sets; Neural networks; Pattern recognition; Feature a fuzzy set theoretic feature evaluation index and a connectionist model for its evaluation alongContributed article Neuro-fuzzy feature evaluation with theoretical analysis R.K. De, J. Basak, S

De, Rajat Kumar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Dark Energy in the Dark Ages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL- 61876 Dark Energy in the Dark Ages Eric V. LinderUniversity of California. Dark Energy in the Dark Ages Eric2008) Non-negligible dark energy density at high redshifts

Linder, Eric V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Utah Commission on Aging June 6, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institutions Norma Matheson Chair Anne Peterson University of Utah Mayor JoAnn Seghini Midvale City Sara to the Commission for consideration. ∑ Aging SMART: Denise Brooks distributed Aging SMART Sourcebook. Website is up

Tipple, Brett

243

Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).

P. Sanchez

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

244

Features, Events, and Processes: system Level  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the system-level features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.113 (d, e, and f) (DIRS 156605). The system-level FEPs addressed in this report typically are overarching in nature, rather than being focused on a particular process or subsystem. As a result, they are best dealt with at the system level rather than addressed within supporting process-level or subsystem-level analyses and models reports. The system-level FEPs also tend to be directly addressed by regulations, guidance documents, or assumptions listed in the regulations; or are addressed in background information used in development of the regulations. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from the TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). The initial version of this report (Revision 00) was developed to support the total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR). This revision addresses the license application (LA) FEP List (DIRS 170760).

D. McGregor

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Dry aging beef for the retail channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Koohmaraie, & Goll, 1995). The Z-line is one myofibrillar structure clearly altered by proteases in the postmortem aging of beef (Goll, Otsuka, Nagainis, Shannon, Sathe, & Muguruma, 1983). However, Z-disk degradation does not occur to any significant... and humidity is said to be dry aged. Practically all beef is vacuumed packaged at the packer level. However, many believe 3 that wet aging does not produce the enhanced palatability characteristics associated with dry aged beef. This process can...

Smith, Robert David

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

246

aged rat erectile: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

98504-3144 An age-length key (ALK) is the tra- ditional method for estimating age-stage length samples for relatively costly age determination (age subsamplel. Age...

247

aged interleukin-18 deficient: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

98504-3144 An age-length key (ALK) is the tra- ditional method for estimating age-stage length samples for relatively costly age determination (age subsamplel. Age...

248

age stratigraphic relationships: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

98504-3144 An age-length key (ALK) is the tra- ditional method for estimating age-stage length samples for relatively costly age determination (age subsamplel. Age...

249

Solid Friction from stick-slip to pinning and aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the present state of understanding of solid friction at low velocities and for systems with negligibly small wear effects. We first analyze in detail the behavior of friction at interfaces between wacroscopic hard rough solids, whose main dynamical features are well described by the Rice-Ruina rate and state dependent constitutive law. We show that it results from two combined effects : (i) the threshold rheology of nanometer-thick junctions jammed under confinement into a soft glassy structure (ii) geometric aging, i.e. slow growth of the real arrea of contact via asperity creep interrupted by sliding. Closer analysis leads to identifying a second aging-rejuvenation process, at work within the junctions themselves. We compare the effects of structural aging at such multicontact, very highly confined, interfaces with those met under different confinement levels, namely boundary lubricated contacts and extended adhesive interfaces involving soft materials (hydrogels, elastomers). This leads us to propose a classification of frictional junctions in terms of the relative importance of jamming and adsoprtion-induced metastability.

Tristan Baumberger; Christiane Caroli

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

NASA Home > News & Features > News Topics > Solar System > Features Send Print Share > Log In To MyNASA | > Sign Up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

overhead to provide a birds-eye view of mountain ranges, lakes and canyons. On the ground, a rover or lakeNASA Home > News & Features > News Topics > Solar System > Features Send Print Share > Log In To MyNASA | > Sign Up News & Features News Topics Shuttle & Station Moon & Mars Solar System Sun-Earth System

Arizona, University of

251

Age And Nature Of Deposits On The Submarine Flanks Of Piton De...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

voluminous formations in the submarine domain around Reunion Island. 21 sites sampled offshore of Piton de la Fournaise were studied. All the dredged rocks have a volcanic origin...

252

No Evidence for Significant Age Spreads in Young Massive LMC Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent discoveries have put the picture of stellar clusters being simple stellar populations into question. In particular, the color-magnitude diagrams of intermediate age (1-2 Gyr) massive clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) show features that could be interpreted as age spreads of 100-500 Myr. If multiple generations of stars are present in these clusters then, as a consequence, young (test this hypothesis. We analyzed the color-magnitude diagrams of these clusters and fitted their star formation history to derive upper limits of potential age spreads. We find that none of the clusters analyzed in this work shows evidence for an extended star formation history that would be consistent with the age spreads proposed for intermediat...

Niederhofer, Florian; Bastian, Nate; Silva-Villa, Esteban

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Collection and Analysis of Geothermal and Volcanic Water and Gas Discharges  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy, -105.3774934¬įCodaColden, New York:Ages of Megabreccia|

254

Energetics of gas-driven limnic and volcanic eruptions Department of Geological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energetics of gas-driven limnic and volcanic eruptions Y. Zhang* Department of Geological Sciences for the rigorous treatment of the energetics of gas exsolution from a gas-containing liquid, which powers gas) are discussed, and the maximum amount of kinetic energy derivable from a reversible gas exsolution process

Zhang, Youxue

255

Michael Gutmann University of Helsinki ICANN2009: Learning Features by Contrasting Natural Images with Noise -p. 1/17 Learning Features by Contrasting Natural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contrastive feature learning Simulations Michael Gutmann ≠ University of Helsinki ICANN2009: Learning Features. image vs. noise q Classifier Contrastive feature learning Simulations Michael Gutmann ≠ University;Introduction q Preliminaries q Nat. image vs. noise q Classifier Contrastive feature learning Simulations

Gutmann, Michael

256

Volcanology and volcanic activity with a primary focus on potential hazard impacts for the Hawaii geothermal project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography reviews published references about potential volcanic hazards on the Island of Hawaii that are pertinent to drilling and operating geothermal wells. The first two sections of this annotated bibliography list the most important publications that describe eruptions of Kilauea volcano, with special emphasis on activity in and near the designated geothermal subzones. References about historic eruptions from Mauna Loa`s northeast rift zone, as well as the most recent activity on the southern flank of dormant Mauna Kea, adjacent to the Humu`ula Saddle are described. The last section of this annotated bibliography lists the most important publications that describe and analyze deformations of the surface of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes.

Moore, R.B. [Federal Center, Denver, CO (United States); Delaney, P.T. [2255 North Gemini Drive, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Kauahikaua, J.P. [Geological Survey, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

IMPROVING FISHERIES SCIENCE WITH ADVANCED SAMPLING TECHNOLOGIES FEATURE ARTICLE 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of advanced sam- pling technologies for providing accurate, precise, and timely population estimates density) in red. Echogram images are vertically exag- gerated to highlight features and patterns

258

atypical mri features: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

al. (2004) found that patients treated with typical antipsychotics exhibited 2 3-D MRI Brain Scan Feature Classification Using an Oct-tree Representation Computer Technologies and...

259

Fall Lectures Feature Life of Einstein; Exploring Our World With...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fall Lectures Feature Life of Einstein; Exploring Our World With Particle Accelerators NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Sept. 22, 2010 - Jefferson Lab's first 2010 Fall Science Series lecture,...

260

Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sources of salts in a granite batholith on the Canadianpetrological features of Toki Granite. STA Science Exchangefrom the rapakivi granite on the island of Hšstholmen.

Karasaki, Kenzi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geothermal Heating and Cooling Systems Featured on NBC Nightly...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

American homes. View the video. Addthis Related Articles Geothermal Energy Featured on NBC's Today Show Building America Update - January 15, 2015 Heat Pump Water Heater Basics...

262

aged korean adults: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AGING & SOCIETY Engineering Websites Summary: DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, AGING & SOCIETY Monthly Speaker Series Dr. Ellen B. Ryan DATE TIME ROOM Department of Health, Aging, &...

263

Materials Research in the Information Age  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Research in the Information Age Accelerating Advanced Material Development NERSC Science Gateway a 'Google of Material Properties' October 31, 2011 | Tags: Materials...

264

Termination Semantics of Logic Programs with Cut and Related Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Termination Semantics of Logic Programs with Cut and Related Features Jamie Andrews Dept of termination for logic programs. I am particularly interested in the termination of logic programs which use practical features such as the Prolog ``cut''. In order to prove termination of such programs

Giesl, Juergen

265

Feature selection in high dimensional regression problems for genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feature selection in high dimensional regression problems for genomics Julie Hamon1,2,3 , Clarisse, France julien.jacques@lifl.fr Abstract. In the context of genomic selection in animal breeding and "closed to real" datasets. Keywords: Feature selection, combinatorial optimization, regression, genomic. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

266

Middleware Support For Crosscutting Features in Distributed, Heterogeneous Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for such features are often locality-dependent and discovered late (e.g., security policies). The DADO3 approach helps program crosscutting features in standard CORBA based DH middleware software through an aspect-oriented approach. A DADO service comprises pairs of adaptlets which are explicitly modeled in IDL. Adaplets may

Devanbu, Prem

267

Credibility in Context: An Analysis of Feature Distributions in Twitter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine who the experts are [2], which party will win the election [3], [4] or who the influential people to make generalized conclusions about Twitter vs. the specific data set that they are derived from. When regression of individual features vs network aggregation algorithms. More importantly, different features may

Hollerer, Tobias

268

The Minimum Description Length Principle Applied to Feature Learning and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the or- thogonal clustering algorithm, called MDL/OC, is nding the features fperson, nationality, sex, generationg from the database of family rela- tions used by Geo rey Hinton 1986] to demonstrate feature Problem : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 26 3.10 Country Trading Problem

Derthick, Mark

269

Translating Orc Features into Petri nets and the Join Calculus #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Translating Orc Features into Petri nets and the Join Calculus # Roberto Bruni 1 , Hern@di.unipi.it, hernan.melgratti@imtlucca.it, et52@mcs.le.ac.uk Abstract. Cook and Misra's Orc is an elegant language the key novel features of Orc by comparing it with variations of Petri nets. The comparison shows that Orc

Bruni, Roberto

270

Translating Orc Features into Petri nets and the Join Calculus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Translating Orc Features into Petri nets and the Join Calculus Roberto Bruni1, Hern¬īan Melgratti2@di.unipi.it, hernan.melgratti@imtlucca.it, et52@mcs.le.ac.uk Abstract. Cook and Misra's Orc is an elegant language the key novel features of Orc by comparing it with variations of Petri nets. The comparison shows that Orc

Bruni, Roberto

271

Topics in Biomedical Optics: introduction to the feature issue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topics in Biomedical Optics: introduction to the feature issue Joseph P. Culver,1, * Wolfgang; accepted 25 March 2009; posted 25 March 2009 (Doc. ID 109253); published 30 March 2009 This Applied Optics feature issue on Topics in Biomedical Optics highlights papers presented at the 2008 Biomedical Topical

Larson-Prior, Linda

272

Feature based volume decomposition for automatic hexahedral mesh generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much progress has been made through these years to achieve automatic hexahedral mesh generation. While general meshing algorithms that can take on general geometry are not there yet; many well-proven automatic meshing algorithms now work on certain classes of geometry. This paper presents a feature based volume decomposition approach for automatic Hexahedral Mesh generation. In this approach, feature recognition techniques are introduced to determine decomposition features from a CAD model. The features are then decomposed and mapped with appropriate automatic meshing algorithms suitable for the correspondent geometry. Thus a formerly unmeshable CAD model may become meshable. The procedure of feature decomposition is recursive: sub-models are further decomposed until either they are matched with appropriate meshing algorithms or no more decomposition features are detected. The feature recognition methods employed are convexity based and use topology and geometry information, which is generally available in BREP solid models. The operations of volume decomposition are also detailed in the paper. The final section, the capability of the feature decomposer is demonstrated over some complicated manufactured parts.

LU,YONG; GADH,RAJIT; TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.

2000-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

273

Feature Reinforcement Learning In Practice September 9, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feature Reinforcement Learning In Practice #12;Problems Robotic control in an unknown environment Feature #12;Problem formulation ht = a1o1r1o2r2a2 . . . otrt at = Agent(ht) ot+1rt+1 = Environment (Closed Finite State Machines) Markov trees are trees where given st and at, ot+1, we know st+1 Parallel

Hutter, Marcus

274

CRITICAL FEATURES IN HUMAN MOTION SIMULATION FOR ERGONOMIC ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CRITICAL FEATURES IN HUMAN MOTION SIMULATION FOR ERGONOMIC ANALYSIS Matthew P. Reed, Don B. Chaffin of choice for assessments of the physical ergonomics of products and workplaces. Software representations important for ergonomic analysis. This paper identifies and justifies a set of these critical features

Faraway, Julian

275

UNDEREMPLOYMENT AMONG MATURE AGE WORKERS IN AUSTRALIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 UNDEREMPLOYMENT AMONG MATURE AGE WORKERS IN AUSTRALIA * Jinjing Li1 , Alan Duncan2 and Riyana Miranti1 1 NATSEM, University of Canberra, Australia 2 Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre, Curtin University of underemployment for mature aged workers in Australia, and seeks in particular to determine the principal factors

276

6, 39453963, 2006 Methanol inside aged  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The oxidation of methane (and other hydrocarbons) can also produce methanol primarily via the self reactionACPD 6, 3945­3963, 2006 Methanol inside aged tropical biomass burning plumes G. Dufour et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions First space-borne measurements of methanol inside aged tropical biomass

277

New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt rocks, or tufas, exposed along the flanks of the Libyan Plateau near Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

Asmerom, Yemane

278

Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of the DOC Adam Foster and Ke Nguyen University of Tennessee - Knoxville Bruce G. Bunting and Todd J. Toops Oak...

279

A commodity approach to aging management review of supports for license renewal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

10CFR Part 54 requires that nuclear power plant licensees who seek renewal of their operating licenses for an additional 20 years of operation (i.e., for a total operating life of 60 years) perform an Integrated Plant Assessment (IPA) on all systems, structures and components (SSCs) within the scope of license renewal. Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE) and MPR Associates, Inc., have recently completed an aging management review of component supports for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP). A commodity approach was used on the basis that component supports perform essentially the same function regardless of the system with which they are associated. This approach, i.e., treating component supports as commodities as opposed to performing the aging management review for each individual component support, resulted in a cost-effective approach for this portion of the IPA. An important feature of the aging management review of component support at CCNPP is the evaluation of the adequacy of existing programs to manage component support aging. Two major programs were included in the evaluation: the ASME Section 11 In-Service Inspection (ISI) Program, and CCNPP`s Seismic Verification Project to resolve USI A-46. The key role that these programs play in the overall aging management strategy for component supports, as well as the evaluation of other on-going activities which complete the aging management approach for component supports, are discussed.

Schlaseman, C.S. [MPR Associates, Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Tilden, B.M. [Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., MD (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Unsupervised Feature Learning for High-Resolution Satellite Image Classification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rich data provided by high-resolution satellite imagery allow us to directly model geospatial neighborhoods by understanding their spatial and structural patterns. In this paper we explore an unsupervised feature learning approach to model geospatial neighborhoods for classification purposes. While pixel and object based classification approaches are widely used for satellite image analysis, often these approaches exploit the high-fidelity image data in a limited way. In this paper we extract low-level features to characterize the local neighborhood patterns. We exploit the unlabeled feature measurements in a novel way to learn a set of basis functions to derive new features. The derived sparse feature representation obtained by encoding the measured features in terms of the learned basis function set yields superior classification performance. We applied our technique on two challenging image datasets: ORNL dataset representing one-meter spatial resolution satellite imagery representing five land-use categories and, UCMERCED dataset consisting of 21 different categories representing sub-meter resolution overhead imagery. Our results are highly promising and, in the case of UCMERCED dataset we outperform the best results obtained for this dataset. We show that our feature extraction and learning methods are highly effective in developing a detection system that can be used to automatically scan large-scale high-resolution satellite imagery for detecting large-facility.

Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sulfur Emissions from Volcanic A c t i v i t y i n 1985 and 1990 Carmen M. Benkovitz and M. A l t a f Mubaraki  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX C Sulfur Emissions from Volcanic A c t i v i t y i n 1985 and 1990 Carmen M. Benkovitz). Global estimates o f anthropogenic emissions o f sulfur f o r 1985 are approximately 65 Tg S y-l (Benkovi Anthropogenic Sulfur Emissions f o r 1985 and 1990 i n t h i s report). Sulfur from biogenic sources i s emitted

282

Computational Age Dating of Special Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide-show presented an overview of the Constrained Progressive Reversal (CPR) method for computing decays, age dating, and spoof detecting. The CPR method is: Capable of temporal profiling a SNM sample; Precise (compared with known decay code, such a ORIGEN); Easy (for computer implementation and analysis). ? We have illustrated with real SNM data using CPR for age dating and spoof detection. If SNM is pure, may use CPR to derive its age. If SNM is mixed, CPR will indicate that it is mixed or spoofed.

None

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

2/21/11 11:08 AMOregon Quarterly Features Page 1 of 4http://www.oregonquarterly.com/winter2010/feature4.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/feature4.php UO Home | Dept index Winter 2010 | Volume 90, Number 2 Donate to OQ | Past Issues:08 AMOregon Quarterly Features Page 2 of 4http://www.oregonquarterly.com/winter2010/feature4.php monochrome

Richmond, Geraldine L.

284

Enhancing inductive learning with feature selection and example selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

independently and as a combined scheme. We propose a sequential search filter approach called Subset selection using Case-based Relevance APproach (SCRAP) for identifying and eliminating irrelevant features. The SCRAP filter addresses the problem of finding a...

Raman, Baranidharan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

PPPL's Earth Week features Colloquium on NYC green plan, cleanup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PPPL's Earth Week features Colloquium on NYC green plan, cleanup and awards By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe April 28, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Volunteers clean...

286

GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features The Google Earth of the Google Earth window. Often when opening up the Google Earth program, the view screen will be a view of the entire Earth from space. Navigation bar

Smith-Konter, Bridget

287

Feature tracking for visual servoing purposes ric Marchand, Franois Chaumette  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feature tracking for visual servoing purposes √?ric Marchand, Fran√ßois Chaumette IRISA - INRIA experiments ordered by subjective increasing difficulties. Email addresses: marchand@irisa.fr (√?ric Marchand

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

288

Intrinsic feature-based pose measurement for imaging motion compensation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods for generating motion corrected tomographic images are provided. A method includes obtaining first images of a region of interest (ROI) to be imaged and associated with a first time, where the first images are associated with different positions and orientations with respect to the ROI. The method also includes defining an active region in the each of the first images and selecting intrinsic features in each of the first images based on the active region. Second, identifying a portion of the intrinsic features temporally and spatially matching intrinsic features in corresponding ones of second images of the ROI associated with a second time prior to the first time and computing three-dimensional (3D) coordinates for the portion of the intrinsic features. Finally, the method includes computing a relative pose for the first images based on the 3D coordinates.

Baba, Justin S.; Goddard, Jr., James Samuel

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

289

Temporal Features for Broadcast News Segmentation Michael T. Johnson1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temporal Features for Broadcast News Segmentation Michael T. Johnson1 and Leah H. Jamieson2 1 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI mike.johnson

Johnson, Michael T.

290

Dynamics of low capillary number interfaces moving through sharp features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, New Mexico 87185 Roger T. Bonnecazea Department of Chemical Engineering and Texas Materials Institute of the feature filling suggest an effective boundary condition for a macroscopic lubrication model of the imprint

291

Discrete Feature Approach for Heterogeneous Reservoir Production Enhancement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents summaries of technology development for discrete feature modeling in support of the improved oil recovery (IOR) for heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, the report describes the demonstration of these technologies at project study sites.

Dershowitz, William S.; Curran, Brendan; Einstein, Herbert; LaPointe, Paul; Shuttle, Dawn; Klise, Kate

2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

Learning Energy Demand Domain Knowledge via Feature Transformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning Energy Demand Domain Knowledge via Feature Transformation Sanzad Siddique Department -- Domain knowledge is an essential factor for forecasting energy demand. This paper introduces a method knowledge substantially improves energy demand forecasting accuracy. However, domain knowledge may differ

Povinelli, Richard J.

293

Feature-Based Statistical Analysis of Combustion Simulation Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new framework for feature-based statistical analysis of large-scale scientific data and demonstrate its effectiveness by analyzing features from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion. Turbulent flows are ubiquitous and account for transport and mixing processes in combustion, astrophysics, fusion, and climate modeling among other disciplines. They are also characterized by coherent structure or organized motion, i.e. nonlocal entities whose geometrical features can directly impact molecular mixing and reactive processes. While traditional multi-point statistics provide correlative information, they lack nonlocal structural information, and hence, fail to provide mechanistic causality information between organized fluid motion and mixing and reactive processes. Hence, it is of great interest to capture and track flow features and their statistics together with their correlation with relevant scalar quantities, e.g. temperature or species concentrations. In our approach we encode the set of all possible flow features by pre-computing merge trees augmented with attributes, such as statistical moments of various scalar fields, e.g. temperature, as well as length-scales computed via spectral analysis. The computation is performed in an efficient streaming manner in a pre-processing step and results in a collection of meta-data that is orders of magnitude smaller than the original simulation data. This meta-data is sufficient to support a fully flexible and interactive analysis of the features, allowing for arbitrary thresholds, providing per-feature statistics, and creating various global diagnostics such as Cumulative Density Functions (CDFs), histograms, or time-series. We combine the analysis with a rendering of the features in a linked-view browser that enables scientists to interactively explore, visualize, and analyze the equivalent of one terabyte of simulation data. We highlight the utility of this new framework for combustion science; however, it is applicable to many other science domains.

Bennett, J; Krishnamoorthy, V; Liu, S; Grout, R; Hawkes, E; Chen, J; Pascucci, V; Bremer, P T

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

294

Multi-tube fuel nozzle with mixing features  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system includes a multi-tube fuel nozzle having an inlet plate and a plurality of tubes adjacent the inlet plate. The inlet plate includes a plurality of apertures, and each aperture includes an inlet feature. Each tube of the plurality of tubes is coupled to an aperture of the plurality of apertures. The multi-tube fuel nozzle includes a differential configuration of inlet features among the plurality of tubes.

Hughes, Michael John

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

The effective field theory of inflation models with sharp features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe models of single-field inflation with small and sharp step features in the potential (and sound speed) of the inflaton field, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Inflation. This approach allows us to study the effects of features in the power-spectrum and in the bispectrum of curvature perturbations, from a model-independent point of view, by parametrizing the features directly with modified ''slow-roll'' parameters. We can obtain a self-consistent power-spectrum, together with enhanced non-Gaussianity, which grows with a quantity ? that parametrizes the sharpness of the step. With this treatment it is straightforward to generalize and include features in other coefficients of the effective action of the inflaton field fluctuations. Our conclusion in this case is that, excluding extrinsic curvature terms, the only interesting effects at the level of the bispectrum could arise from features in the first slow-roll parameter ? or in the speed of sound c{sub s}. Finally, we derive an upper bound on the parameter ? from the consistency of the perturbative expansion of the action for inflaton perturbations. This constraint can be used for an estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio, to show that the observable which is most sensitive to features is the power-spectrum. This conclusion would change if we consider the contemporary presence of a feature and a speed of sound c{sub s} < 1, as, in such a case, contributions from an oscillating folded configuration can potentially make the bispectrum the leading observable for feature models.

Bartolo, Nicola; Cannone, Dario; Matarrese, Sabino, E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: dario.cannone@pd.infn.it, E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ''G. Galilei'', Universitŗ degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Helium isotope study of geothermal features in Chile with field and laboratory data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Dobson, P.F., Kennedy, B.M., Reich, M., Sanchez, P., and Morata, D. (2013) Effects of volcanism, crustal thickness, and large scale faulting on the He isotope signatures of geothermal systems in Chile. Proceedings, 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Feb. 11-13, 2013

Dobson, Patrick

297

HYGROTHERMAL AGING OF POLYIMIDE MATRIX COMPOSITE LAMINATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The time to initiate water-induced microcracks, tm, (in minutes), was log .t T m = + 3423 1 35 (1) #12-ply laminates and supplied to us by the Boeing Company. For hygrothermal aging experiments, a series

Nairn, John A.

298

Aging of polymeric composites : a literature review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to their increased use in today's society, an extensive survey was undertaken in this report to condense what's been, thus far, discovered as to the effects of aging on polymeric composites. Special emphasis was placed ...

TreviŮo-Garrido, Margie N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

QUANTITY SEX AGE WEIGHT WITH: VENDOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUANTITY SEX AGE WEIGHT NUMBER/ CAGE WITH: VENDOR: REFERENCE No: PO No: FACILITY: RECEIVED ON PLACED BY: DATE: SUGGESTED VENDOR: AUP No: USER's PHONE No: USER's NAME: USER's EMAIL: ANIMAL REQUEST

Arnold, Jonathan

300

June 18, 2012 Symposium on Aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, anemia, muscular dystrophy, and diabetes. The reasons for accelerating research into the molecular diseases of aging such as diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease. Today's attendees come not only

Church, George M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Volume Decomposition and Feature Recognition for Hexahedral Mesh Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable progress has been made on automatic hexahedral mesh generation in recent years. Several automatic meshing algorithms have proven to be very reliable on certain classes of geometry. While it is always worth pursuing general algorithms viable on more general geometry, a combination of the well-established algorithms is ready to take on classes of complicated geometry. By partitioning the entire geometry into meshable pieces matched with appropriate meshing algorithm the original geometry becomes meshable and may achieve better mesh quality. Each meshable portion is recognized as a meshing feature. This paper, which is a part of the feature based meshing methodology, presents the work on shape recognition and volume decomposition to automatically decompose a CAD model into meshable volumes. There are four phases in this approach: (1) Feature Determination to extinct decomposition features, (2) Cutting Surfaces Generation to form the ''tailored'' cutting surfaces, (3) Body Decomposition to get the imprinted volumes; and (4) Meshing Algorithm Assignment to match volumes decomposed with appropriate meshing algorithms. The feature determination procedure is based on the CLoop feature recognition algorithm that is extended to be more general. Results are demonstrated over several parts with complicated topology and geometry.

GADH,RAJIT; LU,YONG; TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Unidentified InfraRed Features after ISO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) has provided the first complete mid-IR spectra for a wide range of objects. Almost all of these spectra are dominated by the well-known infrared emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, and 11.2 $\\mu$m, the so-called Unidentified Infra-Red (UIR) features. Besides the major features, there is an array of minor features and broad plateaux stretching from 3 to 20 $\\mu$m which reveal subtle details of conditions in the emission zones and properties of the carriers. Generally attributed to the vibrational relaxation of UV-pumped Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon molecules (PAHs) containing some 50--100 C-atoms, these UIR spectra are a treasure trove of information. The ISO spectra have, for the first time, allowed a systematic analysis of the spectral characteristics of the UIR features in a wide variety of environments. The peak positions, profiles, and relative strengths of the major features vary from source to source and spatially within sources. These specific profiles are not unique to certain object types but can occur within each individual source. Here, we review ISO and recent ground-based observations and assess some of their implications.

E. Peeters; L. J. Allamandola; D. M. Hudgins; S. Hony; A. G. G. M. Tielens

2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - aging society aging Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of two different aging techniques. ... Source: South Dakota State University, Climate Change and Prairie Wetlands Program Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ;...

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - age gestational age Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 25 Pregnancy ComplicationsHealth Problems Complication Explanation Summary: her gestational age. (Sometimes referred to as...

305

Restructuring and aging in a capillary suspension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rheological properties of capillary suspensions, suspensions with small amounts of an added immiscible fluid, are dramatically altered with the addition of the secondary fluid. We investigate a capillary suspension to determine how the network ages and restructures at rest and under applied external shear deformation. The present work uses calcium carbonate suspended in silicone oil (11 % solids) with added water as a model system. Aging of capillary suspensions and their response to applied oscillatory shear is distinctly different from particulate gels dominated by the van der Waals forces. The suspensions dominated by the capillary force are very sensitive to oscillatory flow, with the linear viscoelastic regime ending at a deformation of only 0.1 % and demonstrating power-law aging behavior. This aging persists for long times at low deformations or for shorter times with a sudden decrease in the strength at higher deformations. This aging behavior suggests that the network is able to rearrange and even rupture. This same sensitivity is not demonstrated in shear flow where very high shear rates are required to rupture the agglomerates returning the apparent viscosity of capillary suspensions to the same viscosity as for the pure vdW suspension. A transitional region is also present at intermediate water contents wherein the material response depends very strongly on the type, strength, and duration of the external forcing.

Erin Koos; Wolfgang Kannowade; Norbert Willenbacher

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

306

Microscale Confinement features in microfluidic devices can affect biofilm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biofilms are aggregations of microbes that are encased by extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and adhere to surfaces and interfaces. Biofilm development on abiotic surfaces is a dynamic process, which typically proceeds through an initial phase of adhesion of plankntonic microbes to the substrate, followed by events such as growth, maturation and EPS secretion. However, the coupling of hydrodynamics, microbial adhesion and biofilm growth remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of semiconfined features on biofilm formation. Using a microfluidic device and fluorescent time-lapse microscopy, we establish that confinement features can significantly affect biofilm formation. Biofilm dynamics change not only as a function of confinement features, but also of the total fluid flow rate, and our combination of experimental results and numerical simulations reveal insights into the link between hydrodynamics and biofilm formation.

Kumar, Aloke [ORNL] [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph] [University of Guelph; Acharya, Rajesh K [ORNL] [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL] [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL] [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

SOLAR MAGNETIC TRACKING. IV. THE DEATH OF MAGNETIC FEATURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The removal of magnetic flux from the quiet-Sun photosphere is important for maintaining the statistical steady state of the magnetic field there, for determining the magnetic flux budget of the Sun, and for estimating the rate of energy injected into the upper solar atmosphere. Magnetic feature death is a measurable proxy for the removal of detectable flux, either by cancellation (submerging or rising loops, or reconnection in the photosphere) or by dispersal of flux. We used the SWAMIS feature tracking code to understand how nearly 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} magnetic features die in an hour-long sequence of Hinode/SOT/NFI magnetograms of a region of the quiet Sun. Of the feature deaths that remove visible magnetic flux from the photosphere, the vast majority do so by a process that merely disperses the previously detected flux so that it is too small and too weak to be detected, rather than completely eliminating it. The behavior of the ensemble average of these dispersals is not consistent with a model of simple planar diffusion, suggesting that the dispersal is constrained by the evolving photospheric velocity field. We introduce the concept of the partial lifetime of magnetic features, and show that the partial lifetime due to Cancellation of magnetic flux, 22 hr, is three times slower than previous measurements of the flux turnover time. This indicates that prior feature-based estimates of the flux replacement time may be too short, in contrast with the tendency for this quantity to decrease as resolution and instrumentation have improved. This suggests that dispersal of flux to smaller scales is more important for the replacement of magnetic fields in the quiet Sun than observed bipolar cancellation. We conclude that processes on spatial scales smaller than those visible to Hinode dominate the processes of flux emergence and cancellation, and therefore also the quantity of magnetic flux that threads the photosphere.

Lamb, D. A.; Howard, T. A.; DeForest, C. E. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Parnell, C. E. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Welsch, B. T., E-mail: derek@boulder.swri.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California-Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

308

Is the silicate emission feature only influenced by grain size?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The flattening of the 10mu silicate emission feature observed in the spectra of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be stars is usually interpreted as an indicator of grain growth. We show in this paper that a similar behaviour of the feature shape occurs when the porosity of composite grains varies. The fluffy aggregates, having inclusions of different sizes, were modeled by multi-layered spheres consisting of amorphous carbon, amorphous silicate and vacuum. It is also found that the inclusion of crystalline silicates in composite porous particles can lead to a shift of the known resonances and production of new ones.

N. V. Voshchinnikov; Th. Henning

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Died suddenly under age 50 Heart disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ _____________________________________________________________ Student cell phone Current email address (for contact over the summer) Persons to contact in case _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ Home phone Business phone Cell phone Home phone Business phone Cell phone State of Age at Age Health _________________________________________________ _________________________________________________ City State Zip Code Nation (if not US) Home phone

Smith, Marc L.

310

american children ages: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

july 2004 Age-Specific Demography in Plantago: Uncovering Roach,. Deborah 17 Tackling Dyslexia at an Early Age esearchers at HMS and Boston Children's Biology and Medicine Websites...

311

aging tumor growth: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1983), provide valuable data on the age 85 AGE AND GROWTH OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, AND YELLOWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS ALBACARES, AS INDICATED Environmental Sciences and...

312

aging aircraft nondestructive: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at Early Ages An Experimental and Numerical Analysis by Dr for Nondestructive Testing of Cement-Based Materials at Early Ages - An Experi- mental and Numerical Analysis...

313

Diagnostic and Prognostic Analysis of Battery Performance & Aging...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Prognostic Analysis of Battery Performance & Aging based on Kinetic and Thermodynamic Principles Diagnostic and Prognostic Analysis of Battery Performance & Aging based on...

314

Rapid Aging Protocols for Diesel Aftertreatment Devices: NOx...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Rapid Aging Protocols for Diesel Aftertreatment Devices: NOx Abatement Catalysts Rapid Aging Protocols for Diesel Aftertreatment Devices: NOx Abatement Catalysts Poster...

315

Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review...

316

THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased...

317

Review: Glut: Mastering Information throughout the Ages by Alex Wright  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In positing his proposal, Wright has provided the literaturethrough the Ages by Alex Wright. Washington: Joseph Henrythrough the Ages, Alex Wright may have uncovered one such

Haley, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of non-ageing and ageing ceria nanoparticles suspensions on fresh water micro-algae Manier nanoparticle (nCeO2) suspensions, towards freshwater micro-algae assessing the effect nCeO2 suspensions microscopy (TEM). In addition, the interaction between NPs and algae were investigated using flow

Boyer, Edmond

319

WebFEATURE: An interactive web tool for identifying and visualizing functional sites on macromolecular structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 WebFEATURE: An interactive web tool for identifying and visualizing functional sites University, Stanford CA 94305 USA Abstract WebFEATURE (http://feature.stanford.edu/webfeature/) is a web and nucleic acids. WebFEATURE is the public interface to the scanning algorithm of the FEATURE package

Brutlag, Doug

320

Mesozoic sedimentary rock features resulting from volume movements required in drape folds at corners of basement blocks--Casper Mountain Area, Wyoming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environment resulted in 700 feet of varicolored shale and sandstone of Jurassic age which lie unconformably upon the Triassic rocks. During Cretaceous time 5, 000 feet of marine sandstone and shale were deposited unconformably on tne Jurassic sediments...MESOZOIC SEDIMENTARY ROCK FEATURES RESULTING FROM VOLUME MOVEMENTS REQUIRED IN DRAPE FOLDS AT CORNERS OF BASEMENT BIOCKS ? CASPER MOUNTAIN AREA, MYOMING A Thesis by PATTY HOLYFIELD VAUGHN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A...

Vaughn, Patty Holyfield

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Surface Reconstruction with Feature Preservation based on Graph-cuts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

features. The effectiveness of the weighted minimal surface model E(S) is examined in the tetrahedral mesh is a very close approximation to the global minimum of EC (S). Various examples show the effectiveness Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371. E-mail: wanm0003@e.ntu.edu.sg, {desheng,xctai}@ntu

Soatto, Stefano

322

38 renewable energy focus July/August 2009 Feature article  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

38 renewable energy focus July/August 2009 Feature article Compact electrical generators.: Illustration shows magnified view of high temperature superconductor cable. #12;renewable energy focus July/August 2009 39 Renewable energy/infrastructure there has been excitement about superconductivity. The sting

Hampshire, Damian

323

Stroke Fragmentation based on Geometry Features and Hidden Markov Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Stroke Fragmentation based on Geometry Features and Hidden Markov Model Guihuan Feng, Christian Viard-Gaudin, Technical Report, IRCCyN Nantes/IVC ABSTRACT Stroke fragmentation is one of the key steps in pen-based interaction. In this letter, we present a unified HMM-based stroke fragmentation technique

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

324

Green Building Features Northwest Center for Engineering, Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green Building Features Northwest Center for Engineering, Science and Technology RESOURCE for commercial buildings developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) to provide a national consensus in what constitutes a "green" building and to provide market incentives to build green. PSU has received

Bertini, Robert L.

325

Kernel Machine Based Feature Extraction Algorithms for Regression Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kernel Machine Based Feature Extraction Algorithms for Regression Problems Csaba Szepesv¬īari 1 and Andr¬īas Kocsor and Korn¬īel Kov¬īacs 2 Abstract. In this paper we consider two novel kernel machine based performance of the algorithm. The second algo- rithm combines kernel machines with average derivative

Szepesvari, Csaba

326

Feature-based design for heterogeneous objects Xiaoping Qiana,*,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and combination of these material features, are developed. A physics (diffusion) based B-spline method the implantation. A graded layer of hydroxyapatite (HAp) is coated on the porous metal. It bonds to the bone titanium plus 0010-4485/$ - see front matter q 2004 Elsevier L

Qian, Xiaoping

327

Improving Personal Diaries Using Social Audio Features Michael Kuhn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amount of personal data that well documents a persons life is gathered. Future services could extractImproving Personal Diaries Using Social Audio Features Michael Kuhn Computer Engineering our affinity to reminisce about the personal past. Who does not like to remember"the good old times

328

COG - Special Features of Interest to Criticality Safety Practitioners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COG is a modern, general-purpose, high fidelity, multi-particle transport code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory specifically for use in deep penetration (shielding) and criticality safety calculations. This paper describes some features in COG of special interest to criticality safety practitioners.

Buck, R M; Heinrichs, D P; Krass, A W; Lent, E M

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

329

Feature importance analysis for patient management decisions Michal Valkoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Are pat- terns related to most recent patient history more important than the distant past? What features the results and con- clude. PCP Dataset Post-surgical cardiac patient (PCP) database is a database of de Center (UPMC) teaching hospitals. The entries in the database were populated from data from the MARS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

330

Special Features: Kyoto University with ASEAN and Beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special Features: Kyoto University with ASEAN and Beyond Kyoto University Vol.4 No.2 September 2014 #12;Contents 1 Message from the President Kyoto University with ASEAN and Beyond 2 History Southeast in ASEAN Region 22 Fostering the Next Generation -- The Hakubi Project A Unique Opportunity

Takada, Shoji

331

Energy efficient HVAC system features thermal storage and heat recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes a HVAC system designed to efficiently condition a medical center. The topics of the article include energy efficient design of the HVAC system, incentive rebate program by the local utility, indoor air quality, innovative design features, operations and maintenance, payback and life cycle cost analysis results, and energy consumption.

Bard, E.M. (Bard, Rao + Athanas Consulting Engineering Inc., Boston, MA (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

ORNL Lightweighting Research Featured on MotorWeek  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

PBS MotorWeek, television's longest running automotive series, featured ORNL lightweighting research for vehicle applications in an episode that aired in early April 2014. The crew captured footage of research including development of new metal alloys, additive manufacturing, carbon fiber production, advanced batteries, power electronics components, and neutron imaging applications for materials evaluation.

None

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

333

New MOX Conservation Garden Features Federally Endangered Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is located, has been certified as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold buildingNew MOX Conservation Garden Features Federally Endangered Plant Linda Lee, botanist for the Savannah River Ecology Lab (from left), Clay Ramsey , federal project director of the Mixed Oxide Fuel

Georgia, University of

334

ORNL Lightweighting Research Featured on MotorWeek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PBS MotorWeek, television's longest running automotive series, featured ORNL lightweighting research for vehicle applications in an episode that aired in early April 2014. The crew captured footage of research including development of new metal alloys, additive manufacturing, carbon fiber production, advanced batteries, power electronics components, and neutron imaging applications for materials evaluation.

None

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Development and Features EatSafe: Modular Portable Food Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The convenience of the EatSafe Sensor allows for this. PRONE TO FOOD-POISONING Seniors, children, pregnant womenDevelopment and Features EatSafe: Modular Portable Food Sensor ECE-Rady Design Competition FOOD INDUSTRY Every year >76 million people become sick from the consumption of contaminated food. PACKAGING

California at San Diego, University of

336

Improving Moments-based Visual Servoing with Tunable Visual Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are subjects of active research. The first is the design of visual features most pertinent to the robotic task and y rotational motions. With the proposed method, it is possible to design moment invariants to demonstrate the validity of the proposed ideas. Results from each case are then used to design a moment

Boyer, Edmond

337

2014 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania1 2014 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H.O. Smith Botanic

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

338

2013 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H1 2013 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H.O. Smith Botanic

Omiecinski, Curtis

339

Science Serv.ice Feature Released upn receipt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Serv.ice Feature Released upn receipt but intended for use March 28, 1933 'i 'IJI.IY TKE m estiraating the t o t a l number of lightning flashes, since whiibe som thunderstorms produce only a fern discharges of lightnhg - Say one t o a dozen - there are others that produce thousands. B i s is In one Npine

340

Advertiser retains sole responsibility for content ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between research and the private sector. At present, RMIT has over 200 active research collaborations Solar, or photovoltaic, cells are a com- mon feature in today's cities and the electricity they generate achieve 70 per cent efficiency. Plus, heat is also easier and cheaper to store than electricity

Cai, Long

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(5), 2005, pp. 11241134  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1124 SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(5), 2005, pp. 1124­1134 2005 by the Ecological Society of America STATISTICS OF EXTREMES: MODELING ECOLOGICAL DISTURBANCES RICHARD W. KATZ,1,3 GRACE S. BRUSH,2 AND MARC B ecological disturbances is the central theme of this paper. The statistics of extremes have played only

Gilleland, Eric

342

SpecialFeature Ecology, 84(3), 2003, pp. 574577  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

574 SpecialFeature Ecology, 84(3), 2003, pp. 574­577 2003 by the Ecological Society of America WHAT that genetics should be incorporated into ecological explanations (Collins 1986). C. C. Adams (1915) sug- gested. Evolutionary ecology emerged in the 1960s, driven by empirical results in three areas (Collins 1986

Antonovics, Janis

343

INTRODUCTION 1. The phrase `continuous cover forestry' has featured  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTRODUCTION 1. The phrase `continuous cover forestry' has featured increasingly in discussions about the future management of British forests. For example, The UK forestry standard (Forestry cover forestry system and to build them into the forest design'. `Continuous cover' is defined

344

Author's personal copy Optimal feature selection for support vector machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the classification process. This paper proposes a convex energy-based framework to jointly perform feature selection classification problems because of their flexibility, compu- tational efficiency and capacity to handle high classification accuracy, computational efficiency, and learning convergence. First, the implicit regularization

345

Feature Extraction from Multiple Data Sources Using Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's Multispectral Thermal National Laboratory Mail Stop D436, Los Alamos, NM 87545 ABSTRACT Feature extraction from imagery Imager (MTI) satellite1,2,3 combined with USGS 1:24k digital elevation model (DEM) data.4 The Los Alamos

Theiler, James

346

Accurate Visual Features for Automatic Tag Correction in Videos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate Visual Features for Automatic Tag Correction in Videos Hoang-Tung Tran, Elisa Fromont-Etienne, Fr Abstract. We present a new system for video auto tagging which aims at correcting the tags provided by users for videos uploaded on the In- ternet. Unlike most existing systems, in our proposal, we

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

347

ENGINEERING FEATURES OF THE FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT (FIRE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fusion energy program. It has a major radius of 2 m, and a minor radius of 0.525 m. The general with antenna through the large ports. The major features are shown in Figure 1. -TF Coils and Global Structure coils. Each vessel quadrant has a large mid plane port, angled ports above and below the mid

348

Image Based Exploration for Indoor Environments using Local Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION Mobile robot exploration is a vital cog in the automa- tion of the mapping process. In recentImage Based Exploration for Indoor Environments using Local Features (Extended Abstract) Aravindhan K Krishnan Madhava Krishna Supreeth Achar ABSTRACT This paper presents an approach to explore

Treuille, Adrien

349

Smart Grid Voltage Sag Detection using Instantaneous Features Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Grid Voltage Sag Detection using Instantaneous Features Extraction Yassine Amirat, Mohamed Benbouzid, Tianzhen Wang and Sylvie Turri Abstract--Smart grids have initiated a radical reappraisal, and effective use of the network are indexed as the most important keys for smart grid expansion and deployment

Boyer, Edmond

350

Advertiser retains sole responsibility for content ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advertiser retains sole responsibility for content ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE P lastic pollution detected chemicals from plastic pollution in the feathers of seabirds. However, this research is also of the pollution problem. Contrary to expectations, plastics that degrade in the environment are not necessarily

Cai, Long

351

absorption features dust: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

absorption features dust First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Silicon carbide absorption...

352

Temporal, Spatial, and Morphologic Features of Hair Cell Regeneration in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temporal, Spatial, and Morphologic Features of Hair Cell Regeneration in the Avian Basilar Papilla 98195-7923 ABSTRACT Hair cell≠selective antibodies were used in combination with the nucleotide bromode- oxyuridine (BrdU) to examine the temporal, spatial, and morphologic progression of auditory hair cell

Rubel, Edwin

353

Utah Commission on Aging June 16, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is focusing on fall prevention, end of life care, and elder abuse issues, all of which fall under the auspices Cherie Brunker Health Care Shauna O'Neil Area Agencies on Aging Robert Archuleta Ethnic Minorities Helen-Michele Church Department of Human Services Kent Alderman Legal Profession Gary Kelso Long-Term Care Jo

Tipple, Brett

354

7, 1365313697, 2007 Global mean age of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 7, 13653­13697, 2007 Global mean age of air from MIPAS G. P. Stiller et al. Title Page measurements G. P. Stiller 1 , T. von Clarmann 1 , M. H¨opfner 1 , N. Glatthor 1 , U. Grabowski 1 , S. Kellmann Correspondence to: G. P. Stiller (gabriele.stiller@imk.fzk.de) 13653 #12;ACPD 7, 13653­13697, 2007 Global mean

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

355

Bitcoin and the Age of Bespoke Silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bitcoin and the Age of Bespoke Silicon Michael B. Taylor Associate Professor University of California, San Diego #12;This Talk Introduction An Overview of the Bitcoin Cryptocurrency Bitcoin's Computing Evolution Bespoke Silicon #12;Interesting Facts about Bitcoin The most successful digital

Wang, Deli

356

Aging and Place: Building Health Promotion into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aging and Place: Building Health Promotion into Long-Term Care IHRP Brownbag May 21, 2013 Naoko-being in social contexts. ­ To improve quality of services by building health promotion into long-term care. #12 ­ U.S. 3. Building health promotion into long-term care ­ Why important? ­ Challenges

Illinois at Chicago, University of

357

Stone Age Distributed Computing (Extended Abstract)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the first page. Copyrights for components of this work owned by others than ACM must be honored. AbstractingStone Age Distributed Computing (Extended Abstract) Yuval Emek Distributed Computing Group ETH wattenhofer@ethz.ch ABSTRACT A new model that depicts a network of randomized finite state machines operating

358

Aging assessment of auxiliary feedwater systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of Pressurized Water Reactor Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) Systems has been conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the auspices of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The study has reviewed historical failure experience and current monitoring practices for the AFW System. This paper provides an overview of the study approach and results. 7 figs.

Casada, D.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Eligibility: Cancer Survivor ages 35-75  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eligibility: · Cancer Survivor ages 35-75 · Patient has completed treatment within last two years for non-metastic solid tumor · Patient's cancer is currently considered stable or in remission · At least. Please contact Missy Buchanan 415-353-7019 for more information. Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer

Walter, Peter

360

Metabolic reprogramming, caloric restriction and aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metabolic response to changes in nutrient availability, energetic demand or redox status. The fact that many the response to altered nutri- ent availability with CR and how the pathways they regulate can retard the aging and has the potential to reveal cellular pathways that are important in directing

Sheridan, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NREL: A Year in Clean Energy Innovations; A Review of NREL's 2011 Feature Stories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of articles featuring NREL research and development, deployment, commercialization, and outreach activities in 2011. The feature stories can be found online at http:www.nrel.gov/features/.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The 2006 Harvard / Paul F. Glenn Symposium on Aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diseases of aging, such as diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease. A recent study1 concluded

Church, George M.

363

Helium isotope study of geothermal features in Chile with field and laboratory data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Helium isotope and stable isotope data from the El Tatio, Tinginguirica, Chillan, and Tolhuaca geothermal systems, Chile. Data from this submission are discussed in: Dobson, P.F., Kennedy, B.M., Reich, M., Sanchez, P., and Morata, D. (2013) Effects of volcanism, crustal thickness, and large scale faulting on the He isotope signatures of geothermal systems in Chile. Proceedings, 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Feb. 11-13, 2013

Dobson, Patrick

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

364

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol features biomass Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

features biomass Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aerosol features biomass Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Global observations and...

365

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic feature extraction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: automatic feature extraction Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Computer Science & Engineering Summary: throwing away crucial information. Good Features are...

366

Comparison of organic-rich shales of Pennsylvanian age in Indiana with New Albany Shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abundant black organic-rich shales occur in rocks of Pennsylvanian age in southwestern Indiana. They have not been well characterized except for a few thin intervals in small areas, the best example being at the abandoned Mecca Quarry in west-central Indiana. Although these shales are thinner and less widespread than the organic-rich shales of the New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian age) they warrant characterization because of their accessibility during strip mining of underlying coals. Organic-rich shales of Pennsylvanian age contain up to 44% organic carbon and might be considered potential oil shales. Carbon to hydrogen ratios in these shales are similar to those in the New Albany. Relatively high concentrations of certain metals occur in shales of both ages, especially where phosphate is abundant, and sulfur values for both shales range from < 1 to 6%. Sulfur values are much higher for thin pyrite-rich units. Siderite nodules are common in Pennsylvania shales, but little siderite if found in the New Albany. Dolomite, commonly ferroan, and calcite in a variety of forms are the dominant carbonates in the New Albany. Some Pennsylvanian shales may contain large fossils or mica flakes, but such coarse-grained features are uncommon in the New Albany Shale.

Shaffer, N.R.; Leininger, R.K.; Ennis, M.V.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Age-Related Binding Deficits and the Content of False Memories Keith B. Lyle, Suzanne M. Bloise, and Marcia K. Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Marcia K. Johnson Yale University The authors examined effects of age-related binding deficits on featureIntyre & Craik, 1987), and location (Chalfonte & Johnson, 1996; Light & Zelinski, 1983; Mitchell, Johnson, Raye with actually experi- enced events (e.g., Balota et al., 1999; Henkel, Johnson, & De Leonardis, 1998; Koutstaal

Johnson, Marcia K.

368

Identification of features in indexed data and equipment therefore  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments of the present invention provide methods of identifying a feature in an indexed dataset. Such embodiments encompass selecting an initial subset of indices, the initial subset of indices being encompassed by an initial window-of-interest and comprising at least one beginning index and at least one ending index; computing an intensity weighted measure of dispersion for the subset of indices using a subset of responses corresponding to the subset of indices; and comparing the intensity weighted measure of dispersion to a dispersion critical value determined from an expected value of the intensity weighted measure of dispersion under a null hypothesis of no transient feature present. Embodiments of the present invention also encompass equipment configured to perform the methods of the present invention.

Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Daly, Don Simone [Richland, WA; Anderson, Kevin K [Richland, WA; Wahl, Karen L [Richland, WA

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

369

Biosensor method and system based on feature vector extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for biosensor-based detection of toxins includes providing at least one time-dependent control signal generated by a biosensor in a gas or liquid medium, and obtaining a time-dependent biosensor signal from the biosensor in the gas or liquid medium to be monitored or analyzed for the presence of one or more toxins selected from chemical, biological or radiological agents. The time-dependent biosensor signal is processed to obtain a plurality of feature vectors using at least one of amplitude statistics and a time-frequency analysis. At least one parameter relating to toxicity of the gas or liquid medium is then determined from the feature vectors based on reference to the control signal.

Greenbaum, Elias; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Qi, Hairong; Wang, Xiaoling

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

370

An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University, Athens; Mark, David [University at Buffalo, NY; Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

S e c t i o n 44Cover feature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;S e c t i o n 44Cover feature: Small StepS, Big reSultS B y a m y m a s t From recycling, from lab assistants to senior personnel, look back on the path that led them to a life of science, electric bills and water usage. From small steps such as recycling to hugely ambitious ones

Weston, Ken

372

Features and nongaussianity in the inflationary power spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I summarize recent work on (1) constraining spike-like features in the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure; (2) nonstandard Friedmann equation in stabilized warped 6D brane cosmology, with applications to inflation; and (3) nonlocal inflation models, motivated by string theory, which can yield large nongaussian CMB fluctuations. Work in collaboration with N. Barnaby, T. Biswas, F. Chen, L. Hoi, G. Holder and S. Kanno.

James M. Cline

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

373

Continuous Commissioningģ in an Aged Office Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2005 Cui and Liu Continuous Commissioning SM in an Aged Office Building Y. Cui, Ph.D. Energy Systems Laboratory Architectural Engineering Department University of Nebraska-Lincoln Omaha, NE 68182 cuiy@unomaha.edu Mingsheng Liu, Ph... and Liu Units (AHUs). Among these, 7 AHUs serve the Main Building and Executive Wing areas: one AHU, called Primary AHU, for the perimeter of the Main Building and Executive Wing areas, and six AHUs, called Interior AHUs, for the interior of Main...

Cui, Y.; Liu, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The fuzzy Hough Transform-feature extraction in medical images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Identification of anatomical features is a necessary step for medical image analysis. Automatic methods for feature identification using conventional pattern recognition techniques typically classify an object as a member of a predefined class of objects, but do not attempt to recover the exact or approximate shape of that object. For this reason, such techniques are usually not sufficient to identify the borders of organs when individual geometry varies in local detail, even though the general geometrical shape is similar. The authors present an algorithm that detects features in an image based on approximate geometrical models. The algorithm is based on the traditional and generalized Hough Transforms but includes notions from fuzzy set theory. The authors use the new algorithm to roughly estimate the actual locations of boundaries of an internal organ, and from this estimate, to determine a region of interest around the organ. Based on this rough estimate of the border location, and the derived region of interest, the authors find the final estimate of the true borders with other image processing techniques. The authors present results that demonstrate that the algorithm was successfully used to estimate the approximate location of the chest wall in humans, and of the left ventricular contours of a dog heart obtained from cine-computed tomographic images. The authors use this fuzzy Hough Transform algorithm as part of a larger procedures to automatically identify the myocardial contours of the heart. This algorithm may also allow for more rapid image processing and clinical decision making in other medical imaging applications.

Philip, K.P.; Dove, E.L.; Stanford, W.; Chandran, K.B. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)); McPherson, D.D.; Gotteiner, N.L. (Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Internal Medicine)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

AGES: THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) is a redshift survey covering, in its standard fields, 7.7 deg{sup 2} of the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. The final sample consists of 23,745 redshifts. There are well-defined galaxy samples in 10 bands (the B{sub W} , R, I, J, K, IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m, and MIPS 24 {mu}m bands) to a limiting magnitude of I < 20 mag for spectroscopy. For these galaxies, we obtained 18,163 redshifts from a sample of 35,200 galaxies, where random sparse sampling was used to define statistically complete sub-samples in all 10 photometric bands. The median galaxy redshift is 0.31, and 90% of the redshifts are in the range 0.085 < z < 0.66. Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) were selected as radio, X-ray, IRAC mid-IR, and MIPS 24 {mu}m sources to fainter limiting magnitudes (I < 22.5 mag for point sources). Redshifts were obtained for 4764 quasars and galaxies with AGN signatures, with 2926, 1718, 605, 119, and 13 above redshifts of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. We detail all the AGES selection procedures and present the complete spectroscopic redshift catalogs and spectral energy distribution decompositions. Photometric redshift estimates are provided for all sources in the AGES samples.

Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Eisenstein, D. J.; Caldwell, N.; Jones, C.; Murray, S. S.; Forman, W. R.; Green, P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cool, R. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Assef, R. J.; Eisenhardt, P.; Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Jannuzi, B. T.; Dey, A. [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Brown, M. J. I. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Gonzalez, A. H. [Department of Astronomy, Bryant Space Science Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Age-dependent decay in the landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The picture of the "multiverse" arising in diverse cosmological scenarios involves transitions between metastable vacuum states. It was pointed out by Krauss and Dent that the transition rates decrease at very late times, leading to a dependence of the transition probability between vacua on the age of each vacuum region. I investigate the implications of this non-Markovian, age-dependent decay on the global structure of the spacetime in landscape scenarios. I show that the fractal dimension of the eternally inflating domain is precisely equal to 3, instead of being slightly below 3 in scenarios with purely Markovian, age-independent decay. I develop a complete description of a non-Markovian landscape in terms of a nonlocal master equation. Using this description I demonstrate by an explicit calculation that, under some technical assumptions about the landscape, the probabilistic predictions of our position in the landscape are essentially unchanged, regardless of the measure used to extract these predictions. I briefly discuss the physical plausibility of realizing non-Markovian vacuum decay in cosmology in view of the possible decoherence of the metastable quantum state.

Sergei Winitzki

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

377

Preserving the feature record: a systematic analysis of cooking and heating features from the Richard Beene site (41BX831), Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural and cultural archaeological features at the Richard Beene site (41BX831) occur in deeply buried, well-stratified, and well-dated contexts representing the Holocene period. This thesis establishes a comprehensive, systematic feature...

Clabaugh, Patricia Ann

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

On the seismic age of the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use low-degree acoustic modes obtained by the BiSON to estimate the main-sequence age $t_\\odot$ of the Sun. The calibration is accomplished by linearizing the deviations from a standard solar model the seismic frequencies of which are close to those of the Sun. Formally, we obtain the preliminary value $t_\\odot=4.68\\pm0.02 $Gy, coupled with an initial heavy-element abundance $Z=0.0169\\pm0.0005$. The quoted standard errors, which are not independent, are upper bounds implied under the assumption that the standard errors in the observed frequencies are independent.

G. Houdek; D. O. Gough

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

379

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm It is classified asOpenAges Jump

380

AGE UFMG Incubator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,Information OfOpen EnergyEnergyAGE UFMG Incubator Jump

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Purcell factor of Mie resonators featuring electric and magnetic modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a modal approach to compute the Purcell factor in Mie resonators exhibiting both electric and magnetic resonances. The analytic expressions of the normal modes are used to calculate the effective volumes. We show that important features of the effective volume can be predicted thanks to the translation-addition coefficients of a displaced dipole. Using our formalism, it is easy to see that, in general, the Purcell factor of Mie resonators is not dominated by a single mode, but rather by a large superposition. Finally we consider a silicon resonator homogeneously doped with electric dipolar emitters, and we show that the average electric Purcell factor dominates over the magnetic one.

Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Featured Articles | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticles News News Home Featured Articles 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011

383

Alaska Feature Articles and Blogs | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO Access to OUOAlaska Feature Articles and Blogs Alaska

384

LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - Featured Videos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region serviceMission Statement TitanProposals | FY2016LANSCEContactFeatured

385

Category:Relict Geothermal Features | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascadeJump to:Lists JumpRoadmapFlowchartsFeatures page?

386

The May 22, 1915, explosive eruption of Lassen Peak, California, blasted rock fragments and pumice high into the air and rained fine volcanic ash as far away as Winnemucca, Nevada, 200 miles to the east. In this photograph  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The May 22, 1915, explosive eruption of Lassen Peak, California, blasted rock fragments and pumice of volcanic rock, called lava domes, were created by eruptions of lava too viscous to flow readily away from its source. Eruptions about 27,000 years ago formed Lassen Peak, probably in only a few years

387

SEECAL: Program to calculate age-dependent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the computer program SEECAL, which calculates specific effective energies (SEE) to specified target regions for ages newborn, 1 y, 5 y, 10 y, 15 y, a 70-kg adult male, and a 58-kg adult female. The dosimetric methodology is that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and is generally consistent with the schema of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose committee of the US Society of Nuclear Medicine. Computation of SEEs is necessary in the computation of equivalent dose rate in a target region, for occupational or public exposure to radionuclides taken into the body. Program SEECAL replaces the program SEE that was previously used by the Dosimetry Research Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program SEE was used in the dosimetric calculations for occupational exposures for ICRP Publication 30 and is limited to adults. SEECAL was used to generate age-dependent SEEs for ICRP Publication 56, Part 1. SEECAL is also incorporated into DCAL, a radiation dose and risk calculational system being developed for the Environmental Protection Agency. Electronic copies of the program and data files and this report are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Spray-Formed Tooling with Micro-Scale Features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molds, dies, and related tooling are used to shape many of the plastic and metal components we use every day at home and work. Traditional mold-making practices are labor and capital equipment intensive, involving multiple machining, benching and heat treatment operations. Spray forming is an alternative method to manufacture molds and dies. The general concept is to atomize and deposit droplets of a tooling alloy onto a pattern to form a thick deposit while imaging the patternís shape, surface texture and details. Unlike conventional machining, this approach can be used to fabricate tooling with micro-scale surface features. This paper describes a research effort to spray form molds and dies that are used to image micro-scale surface textures into polymers. The goal of the study is to replicate textures that give rise to superhydrophobic behavior by mimicking the surface structure of highly water repellent biological materials such as the lotus leaf. Spray conditions leading to high transfer fidelity of features into the surface of molded polymers will be described. Improvements in water repellency of these materials was quantified by measuring the static contact angle of water droplets on flat and textured surfaces.

Kevin McHugh

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Pixie Dust: The Silicate Features in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have analyzed the 9.7 and ``18'' micron interstellar silicate absorption features along the line of sight toward four heavily extincted galactic WC-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. We construct two interstellar extinction curves from 1.25 to 25 micron using near-IR extinction measurements from the literature along with the silicate profiles of WR 98a (representing the local ISM) and GCS 3 (representing the Galactic Center). We have investigated the mineralogy of the interstellar silicates by comparing extinction profiles for amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stochiometry to the 9.7 and ``18'' micron absorption features in the WR 98a spectrum. In this analysis, we have considered solid and porous spheres and a continuous distribution of ellipsoids. While it is not possible to simultaneously provide a perfect match to both profiles, we find the best match requires a mixture of these two types of compounds. We also consider iron oxides, aluminosilicates and silicate carbide (SiC) as grain components. Iron oxides cannot be accommodated in the observed spectrum, while the amount of Si in SiC is limited to silicate mineralogy, grain shape and porosity.

J. E. Chiar; A. G. G. M. Tielens

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

390

Transition region features observed with Hinode/EIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two types of active region feature prominent at transition region temperatures are identified in Hinode/EIS data of AR 10938 taken on 2007 January 20. The footpoints of 1 MK TRACE loops are shown to emit strongly in emission lines formed at log T=5.4-5.8, allowing the temperature increase along the footpoints to be clearly seen. A density diagnostic of Mg VII yields the density in the footpoints, with one loop showing a decrease from 3x10^9 cm^-3 at the base to 1.5x10^9 cm^-3 at a projected height of 20 Mm. The second feature is a compact active region transition region brightening which is particularly intense in O V emission (log T=5.4) but also has a signature at temperatures up to log T=6.3. The Mg VII diagnostic gives a density of 4x10^10 cm^-3, and emission lines of Mg VI and Mg VII show line profiles broadened by 50 km/s and wings extending beyond 200 km/s. Continuum emission in the short wavelength band is also found to be enhanced, and is suggested to be free-bound emission from recombination onto He^+.

P. R. Young; G. Del Zanna; H. E. Mason; G. A. Doschek; J. L. Culhane; H. Hara

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Age Dating of Mixed SNM--Preliminary Investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently we investigated the nuclear forensics problem of age determination for mixed special nuclear material (SNM). Through limited computational mixing experiments and interactive age analysis, it was observed that age dating results are generally affected by the mixing of samples with different assays or even by small radioactive material contamination. The mixing and contamination can be detected through interactive age analysis, a function provided by the Decay Interaction, Visualization and Analysis (DIVA) software developed by NSTec. It is observed that for mixed SNM with two components, the age estimators typically fall into two distinct clusters on the time axis. This suggests that averaging or other simple statistical methods may not always be suitable for age dating SNM mixtures. Instead, an interactive age analysis would be more suitable for age determination of material components of such SNM mixtures. This work was supported by the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS).

Yuan, D., Guss, P. P., Yfantis, E., Klingensmith, A., Emer, D.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for...

393

Characterization of thermal aging of duplex stainless steel by SQUID  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal aging is a growing concern for long-term-aged duplex stainless steel piping in nuclear power plants. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used for the detection of thermal aging of SUS329 rolled duplex stainless steel and SCS16 cast duplex stainless steel. It was found that the SQUID output signal pattern in the presence of AC magnetic field applied to the specimen was sensitive to the changes in electromagnetic properties due to thermal aging.

Isobe, Y.; Kamimura, A.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

AGE: a distributed environment for creating interactive animations of graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

com- munication domain. Standard routines, which we shall refer to as the AGE client primitives, that read snd write AGE messages to and from the socket, and routines that create and interpret AGE messages have been developed and are available... for use by those wishing to code a client program (refer to Appendix C). While most requirements for the environment desired are fulfilled by the AGE server, itself, some facilities are supplied by clients, namely, scripts, view broadcasting...

Veatch, Timothy Richard

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The 2008 Harvard / Paul F. Glenn Symposium on Aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aging such as diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease. Thus, a major goal in the coming years

Church, George M.

396

The 2007 Harvard / Paul F. Glenn Symposium on Aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are regulated, leading to novel medicines to forestall and treat diseases of aging such as diabetes, cancer

Church, George M.

397

The 2009 Harvard / Paul F. Glenn Symposium on Aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aging such as diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease. Thus, a major goal in the coming years

Church, George M.

398

Virtual Age: Enabling Technologies and Trends Hamid Mahmoodi 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This much-needed breakthrough manifested itself in the form of the industrial revolution. Industrial revolution signaled the end of the Agricultural Age and moved the human society forward towards the Industrial Age which lasted for about 500 years. In this age, great inventions, such as, the steam engine

Mahmoodi, Hamid

399

FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL Pierre L'Ecuyer, Benoit Martin, controlled by a replacement rule based on age thresholds. We show how to estimate the expected cost­ generative simulation, maintenance models, age replacement policies. #12; 2 L'ECUYER, MARTIN, AND V ' AZQUEZ

L'Ecuyer, Pierre

400

FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUNCTIONAL ESTIMATION FOR A MULTICOMPONENT AGE REPLACEMENT MODEL Pierre L'Ecuyer, Benoit Martin, controlled by a replacement rule based on age thresholds. We show how to estimate the expected cost­ generative simulation, maintenance models, age replacement policies. #12; L'ECUYER, MARTIN, AND V ' AZQUEZ

V√°zquez-Abad, Felisa J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

THE Na 8200 Angstrom-Sign DOUBLET AS AN AGE INDICATOR IN LOW-MASS STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the use of the gravity sensitive neutral sodium (Na I) doublet at 8183 Angstrom-Sign and 8195 Angstrom-Sign (Na 8200 Angstrom-Sign doublet) as an age indicator for M dwarfs. We measured the Na doublet equivalent width (EW) in giants, old dwarfs, young dwarfs, and candidate members of the {beta} Pic moving group using medium-resolution spectra. Our Na 8200 A doublet EW analysis shows that the feature is useful as an approximate age indicator in M-type dwarfs with (V - K{sub s}) {>=} 5.0, reliably distinguishing stars older and younger than 100 Myr. A simple derivation of the dependence of the Na EW on temperature and gravity supports the observational results. An analysis of the effects of metallicity shows that this youth indicator is best used on samples with similar metallicity. The age estimation technique presented here becomes useful in a mass regime where traditional youth indicators are increasingly less reliable, is applicable to other alkali lines, and will help identify new low-mass members in other young clusters and associations.

Schlieder, Joshua E.; Simon, Michal [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Lepine, Sebastien; Rice, Emily [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Fielding, Drummond [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tomasino, Rachael, E-mail: michal.simon@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: schlieder@mpia-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: lepine@amnh.org, E-mail: erice@amnh.org, E-mail: dfieldi1@jhu.edu, E-mail: tomas1r@cmich.edu [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Dark Energy in the Dark Ages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-negligible dark energy density at high redshifts would indicate dark energy physics distinct from a cosmological constant or ``reasonable'' canonical scalar fields. Such dark energy can be constrained tightly through investigation of the growth of structure, with limits of \\la2% of total energy density at z\\gg1 for many models. Intermediate dark energy can have effects distinct from its energy density; the dark ages acceleration can be constrained to last less than 5% of a Hubble e-fold time, exacerbating the coincidence problem. Both the total linear growth, or equivalently \\sigma_8, and the shape and evolution of the nonlinear mass power spectrum for zenergy behavior over the entire range z=0-1100.

Eric V. Linder

2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Features of MCNP6 Relevant to Medical Radiation Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo code for simulating the transport of neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and more recently other fundamental particles and heavy ions. Over many years MCNP has found a wide range of applications in many different fields, including medical radiation physics. In this presentation we will describe and illustrate a number of significant recently-developed features in the current version of the code, MCNP6, having particular utility for medical physics. Among these are major extensions of the ability to simulate large, complex geometries, improvement in memory requirements and speed for large lattices, introduction of mesh-based isotopic reaction tallies, advances in radiography simulation, expanded variance-reduction capabilities, especially for pulse-height tallies, and a large number of enhancements in photon/electron transport.

Hughes, H. Grady III [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Features, Events and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the unsaturated zone (UZ) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling that supports the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for the screening decision. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs deal with UZ flow and radionuclide transport, including climate, surface water infiltration, percolation, drift seepage, and thermally coupled processes. This analysis summarizes the implementation of each FEP in TSPA-LA (that is, how the FEP is included) and also provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (that is, why the FEP is excluded). This report supports TSPA-LA.

P. Persoff

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

407

Features, Events, and Processes in UZ and Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the unsaturated zone (UZ) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling that supports the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded'', is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for the screening decision. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs deal with UZ flow and radionuclide transport, including climate, surface water infiltration, percolation, drift seepage, and thermally coupled processes. This analysis summarizes the implementation of each FEP in TSPA-LA (that is, how the FEP is included) and also provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (that is, why the FEP is excluded). This report supports TSPA-LA.

P. Persoff

2004-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

408

Identifying features in biological sequences: Sixth workshop report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the sixth of an annual series of workshops held at the Aspen Center for Physics concentrating particularly on the identification of features in DNA sequence, and more broadly on related topics in computational molecular biology. The workshop series originally focused primarily on discussion of current needs and future strategies for identifying and predicting the presence of complex functional units on sequenced, but otherwise uncharacterized, genomic DNA. We addressed the need for computationally-based, automatic tools for synthesizing available data about individual consensus sequences and local compositional patterns into the composite objects (e.g., genes) that are -- as composite entities -- the true object of interest when scanning DNA sequences. The workshop was structured to promote sustained informal contact and exchange of expertise between molecular biologists, computer scientists, and mathematicians.

Burks, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Myers, E. [Univ. of Arizona (United States); Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Breakaway safety feature for an intra-oral cone system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an increasing number of high energy accelerators in operation, intra-oral electron radiotherapy is likely to become a more widely-used modality in the treatment of lesions of the oral cavity. However, there is one potential problem associated with this modality which concerns patient safety. There must never be any uncontrolled movement of the couch or gantry while the cone is in the patients's mouth, otherwise serious consequences could occur. In an effort to overcome this problem, a set of cones previously constructed by the authors for use in intra-oral electron radiotherapy has been modified to include a breakaway safety feature. This modification consists of separating the plate into which each of the treatment cones screws, into two pieces, the dividing line being in the shape of a cone frustum flaring out in the upward direction.

Biggs, P.J.; Wang, C.C.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Non-contact feature detection using ultrasonic Lamb waves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method for non-contact ultrasonic detection of features on or within the walls of hollow pipes are described. An air-coupled, high-power ultrasonic transducer for generating guided waves in the pipe wall, and a high-sensitivity, air-coupled transducer for detecting these waves, are disposed at a distance apart and at chosen angle with respect to the surface of the pipe, either inside of or outside of the pipe. Measurements may be made in reflection or transmission modes depending on the relative position of the transducers and the pipe. Data are taken by sweeping the frequency of the incident ultrasonic waves, using a tracking narrow-band filter to reduce detected noise, and transforming the frequency domain data into the time domain using fast Fourier transformation, if required.

Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

411

Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Implementation of efficient algorithms for the computation of morphological texture features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

features, morphological granulometry texture features are the least utilized partly due to the immense amount of time needed for their computation. This is especially so when structuring elements of any geometry are utilized in obtaining a granulometry...

Patel, Manish J

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Combining missing-feature theory, speech enhancement, and speaker-dependent/-independent modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combining missing-feature theory, speech enhancement, and speaker-dependent/-independent modeling filter for speech enhancement, hidden Markov models for speech reconstruction, and speaker reserved. Keywords: Speech enhancement; Speaker modeling; Speech recognition; Missing-feature theory

Glass, James R.

414

ScienceEducation.gov Featured on the new White House Innovation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ScienceEducation.gov Featured on the new White House Innovation Gallery ScienceEducation.gov Featured on the new White House Innovation Gallery December 10, 2010 - 10:27am Addthis...

415

| JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014 | Hydro INTERNATIONAL22 symbols and features used on a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

| JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014 | Hydro INTERNATIONAL22 symbols and features used on a nautical chart #12;Hydro INT

New Hampshire, University of

416

NREL: A Year in Clean Energy Innovations: A Review of NREL's Feature Stories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The publication is a compilation of various feature stories published on NREL's public Web site, nrel.gov, throughout 2009.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix. We examine site characterization projects from several sites in the world. The list includes Yucca Mountain in the USA, Tono and Horonobe in Japan, AECL in Canada, sites in Sweden, and Olkiluoto in Finland. We identify important geologic features and parameters common to most (or all) sites to provide useful information for future repository siting activity. At first glance, one could question whether there was any commonality among the sites, which are in different rock types at different locations. For example, the planned Yucca Mountain site is a dry repository in unsaturated tuff, whereas the Swedish sites are situated in saturated granite. However, the study concludes that indeed there are a number of important common features and parameters among all the sites--namely, (1) fault properties, (2) fracture-matrix interaction (3) groundwater flux, (4) boundary conditions, and (5) the permeability and porosity of the materials. We list the lessons learned from the Yucca Mountain Project and other site characterization programs. Most programs have by and large been quite successful. Nonetheless, there are definitely 'should-haves' and 'could-haves', or lessons to be learned, in all these programs. Although each site characterization program has some unique aspects, we believe that these crosscutting lessons can be very useful for future site investigations to be conducted in Japan. One of the most common lessons learned is that a repository program should allow for flexibility, in both schedule and approach. We examine field investigation technologies used to collect site characterization data in the field. An extensive list of existing field technologies is presented, with some discussion on usage and limitations. Many of the technologies on the list were in fact used during the characterization of Yucca Mountain and elsewhere by LBNL personnel. The study also includes emerging technologies and identifies the need to develop better estimation of important parameters for repository siting. Notable emerging technologies include 3-D seismic and satellite-based remote sensing and wireless micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) sensors. They enable cost-effective and ubiquitous monitoring to be applied for site characterization. We list and classify the types of uncertainties involved in site characterization. Uncertainties can exist in all aspects of site characterization: data, interpretation, conceptualization, and modeling. We use the Swedish program to exemplify such uncertainties. We also devote a chapter on geochemical issues regarding the interaction between groundwater and natural and engineered barrier materials. A recommendation has been made to take advantage of the recent advancement in geochemical modeling capabilities in natural systems. Although it is not of immediate relevance at the preliminary investigation stage, it serves as a good reminder that geochemical investigation efforts should not be overlooked at any stage in the repository program. We construct a synthetic preliminary-investigation site based on an extensive data set available from a geoscientific project in Japan, which we use as a 'real' site to evaluate uncertainties resulting from hydrogeological modeling and examine strategies for characterizing a new site. We plan various preliminary-investigation configurations and conduct preliminary numerical investigations at the synthetic site. We construct a model of the 'real' site for each PI configuration, make predictions of particle travel times, and compare against the 'real' data obtained from the 'real' model. We conclude that drilling as many as nine boreholes does not necessarily improve the understanding of the site compared to drilling as few as three boreholes, unless there is an underlying structure that is larger than the spacing of the boreholes. The

Karasaki, Kenzi; Apps, John; Doughty, Christine; Gwatney, Hope; Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Trautz, Robert; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Iris Image Retrieval Based on Macro-features Manisha Sam Sunder and Arun Ross  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iris Image Retrieval Based on Macro-features Manisha Sam Sunder and Arun Ross West Virginia investigate the use of macro-features that are visible on the anterior surface of RGB images of the iris, melanoma, etc. and may not be present in all iris images. Given an image of a macro- feature, the goal

Ross, Arun Abraham

419

Combining missing-feature theory, speech enhancement, and speaker-dependent/-independent modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combining missing-feature theory, speech enhancement, and speaker-dependent/-independent modeling a missing-feature approach for improving crosstalk/noise robustness, a Wiener filter for speech enhancement enhancement; Speaker modeling; Speech recognition; Missing-feature theory; Posterior union model 1

Glass, James R.

420

From Transformation-Based Dimensionality Reduction to Feature Mahdokht Masaeli masaeli.m@neu.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Transformation-Based Dimensionality Reduction to Feature Selection Mahdokht Masaeli masaeli glenn.fung@siemens.com Computer Aided Diagnosis and Therapy, Siemens Medical Solutions, USA Jennifer G- duce dimensionality: feature selection and feature transformation. When one wishes to keep the original

Dy, Jennifer G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Estimation of eye, eyebrow and nose features in videophone sequences Markus Kampmann, Liang Zhang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of eye, eyebrow and nose features in videophone sequences Markus Kampmann, Liang Zhang sequences at very low bit rates. In this contribution, algorithms for the estima­ tion of eye, eyebrow and nose features are presented. For estimation of eye features, deformable template matching

422

Forms and Distributions of Hurricane Ike Backflow and Scour Features: Bolivar Peninsula, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and backflow features in the beach and dune environments along Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. Using Ward?s cluster analysis, the 454 identified features were grouped according to shape and size characteristics generated by an object-oriented shape analysis... ............................................................................. 76 Analysis of Features per Kilometer of Shoreline ........................... 78 IV RESULTS ............................................................................................. 79 Size...

Potts, Michael Killgore

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

423

Aging and weathering of cool roofing membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aging and weathering can reduce the solar reflectance of cool roofing materials. This paper summarizes laboratory measurements of the solar spectral reflectance of unweathered, weathered, and cleaned samples collected from single-ply roofing membranes at various sites across the United States. Fifteen samples were examined in each of the following six conditions: unweathered; weathered; weathered and brushed; weathered, brushed and then rinsed with water; weathered, brushed, rinsed with water, and then washed with soap and water; and weathered, brushed, rinsed with water, washed with soap and water, and then washed with an algaecide. Another 25 samples from 25 roofs across the United States and Canada were measured in their unweathered state, weathered, and weathered and wiped. We document reduction in reflectivity resulted from various soiling mechanisms and provide data on the effectiveness of various cleaning approaches. Results indicate that although the majority of samples after being washed with detergent could be brought to within 90% of their unweathered reflectivity, in some instances an algaecide was required to restore this level of reflectivity.

Akbari, Hashem; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Levinson, Ronnen; Graveline,Stanley; Foley, Kevin; Delgado, Ana H.; Paroli, Ralph M.

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

Stylized features of single-nucleon momentum distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Background:] Nuclear short-range correlations (SRC) typically manifest themselves in the tail parts of the single-nucleon momentum distributions. [Purpose:] To develop an approximate flexible method for computing the single-nucleon momentum distributions throughout the whole mass table, thereby including the majority of the effects of SRC. To use this method to study the mass and isospin dependence of SRC. [Method:] The low-order cluster approximation (LCA) adopted in this work, corrects mean-field models for correlations by shifting the complexity induced by the SRC from the wave functions to the operators. Due to the local character of the SRC, it is argued that the expansion of these operators can be truncated to a low order. [Results:] After inclusion of the central and tensor correlations, the LCA can generate the SRC-related features of the single-nucleon momentum distribution like the high-momentum tails. These are dominated by correlations operating on mean-field pairs with vanishing relative radial and angular-momentum quantum numbers. In asymmetric nuclei, the correlations make the average kinetic energy for the minority nucleons larger than for the majority nucleons. [Conclusions:] The LCA method explains the dominant role of proton-neutron pairs in generating the SRC and provides predictions for the ratio of the amount of correlated proton-proton to proton-neutron pairs which are in line with the observations.

Maarten Vanhalst; Wim Cosyn; Jan Ryckebusch

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

425

Structural features of Athabasca bitumen related to upgrading performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural studies on asphaltenes and heavy ends have, until recently, only yielded information on some of the gross compositional features of these materials. Spectroscopic methods, for sample, are limited in the sense that even if several functional groups (e.g., aromatic or aliphatic carbon, carbonyl groups, etc.) can be identified, no information on the molecular environment can be deduced. Selective chemical degradative methods, on the other hand, offer more potential and this paper describes some of their recent results on the chemical degradation of asphaltene and heavy ends. Quantitative recoveries of alkyl side chains and bridging units attached to aromatic rings have been achieved, and some insights into the aliphatic framework have been gained. The results could be particularly helpful with regard to monitoring the dealkylation processes during thermal treatment of bitumens. The aliphatic framework of the asphaltene contains units of five- and six-membered ring sulfides and thermal breakdown of these units also contributes to depolymerization and the production of alkanes. Some of the heteroatom-containing classes of compounds identified in the asphaltene and resin fractions of Athabasca bitumen will be briefly discussed.

Strausz, O.P. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Basic features of the pion valence-quark distribution function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impulse-approximation expression used hitherto to define the pion's valence-quark distribution function is flawed because it omits contributions from the gluons which bind quarks into the pion. A corrected leading-order expression produces the model-independent result that quarks dressed via the rainbow-ladder truncation, or any practical analogue, carry all the pion's light-front momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale. Corrections to the leading contribution may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea-quarks. Working with available empirical information, we use an algebraic model to express the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment that allows us to highlight the basic features of the pion's measurable valence-quark distribution, $q^\\pi(x)$; namely, at a characteristic hadronic scale, $q^\\pi(x) \\sim (1-x)^2$ for $x\\gtrsim 0.85$; and the valence-quarks carry approximately two-thirds of the pion's light-front momentum.

Lei Chang; Cťdric Mezrag; Hervť Moutarde; Craig D. Roberts; Jose RodrŪguez-Quintero; Peter C. Tandy

2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - aging glassy systems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

shear melting and aging experiments... was the first to term this phenomenon as phy- sical aging 26, 29, 30. Aging in glassy materials contin- ues... at that tempera-...

428

Chelation: A Fundamental Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors, AGE Breakers, and Other Inhibitors of Diabetes Complications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced glycation or glycoxidation end-products (AGE) increase in tissue proteins with age, and their rate of accumulation is increased in diabetes, nephropathy and inflammatory diseases. AGE inhibitors include a range of compounds that are proposed to act by trapping carbonyl and dicarbonyl intermediates in AGE formation. However, some among the newer generation of AGE inhibitors lack reactive functional groups that would trap reaction intermediates, indicating an alternative mechanism of action. We propose that AGE inhibitors function primarily as chelators, inhibiting metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. The AGE-inhibitory activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers is also consistent with their chelating activity. Finally, compounds described as AGE breakers, or their hydrolysis products, also have strong chelating activity, suggesting that these compounds also act through their chelating activity. We conclude that chelation is the common, and perhaps the primary, mechanism of action of AGE inhibitors and breakers, and that chronic, mild chelation therapy should prove useful in treatment of diabetes and age-related diseases characterized by oxidative stress, inflammation and increased chemical modification of tissue proteins by advanced glycoxidation and lipoxidation end-products.

Nagai, Rhoji; Murray, David B.; Metz, Thomas O.; Baynes, John

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Replication of surface features from a master model to an amorphous metallic article  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The surface features of an article are replicated by preparing a master model having a preselected surface feature thereon which is to be replicated, and replicating the preselected surface feature of the master model. The replication is accomplished by providing a piece of a bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy, contacting the piece of the bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy to the surface of the master model at an elevated replication temperature to transfer a negative copy of the preselected surface feature of the master model to the piece, and separating the piece having the negative copy of the preselected surface feature from the master model.

Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Bakke, Eric (Murrieta, CA); Peker, Atakan (Aliso Viejo, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

age children group: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface area, and thickness measures were obtained. Anxiety symptoms were 22 Tackling Dyslexia at an Early Age esearchers at HMS and Boston Children's Biology and Medicine Websites...

431

aged children hbsc: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface area, and thickness measures were obtained. Anxiety symptoms were 13 Tackling Dyslexia at an Early Age esearchers at HMS and Boston Children's Biology and Medicine Websites...

432

age children preliminary: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface area, and thickness measures were obtained. Anxiety symptoms were 17 Tackling Dyslexia at an Early Age esearchers at HMS and Boston Children's Biology and Medicine Websites...

433

age tumor size: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alternate body arches, fin cartilage 422 AGE AND GROWTH OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, AND YELLOWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS ALBACARES, AS INDICATED Environmental Sciences and...

434

Influence of Aging and Environment on Nanoparticle Chemistry...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of cerium in cerium oxide nanoparticles is studied in detail. The influence of synthesis medium, aging time and local environment on the oxidation state switching, between +3 and...

435

aged patients usefulness: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(6-month old, 12-month old, and adult) based on auditory event-related potentials Reilly, James P. 34 USING OBJECTIVE CRITERIA AND MULTIPLE REGRESSION MODELS FOR AGE...

436

Successful cognitive aging in persons living with HIV infection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

medical evaluations. Successful cognitive aging (SCA) wasby a battery of well- validated cognitive tests andself-endorsed cognitive com- plaints. Thirty-two percent of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

accelerated aging studies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the nominal one, increasing background and pile-up event probability. This requires detector performances which are currently under study in intensive R&D activities. Aging is...

438

age spectrum epidemiology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a young supernova. We associate this break with the phenomenon of synchrotron aging of radiating electrons. From the break in the spectrum we calculate the magnetic field...

439

age experimental analysis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: , by improving the seismic hazard evaluation using probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) methodsSeismic vulnerability assessment to slight dam- age...

440

The Work of Art in the Age of Deindustrialization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deindustrialization By Jasper Quentin Bernes A dissertationof Deindustrialization by Jasper Quentin Bernes Doctor ofAge of Deindustrialization Jasper Bernes i Acknowledgments

Bernes, Jasper

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

An Accelerated Aging Method for Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Diesel Aftertreatment Devices Impact of Fuel Metal Impurities on Diesel Exhaust Catalysts Rapid Aging Protocols for Diesel Aftertreatment Devices: NOx Abatement Catalysts...

442

Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in the Age of E-Government (March 2006) More Documents & Publications Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project Environmental Justice and Public...

443

Strategy for Aging Tests of Fuel Cell Membranes (Presentation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aging Tests Advanced Post Mortem Analysis Concluding Remarks Radiation Grafted Fuel Cell Membranes Lorenz Gubler, Paul Scherrer Institut, 2007 HTWG Meeting @ 212th ECS...

444

aged adults: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The "Aging in Place" project strives to delay taking that first step away from the family home. Through the careful placement of technological support we believe older...

445

age shetland implications: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

initial pricing of this program are not included--see below; all land and water transportation; airport Rowley, Clarence W. 111 Supercomputing Comes of Age Computer Technologies...

446

Aging Impairs Myocardial Fatty Acid and Ketone Oxidation and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with...

447

Microsoft Word - CASS_Aging-LWRS_5YR_Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LTR-2012440 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Cast Stainless Steel Aging Research Plan September 2012 Prepared by: T. S. Byun and J. T. Busby Oak Ridge National Laboratory This...

448

Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Annual Merit Review 1 Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps Mark Crocker Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky May 20, 2009 This presentation...

449

aging colloidal glass: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Matter (arXiv) Summary: We use confocal microscopy to directly visualize the dynamics of aging colloidal glasses. We prepare a colloidal suspension at high density, a...

450

Quantifying Community Assembly Processes and Identifying Features that Impose Them  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Across a set of ecological communities connected to each other through organismal dispersal (a Ďmeta-communityí), turnover in composition is governed by (ecological) Drift, Selection, and Dispersal Limitation. Quantitative estimates of these processes remain elusive, but would represent a common currency needed to unify community ecology. Using a novel analytical framework we quantitatively estimate the relative influences of Drift, Selection, and Dispersal Limitation on subsurface, sediment-associated microbial meta-communities. The communities we study are distributed across two geologic formations encompassing ~12,500m3 of uranium-contaminated sediments within the Hanford Site in eastern Washington State. We find that Drift consistently governs ~25% of spatial turnover in community composition; Selection dominates (governing ~60% of turnover) across spatially-structured habitats associated with fine-grained, low permeability sediments; and Dispersal Limitation is most influential (governing ~40% of turnover) across spatially-unstructured habitats associated with coarse-grained, highly-permeable sediments. Quantitative influences of Selection and Dispersal Limitation may therefore be predictable from knowledge of environmental structure. To develop a system-level conceptual model we extend our analytical framework to compare process estimates across formations, characterize measured and unmeasured environmental variables that impose Selection, and identify abiotic features that limit dispersal. Insights gained here suggest that community ecology can benefit from a shift in perspective; the quantitative approach developed here goes beyond the Ďniche vs. neutralí dichotomy by moving towards a style of natural history in which estimates of Selection, Dispersal Limitation and Drift can be described, mapped and compared across ecological systems.

Stegen, James C.; Lin, Xueju; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Chen, Xingyuan; Kennedy, David W.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Konopka, Allan

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

451

Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

Keller, G.R. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ?) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at {approximately}1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

Keller, G.R. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Theoretical foundation for measuring the groundwater age distribution.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, 81Kr, 4He and themean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2-D and 3-D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3-D domains differ significantly from 2-D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3-D systems. Groundwater environmental tracers can provide important constraints for the calibration of groundwater flow models. Direct simulation of environmental tracer concentrations in models has the additional advantage of avoiding assumptions associated with using calculated groundwater age values. This study quantifies model uncertainty reduction resulting from the addition of environmental tracer concentration data. The analysis uses a synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and the calibration of a flow and transport model using the pilot point method. Results indicate a significant reduction in the uncertainty in permeability with the addition of environmental tracer data, relative to the use of hydraulic measurements alone. Anthropogenic tracers and their decay products, such as CFC11, 3H, and 3He, provide significant constraint oninput permeability values in the model. Tracer data for 39Ar provide even more complete information on the heterogeneity of permeability and variability in the flow system than the anthropogenic tracers, leading to greater parameter uncertainty reduction.

Gardner, William Payton; Arnold, Bill Walter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - age structured equations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ageing may result in biases in stock assessments and Summary: recapture and known-age data. As with Equation 1, for a given true age b, the bias (b) of the observed age... to...

455

Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan. Final report, May 1, 1995--November 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. This comprehensive report describes the work accomplished during FY 1993-1996. A brief review of the geological and geophysical surveys at the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is presented (Section 2). Chemical data, consisting of analyses of steam and water from Sumikawa wells, are described and interpreted to indicate compositions and temperatures of reservoir fluids (Section 3). The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures (Section 4). Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter (Section 5). New interpretations of pressure transient data from several wells are discussed (Section 6). The available data have been synthesized to formulate a conceptual model for the Sumikawa Geothermal Field (Section 7).

Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Pritchett, J.W. [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Cognitive Aging and Neuroimaging (CAN) Lab The Cognitive Aging and Neuroimaging (CAN)Lab investigates the development of both cognitive and neural processes associated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cognitive Aging and Neuroimaging (CAN) Lab Overview: The Cognitive Aging and Neuroimaging (CAN)Lab investigates the development of both cognitive and neural processes associated with aging -with a focus on ageMRI to elucidate the cognitive and neural processes underlying age-related differences in cognitive control

Bj√łrnstad, Ottar Nordal

457

Colored figures Franke & Gaser (2012): Longitudinal changes in individual BrainAGE in healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colored figures Franke & Gaser (2012): Longitudinal changes in individual BrainAGE in healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease Figure 1: Depiction of the BrainAGE concept. A: The model of healthy brain aging is trained with the chronological age and preprocessed structural MRI data

Gaser, Christian

458

The effect of chrome adhesion layer on quartz resonator aging.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This SAND report documents a late start LDRD designed to determine the possible aging effects of a quartz resonator gold adhesion layer. Sandia uses quartz resonators for applications. These applications require a very stable frequency source with excellent aging (low drift) characteristics. These parts are manufactured by one of our qualified vendors outside Sandia Laboratories, Statek Corp. Over the years we, Sandia and the vendor, have seen aging variations that have not been completely explained by the typical mechanisms known in the industry. One theory was that the resonator metallization may be contributing to the resonator aging. This LDRD would allow us to test and analyze a group of resonators with known differentiating metallization and via accelerated aging determine if a chrome adhesion layer used to accept the final gold plating may contribute to poor aging. We worked with our main vendor to design and manufacture a set of quartz resonators with a wide range of metallization thickness ratios between the chrome and gold that will allow us determine the cause of this aging and which plating thickness ratios provide the best aging performance while not degrading other key characteristics.

Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Ohlhausen, James Anthony

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Communicating Coastal Risk Analysis in an Age of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communicating Coastal Risk Analysis in an Age of Climate Change TR-11-04 Brian Blanton, John Mc in an Age of Climate Change Brian Blanton, John McGee, Oleg Kapeljushnik Renaissance Computing Institute of climate change complicates matters further. An immersive visualization environment integrating data from

460

aging materials: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aging materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Ageing and Rheology in Soft Materials...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

International Trade in Natural Gas: Golden Age of LNG?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Trade in Natural Gas: Golden Age of LNG? Yichen Du and Sergey Paltsev Report No. 271;1 International Trade in Natural Gas: Golden Age of LNG? Yichen Du* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract The introduction of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as an option for international trade has created a market for natural gas where

Gabrieli, John

462

THE ROLE OF AGING AND ONCE-THROUGH-COOLED POWER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION THE ROLE OF AGING AND ONCE-THROUGH-COOLED POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA Nyberg, Darryl Metz, Connie Leni. 2009. The Role of Aging and Once-Through-Cooled Power Plants .......................................9 The Performance of Once-Through-Cooled Power Plants 2002

463

Microscopic histochemical changes associated with aging in the feline kidney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 13). This activity increased at one year of age to a moderate level and at 3 years to a high level of activity. A slight non-significant increase in activity was apparent from 5. 5 to 7. 5 years of age (Fig. 14). Aldolase N*-* tive l~omo t...

Kaler, Lawrence William

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Preserved lignin structures in Miocene-aged lignite lithotypes, Bulgaria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preserved lignin structures in Miocene-aged lignite lithotypes, Bulgaria M. Stefanova, O. Maman, B, Orleans Cedex 2, France Abstract Contents of preserved lignin structures in Miocene-aged lignite lithotypes were determined. Phenol aldehydes, ketones and acids released from lignin by CuO oxidative

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

465

Hydrogeologic factors affecting cavern morphology within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavern development within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas is associated with two Pleistocene erosional features, the Boston Mountains Plateau and the Springfield Plateau. Each plateau is characterized by a distinct stratigraphic sequence with unique lithologies. Cavern morphology (both cross-sectional and planimetric) in each plateau is the result of the complex interaction of numerous hydrogeologic factors. Four of the most dominant factors which affect cavern morphology appear to be: (1) composition and continuity of the confining units; (2) percentage of noncarbonate components in rocks of the cavern-forming interval; (3) nature and distribution of ground-water recharge to the cavern-forming interval; and (4) nature and distribution of fractures within the cavern-forming interval. Network maze patterns typically develop in the Pitkin Limestone, the formation in which most caverns form beneath the Boston Mountains Plateau. The Pitkin, a bioclastic limestone, is confined above by siltstones of the Cane Hill member of the Hale Formation and below by shales of the Fayetteville Formation. The maze pattern indicates that these caverns probably were formed by dissolution of the rock matrix by diffuse recharge moving vertically through leaky confining units. Single rooms are the dominant cavern morphology in the chert-dominated Boone Formation of the Springfield Plateau. Where the concentration of chert is greater than 50 percent, the Boone lacks structural integrity and fails to develop well-integrated conduit networks. Point recharge features in outcrop areas of the Boone Formation are not visible in most of the Springfield Plateau because the insoluble residuum masks the upper bedrock surface. Where the Boone Formation is less than 7 meters thick, surface karst features are more prevalent.

Fanning, B.J. (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Geology); Brahana, J.V. (Univ. of Arkansas , Fayetteville, AR (United States). Geological Survey)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 2209  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observations of the 1 Gyr old star cluster NGC 2209 in the Large Magellanic Cloud made with the GMOS imager on the Gemini South Telescope. These observations show that the cluster exhibits a main-sequence turnoff that spans a broader range in luminosity than can be explained by a single-aged stellar population. This places NGC 2209 amongst a growing list of intermediate-age (1-3 Gyr) clusters that show evidence for extended or multiple epochs of star formation of between 50 and 460 Myr in extent. The extended main-sequence turnoff observed in NGC 2209 is a confirmation of the prediction in Keller et al. made on the basis of the cluster's large core radius. We propose that secondary star formation is a defining feature of the evolution of massive star clusters. Dissolution of lower mass clusters through evaporation results in only clusters that have experienced secondary star formation surviving for a Hubble time, thus providing a natural connection between the extended main-sequence turnoff phenomenon and the ubiquitous light-element abundance ranges seen in the ancient Galactic globular clusters.

Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, A. Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant pumps important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

Booker, S.; Katz, D.; Daavettila, N.; Lehnert, D. [MDC-Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Southfield, MI (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storagereservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in deep geologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologic carbon storage is to trap CO{sub 2} underground, CO{sub 2} could migrate away from the storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeable pathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitude releases of CO{sub 2} have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs in numerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbon dioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO{sub 2} reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due to influences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. These systems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potential release of CO{sub 2} from geologic storage reservoirs and provide important information about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that are associated with releases, as well as the health, safety, and environmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can be applied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO{sub 2} and industrial releases of CO{sub 2} and natural gas in the context of these characteristics. Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessons can be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO{sub 2} can both accumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondary reservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Both primary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO{sub 2} should therefore be well characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO{sub 2} have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release, such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential for processes that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks and trigger the release of CO{sub 2} from a storage reservoir should be evaluated. Third, unsealed fault and fracture zones may act as fast and direct conduits for CO{sub 2} flow from depth to the surface. Risk assessment should therefore emphasize determining the potential for and nature of CO{sub 2} migration along these structures. Fourth, wells that are structurally unsound have the potential to rapidly release large quantities of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Risk assessment should therefore be focused on the potential for both active and abandoned wells at storage sites to transport CO{sub 2} to the surface, particularly at sites with depleted oil or gas reservoirs where wells are abundant. Fifth, the style of CO{sub 2} release at the surface varies widely between and within different leakage sites. In rare circumstances, the release of CO{sub 2} can be a self-enhancing and/or eruptive process; this possibility should be assessed in the case of CO{sub 2} leakage from storage reservoirs. Sixth, the hazard to human health has been small in most cases of large surface releases of CO{sub 2}. This could be due to implementation of public education and CO{sub 2} monitoring programs; these programs should therefore be employed to minimize potential health, safety, and environmental effects associated with CO{sub 2} leakage. Finally, while changes in groundwater chemistry were related to CO{sub 2} leakage due to acidification and interaction with host rocks along flow paths, waters remained potable in most cases. Groundwaters should be monitored for changes that may be associated with storage reservoir leakage.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

469

Natural and industrial analogues for leakage of CO2 from storagereservoirs: identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deepgeologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO2emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologiccarbon storage is to trap CO2 underground, CO2 could migrate away fromthe storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeablepathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitudereleases of CO2 have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs innumerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbondioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO2reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due toinfluences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. Thesesystems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potentialrelease of CO2 from geologic storage reservoirs and provide importantinformation about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that areassociated with releases, as well as the health, safety, andenvironmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can beapplied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO2 and industrialreleases of CO2 and natural gas in the context of these characteristics.Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessonscan be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO2 can bothaccumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondaryreservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Bothprimary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO2 should therefore bewell characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO2have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release,such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential forprocesses that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks andtrigger the release of CO2 from a storage reservoir should be evaluated.Third, unsealed fault and fracture zones may act as fast and directconduits for CO2 flow from depth to the surface. Risk assessment shouldtherefore emphasize determining the potential for and nature of CO2migration along these structures. Fourth, wells that are structurallyunsound have the potential to rapidly release large quantities of CO2 tothe atmosphere. Risk assessment should therefore be focused on thepotential for both active and abandoned wells at storage sites totransport CO2 to the surface, particularly at sites with depleted oil orgas reservoirs where wellsare abundant. Fifth, the style of CO2 releaseat the surface varies widely between and within different leakage sites.In rare circumstances, the release of CO2 can be a self-enhancing and/oreruptive process; this possibility should be assessed in the case of CO2leakage from storage reservoirs. Sixth, the hazard to human health hasbeen small in most cases of large surface releases of CO2. This could bedue to implementation of public education and CO2 monitoring programs;these programs should therefore be employed to minimize potential health,safety, and environmental effects associated with CO2 leakage. Finally,while changes in groundwater chemistry were related to CO2 leakage due toacidification and interaction with host rocks along flow paths, watersremained potable in most cases. Groundwaters should be monitored forchanges that may be associated with storage reservoirleakage.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

470

Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive morphological feature-based Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Morphology Summary: . Vis., 17:249-270, 2002. 14 F. Cheng and A. N. Venetsanopoulos. An adaptive morphological filter... features based on gabor filters. IEEE Trans. Image Proc.,...

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - aed device features Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technical White Paper This white paper provides an overview of Microsoft System Center Mobile Device Manager 2008, Summary: features: Windows Server 2008 Compatibility: Mobile...

473

NREL: A Year in Clean Energy Innovations, A Review of NREL's 2012 Feature Stories (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The publication is a compilation of various feature stories published on NREL's public website, nrel.gov, throughout Calendar Year 2012.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Learning Feature-Value Grammars from Plain Text Tony C. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feature-ValueGrammars from Plain Text. In D.M.W. Powers (ed.) NeMLaP3/CoNLL98 Workshopon Paradigmsand Groundingin Language

475

NREL: A Year in Clean Energy Innovations: A Review of NREL's Feature Stories, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The publication is a compilation of various feature stories published on NREL's public website, nrel.gov, throughout Calendar Year 2010.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

NREL: A Year in Clean Energy Innovations, A Review of NREL's 2013 Feature Stories (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The publication is a compilation of various feature stories published on NREL's public website, nrel.gov, throughout Calendar Year 2013.

Not Available

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggressive imaging features Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aggressive imaging features Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Brad J. Bushman University of Michigan & VU University...

478

Autonomous adaptive environmental assessment and feature tracking via autonomous underwater vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the underwater environment, spatiotemporally dynamic environmental conditions pose challenges to the detection and tracking of hydrographic features. A useful tool in combating these challenge is Autonomous Adaptive ...

Petillo, Stephanie Marie

479

Users, technology and space in libraries in the digital age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is a user research study of emerging issues in the use of libraries as public spaces and as information repositories in the digital age. Till recently strong physicality was attached to the library with the ...

G-Chandorkar, Tripti (Gore-Chandorkar)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Aging effects on oil-contaminated Kuwaiti sand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large quantities of oil-contaminated sands resulted from the destruction of oil wells and the formation of oil lakes in Kuwait at the end of the Gulf Wa/r. A laboratory testing program was carried out to determine the geotechnical properties of this material and the effect of aging on their properties. Tests included direct shear, triaxial, and consolidation tests on clean and contaminated sand at the same relative density. The influence of aging was examined by testing uncontaminated sand after aging for one, three, and six months in natural environmental conditions. The results indicated increased strength and stiffness due to aging and a reduction of the oil content due to evaporation of volatile compounds. The factors that influence the depth of oil penetration in compacted sand columns were also examined including the type of oil, relative density, and the amount of fines.

Al-Sanad, H.A.; Ismael, N.F. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "features volcanic age" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism...

482

administration normative aging: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S:pr.aoa.dhhs.govaoastatsaging21demography.html . Administration on Aging. 1999. Profile of Older Americans: 1999. U.S. Department:pr.aoa.dhhs.govaoastatsprofile...

483

Health, Ageing and Ethnicity: A Retrospective and Prospects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health, Ageing and Ethnicity: A Retrospective and Prospects Naina Patel, PhD. Dr. Patel called Minority Elderly Care (MEC) under the EC 5th Framework Research Programme. Formerly the UK

484

Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive Reservoirs and Plays Assessed by...

485

Cognitive training in schizophrenia: golden age or wild west?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Golden Age or Wild West? Sophia Vinogradov, Melissa Fisher,Address correspondence to Sophia Vinogradov, M.D. , 116AĖFrancisco, CA 94121; E-mail: sophia. vinogradov@ucsf.edu.

Vinogradov, Sophia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

age infant sex: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

old, 12-month old, and adult) based on auditory event-related potentials Reilly, James P. 13 RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Sex-related differences and age of peak Physics...

487

advancing age potential: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

old, 12-month old, and adult) based on auditory event-related potentials Reilly, James P. 10 Paradoxical down?regulation of p16 INK4a mRNA with advancing age in Acute...

488

aging decreases expression: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interacting sensory stimuli... Duncan, Nikki 2013-03-13 35 Analysis of Telomere Length in the Aged mdx Diaphragm with and without Transgenic IGF-I Expression CiteSeer...

489

The Effects of Ageing on Memory and Thinking†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main aim of the present study is to examine the effects of ageing on memory and thinking by examining verbal fluency performance. More specifically looking at the differences between older and younger people, to ...

Ford, Amanda

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3624 Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants - Interim Status for FY2014 Milestone Report M3LW-140R04022 September 2014 KL Simmons AM Jones LS...

491

ageing electronic systems: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a time, due to changes in the load current and due to ageing. The calorimeter light emitting diode (LED) monitoring system has been developed to monitor the PMT gain over time...

492

r Journalof Geology LATE ARCHEAN ZIRCON AGES 419  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sows t at t e popu a Ion 0 zIrcons in the banded granulite Ch Zr I, which record ages 238UfO6Pb at 2622

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

493

Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next-generation gas-turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at...

494

System to estimate ages and redshifts for radio galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The system allowing a user to operate with simulated curves of spectral energy distribution (SED) and to estimate ages and redshifts by photometric data at server {\\bf sed.sao.ru} is described.

O. V. Verkhodanov; A. I. Kopylov; N. V. Verkhodanova; O. P. Zhelenkova; V. N. Chernenkov; Yu. N. Parijskij; N. S. Soboleva; A. V. Temirova

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

495

Solar System impact rates measured from lunar spherule ages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The samples were irradiated with fast neutrons for 100 hours at the Oregon State University Reactor. Each measured using a MAP 215-C noble gas mass spectrometer. Spherule ages were determined using the 40 Ar/39 Ar

Muller, Richard A.

496

ageing seed pools: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the methods, expense, and logistics of sample collection. The ability to inventory wild populations would be greatly expanded if pooled adult age-class data (e.g.,...

497

arabian iron age: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

iron deficiency should be the goal of nutritional intervention programs. In the United States, approximately 5 % of children from 1-5 years of age suffer from iron deficiency...

498

ageing study bhas: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Growing-Stock Study at Age 401 William W. Oliver2 Abstract in the southwestern United States (Oliver and Ryker 1990). Throughout this vast area ponderosa pine is one of the most...

499

aging study bhas: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Growing-Stock Study at Age 401 William W. Oliver2 Abstract in the southwestern United States (Oliver and Ryker 1990). Throughout this vast area ponderosa pine is one of the most...

500

Learning with Augmented Features for Heterogeneous Domain Lixin Duan S080003@ntu.edu.sg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning with Augmented Features for Heterogeneous Domain Adaptation Lixin Duan S080003@ntu.edu.sg Dong Xu DongXu@ntu.edu.sg Ivor W. Tsang IvorTsang@ntu.edu.sg School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang be readily incorporated with our newly proposed augmented feature representations to effectively utilize

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"