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Sample records for fdb fcns wo

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/13-FD-b | Open Energy Information

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  2. Data:7d60fdb0-b014-4889-8061-e473d0810742 | Open Energy Information

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  3. File:05-FD-b - DrillingApplicationProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  4. File:09-FD-b - EAProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  5. Reactivity of Hydrogen and Methanol on (001) Surfaces of WO3, ReO3, WO3/ReO3 and ReO3/WO3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Sanliang; Mei, Donghai; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2011-05-16

    Bulk tungsten trioxide (WO3) and rhenium trioxide (ReO3) share very similar structures but display different electronic properties. WO3 is a wide bandgap semiconductor while ReO3 is an electronic conductor. With the advanced molecular beam epitaxy techniques, it is possible to make heterostructures comprised of layers of WO3 and ReO3. These heterostructures might display reactivity different than pure WO3 and ReO3. The interactions of two probe molecules (hydrogen and methanol) with the (001) surfaces of WO3, ReO3, and two heterostructures ReO3/WO3 and WO3/ReO3 were investigated at the density functional theory level. Atomic hydrogen prefers to adsorb at the terminal O1C sites forming a surface hydroxyl on four surfaces. Dissociative adsorption of a hydrogen molecule at the O1C site leads to formation of a water molecule adsorbed at the surface M5C site. This is thermodynamically the most stable state. A thermodynamically less stable dissociative state involves two surface hydroxyl groups O1CH and O2CH. The interaction of molecular hydrogen and methanol with pure ReO3 is stronger than with pure WO3 and the strength of the interaction substantially changes on the WO3/ReO3 and ReO3/WO3 heterostructures. The reaction barriers for decomposition and recombination reactions are sensitive to the nature of heterostructure. The calculated adsorption energy of methanol on WO3(001) of -65.6 kJ/mol is consistent with the previous experimental estimation of -67 kJ/mol. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  6. TriWo AG | Open Energy Information

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  7. NaWoTec | Open Energy Information

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  8. Photoelectrochemical Behavior of Hierarchically Structured Si/WO3 Core-Shell Tandem Photoanodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Photoelectrochemical Behavior of Hierarchically Structured Si/WO3 Core-Shell Tandem Photoanodes 61801, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: WO3 thin films have been deposited and the shells consisting of a controlled morphology WO3 layer. Porosity was introduced into the WO3 outer shell

  9. Radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Belli; R. Bernabei; F. Cappella; R. Cerulli; F. A. Danevich; A. M. Dubovik; S. d'Angelo; E. N. Galashov; B. V. Grinyov; A. Incicchitti; V. V. Kobychev; M. Laubenstein; L. L. Nagornaya; F. Nozzoli; D. V. Poda; R. B. Podviyanuk; O. G. Polischuk; D. Prosperi; V. N. Shlegel; V. I. Tretyak; I. A. Tupitsyna; Ya. V. Vasiliev; Yu. Ya. Vostretsov

    2010-09-05

    The radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators has been measured deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the INFN in Italy with a total exposure 3197 kg x h. Monte Carlo simulation, time-amplitude and pulse-shape analyses of the data have been applied to estimate the radioactive contamination of the ZnWO4 samples. One of the ZnWO4 crystals has also been tested by ultra-low background gamma spectrometry. The radioactive contaminations of the ZnWO4 samples do not exceed 0.002 -- 0.8 mBq/kg (depending on the radionuclide), the total alpha activity is in the range: 0.2 - 2 mBq/kg. Particular radioactivity, beta active 65Zn and alpha active 180W, has been detected. The effect of the re-crystallization on the radiopurity of the ZnWO4 crystal has been studied. The radioactive contamination of samples of the ceramic details of the set-ups used in the crystals growth has been checked by low background gamma spectrometry. A project scheme on further improvement of the radiopurity level of the ZnWO4 crystal scintillators is briefly addressed.

  10. Photoeffects in WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, K.H.; Lee, J.W.; Cho, Y.S.; Kang, D.H.

    1996-12-01

    Photoeffects of a {ital p}-type GaAs coated with WO{sub 3} thin film have been investigated as a function of film thickness and photoresponse transients of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were studied. Also, these results were compared to those for a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. The photocurrent of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode depended on the film thickness of the WO{sub 3}, showing an optimum photon efficiency for specimens of 800 A thickness. This is due to the existence of an effective interface state within the band gap which reduces trapping of carriers and facilitates carrier movement. For an 800-A-thick WO{sub 3} thin film deposited {ital p}-GaAs photoelectrode, the photogenerated electrons were found to move to an electrolyte at a higher positive onset potential compared with that of single {ital p}-type GaAs, which was confirmed as a result of transient behavior. {ital I}{endash}{ital V} and {ital C}{endash}{ital V} characteristics of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were also compared with those of a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Bull. Mater. Sci., Vol. 35, No. 5, October 2012, pp. 767772. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Anti-tumor activity of self-charged (Eu,Ca):WO3 and Eu:CaWO4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    -tumor activity of self-charged (Eu,Ca):WO3 and Eu:CaWO4 nanoparticles CAO LIN , CAO JIEXIN , WANG CONG, CHE PING July 2011 Abstract. Non-stoichiometric (Eu,Ca):WO3 and Eu:CaWO4 nanoparticles with anti-tumor activity structure. Colorimetric assay shows that 10 nm (Eu,Ca):WO3 and Eu:CaWO4 nanoparticles can effectively

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Synthesis of WO3 catalytic powders: evaluation of photocatalytic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER Synthesis of WO3 catalytic powders: evaluation of photocatalytic activity under NUV New York 2015 Abstract WO3 catalytic powders were successfully syn- thesized from tungstic acid-temperature hydrothermal treatment. WO3 crystallization process was completed with calcina- tion of the samples at 500

  13. Nanostructured SrTiO3/WO3 Heterojunction Thin Films for Efficient Photoelectrochemical Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrman, Sheryl H.

    Nanostructured SrTiO3/WO3 Heterojunction Thin Films for Efficient Photoelectrochemical Water transfer and separation of photogenerated charge carriers. Introduction #12;Why SrTiO3 and WO3 Tungsten Oxide (WO3) [Eg :- ~ 2.7 eV] Advantages: Basically n-type in nature due to presence of oxygen vacancies

  14. Magnetron sputtering of gold nanoparticles onto WO3 and activated carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Magnetron sputtering of gold nanoparticles onto WO3 and activated carbon Gabriel M. Veith a and investigation of two supported gold catalyst systems prepared by magnetron sputtering: Au on WO3 and Au, such as WO3 and carbon, which are generally not accessible using the ubiquitous deposition

  15. On the nature of WO stars: a quantitative analysis of the WO3 star DR1 in IC 1613

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tramper, F; Hartoog, O E; Sana, H; de Koter, A; Vink, J S; Ellerbroek, L E; Langer, N; Garcia, M; Kaper, L; de Mink, S E

    2013-01-01

    Context. Oxygen sequence Wolf-Rayet (WO) stars are thought to represent the final evolutionary stage of the most massive stars. The characteristic strong O vi emission possibly originates from an enhanced oxygen abundance in the stellar wind. Alternatively, the O vi emission can be caused by the high temperature of these stars, in which case the WO stars are the high-temperature extension of the more common carbon sequence Wolf-Rayet (WC) stars. Aims. By constraining the physical properties and evolutionary status of DR1, a WO star in the low-metallicity Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 1613 and one of only two objects of its class known in a SMC-like metallicity environment, we aim to investigate the nature of WO stars and their evolutionary connection with WC stars. Methods. We use the non-LTE atmosphere code cmfgen to model the observed spectrum of DR1 and to derive its stellar and wind parameters. We compare our values with other studies of WC and WO stars, as well as with the predictions of evolutionary model...

  16. Improved Visible Light Harvesting of WO3 by Incorporation of Sulfur or Iodine: A Tale of Two Impurities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jung-Fu "Afu"

    Improved Visible Light Harvesting of WO3 by Incorporation of Sulfur or Iodine: A Tale of Two report the incorporation of sulfur or iodine into monoclinic tungsten trioxide (S:WO3 or I:WO3 pyrolysis with either ammonium sulfide or iodide added to the aqueous WO3 precursor solutions. Red shifts

  17. Electrochromic Behavior in Flexible WO3 and Prussian Blue Thin Films for Use in Ski Goggle Lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Taylor D.

    Electrochromic Behavior in Flexible WO3 and Prussian Blue Thin Films for Use in Ski Goggle Lenses electrodeposited Prussian blue (PB) and sputtered WO3 thin films on ITO coated PET substrates 3. Films were to intercalate with the crystal structure of the electrochromic layer. This reaction for WO3 is as follows: WO3

  18. The Perseids 1995 in Poland ARKADIUSZ OLECH and PRZEMYSLAW WO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olech, Arkadiusz Kamil

    The Perseids 1995 in Poland ARKADIUSZ OLECH and PRZEMYSLAW WO #19; ZNIAK Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, Warszawa, 00-478 Poland (Received 29 December 1995) Abstract Visual observations of 1995 Perseid meteor stream made by Polish astronomy amateurs are reported. Using this material

  19. Photocatalytic Inhibition of Algae Growth Using TiO2, WO3, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouellette, Anthony J. A.

    Photocatalytic Inhibition of Algae Growth Using TiO2, WO3, and Cocatalyst Modifications C L O V I Road, Cocoa, Florida 32922-5703 TiO2 and WO3, with and without noble metal cocatalysts, were employed structures. Introduction Wide band gap metal oxides such as TiO2 and WO3 (Eg ) 3.1 and 2.7 eV, respectively

  20. Electrochromism vs. the Bugs:DevelopingWO3 Thin Film Windows...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrochromism vs. the Bugs:DevelopingWO3 Thin Film Windows toControl Photoactive Biological Systems. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrochromism vs. the...

  1. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Final 7-26-2012.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Request Document No .: -"Q, EP- WCRR- WO-DOP-0233 I Revision No.: 36 . Title: WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations I Page 1 of -' Description of requested action...

  2. EXPERIMENTAL AND SIMULATED SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY OF THE CLEAVED Rb1/3WO3 (0001) SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    EXPERIMENTAL AND SIMULATED SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY OF THE CLEAVED Rb1/3WO3 (0001) SURFACE of cleaved (0001) surfaces of the hexagonal tungsten bronze, Rbl/ 3WO3 , show two distinct contrast patterns bronze (HTB), Rbl/ 3WO3 [5]. The structure of this compound, originally determined by Magndli [6

  3. Interface electronic structures of organic light-emitting diodes with WO3 interlayer: A study by photoelectron spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    Interface electronic structures of organic light-emitting diodes with WO3 interlayer: A study,10 -biphenyl-4,40 -diamine (NPB)/indium tin oxide (ITO) was estimated 1.32 eV, while that with a thin WO3 layer annealing the WO3 interlayer at 350 C, the reduction of hole injection barrier height largely disappears

  4. Alkaline phosphatase, a biochemical marker of cellular differentiation of BeWo choriocarcinoma cell line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wei

    1997-01-01

    Cellular copper homeostasis depends on a Cu-ATPase enzyme in the membrane. Surprisingly, flask-grown BeWo cells do not display ATPase. We found Cu-ATPase is only expressed in differentiated cells such as Caco-2 cells. Since BeWo cells...

  5. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 92 (2008) 821829 Modeling the optical properties of WO3 and WO3SiO2 thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirumalai, Devarajan

    2008-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 92 (2008) 821829 Modeling the optical properties of WO3 the optical response of the films in the near-UV and visible region: two interband transitions for energies E

  6. MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite photoanode for visible light induced water splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousefzadeh, Samira; Reyhani, Ali; Naseri, Naimeh; Moshfegh, Alireza Z.

    2013-08-15

    The Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films with different MWCNTs weight percentages were prepared by solgel method as visible light induced photoanode in water splitting reaction. Weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films was confirmed by TGA/DSC analysis. According to XPS analysis, oxygenated groups at the surface of the MWCNT and stoichiometric formation of WO{sub 3} thin films were determined, while the crystalline structure of the nanocomposite samples was studied by XRD indicating (0 0 2) peak of MWCNT in the monoclinic phase of WO{sub 3}. The influence of different weight percentage (wt%) of MWCNT on WO{sub 3} photoactivity showed that the electron conductivity, charge transfer and electron life time had improved as compared with the pure WO{sub 3}. Based on linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometry measurements, the (1 wt%) MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films photoanode has a maximum photocurrent density of ?4.5 A/m{sup 2} and electron life time of about 57 s. - Graphical abstract: Photocurrent density versus time at constant potential (0.7 V) for the WO{sub 3} films containing different MWCNT weight percentages annealed at 400 C under 1000 Wm{sup ?2} visible photo-illumination. Display Omitted - Highlights: MWCNT/ WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films were synthesized using solgel derived method. TGA/DSC confirmed the weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films. XPS analysis revealed that WO{sub 3} was attached on the oxygenated group of MWCNT surface. The Highest Photoelectrochemical activity is achieved for (1 wt%)MWCNT/WO{sub 3} thin film.

  7. Epitaxial growth of high quality WO3 thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leng, X.; Pereiro, J.; Strle, J.; Bollinger, A. T.; Bozovic, I.

    2015-09-09

    We have grown epitaxial WO3 films on various single-crystal substrates using radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. While pronounced surface roughness is observed in films grown on LaSrAlO4 substrates, films grown on YAlO3 substrates show atomically flat surfaces, as demonstrated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The crystalline structure has been confirmed to be monoclinic by symmetric and skew-symmetric XRD. The dependence of the growth modes and the surface morphology on the lattice mismatch is discussed.

  8. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 R28 final.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Originator Request Document No.: EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 I Revision No .: 28 Title: WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations I Page 1 of I Description of requested action...

  9. WO3/TiO2 nanotube photoanodes for solar water splitting with simultaneous wastewater treatment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, Karla Rosa; Robinson, David B.

    2013-05-01

    Nanostructured WO3/TiO2 nanotubes with properties that enhance solar photoconversion reactions were developed, characterized and tested. The TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by anodization of Ti foil, and WO3 was electrodeposited on top of the nanotubes. SEM images show that these materials have the same ordered structure as TiO2 nanotubes, with an external nanostructured WO3 layer. Diffuse reflectance spectra showed an increase in the visible absorption relative to bare TiO2 nanotubes, and in the UV absorption relative to bare WO3 films. Incident simulated solar photon-to-current efficiency increased from 30% (for bare WO3) to 50% (for WO3/TiO2 composites). With the addition of diverse organic pollutants, the photocurrent densities exhibited more than a 5-fold increase. Chemical oxygen demand measurements showed the simultaneous photodegradation of organic pollutants. The results of this work indicate that the unique structure and composition of these composite materials enhance the charge carrier transport and optical properties compared with the parent materials.

  10. NO{sub 2} gas sensing of flame-made Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} thick films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samerjai, Thanittha [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Program, Faculty of Graduate School, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Tamaekong, Nittaya [Program in Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Liewhiran, Chaikarn [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wisitsoraat, Anurat [Nanoelectronics and MEMS Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Phanichphant, Sukon, E-mail: sphanichphant@yahoo.com [Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-06-01

    Unloaded WO{sub 3} and 0.251.0 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles for NO{sub 2} gas detection were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) and characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The BET surface area (SSA{sub BET}) of the nanoparticles was measured by nitrogen adsorption. The NO{sub 2} sensing properties of the sensors based on unloaded and Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were investigated. The results showed that the gas sensing properties of the Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensors were excellent to those of the unloaded one. Especially, 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensor showed highest response to NO{sub 2} than the others at low operating temperature of 150 C. - Graphical abstract: The response of 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO3 sensor was 637 towards NO{sub 2} concentration of 10 ppm at 150 C. - Highlights: Unloaded and Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} nanoparticles for NO{sub 2} gas detection were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). Gas sensing properties of the Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensors were excellent to those of the unloaded one. 0.25 wt% Pt-loaded WO{sub 3} sensor showed highest response to NO{sub 2} at low operating temperature of 150 C.

  11. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 89, 195304 (2014) Coupling between octahedral rotations and local polar displacements in WO3/ReO3 superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rappe, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    displacements in WO3/ReO3 superlattices Joseph T. Schick Department of Physics, Villanova University, Villanova (Received 14 January 2014; published 13 May 2014) We model short-period superlattices of WO3 and ReO3 of the corner-shared oxygen atoms. However, we find that octahedral rotation is enhanced within WO3 layers

  12. Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 162 (1) H65-H71 (2015) H65 Enhancing Majority Carrier Transport in WO3 Water Oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Transport in WO3 Water Oxidation Photoanode via Electrochemical Doping Jing Zhao, Everardo Olide, and Frank for monoclinic tungsten trioxide (WO3) particulate photoanodes. Electrochemical impedance and improved electron transport. Minority carrier extraction can be increased by reducing the WO3 particle size

  13. H.sub.2O doped WO.sub.3, ultra-fast, high-sensitivity hydrogen sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ping (Denver, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Lee, Se-Hee (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-03-22

    An ultra-fast response, high sensitivity structure for optical detection of low concentrations of hydrogen gas, comprising: a substrate; a water-doped WO.sub.3 layer coated on the substrate; and a palladium layer coated on the water-doped WO.sub.3 layer.

  14. Styron 663 W/O Additives DatapointLabs Report # 7903: Styron 663 W/O Additives PAGE 1 OF 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Certificate # 1242.01), and maintains a quality system in accordance with ISO/IEC 17025. Any opinions 1714.60 100 1139.50 30000 14.34 1000 558.33 1000 220.85 50001 10.67 8000 57.70 80000 7.46 30000 22.44 50001 19.53 PAGE 3 OF 17 #12;DatapointLabs Report # 7903: Styron 663 W/O Additives PAGE 4 OF Viscosity

  15. Structures and defects of WO3x nanorods grown by in-situ heating tungsten filament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Structures and defects of WO3x nanorods grown by in-situ heating tungsten filament Huairuo Zhang a nanorods were grown on the tips of electrochemical etched W filaments by in-situ heating under different work, we prepare tungsten oxide nanorods by heating the electrochemical etched W filaments under

  16. On the nature of the WO3 star DR1 in IC 1613

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tramper, F; Hartoog, O E; Sana, H; de Koter, A; Vink, J S; Ellerbroek, L E; Langer, N; Garcia, M; Kaper, L; de Mink, S E

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the oxygen-sequence Wolf- Rayet star DR1 in the low-metallicity galaxy IC 1613. Our models suggest that the strong oxygen emission lines are the result of the high temperature of this WO3 star and do not necessarily reflect a more advanced evolutionary stage than WC stars.

  17. Policy ReseaRch WoRking PaPeR 4680 Safeguards and Antidumping in Latin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy ReseaRch WoRking PaPeR 4680 Safeguards and Antidumping in Latin American TradePublicDisclosureAuthorizedPublicDisclosureAuthorizedPublicDisclosureAuthorized #12;Produced by the Research Support Team Abstract The Policy ResearchWorking Paper Series they represent. Policy ReseaRch WoRking PaPeR 4680 The binding of tariff rates and adoption of the General

  18. Pulse-shape discrimination with PbWO$_4$ crystal scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Bardelli; M. Bini; P. G. Bizzeti; F. A. Danevich; T. F. Fazzini; V. V. Kobychev; N. Krutyak; P. R. Maurenzig; V. M. Mokina; S. S. Nagorny; M. Pashkovskii; D. V. Poda; V. I. Tretyak; S. S. Yurchenko

    2007-06-16

    The light output, $\\alpha/\\beta$ ratio, and pulse shape have been investigated at $-25^\\circ$ C with PbWO$_4$ crystal scintillators undoped, and doped by F, Eu, Mo, Gd and S. The fast $0.01-0.06 \\mu$s and middle $0.1-0.5 \\mu$s components of scintillation decay were observed for all the samples. Slow components of scintillation signal with the decay times $1-3 \\mu$s and $13-28 \\mu$s with the total intensity up to $\\approx50%$ have been recognized for several samples doped by Molybdenum. We found some indications of a pulse-shape discrimination between $\\alpha$ particles and $\\gamma$ quanta with PbWO$_4$ (Mo doped) crystal scintillators.

  19. Nanocrystalline Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles: Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and near-infrared shielding characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jing-Xiao, E-mail: drliu-shi@dlpu.edu.cn [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan); Shi, Fei; Dong, Xiao-Li; Xu, Qiang [School of Textile and Material Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034 (China); Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Material, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577,Japan (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    In order to further improve the near-infrared shielding properties of cesium tungsten bronze (Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}) for solar filter applications, Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles were prepared by solvothermal reaction method and the effects of nitrogen annealing on the microstructure and near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were investigated. The obtained Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectrophotometer. The results indicate that nanosheet-like Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles with hexagonal structure began to transform into nanorods after annealed at temperature higher than 600 C. The near-infrared shielding properties of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles could be further improved by N{sub 2} annealing at 500700 C. Particularly, the 500 C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples in the N{sub 2} atmosphere showed best near-infrared shielding properties. It was suggested that the excellent near-infrared shielding ability of the 500 C-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} samples is correlated with its minimum O/W atomic ratio and most oxygen vacancies. Highlights: N{sub 2} annealing could further improve the near-infrared (NIR) shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3}. Effects of N{sub 2} annealing on microstructure and NIR shielding of Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} were studied. The 500 C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} exhibited minimum O/W ratio and most oxygen vacancies. The 500 C-N{sub 2}-annealed Cs{sub x}WO{sub 3} particles exhibited best NIR shielding properties.

  20. Ab-initio structure determination of {beta}-La{sub 2}WO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambrier, M-H.; Kodjikian, S.; Ibberson, R.M.; Goutenoire, F.

    2009-02-15

    The structure of the low-temperature form of {beta}-La{sub 2}WO{sub 6} has been determined from laboratory X-ray, neutron time-of-flight and electron diffraction data. This tungstate crystallizes in the non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic space group (no. 19) P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with Z=8, a=7.5196(1) A, b=10.3476(1) A, c=12.7944(2) A, and a measured density 7.37(1) g cm{sup -3}. The structure consists of tungsten [WO{sub 6}] octahedra and tetrahedral [OLa{sub 4}]. Tungsten polyhedra are connected such that [W{sub 2}O{sub 11}]{sup 10-} units are formed. - Graphical abstract: Projection of La{sub 2}WO{sub 6} structure along [100]. The structure could be described by [W{sub 2}O{sub 11}]{sup -10} structural unit formed by two corner-sharing octahedra.

  1. Composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures for high electrochromic activity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, Karla Rosa; Stephens, Zachary Dan.; Robinson, David B.

    2013-05-01

    A composite material consisting of TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) with WO3 electrodeposited homogeneously on its surface has been fabricated, detached from its substrate, and attached to a fluorine-doped tin oxide film on glass for application to electrochromic (EC) reactions. A paste of TiO2 made from commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles creates an interface for the TiO2 NT film to attach to the FTO glass, which is conductive and does not cause solution-phase ions in an electrolyte to bind irreversibly with the material. The effect of NT length on the current density and the EC contrast of the material were studied. The EC redox reaction seen in this material is diffusion- limited, having relatively fast reaction rates at the electrode surface. The composite WO3/TiO2 nanostructures showed higher ion storage capacity, better stability, enhanced EC contrast and longer memory time compared with the pure WO3 and TiO2.

  2. Chemical Engineering Science, Vol. 45, No. 7, pp. 1719-1731.1990. ooo9-2509/90 53.00 + 0.00 Printed in Grca~ Britain. Q 1wo Pergamon Press plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    in Grca~ Britain. Q 1wo Pergamon Press plc SIMULTANEOUS MOMENTUM, HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER WITH CHEMICAL

  3. Dynamic Asphaltene-Resin Exchange at the Oil/Water Interface: Time-Dependent W/O Emulsion Stability for Asphaltene/Resin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    oil (W/O) emulsions continue to challenge the petroleum industry during crude oil production roles in stabilizing water-in-crude oil emulsions.3-10 They adsorb onto and accumulate at W/O interfaces of crude oil emulsions.11,12 Many research groups have studied extensively this subject for decades.13

  4. Electron microscopy analyses and electrical properties of the layered Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taoufyq, A. [Institut Matriaux Microlectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Universit du Sud Toulon-Var, BP 20132, 83957, La Garde Cedex (France); Laboratoire Matriaux et Environnement LME, Facult des Sciences, Universit Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cit Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); Dpartement dtudes des Racteurs, Laboratoire Dosimtrie Capteurs Instrumentation, CEA Cadarache (France); Socit CESIGMASignals and Systems, 1576 Chemin de La Planquette, F 83 130 LA GARDE (France); Ait Ahsaine, H. [Laboratoire Matriaux et Environnement LME, Facult des Sciences, Universit Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cit Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); Patout, L. [Institut Matriaux Microlectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Universit du Sud Toulon-Var, BP 20132, 83957, La Garde Cedex (France); Benlhachemi, A.; Ezahri, M. [Laboratoire Matriaux et Environnement LME, Facult des Sciences, Universit Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cit Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); and others

    2013-07-15

    The bismuth tungstate Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} was synthesized using a classical coprecipitation method followed by a calcination process at different temperatures. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) analyses. The Rietveld analysis and electron diffraction clearly confirmed the Pca2{sub 1} non centrosymmetric space group previously proposed for this phase. The layers Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} and WO{sub 4}{sup 2?} have been directly evidenced from the HRTEM images. The electrical properties of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} compacted pellets systems were determined from electrical impedance spectrometry (EIS) and direct current (DC) analyses, under air and argon, between 350 and 700 C. The direct current analyses showed that the conduction observed from EIS analyses was mainly ionic in this temperature range, with a small electronic contribution. Electrical change above the transition temperature of 660 C is observed under air and argon atmospheres. The strong conductivity increase observed under argon is interpreted in terms of formation of additional oxygen vacancies coupled with electron conduction. - Graphical abstract: High resolution transmission electron microscopy: inverse fast Fourier transform giving the layered structure of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} phase, with a representation of the cell dimensions (b and c vectors). The Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} and WO{sub 4}{sup 2?} sandwiches are visible in the IFFT image. - Highlights: Using transmission electron microscopy, we visualize the layered structure of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}. Electrical analyses under argon gas show some increase in conductivity. The phase transition at 660 C is evidenced from electrical modification.

  5. Low-Temperature Scintillation Properties of CaWO4 Crystals for Rare-Event Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivers, M v; Di Stefano, P C F; Erb, A; Gtlein, A; Lanfranchi, J -C; Mnster, A; Nadeau, P; Piquemal, M; Potzel, W; Roth, S; Schreiner, K; Strauss, R; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Zller, A

    2015-01-01

    In prospect of its application in cryogenic rare-event searches, we have investigated the low-temperature scintillation properties of CaWO4 crystals down to 3.4 K under {\\alpha} and {\\gamma} excitation. Concerning the scintillation decay times, we observe a long component in the ms range which significantly contributes to the light yield below 40K. For the first time we have measured the temperature dependence of the {\\alpha}/{\\gamma}- ratio of the light yield. This parameter which can be used to discriminate {\\alpha} and {\\gamma} events in scintillating bolometers is found to be about 8-15% smaller at low temperatures compared to room temperature.

  6. Quasi-1D Hyperbranched WO3 Nanostructures for Low Voltage Photoelectrochemical Water-Splitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balandeh, Mehrdad; Mezzetti, Alessandro; Tacca, Alessandra; Leonardi, Silvia; Marra, Gianluigi; Divitini, Giorgio; Ducati, Caterina; Meda, Laura; Di Fonzo, Fabio

    2015-02-02

    economy is the need for an energy vector like standard fuels. The production of hydrogen via solar energy stands as one of the most promising answers to the problem, especially given the recent development in the field of hydrogen- based fuel cells... for the photocurrent and 6% for the solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiency.32 Photoanodes made by WO3 nanoparticles33,34 have been thoroughly studied and optimized, reaching photocurrents up to the range of 2.5 mA/cm2 with layers as thin as 2.5 ?m.35 Although well...

  7. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction beam-induced structural and property changes on WO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Y., E-mail: yingge.du@pnnl.gov; Varga, T. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Zhang, K. H. L.; Chambers, S. A. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    Reduction of transition metal oxides can greatly change their physical and chemical properties. Using deposition of WO{sub 3} as a case study, we demonstrate that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), a surface-sensitive tool widely used to monitor thin-film deposition processes, can significantly affect the cation valence and physical properties of the films through electron-beam induced sample reduction. The RHEED beam is found to increase film smoothness during epitaxial growth of WO{sub 3}, as well as change the electronic properties of the film through preferential removal of surface oxygen.

  8. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Zhang, Hongliang; Varga, Tamas; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-08-08

    Reduction of transition metal oxides can greatly change their physical and chemical properties. Using deposition of WO3 as a case study, we demonstrate that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), a surface-sensitive tool widely used to monitor thin-film deposition processes, can significantly affect the cation valence and physical properties of the films through electron-beam induced sample reduction. The RHEED beam is found to increase film smoothness during epitaxial growth of WO3, as well as change the electronic properties of the film through preferential removal of surface oxygen.

  9. Response of CdWO4 crystal scintillator for few MeV ions and low energy electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. G. Bizzeti; L. Carraresi; F. A. Danevich; T. Fazzini; P. R. Maurenzig; F. Taccetti; N. Taccetti; V. I. Tretyak

    2012-08-31

    The response of a CdWO4 crystal scintillator to protons, alpha particles, Li, C, O and Ti ions with energies in the range 1 - 10 MeV was measured. The non-proportionality of CdWO4 for low energy electrons (4 - 110 keV) was studied with the Compton Coincidence Technique. The energy dependence of the quenching factors for ions and the relative light yield for low energy electrons was calculated using a semi-empirical approach. Pulse-shape discrimination ability between gamma quanta, protons, alpha particles and ions was investigated.

  10. Synthesis and luminescent properties of spindle-like CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Yue [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China) [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Liu, Yu [Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116024 (China)] [Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116024 (China); Hua, Ruinian, E-mail: rnhua@dlnu.edu.cn [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China)] [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Na, Liyan [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China)] [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Chen, Baojiu, E-mail: chenmbj@sohu.com [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)] [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Graphical abstract: In this paper, spindle-like CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors were prepared via a polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-assisted sonochemical process. Dependence of emission intensity on Sm{sup 3+} ions concentration in the CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphor were also calculated via a nonlinear fitting by using the formula y = ax/(1 + bx{sup c}). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples were prepared via a PVP assisted sonochemical process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The color coordinates for 1 mol% Sm{sup 3+} doped CaWO{sub 4} phosphor were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The D-D interaction is responsible for concentration quenching between Sm{sup 3+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical energy transfer distances (R{sub c}) were obtained. -- Abstract: Spindle-like CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors were prepared via a Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-assisted sonochemical process, and characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The XRD results suggested that the prepared samples are single-phase. The FE-SEM images indicated that the prepared CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors are composed of many spindles with maximum average diameter of 150 nm and maximum average length of 500 nm. Under 404 nm excitation, the characteristic emissions corresponding to {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} {yields} {sup 6}H{sub J} (J = 5/2, 7/2, 9/2 and 11/2) transitions of Sm{sup 3+} in CaWO{sub 4} phosphors were observed. The color coordinates for 1 mol% Sm{sup 3+} doped CaWO{sub 4} phosphor were calculated to be (0.595, 0.404). The fluorescent concentration quenching of Sm{sup 3+} doped spindle-like phosphors was studied based on the Van Uitert's model, and it was found that the electric dipole-dipole (D-D) interaction is the dominant energy transfer mechanism between Sm{sup 3+} ions in the CaWO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors. The critical energy transfer distance was estimated.

  11. Macro-and Microscale Waterflooding Performances of Crudes which form w/o Emulsions upon Mixing with Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    the reservoir brine. These crudes are obtained from a large oil field with stock tank oil viscositiesMacro- and Microscale Waterflooding Performances of Crudes which form w/o Emulsions upon Mixing ABSTRACT: We study the micro- and macroscale waterflooding performances of unusual crudes which naturally

  12. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals synthesized by the microwave-hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almeida, M.A.P. [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil)] [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil); Cavalcante, L.S., E-mail: laeciosc@bol.com.br [INCTMN-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Morilla-Santos, C.; Filho, P.N. Lisboa [MAv-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 473, 17033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil)] [MAv-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 473, 17033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Beltran, A.; Andres, J.; Gracia, L. [Department de Quimica Fisica i Analitica, Universitat Jaume I, E-12071 Castello (Spain)] [Department de Quimica Fisica i Analitica, Universitat Jaume I, E-12071 Castello (Spain); Longo, E. [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil) [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil); INCTMN-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    This communication reports that FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals were successfully synthesized by the microwave-hydrothermal method at 443 K for 1 h. The structure and shape of these nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refinement, and transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results and first principles calculations were combined to explain the electronic structure and magnetic properties. Experimental data were obtained by magnetization measurements for different applied magnetic fields. Theoretical calculations revealed that magnetic properties of FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals can be assigned to two magnetic orderings with parallel or antiparallel spins in adjacent chains. These factors are crucial to understanding of competition between ferro- and antiferromagnetic behavior. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monophasic FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized by the microwave-hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rietveld refinement and clusters model for monoclinic structure Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties of FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals at different temperatures.

  13. Enhancement of methanol electrocatalytic oxidation on platinized WO{sub 3}TiO{sub 2} composite electrode under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Caiqin [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Jiang, Fengxing [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Jiangxi Key Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China); Zhou, Rong [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Du, Yukou, E-mail: duyk@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Yang, Ping [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Chuanyi, E-mail: cywang@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Xu, Jingkun, E-mail: xujingkun@tsinghua.org.cn [Jiangxi Key Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ? A ternary composite catalyst of PtWO{sub 3}TiO{sub 2} has been synthesized. ? The introduction of WO{sub 3} extends its absorption edge to visible light region. ? The electrode displays high electrocatalytic activity. ? With visible light irradiation, its electrocatalytic activity increases 70%. - Abstract: A ternary composite catalyst of PtWO{sub 3}TiO{sub 2} has been successfully prepared by a chemical method. The prepared composite was systematically characterized by UVvis diffuse reflectance absorption spectra (DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrocatalytic properties of PtWO{sub 3}TiO{sub 2} for methanol oxidation in an alkaline medium were evaluated by the cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) with or without visible light irradiation. Compared with the pure TiO{sub 2}, the introduction of WO{sub 3} extends its absorption edge to visible light region. Under visible light illumination, the PtWO{sub 3}TiO{sub 2} composite catalyst exhibits higher electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation in comparison with its counterpart, the pure PtTiO{sub 2} catalyst.

  14. Single crystal growth of Yb doped NaGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} and structural and spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, S. G.; Singh, A. K.; Desai, D. G.; Tiwari, B.; Tyagi, M. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    High quality single crystals of NaGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} doped with 5 mol % Yb and oriented along <001> have been grown by the Czochralski technique in Ar atmosphere. The tetragonal space group I41/a accounts for all the reflections observed in the powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Polarized optical spectroscopy at room temperature revealed a direction dependence of absorption at different wavelength. As a novel uniaxial laser host for Yb{sup 3+}, NaGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} is characterized with respect to its transparency and band-edge. The emission spectrum of Yb{sup 3+} (excitation: 980-990 nm diode laser) was also recorded.

  15. Chronic exposure to bisphenol A reduces SULT1A1 activity in the human placental cell line BeWo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitra, Pallabi

    2006-10-27

    Chronic exposure to bisphenol A reduces SULT1A1 activity in the human placental cell line BeWo Pallabi Mitra Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry University of Kansas October 27, 2006 Outline ? Placental structure and models ? Placental... permeation ? Placental metabolism and regulation (induction/inhibition) ? Sulfotransferase enzymes in trophoblast ? Bisphenol A ? Effects of bisphenol A on SULT1A1 ? Conclusions The placental barrier Mother?s blood ?Trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts line...

  16. Large ferroelectric polarization in the new double perovskite NaLaMnWO$_{6}$ induced by non-polar instabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukushima, T; Picozzi, S; Perez-Mato, J M

    2011-01-01

    Based on density functional theory calculations and group theoretical analysis, we have studied NaLaMnWO$_{6}$ compound which has been recently synthesized [Phys. Rev. B 79, 224428 (2009)] and belongs to the $AA'BB'{\\rm O}_{6}$ family of double perovskites. At low temperature, the structure has monoclinic $P2_{1}$ symmetry, with layered ordering of the Na and La ions and rocksalt ordering of Mn and W ions. The Mn atoms show an antiferromagnetic (AFM) collinear spin ordering, and the compound has been reported as a potential multiferroic. By comparing the low symmetry structure with a parent phase of $P4/nmm$ symmetry, two distortion modes are found dominant. They correspond to MnO$_{6}$ and WO$_{6}$ octahedron \\textit{tilt} modes, often found in many simple perovskites. While in the latter these common tilting instabilities yield non-polar phases, in NaLaMnWO$_{6}$ the additional presence of the $A$-$A^{'}$ cation ordering is sufficient to make these rigid unit modes as a source of the ferroelectricity. Throu...

  17. Mechanochemical synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles by using WO{sub 3}/Zn/C powder mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoseinpur, Arman; Vahdati Khaki, Jalil; Marashi, Maryam Sadat

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Nano particles of WC are synthesized by mechanochemical process. ? Zn was used to reduce WO{sub 3}. ? By removing ZnO from the milling products with an acid leaching, WC will be the final products. ? XRD results showed that the reduction reactions were completed after 36 h. ? TEM and SEM images showed that the morphology of produced powder is nearly spherical like. -- Abstract: In this research we introduce a new, facile, and economical system for fabrication of tungsten carbide (WC) nano particle powder. In this system WO{sub 3}, Zn, and C have been ball-milled for several hours, which led to the synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles. The synthesized WC can successfully be separated from the ball-milled product by subjecting the product powder to diluted HCl for removing ZnO and obtaining WC. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates that the reduction of WO{sub 3} will be completed gradually by increasing milling time up to 36 h. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that after 36 h of milling the particle size of the fabricated powder is nano metric (about 20 nm). Results have shown that this system can surmount some main problems occurred in previous similar WC synthesizing systems. For example carbothermic reduction reactions, which lead to the synthesis of W{sub 2}C instead of WC, would not be activated because in this system reactions take place gradually.

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/12-FD-b | Open Energy Information

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  9. RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-b | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-ab < RAPID‎ |cabcb <

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/9-FD-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-abFD-a <aAK-a <a <b

  11. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:RE{sup 3+} (RE = Eu, Sm, Tb) phosphor for white LED application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Jingshan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Dong Hua University, Shanghai 200051 (China) [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Dong Hua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yin, Xin [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China) [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Huang, Fuqiang, E-mail: huangfq@mail.sic.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China) [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiang, Weizhong, E-mail: jwzh@dhu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Dong Hua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Dong Hua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ? NaLa{sub 1?x}MgWO{sub 6}:xRE{sup 3+} phosphors were synthesized by solid-state reaction method. ? Compared with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} performed better luminescence properties. ? The results demonstrated NaLaMgWO{sub 6} as a suitable host for RE{sup 3+}-doping. -- Abstract: Single phase of NaLa{sub 1?x}MgWO{sub 6}:xRE{sup 3+} (0 < x ?1) (RE = Eu, Sm, Tb) phosphors were prepared by solid-state reaction method. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, the morphology energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UVvis diffuse reflectance spectra and photoluminescence were used to characterize the samples. Under the light excitation, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+}, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Sm{sup 3+} and NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Tb{sup 3+}, phosphors showed the characteristic emissions of Eu{sup 3+} ({sup 5}D{sub 0} ? {sup 7}F{sub 4,3,2,1}), Sm{sup 3+} ({sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 5/2,7/2,9/2}), and Tb{sup 3+} ({sup 5}D{sub 4} ? {sup 7}F{sub 6,5,4,3}), respectively. The intensity of the red emission for Na(La{sub 0.6}Eu{sub 0.4})MgWO{sub 6} is 2.5 times higher than that of (Y{sub 0.95}Eu{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 3} under blue light irradiation. The quantum efficiencies of the entitled phosphors excited under 394 nm and 464 nm are also investigated and compared with commercial phosphors Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}, Sr{sub 2}Si{sub 5}N{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+} and Y{sub 3}A{sub 5}G{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}. The results demonstrated NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:RE{sup 3+} phosphors as potential candidates for white light emitting diode pumped by UV or blue chip.

  12. DR1: A WO3 star in the low-metallicity galaxy IC 1613 Frank Tramper1, Gtz Grfener2, Hugues Sana1, Alex de Koter1, Jorick Vink2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    DR1: A WO3 star in the low-metallicity galaxy IC 1613 Frank Tramper1, Gtz Grfener2, Hugues Sana1), DR1 is a WO3 star (Kingsburgh et al. 1995) located in the metal-poor Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 1613

  13. Highly efficient visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaiwichian, Saranyoo [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai50200 (Thailand); Inceesungvorn, Burapat [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wetchakun, Khatcharin [Program of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ubon Ratchathani Rajabhat University, Ubon Ratchathani 34000 (Thailand); Phanichphant, Sukon [Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Kangwansupamonkon, Wiyong [National Nanotechnology Center, Thailand Science Park, Phahonyotin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Phathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Wetchakun, Natda, E-mail: natda_we@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai50200 (Thailand)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts were obtained using hydrothermal method. Physicochemical properties played a significant role on photocatalytic efficiency. Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterogeneous structures were greatly enhanced for degradation of MB. A tentative mechanism of charge transfer process in MB degradation was proposed. - Abstract: The Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts were synthesized by hydrothermal method. Physical properties of the heterojunction photocatalyst samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The XRD results indicated that BiVO{sub 4} retain monoclinic and tetragonal structures, while Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} presented as orthorhombic structure. The Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) adsorptiondesorption of nitrogen gas for specific surface area determination at the temperature of liquid nitrogen was performed on all samples. UVvis diffuse reflectance spectra (UVvis DRS) were used to identify the absorption range and band gap energy of the heterojunction photocatalysts. The photocatalytic performance of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}/BiVO{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts was studied via the photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. The results indicated that the heterojunction photocatalyst at 0.5:0.5 mole ratio of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}:BiVO{sub 4} shows the highest photocatalytic activity.

  14. Quantum chemistry studies of the O K-edge X-ray absorption in WO3 and AWO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bocharov, Dmitry; Purans, Juris; Zhukovskii, Yuri; 10.1117/12.815297

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present an interpretation of experimental O K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) in perovskite-type WO3 and AWO3 compounds (A = H and Na) using three different first principles approaches: (i) full-multiple-scattering (FMS) formalism (the real-space FEFF code), (ii) hybrid density functional theory (DFT) method with partial incorporation of exact Hartree-Fock exchange using formalism of the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) as implemented in the CRYSTAL code; (iii) plane-wave DFT method using formalism of the projector-augmented waves (PAW) as implemented in the VASP code.

  15. Beam Test Result for aBeam Test Result for a Prototype PbWOPrototype PbWO44 CalorimeterCalorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Beam Test Result for aBeam Test Result for a Prototype PbWOPrototype PbWO44 Calorimeter and represents one of the most definitiveanomaly and represents one of the most definitive tests of lowtests of beam testDescription of beam test In the prototype beam test,In the prototype beam test, the photons

  16. Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/156853508X359949 Worldviews 12 (2008) 129-145 www.brill.nl/wo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    the authority to sustain the relation- ships of self, society, and environment that define human life. Reaching.brill.nl/wo WORLDVIEWS Sustainability, Faith, and the Market Lloyd E. Sandelands and Andrew J. Hoffman University of Michigan lsandel@umich.edu; ajhoff@umich.edu Abstract Although sustainability is a growing concern

  17. Raman laser with intracavity conversion of 1.34-?m laser radiation in a BaWO{sub 4} crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilov, A V; Ershkov, M N; Fedin, A V [V.A. Degtyarev Kovrov State Technological Academy, Kovrov, Vladimir region (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-31

    Intracavity Raman conversion of 1.34-?m radiation of a Nd : YAG laser by a BaWO{sub 4} crystal into the 1.53-?m first-Stokes component is studied in different operation regimes. In the case of passive Q-switching of the Nd : YAG laser, the SRS radiation has an average power of 0.28 W with a pulse train energy up to 5 mJ, an individual pulse duration of 19 ns, and a pump pulse repetition rate of 15 Hz. In the case of active Q-switching, the average SRS power is 0.85 W at a pulse energy up to 28 mJ, a pulse duration of 20 ns, and a pump pulse repetition rate of 30 Hz. (lasers)

  18. Probing structure-induced optical behavior in a new class of self-activated luminescent 0D/1D CaWO? metal oxide CdSe nanocrystal composite heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyu [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McBean, Coray [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Wang, Lei [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Hoy, Jessica [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Jaye, Cherno [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Liu, Haiqing [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Li, Zhuo-Qun [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Sfeir, Matthew Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, Daniel A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Taylor, Gordon T. [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Misewich, James A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2015-02-10

    In this report, we synthesize and characterize the structural and optical properties of novel heterostructures composed of (i) semiconducting nanocrystalline CdSe quantum dot (QDs) coupled with (ii) both one and zero-dimensional (1D and 0D) motifs of self-activated luminescence CaWO? metal oxides. Specifically, ~4 nm CdSe QDs have been anchored onto (i) high-aspect ratio 1D nanowires, measuring ~230 nm in diameter and ~3 ?m in length, as well as onto (ii) crystalline 0D nanoparticles (possessing an average diameter of ~ 80 nm) of CaWO? through the mediation of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a connecting linker. Composite formation was confirmed by complementary electron microscopy and spectroscopy (i.e. IR and Raman) data. In terms of luminescent properties, our results show that our 1D and 0D heterostructures evince photoluminescence (PL) quenching and shortened PL lifetimes of CaWO? as compared with unbound CaWO?. We propose that a photo-induced electron transfer process occurs from CaWO? to CdSe QDs, a scenario which has been confirmed by NEXAFS measurements and which highlights a decrease in the number of unoccupied orbitals in the conduction bands of CdSe QDs. By contrast, the PL signature and lifetimes of MPA-capped CdSe QDs within these heterostructures do not exhibit noticeable changes as compared with unbound MPA-capped CdSe QDs. The striking difference in optical behavior between CaWO? nanostructures and CdSe QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. In addition, the PL quenching behaviors for CaWO? within the heterostructure configuration were examined by systematically varying (i) the quantities and coverage densities of CdSe QDs as well as (ii) the intrinsic morphology (and by extension, the inherent crystallite size) of CaWO? itself.

  19. Probing structure-induced optical behavior in a new class of self-activated luminescent 0D/1D CaWO? metal oxide CdSe nanocrystal composite heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Hoy, Jessica; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Li, Zhuo-Qun; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Taylor, Gordon T.; et al

    2015-01-30

    In this report, we synthesize and characterize the structural and optical properties of novel heterostructures composed of (i) semiconducting nanocrystalline CdSe quantum dot (QDs) coupled with (ii) both one and zero-dimensional (1D and 0D) motifs of self-activated luminescence CaWO? metal oxides. Specifically, ~4 nm CdSe QDs have been anchored onto (i) high-aspect ratio 1D nanowires, measuring ~230 nm in diameter and ~3 ?m in length, as well as onto (ii) crystalline 0D nanoparticles (possessing an average diameter of ~ 80 nm) of CaWO? through the mediation of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a connecting linker. Composite formation was confirmed by complementarymoreelectron microscopy and spectroscopy (i.e. IR and Raman) data. In terms of luminescent properties, our results show that our 1D and 0D heterostructures evince photoluminescence (PL) quenching and shortened PL lifetimes of CaWO? as compared with unbound CaWO?. We propose that a photo-induced electron transfer process occurs from CaWO? to CdSe QDs, a scenario which has been confirmed by NEXAFS measurements and which highlights a decrease in the number of unoccupied orbitals in the conduction bands of CdSe QDs. By contrast, the PL signature and lifetimes of MPA-capped CdSe QDs within these heterostructures do not exhibit noticeable changes as compared with unbound MPA-capped CdSe QDs. The striking difference in optical behavior between CaWO? nanostructures and CdSe QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. In addition, the PL quenching behaviors for CaWO? within the heterostructure configuration were examined by systematically varying (i) the quantities and coverage densities of CdSe QDs as well as (ii) the intrinsic morphology (and by extension, the inherent crystallite size) of CaWO? itself.less

  20. The Ordered [WO2F4]2-Anion Margaret E. Welk, Alexander J. Norquist, Charlotte L. Stern, and Kenneth R. Poeppelmeier*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    through the protonated amine and a second hydrogen bond to a different cluster through the hydroxyl group in the new compound [HNC6H6OH]2[Cu(NC5H5)4- (WO2F4)2], using the additional hydrogen bond from the hydroxyl a hydrogen bond from the protonated amine in [HNC6H6OH]+. The third contact to the anion is made through F(2

  1. Origin of the improved photo-catalytic activity of F-doped ZnWO{sub 4}: A quantum mechanical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Honggang; Fan, Weiliu; Li, Yanlu; Cheng, Xiufeng; Li, Pan; Zhao, Xian

    2010-12-15

    Two different mechanisms for improving photo-catalytic activity in different types of F-doped ZnWO{sub 4} are tentatively proposed, based on density function theory calculations. When the lattice O atom is substituted by one F atom, our calculations show that a reduced W{sup 5+} center adjacent to the doped F atom will act as a trap for the photo-induced electron, and will thus result in a reduction of electron-hole recombination and improvement of the photo-catalytic activity. For the interstitial F-doped model, partial F 2p states mixing with O 2p states localize above the top of the valence band and act as the frontier orbital level. Electronic transitions from these localized states induce a red shift of about 54 nm of the optical absorption edge. This work shows that F-doped ZnWO{sub 4} will be a promising photo-catalyst with favorable photo-catalytic activity in the UV region. -- Graphical Abstract: DFT calculations are used to investigate the origin of the improved photo-activity of monoclinic ZnWO{sub 4} induced by the substituted and interstitial F-doping. Two possible mechanisms are tentatively put forward according to the F-doping types. Display Omitted

  2. First test of a cryogenic scintillation module with a CaWO4 scintillator and a low-temperature photomultiplier down to 6 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kraus; V. B. Mikhailik

    2010-04-12

    Future cryogenic experiments searching for rare events require reliable, efficient and robust techniques for the detection of photons at temperatures well below that to which low-temperature photomultipliers (PMT) were characterised. Motivated by this we investigated the feasibility of a low-temperature PMT for the detection of scintillation from crystalline scintillators at T = 6 K. The scintillation module was composed of a CaWO4 scintillator and a low-temperature PMT D745B from ET Enterprises. The PMT responsivity was studied at T=290, 77 and 6 K using gamma-quanta from 241Am (60 keV) and 57Co (122 and 136 keV) sources. We have shown that the low-temperature PMT retains its single photon counting ability even at cryogenic temperatures. At T = 6 K, the response of the PMT decreases to 51 +- 13 % and 27 +- 6 % when assessed in photon counting and pulse height mode, respectively. Due to the light yield increase of the CaWO4 scintillating crystal the overall responsivity of the scintillation modules CaWO4+PMT is 94 +- 15 % (photon counting) and 48 +- 8 % (pulse height) when cooling to T = 6 K. The dark count rate was found to be 20 s-1. The energy resolution of the module remains similar to that measured at room temperature using either detection mode. It is concluded that commercially available low-temperature PMT are well suited for detection of scintillation light at cryogenic temperatures.

  3. Search for long-lived superheavy eka-tungsten with radiopure ZnWO$_4$ crystal scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Belli; R. Bernabei; F. Cappella; R. Cerulli; F. A. Danevich; V. Yu. Denisov; A. d'Angelo; A. Incicchitti; V. V. Kobychev; D. V. Poda; O. G. Polischuk; V. I. Tretyak

    2015-04-28

    The data collected with a radioactively pure ZnWO$_4$ crystal scintillator (699 g) in low background measurements during 2130 h at the underground (3600 m w.e.) Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (INFN, Italy) were used to set a limit on possible concentration of superheavy eka-W (seaborgium Sg, Z = 106) in the crystal. Assuming that one of the daughters in a chain of decays of the initial Sg nucleus decays with emission of high energy $\\alpha$ particle ($Q_\\alpha > 8$ MeV) and analyzing the high energy part of the measured $\\alpha$ spectrum, the limit N(Sg)/N(W) < 5.5 $\\times$ 10$^{-14}$ atoms/atom at 90% C.L. was obtained (for Sg half-life of 10$^9$ yr). In addition, a limit on the concentration of eka-Bi was set by analysing the data collected with a large BGO scintillation bolometer in an experiment performed by another group [L. Cardani et al., JINST 7 (2012) P10022]: N(eka-Bi)/N(Bi) < 1.1 $\\times$ 10$^{-13}$ atoms/atom with 90% C.L. Both the limits are comparable with those obtained in recent experiments which instead look for spontaneous fission of superheavy elements or use the accelerator mass spectrometry.

  4. Strain-induced orbital polarization and multiple phase transitions in Ba{sub 2}MnWO{sub 6} from first principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Weiwei; Zhao, Bao; Yang, Zhongqin

    2013-11-28

    Electronic structures of double perovskite Ba{sub 2}MnWO{sub 6} with epitaxial strain are explored by using methods based on density functional theory. An in-plane compressive strain is found not only resulting in a semiconductor-metal transition (SMT), but also altering the magnetic structures, from different kinds of antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic orders. Orbital polarization and different orbital occupancies of Mn d{sub z{sup 2}} and d{sub x{sup 2}?y{sup 2}} states, induced by the epitaxial strain, are employed to understand the SMT. The rich magnetic phase transitions are rationalized by a magnetic stabilization mechanism. Our results show that many technological applications may be carried out in the material with the control of epitaxial strain.

  5. Pumping-route-dependent concentration quenching and temperature effect of green up- and down-conversion luminescence in Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jingjing; Sun, Jiashi [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Liu, Jutao [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Jinsu [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Tian, Yue [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Fu, Shaobo; Cheng, Lihong; Zhong, Haiyang [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Xia, Haiping [Key laboratory of Photo-electronic Materials, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Chen, Baojiu, E-mail: chenmbj@sohu.com [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: A comparative study on the concentration quenching behaviors of green down- and up-conversion emissions was carried out for the first time, and the different concentration quenching mechanisms were analyzed. Secondly, the thermal effect induced by 980 nm LD irradiation was investigated, it was observed that the equilibrium temperature of Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} sample was decided by both the excitation power and Er{sup 3+} doping concentration. Highlights: ? Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er/Yb phosphors were prepared via a co-precipitation reaction. ? Morphology and structure of the phosphors were characterized by XRD and SEM. ? Concentration quenching mechanisms for down and up emissions were studied. ? Thermal effect induced by laser irradiation was studied via temperature sensing tech. - Abstract: Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} phosphors with various Er{sup 3+} concentrations and fixed Yb{sup 3+} concentration were synthesized via a co-precipitation method, and their crystal structure and morphology were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The concentration quenching behaviors of green up- and down-conversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} were analyzed, and it was confirmed that the difference between quenching concentration for up- and down-conversion emissions resulted from the different population routes. The temperature sensing properties of the Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} phosphors were studied, and it was found that the Er{sup 3+} doping concentration slightly affected the sensitivity, and Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} phosphors could be used in a broad temperature region for detecting temperature. Finally, the thermal effect induced by 980 nm LD irradiation was investigated, it was observed that the equilibrium temperature of Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} sample was decided by both the excitation power and Er{sup 3+} doping concentration.

  6. File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello GeothermalFideris IncFile FTP DocumentFD-b -

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/3-FD-b (2) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevadaa < RAPID‎f <CA-aa < RAPID‎ |2)

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/3-FD-b (1) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-a <CA-a < RAPID‎1)

  9. inside shuttle sign wo date

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWooden Rooftops |.doc&#0;8 IHome *Suite

  10. Cationic disorder and Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} charge ordering in the B? and B? sites of Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} perovskite: a comparison with Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez, C.A.; Saleta, M.E.; Pedregosa, J.C.; Snchez, R.D.; Alonso, J.A.; and others

    2014-02-15

    We describe the preparation, crystal structure determination, magnetic and transport properties of two novel Mn-containing perovskites, with a different electronic configuration for Mn atoms located in B site. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sup 3+}{sub 2}WO{sub 9} and Ca{sub 3}Mn{sup 3+/4+}{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} were synthesized by standard ceramic procedures; the crystallographic structure was studied from X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and neutron powder diffraction (NPD). Both phases exhibit a monoclinic symmetry (S.G.: P2{sub 1}/n); Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9} presents a long-range ordering over the B sites, whereas Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} is strongly disordered. By in-situ NPD, the temperature evolution of the structure study presents an interesting evolution in the octahedral size (?MnO?) for Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9}, driven by a charge ordering effect between Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} atoms, related to the anomaly observed in the transport measurements at T?160 K. Both materials present a magnetic order below T{sub C}=30 K and 40 K for W and Nb materials, respectively. The magneto-transport measurements display non-negligible magnetoresistance properties in the paramagnetic regime. - Graphical abstract: Comparison between the octahedron size and the magnetic behaviour for Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} in the temperature region where the charge and magnetic order occur. Display Omitted - Highlights: Two novel Mn-containing double perovskites were obtained by solid-state reactions. Both double perovskites are monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) determined by XRPD and NPD. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9} contains Mn{sup 3+} while Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} includes mixed-valence cations Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+}. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} presents a charge-ordering effect between Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} evidenced by NPD. The magnetic and transport studies evidenced the charge ordering in Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9}.

  11. Wo?ch nan sole?y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paultre, Carrie?; Ross, Jim D.; Freeman, Bryant C.

    2000-01-01

    rakonte kalite bon bagay yo te fe kado nan lari a. Pou di laverite, se pa t fot pesonn, paske jou yo te vini nan katye bo lakay li a, li te kouche plat ate ak yon lafyev. Se sa k fe, jou vennsenk (25) desanm sa a, malerez la leve san senk (5) kob nan... la. Pouki gad pa arete moun sa yo? Le Melani konprann tout bon se avek li madmwazel la t ap pale, se pa ti wont malerez la wont. Li pa konn ki pye pou 1 mete devan, ki pye pou 1 mete deye pou 1 chache yon kote pou 1 kache. Te gen yon jenn gason...

  12. Data:7e173d10-c429-45fd-b46c-2ea652fe29af | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  13. Materials Data on WO2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. SNL Memohead (black tbird w/o macro)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the passing air even as the convection coefficient was diminished by reduced flow velocity. The magnitude of the P7R7 air temperature increase and the increase in...

  15. SNL Memohead (black tbird w/o macro)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Mexico 87185-0836 date: : November 25, 2014 to: Distribution from: Jeffrey A. Smith, 1555 subject: Mechanical Modeling of a WIPP Drum Under Pressure. Executive Summary...

  16. A, 3cionco Sorvico FcctWo blocsod on roooipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BHYTmWEATIIER Mailod Augwst 2, 1926 By Drc Charles F. Brocks of Clark Univorsity A HURRICANE A single storm that killod anticipation of wind and rain that cam as forecast. This tropical ojcclono, or $lost Indian hurricano, though

  17. Wo finde ich Hilfe? Hilfetelefon Gewalt gegen Frauen.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    counsellors (exclusively women) can provide advice on all forms of violence against women. In doing so

  18. SNL Memohead (blue tbird w/o macro)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and the aluminum vessel. This was done prior to testing this mixture in a closed vessel, and to determine if reaction between the acid (in the presence of the Swheat and...

  19. SNL Memohead (black tbird w/o macro)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model for the Semprius module determined from measurement and characterization of module performance at Sandia National Laboratory's Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  20. SNL Letterhead (blue tbird w/o macro)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    attempts by scam artists to procure goods from legitimate, existing laboratory suppliers utilizing tactics such as "Laboratory credit" to procure "limited" amounts of...

  1. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:130) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Pd/Ni-WO3 anodic double layer gasochromic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping

    2004-04-20

    An anodic double layer gasochromic sensor structure for optical detection of hydrogen in improved response time and with improved optical absorption real time constants, comprising: a glass substrate; a tungsten-doped nickel oxide layer coated on the glass substrate; and a palladium layer coated on the tungsten-doped nickel oxide layer.

  4. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:60) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:185) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on WO3 (SG:193) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. SNL Memohead (black tbird w/o macro)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small Angle

  10. Bureau of Land Management - WO-210 - Contact Information | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine: EnergyEnergyOhio: EnergyNorth

  11. MESSAGE: WIA W/O CLOSING REF CLOSING REF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N3 April 2011

  12. SNL Letterhead (blue tbird w/o macro)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The2/01/12 Page 1 ofSuper HeavySLEPcService in the

  13. New Mexico/Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Process (NV only) 4-FD-c: Exploration Application Process USFS 4-FD-d: BLM Exploration Operations 5-FD-a: Drilling Application Process 5-FD-b: Drilling Pre-Application Process...

  14. Materials Data on Pr(WO4)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on LiCo(WO4)2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Thrombosuction and Tirofiban Infusion (ITTI) trial Department of Internal Medicine, NTU Hospital Department

  17. Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Oncology Summit 2013 Department of Internal Medicine, NTU College of Medicine Hepatitis Research Center%IFIF 201421 2 #12;IF IF IF10 BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL Volume: 347 Article Number: f6008 Amplification of HOXD-Harboring Chromosome Region Is Implicated in Mulitiple- Walled Carbon Nanotubes

  18. Materials Data on SrLaMnWO6 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Bi2WO8 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Final 7-26-2012.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Page: 15 of 108 3. PRECAUTIONS AND LIMITATIONS (continued) * Personnel SHALL be aware of heat and cold stress indicators and observe co-workers in accordance with the Thermal...

  1. Milagro Tank Temperature Study: w/ and w/o Tank Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ice on water top surface/sides ... but never close to freezing solid!" John Matthews/Auger North depths (below the surface of the water) of below the surface [Ch 1/2-immersed, only electronics: PMT-base Water depth typically 30-inches (i.e. deeper than drawn

  2. ~ 4[1 HoMfWoRK Min Kj \\A()~ JI,{".5 ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jolly, Michael S.

    . IVlI.4.$ A is. c.to.sid. But A If, not bov(()d~J. ej H -f3 t'hm.) A IS l'1\\?t (OMptllt. § 1.7. 4 L

  3. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 R37 final.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Effective Date: 032013 NOTE This procedure may be either a Moderate or HighComplex Hazard activity based on the anticipated...

  4. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 R38 final.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Effective Date: 082913 NOTE This procedure may be either a Moderate or HighComplex Hazard activity based on the anticipated...

  5. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Revision 35 Final 6-27...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 WCRRF Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Effective Date: 7-1-2012 NOTE This procedure may be either a Moderate or HighComplex Hazard activity based on the anticipated...

  6. RadioWoRld | radioworld.com Vol. 35, No. 8 March 23, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RthERN EURoPE: graham Kirk, g.kirk@audiomedia.com t: +44-1480-461555 | F: +44-1480-461550 JaPaN: Eiji

  7. Materials Data on LiFe(WO4)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Nd2WO6 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF5%Web of ScienceWoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    / Henriette Kirchner / Paul T. Pfluger / Vincent Bernard / Yu-yi Lin / Erin M. Bowers / Chandrani MukherjeeIF 5% IF #12;HEMATOLOGY261Wen-Chien Chou / Huai-Hsuan Huang / Hsin-An Hou / Chien- Yuan Chen / Jih

  10. WO3 and HPA based system for ultra high stability Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities Nanostructured Metal Oxide Anodes Atomic Layer Deposition for Stabilization of Amorphous Silicon Anodes...

  11. Materials Data on Li2WO4 (SG:141) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Li2WO4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on CoWO4 (SG:13) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on RbLa(WO4)2 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Hydrothermal growth and photoluminescence property of textured CdWO4 scintillator films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    and Y. Wang Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 Received alumina,18 zirconia,19 barium titanate,20 and bioceramics21 , composites,22 ultrafine particles

  16. Materials Data on Na3(WO3)4 (SG:229) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-26

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on H(WO3)2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Na3(WO3)4 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Tl(WO3)6 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Cs(WO3)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Rb(WO3)3 (SG:10) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Rb(WO3)6 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Na(WO3)2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on K(WO3)6 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Na3(WO3)10 (SG:10) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-03

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. LLNV-WO1000-2009-0002-EA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectric Cooperative(RedirectedChem LtdLLNL Energy

  7. LLNV-WO1000-2009-0034-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectric Cooperative(RedirectedChem LtdLLNL Energy34-CX

  8. DOI-BLM-NV-WO10-2014-0002-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) Wind FarmEnergy1070-DNA

  9. Electrochromism vs. the Bugs:DevelopingWO3 Thin Film Windows toControl

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article) |ContinuumPhotoactive Biological Systems.

  10. WO3 and HPA based system for ultra high stability Innovation for Our Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'S FUTURE. regulators consumerWINDDepartment of

  11. Microsoft Word - 01-3199 Rev 6 Final w_o signature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete and realistic microscopic calculations forShippingWIPP

  12. Sensorless Control Method and Apparatus for A Motor Drive System http://www.wipo.int/pctdb/en/wo.jsp?IA=WO2005%2F008890&DISPLAY=STATUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bin

    , UZ, VC, VN, YU, ZA, ZM, ZW. African Regional Intellectual Property Org. (ARIPO) (BW, GH, GM, KE, LS, MW, MZ, NA, SD, SL, SZ, TZ, UG, ZM, ZW) Eurasian Patent Organization (EAPO) (AM, AZ, BY, KG, KZ, MD, RU, TJ, TM) European Patent Office (EPO) (AT, BE, BG, CH, CY, CZ, DE, DK, EE, ES, FI, FR, GB, GR, HU

  13. Dense and optical transparent CdWO4 films by sol-gel processing for scintillation applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    using tungstic acid and cadmium nitrate as precursors and hydrogen peroxide as solvent; homogeneous fabrication of dense and optically transparent cadmium tungstate (CWO) films by sol-gel processing, nanostructures, and optical and x-ray scintillation properties are discussed in detail. I. INTRODUCTION Cadmium

  14. Pe n n s ylv a n ia Wo o d la n d s TIMBER MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water/methanol/ acetonitrile gave the deoxyheptitols 8 and 9 in a ratio of 98:2 (81% yield; 74% from

  15. Effect of Bisphenol A on Drug Efflux in BeWo, a Human Trophoblast-like Cell Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audus, Kenneth L.; Jin, H.

    2005-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a monomer of polycarbonate plastics that has estrogenic activities and has been shown to be a substrate for multidrug resistant efflux mechanisms, specifically, P-glycoprotein. Since the natural hormone estrogen reverses...

  16. Impact of Coherent Neutrino Nucleus Scattering on Direct Dark Matter Searches based on CaWO$_4$ Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gtlein; G. Angloher; A. Bento; C. Bucci; L. Canonica; A. Erb; F. v. Feilitzsch; N. Ferreiro Iachellini; P. Gorla; D. Hauff; J. Jochum; M. Kiefer; H. Kluck; H. Kraus; J. -C. Lanfranchi; J. Loebell; A. Mnster; F. Petricca; W. Potzel; F. Prbst; F. Reindl; S. Roth; K. Rottler; C. Sailer; K. Schffner; J. Schieck; S. Schnert; W. Seidel; M. v. Sivers; L. Stodolsky; C. Strandhagen; R. Strauss; A. Tanzke; M. Uffinger; A. Ulrich; I. Usherov; S. Wawoczny; M. Willers; M. Wstrich; A. Zller

    2015-03-17

    Atmospheric and solar neutrinos scattering coherently off target nuclei will be an important background source for the next generation of direct dark matter searches. In this work we focus on calcium tungstate as target material. For comparison with existing works we calculate the neutrino floor indicating which sensitivities can be reached before the neutrino background appears. In addition, we investigate the sensitivities of future direct dark matter searches using CRESST-II like detectors. Extending previous works we take into account achievable energy resolutions and thresholds as well as beta and gamma backgrounds for this investigation. We show that an exploration of WIMP-nucleon cross sections below the neutrino floor is possible for exposures of $\\gtrsim10$ kg-years or higher. In the third part we show that a first detection of coherent neutrino nucleus scattering of atmospheric and solar neutrinos using the same detectors and the backgrounds is feasible for exposures of $\\gtrsim50$ kg-years.

  17. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supporting Technical Document for the Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report (Phase II Report)

  18. Microsoft Word - Hanford Site Traffic Safety Improvements FACT SHEET V5 WO One Way Option.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OF PAGESpersonal CERTIFIED MAIL43 PART III:

  19. Efficient 2-?m laser oscillation of 5% Tm{sup 3+} : KLu(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} disks and 5% Tm{sup 3+} : KLu(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}/KLu(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} composite structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatnik, S M; Vedin, I A; Kurbatov, P F [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Pavlyuk, A A [A.V. Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    The spectral and lasing characteristics of active disk elements made of double potassium lutetium tungstates 5% Tm : KLuW and 5% Tm : KLuW/KLuW composite structures are comparatively studied. Laser power of about 5 W in the cw regime at a wavelength of 1.85 ?m was achieved in a composite sample with the active layer thickness of 250 ?m. Under quasi-cw pumping, the slope efficiency of all the studied samples exceeded 50%. It is experimentally shown that the internal stresses in the composite structures strongly affect the spectral characteristics of the laser radiation. (lasers)

  20. Narrative in Mao Dun's Eclipse Trilogy: A Conflicted Mao Dun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, David

    2012-01-01

    most notably his autobiography, Wo zouguo de daolu, hisdifficult times. In his autobiography, Mao Dun explains thaton and published as an autobiography, Wo zouguo de daolu, in

  1. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents...

  2. ARCHOBOTANIK von der Probenentnahme.....

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacomet, Stefanie

    Mll: Wie? Wo? 19.12. (SJ) Auswirkungen von Beschaffung und Produktion: LANDNUTZUNG GESCHICHTE DER

  3. Mechanistic Aspects and Reaction Pathways for Oxidative Coupling of Methane on Mn/Na2WO4/SiO2 Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    sensitivity to the energy of the C-H bond containing the hydrogen abstracted. These coupled homogeneous-catalytic+ selectivities but only when OH radicals are maintained at equilibrium concentrations via catalytic H2O-O2 required in indirect routes involving CH4 reforming and FischerTropsch synthesis,3 while producing light

  4. Skeletons and Asynchronous RPC for Emb edded Data-and Task Parallel Image Wo u ter C aarls, Pieter Jo nk er

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    implementation doesn't support task parallelism, however. EASY-PIPE [ results from our prototype, and finally sec- tion 6 draws conclusions and points to future work. 2 R ela

  5. Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) isoforms and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) mediate sulfate conjugate efflux out of BeWo cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audus, Kenneth L.; Mitra, Pallabi

    2010-01-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) have the ability to eliminate sulfate conjugates but it is not known if this constitutes one of their roles in the placenta. ...

  6. PATENTES INTERNACIONAIS RECENTES ORDONEZ, Juan Carlos ; Ruiz, C. O. ; SOUZA, Jeferson vila ; Vargas, Jos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paran, Universidade Federal do

    ;WO2012050608-A1 - Photo-bioreactor for growing algae e.g. microalgae within nutrient medium ;WO2012050608-A1 - Photo-bioreactor for growing algae e.g. microalgae within nutrient medium

  7. B0 Shimming Methods for UHF MRI P. Chang1,2 A. Fillmer3 T. Shao1 S. Nassirpour1,2 A. Henning1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    400 300 200 100 0 -100 -200 -300 -400 -500 Slice20Slice10Slice1 NS SW w/o PE SW w/o F0 SW SW stat Z0

  8. A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc, Wesley Wai

    Centrifugal Pump Floating Head Heat Exchanger w/o catalyst Centrifugal PumpCentrifugal Pump Centrifugal Pump Vertical Vessel Vertical

  9. TEXT THOMAS BHRKE Foto:SPLAgenturFocus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falge, Eva

    200000 Kilometer unter der Oberfl- che. Anders als bei der Erde, wo es hauptschlich an den beiden Polen

  10. The Yang Obeys, but the Yin Ignores: Copyright Law and Speech Suppression in the People's Republic of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Chen Hong, in Kuai Zhi Ding Shi He Wo Guo Guo Qing de BanGuan yu Lian Li Wo Guo Ban Quan Fa Lu Zhi Du de Gou Xiang [AFa Zuo Pin Zhi Zhu Zuo Quan Tan Jiu-Jian Lun Wo Guo "Zhu Zuo

  11. A Tale of Two Juries: Lay Participation Comes to Japanese and Chinese Courts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landsman, Stephen; Zhang, Jing

    2008-01-01

    li, jian ping wo guo xin pei sheng zhi [An Analysis Of TheJian, Yi lun wo guo renmin pei sheng yuan zhi du: yi li shi,lun - jian yi wo guo renmin pei sheng zhi du de gai zao [The

  12. HVAC Energy Recovery Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinnier, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    to approximate the annual heating fuel savings utilizing the equation which follows: where EH annual winter energy savings QT hourly energy saved, MBH D number of degree days ~t building and outside air temperature difference, T3 - Tl, ?FDB n rated full... load heating efficiency, where EH is expressed in MBH for electric heat, n = 1.0 and for gas heat, n = .8 V heating value of fuel, where EH is expressed in MBH, V = 3.413 M BTU/KW for electric heat and is not used for gas heat Interim Correction...

  13. File:05AKADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1ORDExplorationInjectionPermit (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File-FD-a -5-FD-b

  14. File:09-FD-c - EISProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages08TXATransmissionSiting.pdf Jump to:9-FD-a -9-FD-b

  15. Dentistry is one of the most exciting, challenging, and rewarding professions. Individuals who choose to pursue dental careers are motivated, scien-tifically curious, intelligent, ambitious, and socially conscious health professionals. They are men and wo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Suman

    #12;Dentistry is one of the most exciting, challenging, and rewarding professions. Individuals who. Furthermore, the dental profession includes not only those who provide direct patient care, but those who The dental profession offers a wide range of clinical practice, research, and academic opportunities; 1

  16. 2/1/2014 Kleiner als ein Floh: Forscher bauen Mini-Windrad -WiWo Green http://green.wiwo.de/kleiner-als-ein-floh-us-forscher-bauen-mini-windrad/ 1/4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    angestrebten Energiewende. Schon eine einzige dieser modernen Windmhlen kann an einem strmischen Tag ganze

  17. www.dol.gov/wb whygreenisyourcolorA Wo m a n 's G u i d e t o a S u s t a i n a b l e C a r e e r

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Energy 18 Environmental Protection 19 Green Building and Energy Efficiency 20 Doing Your Own Research 22 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE GLOSSARY Why Green Is Your Color: A Woman's Guide Why Is Green Good for Women? Green Occupations Educating Yourself For a Green Career Finding Your

  18. An experimental investigation of the urea-water decomposition and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxides with urea using V2O5-WO3-TiO2 catalyst.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johar, Jasmeet Singh

    2005-11-01

    ...................................................... 35 viii Page 4.3 Mass flow controllers (MFC)........................................................... 37 4.3.1 MFC calibration process .................................................... 39 4.4 Urea-water injector... ...................................................................................... 120 REFERENCES.......................................................................................................... 121 APPENDIX A MASS FLOW CONTROLLERS CALIBRATION PROCE- DURE...

  19. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Adam Z.

    2013-01-01

    Ltd." . Http://Plurionsystems.Com/Tech_Flow_Advantages.Html.plurionsystems.com/tech_flow_advantages.html [71] P. Leung,High Energy Density Redox Flow Device," ed: WO Patent

  20. ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    HP) Gas Turbines W/O Generators (1000 HP) Draglines (CubicYards) Draglines (Tons) Drill Rigs (Item-Years) Pumps &

  1. ng to fat-fr w.choosemyplat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    than re s popular in waffles, and buttermilk wo to three o the USDA. erm uid and pow en removed nt than

  2. BROWN AND CLEAR OLIVINE IN CHASSIGNITE NWA 2737: WATER AND DEFORMATION. A.H. , M. McCanta1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroi, Takahiro

    ]. Petrography. NWA 2737 contains ~87% olivine (Mg#=78.30.4%), ~6% pyroxenes (Wo39En51Fs10 (~15% of Fe is Fe3

  3. 2008 Regents University of California. All Rights Reserved RAMP Blue: Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wawrzynek, John

    . Administration/ maintenance ports: · 10/100 Enet · HDMI/DVI · USB ~$6K (w/o FPGAs or DRAM or enclosure) RAMP Blue

  4. On the possibility to search for double beta decay of initially unstable (alpha/beta radioactive) nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Tretyak; F. A. Danevich; S. S. Nagorny; Yu. G. Zdesenko

    2004-04-13

    Possibilities to search for double beta decay of alpha/beta unstable nuclei, many of which have higher energy release than "conventional" (beta stable) double beta decay candidates, are discussed. First experimental half-life limits on double beta decay of radioactive nuclides from U and Th families (trace contaminants of the CaWO_4, CdWO_4 and Gd_2SiO_5 scintillators) were established by reanalyzing the data of low-background measurements in the Solotvina Underground Laboratory with these detectors (1734 h with CaWO_4, 13316 h with CdWO_4, and 13949 h with Gd_2SiO_5 crystals).

  5. Reframing Mexican Migration as a Multi-Ethnic Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jonathan A

    2006-01-01

    y wo rds indigenous; migration; Mexico; collective identityCulture of Migration in Southern Mexico. Austin: Universitylong-standing patterns of migration to Mexicos cities. For

  6. THE KINETICS OF LASER PULSE VAPORIZATION OF URANIUM DIOXIDE BY MASS SPECTROMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chuen-horng

    2012-01-01

    partial differential equation; e.g. WO(l) - initial temperature and W0(2) - initial composition (10) RESTART OR TERMINATION

  7. Solar-Driven Microbial Photoelectrochemical System for Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hanyu

    2015-01-01

    Fan, Y. ; Liu, H. , Hydrogen Production Using Single-ChamberCatalysts for Hydrogen Production in Microbial Electrolysisof Glucose for Hydrogen Production Using a WO3-Based Tandem

  8. White Papers on Materials for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Technoeconomic Analysis of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production WO3 and HPA based system for ultra high stability Innovation for Our Energy Future...

  9. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulian, Christopher J. (Yankton, SD); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Son, Steven F. (Los Alamos, NM); Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Perry, W. Lee (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2009-09-22

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  10. @_jon_bell_WiC May 14, 2013 A Large-Scale, Longitudinal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Gail E.

    Achievements Professions 5 #12;@_jon_bell_WiC May 14, 2013 WoW: Quantitative Data In-game "Demographics" Guild, Class, Race, Level Quests Achievements Professions Raids 5 #12;@_jon_bell_WiC May 14 Achievements Professions Raids Companions 5 #12;@_jon_bell_WiC May 14, 2013 WoW: Quantitative Data In

  11. The Li'an ("Docketing") Process: Barriers to Initiating Lawsuits in China and Possible Reforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheuk, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    zhi lu de bi jing zhi men: Dui wo guo min shi su song shouSee Mao Junmin, Wo guo minshi qi su yao jian zhi zhong gou [HUA REN MIN GONG HE GUO MIN SHI FA YUAN ZU ZHI FA [COURT

  12. Service Interruption Notices Between 11/13/15 and 12/19/15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    : 545-6453 WO#: 12-00051001 Shop/Crew: Air Conditioning Autoclaves Cold Water Cold Storage Compressed ProjEngineer: Ted Mendoza Proj Phone: 5-6564 WO#: Shop/Crew: Air Conditioning Autoclaves Cold Water/Crew: Air Conditioning Autoclaves Cold Water Cold Storage Compressed Air Computers Condenser Pumps Distilled

  13. Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeckley, Russell L. (Oakham, MA)

    1996-01-01

    A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of nano-engineered membranes for oil-water separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Brian R. (Brian Richmond)

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the design and testing of membranes for separation of water-in- oil (w/o) emulsions. A polycarbonate membrane treated with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) is used to filter a 3 wt% w/o emulsion. ...

  15. Simply-Typed Ayala-Rinc on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    Computer and Electrical Engineering Universidade de Bras#19; #16;lia Heriot-Watt University Bras#19; #16;lia D. F., Brasil Edinburgh, Scotland WoLLIC 2001 | August 21 st , 2001 Universidade de Bras#19; #16;lia / Heriot-Watt University #12; WoLLIC 2001 | Applying #21;se -Uni#12;cation for HOU in the #21

  16. Web of Science What is Web of Science?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheichl, Robert

    . When you enter Web of Science, you will be able to search simultaneously all of the WoS databases. Entering keywords When you enter a keyword, WoS will automatically search for many variations on that word.g. *saccharide Combining search terms If you click the + add another field link underneath the search box, you

  17. A Distributed Resource Management Architecture for Interconnecting Web-of-Things using uBox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    . INTRODUCTION With the IPv4 Internet age at an end and IPv6 at the doorstep, the Internet of Things vision the Web of Things (WoT), the application layer of an Internet of Things. In this paper we show how Wo and contextual relations between things explicit is a challenge for a purely technical Internet of Things

  18. Morphology Tuning of Strontium Tungstate Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, S.; George, T. [Nirmala College, Muvattupuzha, 686 661, Kerala (India); George, K. C. [S.B. College, Changanacherry, 686 101, Kerala (India); Sunny, A. T.; Mathew, S. [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, 686 560, Kerala (India)

    2007-08-22

    Strontium tungstate nanocrystals in two different morphologies are successfully synthesized by controlled precipitation in aqueous and in poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) medium. Structural characterizations are carried out by XRD and SEM. The average particle size calculated for the SrWO4 prepared in the two different solvents ranges 20-24 nm. The SEM pictures show that the surface morphologies of the SrWO4 nanoparticles in aqueous medium resemble mushroom and the SrWO4 nanoparticles in PVA medium resemble cauliflower. Investigations on the room temperature luminescent properties of the strontium tungstate nanoparticles prepared in aqueous and PVA medium shows strong emissions around 425 nm.

  19. Synthesis of compositionally-defined single-crystalline Eu?-activated molybdate-tungstate solid solution composite nanowires and observation of charge transfer in a novel class of 1D CaMoO?-CaWO?: Eu? 0D CdS/CdSe QD nanoscale heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyi [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McBean, Coray [State Univ. of Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Wang, Lei [State Univ. of Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Jaye, Cherno [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Liu, Haiqing [State Univ. of Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Fischer, Daniel A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); State Univ. of Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2015-02-19

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu?-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW??xMoxO? (0 ? x ? 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (x). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition with our 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at x = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (x = 0.8) 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu? activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that the PL quenching can be attributed to a photo-induced electron transfer process from CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) to both CdSe and CdS QDs, an assertion supported by complementary NEXAFS measurements.

  20. Synthesis of Compositionally Defined Single-Crystalline Eu 3+ -Activated MolybdateTungstate Solid-Solution Composite Nanowires and Observation of Charge Transfer in a Novel Class of 1D CaMoO 4 CaWO 4 :Eu 3+ 0D CdS/CdSe QD Nanoscale Heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-02-10

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu?-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW??xMoxO? (0 ? x ? 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (x). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition withmoreour 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at x = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (x = 0.8) 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu? activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that the PL quenching can be attributed to a photo-induced electron transfer process from CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) to both CdSe and CdS QDs, an assertion supported by complementary NEXAFS measurements.less

  1. Synthesis of compositionally-defined single-crystalline Eu?-activated molybdate-tungstate solid solution composite nanowires and observation of charge transfer in a novel class of 1D CaMoO?-CaWO?: Eu? 0D CdS/CdSe QD nanoscale heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyi; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-02-10

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu?-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW??xMoxO? (0 ? x ? 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (x). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition withmoreour 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (0 ? x ? 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at x = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (x = 0.8) 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu? activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that the PL quenching can be attributed to a photo-induced electron transfer process from CaW??xMoxO?: Eu? (x = 0.8) to both CdSe and CdS QDs, an assertion supported by complementary NEXAFS measurements.less

  2. This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012 Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 365367 365 Cite this: Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 365367

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    of their promising applications in energy-efficient windows that can control the solar light transmission indoors in buildings (as a result of curtailing of air conditioning) but also comfortable esthetics.20 WO3 can display

  3. 3D Visualization and Analysis of Ecological Networks on WWW Sanghyuk Yoon Ilmi Yoon Rich Williams Neo Martinez Jennifer Dunne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Ilmi

    , connectivity, generality, vulnerability, taxonomy, and biomass) of network nodes and links on top of ecological Semantic Web. We describe our deployment of "Webs on the Web" (WoW) visualization

  4. Putting Science to Work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that 'bright kid' whose advice I have always sought and mostly followed." Putting Science to Work SafeTy remINDer Filigenzi, Gergel on the Job for TTED T wo new ORNL staff...

  5. On irreducibility of standard modules for generic representations.pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-09

    web), ~,~).f', f$ where s2' is the standard Whittaker functional on I(wo(v), W,,(Q)). By Proposition 7.3 of [23], Conjecture 1.1 is true and therefore the denominator...

  6. United states Depart .ent of th8 Interior, J . Fish and l!iildl i fe Service , Albert I . a , r c or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ."'Tli r elated that t o dat e his Rffo rts .3.ve bepn irec eri wo:o.:-tJ s ecur ing fal.;t u:::l i nfo

  7. Putting downward pressure on natural gas prices: The impact of renewable energy and energy efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Hogan, W. 1989. Wo rld Oil Price Projections: A Sensitivitypursuant to the Harvard-Japan World Oil Market Study, Energyrichene, N. 2002. World Crude Oil and Natural Gas: A Demand

  8. Evaluating Information Presentation Strategies for Spoken Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winterboer, Andi; Moore, Johanna D.

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of a Wizard-of-Oz (WoZ) study comparing two approaches to presenting information in a spoken dialogue system generating flight recommendations. We found that recommendations presented using the user-model based summarize...

  9. Vector Quantization Codebook Generation Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cockshott, P.; Lambert, R.B.; US patent 6438268 International Patent Application publication no wo 98/18262 Publication date 30 april 1998; Application no pct/gb97/02841 [More Details

    Cockshott,P. Lambert,R.B. US patent 6438268 International Patent Application publication no wo 98/18262 Publication date 30 april 1998; Application no pct/gb97/02841

  10. Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Diesel (Coal-to- Liquids) Hydrogen (Natural Gas, pipeline)Hydrogen (Natural Gas, liquid H2 truck) Hydrogen (Coal,Natural Gas, on-site Natural Gas, liquid H2 truck, w/o or w/

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Evolutionary Home Builders...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    vented attic with R-100 blown cellulose; wo air-to-air heat pumps SEER 14.1; HSPF 9.6; heat pump water heater. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Evolutionary Home Builders,...

  12. NMNM--CAFO PLANNINGCAFO PLANNING the Job Aheadthe Job Ahead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    irrigation water managementPoor irrigation water management Poor record keeping skillsPoor record keeping if pumped to a circle with properfilters if pumped to a circle with proper nozzlingnozzling.. W/O proper

  13. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Willkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1998-06-02

    A ceramic body is disclosed comprising at least about 80 w/o silicon nitride and having a mean tensile strength of at least about 800 MPa. 4 figs.

  14. Ethical Issues in Research with "Vulnerable" and "HardtoReach"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    are interdependentinterdependent One can be vulnerable w/o being harmed or d ( d i )wronged (and vice versa) #12;2 Ways women (Subpart B) ADDITIONAL SAFEGUARDS? handicapped persons Prisoners (Subpart C) Children

  15. TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF A CHAIN OF ANHARMONIC OSCILLATORS WITH RANDOM FLIP OF VELOCITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF A CHAIN OF ANHARMONIC OSCILLATORS WITH RANDOM FLIP OF VELOCITIES C into the hot reservoir, but it is impossible to extract energy for the cold reservoir. In other wo

  16. DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF FOUNDATIONS: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN A CENTRIFUGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hushman, B.

    1984-01-01

    1975. Sco tt, R. F . , "Centrifuge Studies of Cyclic LateDynam i c Pile Tests by Centrifuge Mo deling ," Proc. 6th WoADVANCES IN GEOTECHNICAL CENTRIFUGE MODELING A symposium on

  17. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Rural Developmen...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    with Building America research partner CARB to design affordable HERS-8 homes (60 wo PV), with double-stud walls heavy insulation, low-load sealed-combustion gas space heaters,...

  18. Charles Linder Research Interests and Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardi, Amichay

    for the development of novel membranes for water purification and energy storage devices. The objective was to study "Ordered Ion Exchange Membranes". WO2004005380 20040115 ) 3) "Building DefectFree Nanostructured films

  19. Women of Wind Energy Annual Luncheon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Women of Wind Energy (WoWE) annual luncheon, held each year during the American Wind Energy Association's WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, is a premier networking event and highly visible...

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Charcaterize Performance FY12-Q4 Milestone: Demonstration Liquid Phase Spray for WO3 at 6" by 6" Current work and future research Work with Sage Electrochromics to Transfer...

  1. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Adam Z.

    2013-01-01

    of a Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery to Maintain Power Quality,"Fuel System Using Redox Flow Battery," ed: WO Patentand D. B. Hickey, "Redox Flow Battery System for Distributed

  2. Photo-controllable thermoelectric properties with reversibility and photo-thermoelectric effects of tungsten trioxide accompanied by its photochromic phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuma, Chiori; Kawano, Takuto; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2014-11-07

    The addition of photo-controllable properties to tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) is of interest for developing practical applications of WO{sub 3} as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a sputtered crystalline WO{sub 3} thin film generated thermoelectric power due to ultraviolet (UV) light-induced band-gap excitation and was accompanied by a photochromic reaction resulting from generating W{sup 5+} ions. The thermoelectric properties (electrical conductivity (?) and Seebeck coefficient (S)) and coloration of WO{sub 3} could be reversibly switched by alternating the external stimulus between UV light irradiation and dark storage. After irradiating the film with UV light, ? increased, whereas the absolute value of S decreased, and the photochromic (coloration) reaction was detected. Notably, the opposite behavior was exhibited by WO{sub 3} after dark storage, and this reversible cycle could be repeated at least three times. Moreover, photo-thermoelectric effects (photo-conductive effect (photo-conductivity, ?{sub photo}) and photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, S{sub photo})) were also detected in response to visible-light irradiation of the colored WO{sub 3} thin films. Under visible-light irradiation, ?{sub photo} and the absolute value of S{sub photo} increased and decreased, respectively. These effects are likely attributable to the excitation of electrons from the mid-gap visible light absorption band (W{sup 5+} state) to the conduction band of WO{sub 3}. Our findings demonstrate that the simultaneous, reversible switching of multiple properties of WO{sub 3} thin film is achieved by the application of an external stimulus and that this material exhibits photo-thermoelectric effects when irradiated with visible-light.

  3. EndNote Online for Health: guide 1. Registering with EndNote Online p.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    of the WoS screen. Finally, enter the email and password details that you have set up. Agree to terms of use to proceed. ii. Search for articles in WoS e.g. either on a topic of your choice or enter biomechanic experience on the right-hand side of the screen. Then enter your email address twice as directed and click

  4. Performance of scintillation materials at cryogenic temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. B. Mikhailik; H. Kraus

    2010-01-29

    An increasing number of applications of scintillators at low temperatures, particularly in cryogenic experiments searching for rare events, has motivated the investigation of scintillation properties of materials over a wide temperature range. This paper provides an overview of the latest results on the study of luminescence, absorption and scintillation properties of materials selected for rare event searches so far. These include CaWO4, ZnWO4, CdWO4, MgWO4, CaMoO4, CdMoO4, Bi4Ge3O12, CaF2, MgF2, ZnSe and AL2O3-Ti. We discuss the progress achieved in research and development of these scintillators, both in material preparation and in the understanding of scintillation mechanisms, as well as the underlying physics. To understand the origin of the performance limitation of self-activated scintillators we employed a semi-empirical model of conversion of high energy radiation into light and made appropriate provision for effects of temperature and energy transfer. We conclude that the low-temperature value of the light yield of some modern scintillators, namely CaWO4, CdWO4 and Bi4Ge3O12, is close to the theoretical limit. Finally, we discuss the advantages and limitations of different materials with emphasis on their application as cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors (CPSD) in rare event search experiments.

  5. Massive stars on the verge of exploding: the properties of oxygen sequence Wolf-Rayet stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tramper, F; Sanyal, D; Sana, H; de Koter, A; Grfener, G; Langer, N; Vink, J S; de Mink, S E; Kaper, L

    2015-01-01

    Context. Oxygen sequence Wolf-Rayet (WO) stars represent a very rare stage in the evolution of massive stars. Their spectra show strong emission lines of helium-burning products, in particular highly ionized carbon and oxygen. The properties of WO stars can be used to provide unique constraints on the (post-)helium burning evolution of massive stars, as well as their remaining lifetime and the expected properties of their supernovae. Aims. We aim to homogeneously analyse the currently known presumed-single WO stars to obtain the key stellar and outflow properties and to constrain their evolutionary state. Methods. We use the line-blanketed non-local thermal equilibrium atmosphere code cmfgen to model the X-Shooter spectra of the WO stars and deduce the atmospheric parameters. We calculate dedicated evolutionary models to determine the evolutionary state of the stars. Results. The WO stars have extremely high temperatures that range from 150 kK to 210 kK, and very low surface helium mass fractions that range f...

  6. Permeability and wet-out characterization of SRIM automotive bumper beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Christopher Todd

    1992-01-01

    types 0/CONTINUOUS HAT LAYERS (12 TOTAL) 0 DEGREE PLY MATERIAL ? TOW WEIGHT (YDS/?) LOOPS/ INCH TONS/ LOO P 0 DEG WEIGHT (OZ/YD 2) MAT TYPE NAT WEIGHT (OZ/YD"2) TOTAL LAYER WEIGHT ACTUAL STIFFNESS RATIO UO1 UO2 UO3 225 450... ACTUAL STIFFNES RATIO WOI WO2 WO3 W(N WO! 450 8 00 225 8 00 225 5 50 225 5 50 225 8 00 I 0 24 20 48 28 16 14 08 20 48 450 225 225 450 450 1 00 ! (Kl 4 50 4 50 7 00 3 84 7 68 I I 52 5 76 89( CO)J I fNUOUS CON( ll4UOUS LONI...

  7. Experimental research of double beta decay of atomic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. A. Danevich

    2011-12-26

    Results of several double beta decay experiments, performed with the help of low background crystal scintillators, are presented. In particular, the half-life value of the two-neutrino double beta decay of 116-Cd has been measured as 2.9 10^{19} yr, and the new half-life limit on the neutrinoless double beta decay of 116-Cd has been established as >1.7 10^{23} yr at 90%, which corresponds to a restriction on the neutrino mass <1.7 eV. New half-life bounds on the level of 10^{17}-10^{21} yr were set for double beta processes in 64-Zn, 70-Zn, 106-Cd, 108-Cd, 114-Cd, 136-Ce, 138-Ce, 142-Ce, 160-Gd, 180-W, and 186-W by using low-background CdWO4, GSO, and ZnWO4 crystal scintillators. The claim of discovery of the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76-Ge [Mod. Phys. Lett. A 16 (2001) 2409] was analyzed. The demands of the future high sensitivity double beta decay experiments, aiming to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay or to advance restrictions on the neutrino mass to < 0.01 eV, were considered. Requirements for their sensitivity and discovery potential were formulated. Two projects of double beta experiments with a sensitivity on the level of 10^{26}-10^{27} yr (CAMEO and CARVEL projects) were discussed. Scintillation properties and radioactive contamination of CaWO4, ZnWO4, CdWO4, PbWO4, GSO(Ce), CeF3, yttrium-aluminum garnet doped with neodymium (YAG:Nd) crystal scintillators were studied. Applicability of these scintillators to search for double beta decay was discussed.

  8. Studien in dem Romanstil Otto Ludwigs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trovillo, Bessie

    1910-01-01

    Richter und Ohms be deutend. In 1844 ging er zum letzten MalC nach Leipsig, wo er einige Monate blieb; nachher ging er nach Meissen zurck wo er im Jahre 1352Aeiner achtjhrigen Verlobung (^ ac^ l Emilie Winkler heiratete und mit ihr in glcklichster... zueilte, als die Alte sich davon entfernte.n S. 233. "Die Leut sind nix, wie so ein verwnschter Fieberhund." S. 246. (Kurator) "Er war das lebendige Tokalblatt de Stdtchens." S. 251. "Der dicke Meister sah aus wie die gesegnete Mahlzeit...

  9. Surface Treatment And Protection Method For Cadium Zinc Telluride Crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W. (Nashville, TN); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Chinn, Douglas A. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-02-21

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH4F and 10 w/o H2O2 in water.

  10. Surface treatment and protection method for cadmium zinc telluride crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W. (Nashville, TN); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Chinn, Douglas A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water.

  11. Ionizing Radiation Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W. (Nashville, TN); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Chinn, Douglas A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-11-18

    A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

  12. Pastaklan Vesla Issue 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1978-01-01

    Bo KclCendrick- .6, 1-0, 19 Allan Andress- 25t^L Ginnio Reynolds- 3^i 36, 4-3 No trades for other fanzines Kathy. Bushman.* 29 Peggy Barilla- 55, 56 Steve Barnes- 73, 84, 93 CAB - Bacovcr Horta Press Issue ;"*5 Rhubarb Publication.../\\ M A?TD TH5?T THERE'S. ? . 1 - ' > ?-^WW I II i,ijw" I Friends t We cano^up with this idea and we organized it and we bought the supplies and wo typed it and we glued it together and wo printed it and we collated7 w&at we printed and...

  13. Electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation in fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.

    2001-01-01

    Binary and ternary electrocatalysts are provided for oxidizing alcohol in a fuel cell. The binary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate selected from the group consisting of NiWO.sub.4 or CoWO.sub.4 or a combination thereof, and 2) Group VIII noble metal catalyst supported on the substrate. The ternary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate as described above, and 2) a catalyst comprising Group VIII noble metal, and ruthenium oxide or molybdenum oxide or a combination thereof, said catalyst being supported on said substrate.

  14. (12) INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) (19) World Intellectual Property Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    ) INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) (19) World Intellectual Property.11.2003) PCT WO 03/097291 Al (51) International Patent Classification7: B23K 26/00 (74) Agents: TANG, Henry eta, SD, SE, SG, SK, SL, TJ, TM, TN, TR, TT, TZ, UA, UG, US, UZ, VC, VN, YU, ZA, ZM, ZW. (84) Designated

  15. (12) INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) (19) W(4orld Intellectual Property Organization III IIIIIIInIIIIIIII p aIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIII III IIIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robins, Gabriel

    (12) INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) (19) W(4orld.04.2012) PCT WO 20 12/047559 A2 (51) International Patent Classification: GOIS 5/02 (2010.01) G06K17/00 (2006, VC, VN, ZA, ZM, ZW. (84) Designated States (unless otherwise indicated,for every kind

  16. (12) INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) (19) World Intellectual Property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    ---- (12) INTERNATIONAL APPLICATION PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATENT COOPERATION TREATY (PCT) (19) World.01.2005) PCT WO 2005/005069 A2 (51) International Patent Classification7: B21D (74) Agents: TANG, Henry eta, SG, SK, SL, TJ, TM, TN, TR, TT, TZ, UA, UG, US, UZ, VC, VN, YU, ZA, ZM, ZW. (84) Designated States

  17. Chemical Bonding: The Classical Description sharing or transferring electrons between atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    Chemical Bonding: The Classical Description sharing or transferring electrons between atoms LEWIS electron dot diagram -> formula (SF6) VSEPR (valence-shell electron-pair repulsion) theory Molecular Structure (w/o quantum mechanics) Chapter. 3 Two or more atoms approach -> their electrons interact and form

  18. PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Marine Biological Laboratory WOODS PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THF WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Herbert Wo Graham, Fishery Biologist, John Mo of T richodesmium floating on the surface over water of very low phosphorus content. #12;CONTENTS Page Methods

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Conservatism and novelty in the genetic architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joron, Mathieu

    OPEN ORIGINAL ARTICLE Conservatism and novelty in the genetic architecture of adaptation Gilles1,3, T Wirth1,2, WO McMillan3 and M Joron1,3 Understanding the genetic architecture of adaptive the genetic architecture of ecologically important traits influences their diversification has been hampered

  20. LA-UR-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    e tt yO conso l e cy SO, 1l 5 20 0n8 ' Ibootl g ub grub .cont un-jj INFINIB.lWD fI.ttfI. gets it a ll wo r king Ins talls i n Ein i b and dri v e r s and...

  1. Exploring Interruption in HRI using Wizard of Oz Paul Saulnier, Ehud Sharlin, Saul Greenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Saul

    experiments and should call for future research of interruption in human-robot interaction. II. DESCRIPTION of Oz (WoO) should interrupt humans in various social settings. While there is considerable work social HRI experiments as well as reflections on our future interruption HRI research Keywords

  2. Greg Pfister Affiliation: Free at Last!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tracking file system in memory storage database system DNS high availability (failover) (geo) firewallSpace WoW Second Life IM service Amazon EC2, Google App Engine, Enomaly, Cassat (energy), Intuit Quick. Geographical HA / failover. Interoperability and standards (maybe). Specialization to particular workloads

  3. Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 17 Number 4 : Full issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

    1981-11-18

    tor ,common :moflks .aaprr,ing ,far ,Arhata~. Iii} The '!'fana ofsert realised Gshen. :11 'has 1WO 'sspects:- ,a) T.he Sraxrakayana .accorning ,to '.which externalmOnion (tsong) Amdo in North East Tibet popularly known as Tsong Khapa, Je Rinpoche, Lobsang dakpa (Sumatikirti), he was the founder...

  4. FOOD PRESERVATION SERIES RECOMMENDED VARIETIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that are not bruised or damaged. Bag fresh fruits separate from meat, poultry and seafood products. Wash hands before a separate cutting board for fruits, and keep away from raw meat, poultry and seafood Follow standardized. WO1043 #12;how to preserve FREEZING OF PEARS Select pears that are well ripened and firm

  5. .-4 Ijcie;we _SOi-ViCq h t U t . 9 Released upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WINDS-- me task of docking o r undocking an airship--- the operations of putting the vessel into her' and they are found to be vary complox. logical officer of the U.S. naval airship %os Angel.ss, Liout. h m c i s WO

  6. In the Shadow of the Cell-Phone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2009-01-01

    K. Tracking himself, so the FBI won't have to. NJ.com, Newtracking_himself_so_t he_fbi_wo.html> Accessed 8 July 2009 [he was held back by the FBI in 2003 on suspicion of being a

  7. Service Interruption Notices Between 6/10/15 and 7/11/15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    /Crew: Air Conditioning Autoclaves Cold Water Cold Storage Compressed Air Computers Condenser Pumps Distilled: 577-0909 WO#: 13-00146201 Shop/Crew: Air Conditioning Autoclaves Cold Water Cold Storage Compressed-001495-01 Shop/Crew: Air Conditioning Autoclaves Cold Water Cold Storage Compressed Air Computers Condenser Pumps

  8. Fate of Deepwater Horizon oil in Alabama's beach system: Understanding physical evolution processes based on observational data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    : Available online 10 December 2014 Keywords: Oil spill Deepwater Horizon spill Beach contamination Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Crude oil spill a b s t r a c t The impact of MC252 oil on northern Gulf of Mexico impacting these beaches was predominantly in the form of water- in-oil (W/O) emulsions, a highly viscous

  9. EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 13: Solar Cell Design I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    Commercial cost of manufacture Research highest efficiency w/o regard to expense 2 Si Solar Cell Efficiency1 EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 13: Solar Cell Design I Dr. Todd J. Kaiser tjkaiser@ece.montana.edu Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University - Bozeman Solar Cell Design

  10. Jeanne A. Hardy, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Jeanne

    -1994). Studied mechanism by which iron on asbestos increases DNA damage. PUBLICATIONS and PATENTS: Hardy, J. A Approaches to Structure Based Drug Design, publishers Royal Society of Chemistry, submitted with expected, S.K., Hardy, J. A., Lam, J., O'Brien, T. "Methods for Identifying Allosteric Sites." World Patent WO

  11. OFC Review 2013 Software Defined Network (SDN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and transmission rate w/o hardware change Dedicated PCE to scale OpenFlow architectutre #12;Network ArchitectureOFC Review 2013 Software Defined Network (SDN) M. Farhan Habib May 10, 2013 Friday Group Meeting Networks Lab @ UCD #12;NTu3F: SDN in Today's Network #12;SDN: What and Why Traditional distributed

  12. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information Information Officer, National Incident Management Information (NIMO), State Forestry (WO), Fire and Aviation.g., fire behavior, weather, fuels) and (b) management events that repre- sent responses to the fire

  13. Exact three-dimensional spectral solution to surface-groundwater interactions with arbitrary surface topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surface topography Anders Worman,1 Aaron I. Packman,2 Lars Marklund,1 Judson W. Harvey,3 and Susa H. [1] It has been long known that land surface topography governs both groundwater flow patterns that the surface topography can be separated in a Fourier-series spectrum that provides an exact solution

  14. Role of glutathione in intracellular copper transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Chenxiang

    1994-01-01

    , is thought to play a crucial role in the regulation of this reactive ion. Using reversed phase HPLC, we have identified a glutathione-Cu complex in the acid-soluble fraction of cell extracts from human BeWo cells following treatment with 67CUC12. 67Cu...

  15. PRELIMINARY VALEN MODELING OF PASSIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRELIMINARY VALEN MODELING OF PASSIVE AND ACTIVE CONTROL OF RWM IN FIRE J. Bialek Columbia;VALEN Model of FIRE Passive & Active Stabilization 43210 -2 -1 0 1 2 z Z-vv Data from "dcon.FIRE.01" r z structure is computed w/o FIRE conducting wall. #12;VALEN Model of FIRE Passive Stabilization 1 0 0 1 0 - 1

  16. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Rural Development, Greenfield, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This builder worked with Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings to design affordable HERS-8 homes (60 w/o PV), with double-stud walls heavy insulation, low-load sealed-combustion gas space heaters, triple-pane windows, solar water heating, and PV

  17. Do financial investors destabilize the oil price?

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    N E 2 011 by Marco J. Lombardi and Ine Van Robays DO FINANCIAL INVESTORS DESTABILIZE THE OIL PRICE? WO R K I N G PA P E R S E R I E S N O 13 4 6 J U N E 2011 DO FINANCIAL...

  18. Courses: Women's and Gender Studies (WGS) Page 381Sonoma State University 2015-2016 Catalog Women's and Gender Studies (WGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    in the social construction of modern gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer (GLBTQ) identities. StudentsS 280 WoMen'S BodieS: HeALtH And iMAge (4) This course examines research and theory about the health. This includes health advocacy, gendered representations, women's health movements, the gender politics

  19. EXPONENTIAL INSTABILITY FOR A CLASS OF DISPERSING LUCHEZAR STOYANOV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the manifold M . Let S t be the billiard flow on M (see [CFS]). Given x = (q; v) 2 M , the trajectory fl(x) = f [Si1], [Si3], [CFS], [DS], [BSC], [Ch], [CvE], [Wo] and the references there). The motivation

  20. Neutron Scattering Facility for Characterization of CRESST and EURECA Detectors at mK Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -C. Lanfranchi; C. Ciemniak; C. Coppi; F. von Feilitzsch; A. Gtlein; H. Hagn; C. Isaila; J. Jochum; M. Kimmerle; S. Pfister; W. Potzel; W. Rau; S. Roth; K. Rottler; C. Sailer; S. Scholl; I. Usherov; W. Westphal

    2008-10-01

    CRESST (Cryogenic Rare Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers) is an experiment located at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory and aimed at the direct detection of dark matter in the form of WIMPs. The setup has just completed a one year commissioning run in 2007 and is presently starting a physics run with an increased target mass. Scintillating $\\mathrm{CaWO_4}$ single crystals, operated at temperatures of a few millikelvin, are used as target to detect the tiny nuclear recoil induced by a WIMP. The powerful background identification and rejection of $\\alpha$, e$^{-}$ and $\\gamma$ events is realized via the simultaneous measurement of a phonon and a scintillation signal generated in the $\\mathrm{CaWO_4}$ crystal. However, neutrons could still be misidentified as a WIMP signature. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the individual recoil behaviour in terms of phonon generation and scintillation light emission due to scattering on Ca, O or W nuclei, respectively, is mandatory. The only setup which allows to perform such measurements at the operating temperature of the CRESST detectors has been installed at the Maier-Leibnitz-Accelerator Laboratory in Garching and is presently being commissioned. The design of this neutron scattering facility is such that it can also be used for other target materials, e.g. $\\mathrm{ZnWO_4}$, $\\mathrm{PbWO_4}$ and others as foreseen in the framework of the future multitarget tonne-scale experiment EURECA (European Underground Rare Event Calorimeter Array).

  1. SHORT REVIEW Butterfly genomics eclosing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beldade, Patrcia

    SHORT REVIEW Butterfly genomics eclosing P Beldade1 , WO McMillan2 and A Papanicolaou3 1 Section to an explosion of genomic data and the emergence of new research avenues. Evolutionary and ecological functional genomics, with its focus on the genes that affect ecological success and adaptation in natural populations

  2. http://depts.washington.edu/rppl/presentations/index.html The TCS Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    discharge cleaning - Wall Gettering Samples in & out Plasma electron energy analyzer (CMA) G at e V al v e 3 of the TCS upgrade FRCs at RPPL FRC's have potential to make near ideal reactor - linear, high beta flux w/o sustainment (LSX) or cold low flux steady state (RMF) Present approach at RPPL: Improve

  3. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  4. FY 1993 Projection Capability Assurance Program waste and hazard minimization. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haws, L.D.; Homan, D.A.

    1993-01-15

    Waste and hazard minimization efforts in the following areas are described: (1) environmentally responsive cleaning, (2) hazardous material exposure, (3) explosive processing, (4) flex circuit manufacturing, (5) tritium capture w/o conversion to water, (6) ES&H compatible pyrotechnic materials, and (7) remote explosive component assembly.

  5. Big Data Use Cases and Requirements GEOFFREY FOX, Indiana University, School of Informatics and Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Big Data Use Cases and Requirements GEOFFREY FOX, Indiana University, School of Informatics and Computing Co-Chair, Use Cases & Requirements Subgroup, NIST Big Data Public Working Group WO CHANG, National Institute of Standards and Technologies Co-Chair, NIST Big Data Public Working Group Abstract We formed

  6. I,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    cy. IA) 2A, 3A - 8. H. Brown (want. cy. :?A,sA) P. Mb. Balrrara (w'eac. cy. 4A) R. J. Smith, Jr. (w&o. cy. 5A) 4A- 6A - 6A - 7A - SA- SA - 1oA - 6. R. Gtistavson (+nc. cy; bA)-...

  7. Si composite electrode with Li metal doping for advanced lithium-ion battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Gao; Xun, Shidi; Battaglia, Vincent

    2015-12-15

    A silicon electrode is described, formed by combining silicon powder, a conductive binder, and SLMP.TM. powder from FMC Corporation to make a hybrid electrode system, useful in lithium-ion batteries. In one embodiment the binder is a conductive polymer such as described in PCT Published Application WO 2010/135248 A1.

  8. ZHANG ET AL. VOL. 8 ' NO. 9 ' 95909596 ' 2014 www.acsnano.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Qinghua

    to this work. T wo-dimensional (2D) layered materi- als,includingsemimetallicgraphene,17 semiconducting (termed phosphorene) has become a new class of 2D layered material, with a pre- dicted layer the gapless graphene and the comparably large gap TMD semiconductors.2224 The predicted direct band gap

  9. WORLDLY | IntegRateD | peRsOnaLIzeD MBa Message from the Director 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    WORLDLY | IntegRateD | peRsOnaLIzeD MBa beyond business as usual #12;Contents WoRLDLY Message from: An International & Dynamic City 16 InteGRAteD What is Integrated Management? 18 Our Unique Integrated Approach Program 29 PeRsonALIzeD Message from Career Services 30 Employment Statistics 32 Our Mentoring Program 33

  10. Monodisperse Emulsion Generation via Drop Break Off in a Coflowing Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    diameter, the velocity of the continuous phase, the extrusion rate, and the viscosities and interfacial to microemulsions, the emulsions we consider here are thermodynamically metastable. Common emul- sions include oil-in-water (O/W), or direct emulsions, and water-in-oil (W/O), or inverted emulsions. Addition of a surfactant

  11. Positioning Unknown Words in a Thesaurus by Using Information Extracted from a Corpus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Positioning Unknown Words in a Thesaurus by Using Information Extracted from a Corpus Na extracted from a large corpus. A suitable area (if the thesaurus for an unknown woM ix estimated l)y inte- grating the human intuition I)urled in the thesaurus and statistical data extracted from the corpus

  12. Surface Engineering Proceedings of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    oxides such as WO3, MoO3 and TiO2 were studied. In this paper, however, the results in the case of one for the nanotube/nanowire synthesis. Thus, they become model systems to study and correlate the theoretical

  13. Fly Through the Universe: Bring Real Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    Zoo) Resources Acknowledgments 2 2 #12;On Stop Shopping Web Posting NSTA Boston httpToday Dark Matter (suspected since 1930s known since 1970s) Dark Energy (suspected since 1980s known since) - Interactive Needed (Hardware Revolution w/o Content) - Museums, Web Pages, New Technologies - Planetaria now

  14. Studies of epithermal neutrons in uranium, heavy water lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Ardenne, Walter Herbert

    1964-01-01

    Measurements related to reactor physics parameters were made in three heavy water lattices. The three lattices studied consisted of 0.250-inch-diameter, 1.03 w/o U2 3 5 uranium fuel rods arranged in triangular arrays and ...

  15. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to comply with the Administrations' Clean Power Plan and maintain regional adequacy standards. Relevance analysis and sensitivity studies conducted to support the development of the Seventh Power Plan Sensitivity S2.1 Scenario 2C w/Lower Natural Gas Prices Sensitivity S3.1 Scenario 2C w/o Demand Response

  16. Albritton Bell Tower - 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based (V2O5-WO3/TiO2) and pillared interlayer clay-based (V2O5/Ti-PILC) monolithic honeycomb catalysts using a laboratory laminar-flow reactor was investigated...

  17. Petroleum Institute Scholarly Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editor: C. Brandt Program Editors: K. Nandakumar Chemical Engineering A. A. Shehada Electrical exfoliated graphite oxide and its use in nanocomposites," PCT Int. Appl. WO 2007047084, April 26th, 2007 of Science, Mathematics and Computing (METSMaC), Abu Dhabi, UAE, 2007. #12;- 6 - Scholarly Publications 2007

  18. Egyptian Journal of Natural History, 2007, Vol. 4 , pp 1 -9 Printed in Egypt. Egyptian British Biological Society (EBB Soc)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nottingham, University of

    Egyptian Journal of Natural History, 2007, Vol. 4 , pp 1 - 9 Printed in Egypt. Egyptian British. Ampulicidae, Sphecidae & Crabronidae) of Egypt. Part 2: Checklist C. Giles Roche Lot 44, Taman Wong Wo Lo not been recorded from Egypt hitherto (Spilomena, Crossocerus, Lestica). Twenty-four species are recorded

  19. Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories Web Science Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories Ian Brown Web Science Institute University of Southampton University of Southampton Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK +44 (0)23 8059 5000 wh@soton.ac.uk Lisa Harris Web.j.harris@soton.ac.uk ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose an initial structure to support a taxonomy for Web Observatories (WO

  20. World of Warcraft Avatar History Dataset Yeng-Ting Lee12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    World of Warcraft Avatar History Dataset Yeng-Ting Lee12 , Kuan-Ta Chen2 , Yun-Maw Cheng3 History (WoWAH) dataset, which comprises the records of 91, 065 avatars. The data includes the avatars on the Internet. In [26], it is reported that over 55% of Internet users are also online Permission to make

  1. New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adzic, Radoslav

    1998-08-01

    A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- srpported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

  2. The Delphion Integrated View Get Now: PDF | More choices... Tools: Add to Work File: Create new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tessler, Nir

    and More about this company Published / Filed: 2000-01-27 / 1999-07-14 Application Number: WO1999GB0002263 actions Get Now: Family Legal Status Report Designated Country: AE AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BY CA CH CN Family: Show 17 known family members Description Expand description + OPTICAL DEVICES This invention

  3. review of: A Companion to Linear B: Mycenaean Greek Texts and Their World, edited by Yves Duhous and Anna Morporgo Davies, Louvain & Dudley MA: Peeters 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    2009-10-01

    n A e A n Gr e e k te x t s A n d th e i r Wo r L d . Vo L . 1 edited by yves duhOux and anna MORPuRgO davies. PP. xi + 448, figs. 96, tables 5. PeeteRs, lOuvain and dudley, Mass. 2008. 55. isbn 078-90-42-1848-1 (PaPeR). This volume has nine... n A e A n Gr e e k te x t s A n d th e i r Wo r L d . Vo L . 1 edited by yves duhOux and anna MORPuRgO davies. PP. xi + 448, figs. 96, tables 5. PeeteRs, lOuvain and dudley, Mass. 2008. 55. isbn 078-90-42-1848-1 (PaPeR). This volume has nine...

  4. ARRIVING AT A COMMON GROUND: JOHN REED SWANTON AND AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSanti, Brady James

    2012-08-31

    am grateful to have worked with him throughout this process. I am fortunate to have Dr. Kelton as a friend and look forward to future collabor ations with him. , aP PoVW JraWeIXO Wo P\\ oWher FoPPiWWee PePEerV FoXnVeO anG reFoPPenGaWionV during my...WriEXWionV. His meticulous research, which included scouring archives along with field work, provides a EoG\\ oI ZorN inGiVSenVaEOe WoGa\\. SZanWonV reVearFh methods anticipated ethnohistory, using an interdisciplinary approach to culture. And while not exempt...

  5. Investigation of Glass Transition Temperature of Binary Tellurite Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chippy, L.; Unnithan, C. Harikuttan [Solid State Physics Laboratory, D.B. College, Sasthamcotta, Kollam, Kerala-690 521 (India); Jayakumar, S. [MSM College, Kayamkulam, Kerala (India)

    2011-10-20

    Five series of binary Tellurite glass samples containing Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4}, WO{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O and ZnO{sub 2} are studied in terms of the variation of glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). It is seen that Tg increases as Tellurite concentration decreases in the case of glasses containing metal oxides Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4} WO{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} while T{sub g} shows a decreasing trend with that of Na{sub 2}O and ZnO and the corresponding changes in the network structure are accounted to possible extent. The structural variations are analyzed using the concept of electronegativity.

  6. How We Achieved a 41% Energy Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    ~ ENERGY REDUCTION Malcom E. Maze Abbott Labo~ato~ies No~th Chicago, IL ABSTRACT Abbott Labo~ato~ies is a wo~ldwide company devoted to the discove~, development, manufactu~e and sale of a b~oad and dive~sified line of human health ca~e p...~ato~ies is a wo~ldwide health ca~e company with 1984 sales in excess of $3.1 billion. Abbott employs some 34,000 people in 28 domestic and 44 inte~ational locations. ou~ ene~gy conse~vation p~og~am was sta~ted in 1973 du~ing the A~ab oil emba...

  7. DOE ZERH Case Study: Evolutionary Home Builders, The Adaptation Home, Geneva, IL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the cold climate that got a HERS 30 without PV, with 2x8 24 on center walls with blown fiberglass and 4 polysio rigid foam; basement with 2 XPS interior, 4 under slab, 4 exterior of foundation wall; vented attic with R-100 blown cellulose; wo air-to-air heat pumps SEER 14.1; HSPF 9.6; heat pump water heater.

  8. DOE ZERH Case Study: Dwell Development, Reclaimed Modern, Seattle, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the cold climate that got a HERS 30 without PV, with 2x8 24 on center walls with blown fiberglass and 4 polysio rigid foam; basement with 2 XPS interior, 4 under slab, 4 exterior of foundation wall; vented attic with R-100 blown cellulose; wo air-to-air heat pumps SEER 14.1; HSPF 9.6; heat pump water heater.

  9. Calculation of Nox Emissions Reductions from Energy Efficient Residential Building Construction in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.

    2004-01-01

    severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. This paper provides an overview of the procedures that have been developed and used to calculate the electricity savings and NOx reductions from code-compliant residential construction in non...,000 ft2 single-family residence. ESL Code Traceable DOE-2 Simulation (Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Renewables) County-wide Electricity Use (w/ and w/o code) E-GRID Database Model For ERCOT, SERC, SPP, and WSCC Regions 1999 Building...

  10. A robust soliton ratchet using combined antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic interlayer couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansell, R.; Lavrijsen, R.; Fernndez-Pacheco, A.; Petit, D. C. M. C.; Lee, J. H.; Koopmans, B.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2015-03-03

    . Values extracted from the experimental data for the coercivities and interlayer couplings show significant variation, which demonstrates the robustness of the soliton propagation. Three-dimensional spintronic devices, with the abil- ity to propagate... (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3672079. 10R. P. Cowburn, Patent WO2012076871A1 (2012). 11D. Petit, R. Mansell, A. Fernandez-Pacheco, J. Lee, and R. Cow- burn, Three-dimensional spintronics, in VLSI: Circuits for Emerging Applications, Devices...

  11. Structure determination of {alpha}-La{sub 6}W{sub 2}O{sub 15}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambrier, M-H.; Ibberson, R.M.; Goutenoire, F.

    2010-06-15

    The structure of the high temperature alpha form of La{sub 6}W{sub 2}O{sub 15} has been determined ab-initio from high temperature laboratory X-ray and neutron time-of-flight data. This tungstate crystallizes in the non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic space group (No. 20) C222{sub 1}, with Z=2, a=12.6250(2) A, b=9.1875(1) A, c=5.9688(1) A. The structure comprises [O{sub 2}La{sub 3}] infinite ribbons and is better described by the structural formula [O{sub 2}La{sub 3}]{sub 2}[WO{sub 5.5}]{sub 2}. Using this description we can understand the strong structural similarity of the present compound with compounds of the general composition BiM{sub 2}AO{sub 6} (M=Cu, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cd, Ca, Pb; A=P, As, V) described as [O{sub 2}M{sub 2}Bi][AO{sub 4}]. The [WO{sub 5.5}] entity implies oxygen disorder in the material. - Graphical abstract: Projection of the polyhedra around the tungsten atom. Atoms labelled in grey are occupied at 50%. Short oxygen-oxygen distances are marked. The polyhedra represents WO{sub 5.5} that is related to the structural unit W{sub 2}O{sub 11} unit. Alpha-La{sub 6}W{sub 2}O{sub 15} could be described as [O{sub 2}La{sub 3}]{sub 2}[WO{sub 5.5}]{sub 2}.

  12. SOME ANALYTIC MODELS OF PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDING PERFORMANCE: A THEORETICAL APPROACH TO THE DESIGN OF ENERGY-CONSERVING BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, David Baird

    2011-01-01

    N f Cf A A P A w A U wo C w Ufo Cf A G A f A p U NfNw q ~= CA A = A f G (1 _ N f ) N R Ufo C f A F = A R N N N f R A Q == A f A N h f A (a s) R N A Ufo a = A f - + C - N f R Table

  13. for LHD Experimental Group and all of Contributors Director General and Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /n=1/1 island separatrix Separatrix (disappeared) Hydrogen pellet Time constant of n(0) decay is 1sec of IDBFormation of IDB Effective Core fueling by pellet injection isEffective Core fueling by pellet injection puff pellet w/o IDB pellet w. IDB E exp(s) E ISS95 Rax=3.75m 0 0.5 1.0 0 10 20 30 Gas puff Pellet (w

  14. ISSN:1369 7021 Elsevier Ltd 2008APRIL 2008 | VOLUME 11 | NUMBER 418 Designer emulsions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowat, Amy C.

    of small drops in another liquid that forms a continuous phase14. Common types of emulsions include oil-in-water (o/w), such as milk, and water in oil (w/o), like butter. They are extremely important for a variety of applications such as macromolecular delivery58, oil recovery9,10, food processing11,12, and hazardous material

  15. The Design of Small Sue Chip Ceramic Dielectric Antenna for Bluetooth Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Seong-Ook

    The Design of Small Sue Chip Ceramic Dielectric Antenna for Bluetooth Application Abstract This pap uls radiation mtalr are formed on bothIhs fDsr of ceramic dicbrlnr (8 x I x 1.5 mm, alumma) nod (WO. SocCzy, vol. II,pp.55-62, 2000 [ 5 ] HFSS.AnroRCom. #12;Fig 3 The rrlum 101s of pmpored ceramic ammna

  16. University of Bath Ashbed Plantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    CLAVERTO N HILL Lake El Sub Sta 2241 Bushey Norwood Sports Training Village 8700 W ard Bdy CLAVERTON HILL Start Track Facility 0019 FW Bushey Norwood Ward Bdy FF FW Path (um) FW FW Bushey Norwood 173.7m BM 174 158.2m LB NO RTH LAN E Wo odla nd Pla ce Wood Hill Place Uplands 1 2 1 Woodhill Mews Lodge WID COM

  17. Development of By-Pass Blending Station System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Barnes, D.; Bunz, K.; Rosenberry, N.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Ambient Temeprature Ra ti o Load Ratio Power Savings Ratio W/O DP Reset Differential Pressure Ratio Power Savings With DP Reset ICEBO 2003, Development of By-pass Blending...

  18. Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 15, 7 June 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Kashish Das

    lbg Go'of]s{df ls/f+t /fO{ x?sf] kj{ r08Lgfr eJo ?kdf ;DkGg eof] . Go'of]s{sf] SjLG; af]/f] a|Lh kfs{ / HofS;g xfO6df ul/ b'O r/0fdf ul/Psf] pSt sfo{s|ddf ljleGg jStfx?n] dGtJo z[esfdgf cfbfg k|bfg k|z+;f kq ljt/0f ug{' ePsf] lyof] . pSt kj... ckmo'P;P sf pkfWoIf ;"o{ tfdf, ls/+ft r'dn' o'P;P sf cWoIf Zofd lnDa', z]kf{ lsb'ssf cWoIf nK;f z]k{f, soflnkmf]lg{ofsf k|ltlglw ;'/]z rfdln, Go'of]s{df /fO{x?sf] r08Lgfr kj{ eJotfsf ;fy ;DkGg Dof;fr';]6;\\ sf xf]d/fh /fO{, Sofgf8fsL k...

  19. Titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition and a process for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A ceramic composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness.

  20. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1992-01-01

    A ceramic composition composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to aobut 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness.

  1. Cationcation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balboni, Enrica [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Burns, Peter C., E-mail: pburns@nd.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} (1), Ag(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), K(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (3), Rb(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3.5} (4), and Cs(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), ?=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), ?=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), ?=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), ?=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), ?=101.661 (4). Compounds 15 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cationcation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 25, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO{sub 6} octahedra. Chains are linked through cationcation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [?1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 C. - Graphical abstract: Chains of uranium and tungsten polyhedra are connected into a three dimensional framework by cationcation interactions occurring between two symmetrically independent uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. Monovalent cations present in channels within the structure can be exchanged by room temperature or mild hydrothermal treatments. The framework of these compounds is robust to cation exchange and heat. (yellow polyhedra=uranium pentagonal bipyramids; blue polyhedra=tungsten octahedral, purple balls=K; yellow balls=Na; grey balls=Tl). - Highlights: Five isostructural uranyl tungstates compounds were synthesized hydrothermally. The structures consist of a chains of uranium and tungstate polyhedral. Chains are connected into a framework by cationcation interactions. Cation exchange does not alter the structural integrity of the compounds. Cation exchange was successful at room temperature and mild hydrothermal conditions.

  2. Electrochromism in sol-gel deposited TiO(sub 2) films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, J.M.; Barczynska, J.; Evans, L.A.; MacDonald, K.A.; Wang, J.; Green, D.C.; Smith, G.B.

    1994-12-31

    Electrochromism in sol-gel deposited TiO{sub 2} films and films containing TiO{sub 2} and WO{sub 3} has been observed. The films are deposited by dip-coating from a precursor containing titanium isopropoxide in ethanol or titanium propoxide in ethanol, and after deposition the films are heat treated to between 250 C and 300 C. The films do not show any signs of crystallinity. However substantial coloration is observed using Li{sup +} ions in a non-aqueous electrolyte, both in pure TiO{sub 2} films and in mixed metal oxide films (WO{sub 3}:TiO{sub 2}), although the voltage required to produce coloration is different in the two cases. Results will be presented detailing the optical switching and charge transport properties of the films during cyclic voltammetry. These results will be used to compare the performance of the TiO{sub 2} films with other electrochromics. The TiO{sub 2} and mixed metal films all color cathodically, and the colored state is a neutral greyish color for TiO{sub 2}, while the bleached state is transparent and colorless. Results on coloration efficiency and the stability under repeated electrochemical cycling will also be presented. The neutral color of the TiO{sub 2} films and mixed-metal films means that electrochromic windows based on TiO{sub 2} may have significant advantages over WO{sub 3}-based windows. A detailed analysis of the optical properties of the colored state of the films will be presented. The dynamics of coloration for these films is also under investigation, and preliminary results will be presented.

  3. Structural, thermal, optical properties and simulation of white light of titanium-tungstate-tellurite glasses doped with dysprosium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jyothi, L. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Upender, G. [Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division, CSIR-CGCRI, Kolkata 700032 (India); Kuladeep, R. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Rao, D. Narayana, E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: CIE coordinate diagram of different concentrations of the Dy{sup 3+}-doped TTWD glasses with coordinates in the white light region. - Highlights: Radiative lifetime of {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level of Dy{sup 3+} ions is longer in the tellurite glass. Quantum efficiency is found to be high. These glasses are suitable materials for generating white light. - Abstract: Structural, thermal, optical properties and simulation of white light of Dy{sup 3+}-doped tellurite glasses of composition TTWD: (75 ? x)TeO{sub 2} ? 10TiO{sub 2} ? 15WO{sub 3} ? xDy{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mol%) were investigated. Raman spectra revealed that the glass contains TeO{sub 4}, TeO{sub 3}, WO{sub 4} and WO{sub 6} units. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were carried out to measure the glass transition temperature of all the glasses. From the optical absorption spectra, luminescence spectra and using the JuddOfelt (JO) analysis, we estimated the radiative transition probabilities, emission cross-sections, branching ratios and radiative lifetimes. The decay curves at lower concentrations are exponential while they show a non-exponential behavior at higher concentrations (?0.5 mol%) due to energy transfer processes. The effective lifetime for the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level decreases with increase in Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration for the glasses under investigation. The non-exponential decay curves could fit well to the InokutiHirayama (IH) model with S = 6, indicating that the nature of interaction responsible for energy transfer is of dipoledipole type. Simulation of white light is examined with varying concentration and the results indicate that these glasses are suitable for white light emitting diode applications.

  4. New experimental limits on the alpha decays of lead isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Beeman; F. Bellini; L. Cardani; N. Casali; S. Di Domizio; E. Fiorini; L. Gironi; S. S. Nagorny; S. Nisi; F. Orio; L. Pattavina; G. Pessina; G. Piperno; S. Pirro; E. Previtali; C. Rusconi; C. Tomei; M. Vignati

    2012-12-12

    For the first time a PbWO4 crystal was grown using ancient Roman lead and it was run as a cryogenic detector. Thanks to the simultaneous and independent read-out of heat and scintillation light, the detector was able to discriminate beta/gamma interactions with respect to alpha particles down to low energies. New more stringent limits on the alpha decays of the lead isotopes are presented. In particular a limit of T_{1/2} > 1.4*10^20 y at a 90% C.L. was evaluated for the alpha decay of 204Pb to 200Hg.

  5. Triadelphia, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergyTrail CanyonsourceRiver Solar |TrexaTri-StateTriWo

  6. Long cycle life solid-state solid polymer electrolyte cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1988-02-02

    This patent describes a rechargeable solid-state lithium conducting solid polymer electrolyte electrochemical cell comprising: a lithium intercalation compound negative electrode selected from the group consisting of: MoO/sub 2/; RuO/sub 2/; WO; OsO/sub 2/; IrO/sub 2/; and Mo1/2V1/2O/sub 2/; a lithium ion conducting solid polymer electrolyte comprising a lithium ion conducting supporting electrolyte complexed with a solid polymer contacting the negative electrode on one side; and a lithium intercalation compound positive electrode contacting the opposite side of the solid polymer electrolyte.

  7. Temperature control of some metallic conductors in the region of the melting point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Arifur

    1961-01-01

    . The central aluminium bracket is a support for the thermocouple. a 1 / a J, ' 10 Vacuum Pump A Welch Duo-seal oil type vacuum pump was used to evacuate the chamber. According to the manufacturers of the pump, it is possible to obtain a pressure... amperes, (with a supply voltage of about 14 volts D. C. ) it was thought suitable to use t'wo 2N512A's in parallel. To overcome the problem of heat dissipation, the final stage transistors were mounted on an I/8" thick aluminium plate 10. 5" x 20...

  8. Rate of isomerization of triethyl phosphite to diethyl ethylphosphonate in the presence of ethyl iodide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zerwekh, Ralph Edwin

    1955-01-01

    - ~ that ths inta~ate waa fpimei. but hag cog a ~ent emistsnos because of its instability et tbs. eomlitions of the zyaetk. en, ; deeense. of- AAmcsovcs ~naive wo0h wi'th this seaotion, it is b'av g zy all ag tba t msas ion i'ollows the oonvse yeopossk bg... 44&Vgf & p C ~'& p. p, w4em 4'mymseA@ Qe. emied hag CM@ OA~ M ~l XCtgAII PKQ ~'4658 p&~84%4@ '4@ CCSt 14'5i@@ ~ WM ~40k QC . 4@+ p4%4QC45 . 9@4%4', 'Lk40 ~g4QS, , ~ 1 . -. , ::. "'-':. =-'. "-:. - -'. , ':, , "; j...

  9. ThousandWorlds Collected Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowakowska, Maggie

    1983-01-01

    squad's equal in other, more familiar specters of white, clacking plasticine. who?! Your death, Jedi, said the shadow to Borcin Jana. It was a noise such as he had not heard in over twenty years. It crashed into his meditation, vi brant and startling..., barely tempered by death and charged with a roaring incredulity that rocked the rogue Jedi despite his concentration. Wo.' How can it be?! Vader snatched at the surge of undisciplined power and was ensnared by its intimacy. Once again, he too...

  10. Volume 72, Numbers 3 & 4 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Nicky Hallett, The Senses in Religious Communities, 1600-1800: Early Modern Convents of Pleasure. Review by elena levy-navarro .................. 206 S u s a n n e Wo o d s , M i l t o n a n d t h e Po e t i c s o f F r e e d o m . Review... the Ancient s : The Fir s t Ita l ian Mythography. Review by catherine gimelli martin ........................................... 264 David Cast, ed. The Ashgate Research Companion to Giorgio Vasari. Review by maureen pelta, moore college of art and design...

  11. A review of "Travels in Africa Persia, and Asia the Great" by Sir Thomas Herbert, edited and with an introduction by John Anthony Butler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aune, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Nicky Hallett, The Senses in Religious Communities, 1600-1800: Early Modern Convents of Pleasure. Review by elena levy-navarro .................. 206 S u s a n n e Wo o d s , M i l t o n a n d t h e Po e t i c s o f F r e e d o m . Review... the Ancient s : The Fir s t Ita l ian Mythography. Review by catherine gimelli martin ........................................... 264 David Cast, ed. The Ashgate Research Companion to Giorgio Vasari. Review by maureen pelta, moore college of art and design...

  12. Feeding Baby Beeves.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, John C.

    1916-01-01

    of calves for the market, or, in other words, the procluction of %aby beef." 2. To compare cotton seed meal, cold-pressed cotton seed, and peanut meal for supplementing a ration composed of ground milo, corn or- . I sorghum silage, and Sudan hap... seed, ground milo, corn silage, and Sudan hajr. There was no trouble whatever in getting then1 on feed. ifter the first few days they were fed a11 the roughage (silage and hay) hev wo~~lil eat, hut the amount of concentrates (cake and milo) wac ~ept...

  13. Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 14, 10 May 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Kashish Das

    |'k cnld:gfbsf pkfWoIf aL/]Gb| ofSy'Dafn] cfk\\mgf] ;d'xsf af/]df hfgsf/L lbPsf lyP . Anushil?Shrestha?in?Qatar Above: Sangarsha Band performing in Doha, Qatar. Left: Pop star Prakash Paudel also perfoms at the same event Photos: Anushil Shrestha... (Drums, Vocal), Nirakar Yaktumba (bass), Manoj KC (Guitar, Keyboard), Sanjay Shrestha (Percussions) and Manose Singh (flute). There is no lack of Nepali fans for this band. But the fact that they play fusion rock, and in recent years fusion jazz...

  14. Thermodynamic stability of recoding RNA pseudoknots and ribosomal frameshifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cannon, Brian Ray

    2013-02-22

    )ou&(opnasd go sa)I&oJd SU(&&aw p() woJ) sJa)aweJed o(weukpowJaqj g a(qadi 9. o si': iioYcz' "lao3c'0 &czo L'9) (eo) ve) &~)0 OL (&0) c & (o o) c ) &o o& c o- To@9 i. eI, R D Z. L9 (9'9) 9'es &9'07 I 'e9 (so) 8oz (c &)ZZI & &)fez &9. 0T'z. cs (L. O) 9...

  15. Effects of dietary silicon on bone characteristics of poultry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plyler, James Edward

    1977-01-01

    with day-old cockerels, eight-week-old turkey poults, and spent hens, to determine the effects of feeding dietary silicon in the form of sodium meta-silicate on bone character- istics. Growth effects were also determined for the cockerels and poults.... In experiments one and, rt:wo, 832 day-old Single Comb White Leghorn cockerel were fed corn-soy chick starter diets at two calcium levels, 0. 42% and 1. 00%. 'Each level was supplemented with 0, 25, 50, 100, or 200 p. p. m. silicon, in the form of sodium meta...

  16. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, E.L.; Marsen, B.; Paluselli, D.; Rocheleau, R.

    2004-11-17

    The scope of this photoelectrochemical hydrogen research project is defined by multijunction photoelectrode concepts for solar-powered water splitting, with the goal of efficient, stable, and economic operation. From an initial selection of several planar photoelectrode designs, the Hybrid Photoelectrode (HPE) has been identified as the most promising candidate technology. This photoelectrode consists of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) junction and a solid-state photovoltaic (PV) junction. Immersed in aqueous electrolyte and exposed to sunlight, these two junctions provide the necessary voltage to split water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. The efficiency of the conversion process is determined by the performance of the PEC- and the PV-junctions and on their spectral match. Based on their stability and cost effectiveness, iron oxide (Fe2O3) and tungsten oxide (WO3) films have been studied and developed as candidate semiconductor materials for the PEC junction (photoanode). High-temperature synthesis methods, as reported for some high-performance metal oxides, have been found incompatible with multijunction device fabrication. A low-temperature reactive sputtering process has been developed instead. In the parameter space investigated so far, the optoelectronic properties of WO3 films were superior to those of Fe2O3 films, which showed high recombination of photo-generated carriers. For the PV-junction, amorphous-silicon-based multijunction devices have been studied. Tandem junctions were preferred over triple junctions for better stability and spectral matching with the PEC junction. Based on a tandem a-SiGe/a-SiGe device and a tungsten trioxide film, a prototype hybrid photoelectrode has been demonstrated at 0.7% solar-to-hydrogen (STH) conversion efficiency. The PEC junction performance has been identified as the most critical element for higher-efficiency devices. Research into sputter-deposited tungsten trioxide films has yielded samples with higher photocurrents of up to 1.3 mA/cm2. An improved a-Si/aSi tandem device has been demonstrated that would provide a better voltage match to the recently improved WO3 films. For a hybrid photoelectrode based on these component devices the projected STH efficiency is 1.3%. For significant efficiency enhancements, metal oxide films with increased optical absorption, thus lower bandgap, are necessary. Initial experiments were successful in lowering the WO3 bandgap by nitrogen doping, from 3.0 eV to 2.1 eV. Optimizing the electronic properties of these compounds, or other reduced-bandgap materials such as Fe2O3, is the most immediate challenge. As the photocurrent levels of the PEC junction are improved, increasing attention will have to be paid to the matching PV junction.

  17. Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K I N G PA

  18. Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K I N G PA6)

  19. Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K I N G

  20. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K I N

  1. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by Area

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K I N2009

  2. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected Crude Streams

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K I N20092009

  3. Douglas, AZ Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  4. Douglas, AZ Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Dollars per Thousand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K ICubic

  5. Douglas, AZ Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Dollars per Thousand

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K ICubicCubic

  6. Douglas, AZ Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K

  7. Dry Natural Gas Estimated Production (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K1,594 22,239

  8. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R K1,594

  9. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  10. Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  11. Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Adjustments (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1-- -- -- --WO R5,098 509

  12. Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Extensions (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  13. Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves New Field Discoveries (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  14. Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  15. Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  16. Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves Sales (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  17. Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  18. Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  19. Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  20. Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  1. Nagaland Renewable Energy Development Agency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. Nagarjuna Hydro Energy Pvt Ltd NHEPL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,MeregNIFE BateriasInternationalNTTEA-030-07-05NaWoTecHydro

  3. Do financial investors destabilize the oil price?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown HallfromObservationsWO R K I

  4. Docker File System Isolation By Darrin Schmitz David Huff Destiny Velasquez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown HallfromObservationsWO R K

  5. Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown HallfromObservationsWO R 29

  6. Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown HallfromObservationsWO R

  7. Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown HallfromObservationsWO R786

  8. Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown HallfromObservationsWO

  9. Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown HallfromObservationsWO63

  10. Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown HallfromObservationsWO63596

  11. Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown HallfromObservationsWO63596

  12. Etching high aspect ratio (110) silicon grooves in CsOH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, S.; Hesketh, P.J.; Macrander, A.T.

    1995-02-01

    In a previous study the authors developed a fabrication process for a single-crystal silicon X-ray analyzer for use at the Advanced Photon Source, a 6 GeV synchrotron accelerator ring under construction at Argonne National Laboratories. The bent silicon crystal will be used as an analyzer to collect and focus a monochromatic beam of X-rays by Bragg reflection with an energy resolution better than 10 meV for the (hhh) planes (H>6) for diffraction near backscattering. The cross-sectional geometry produced by anisotropic etching high aspect ratio (height/width = 115) silicon grooves with CSOH was studied as a function of the solution concentration. At 50 weight percent (w/o) CSOH straight sidewalls are produced, but at 15 and 25 w/o re-entrant tapered profiles are produced. The etch rates are increased in the groove by 25--100% indicating diffusion effects. The etch rate of the surface was in agreement with previous studies of CSOH etching, but unable to predict the dimensional changes in the grooves.

  13. Oxidation kinetics of calcium-doped palladium powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, S.; Kodas, T.T.; Hampden-Smith, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The oxidation kinetics of submicron Ca-containing Pd powders produced by spray pyrolysis were studied in the temperature range 600 to 675 C using thermogravimetric analysis. The oxidation of pure Pd powder had an activation energy of {approximately}230 kJ/mol in the region 27% < oxidation < 70% and 65 kJ/mol for oxidation > 70%. The activation energies for Pd particles containing 0.01 weight percent (w/o) and 0.4 w/o Ca in the region 27% < oxidation < 70% were {approximately}230 kJ/mol and {approximately}50 kJ/mol, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy suggested that the conversion of Pd to Pd{sup II}O (stoichiometric PdO) proceeds from the particle surface into the interior and not homogeneously throughout the particle. The predictions of a variety of models and rate laws (shrinking core, parabolic, cubic, logarithmic, and inverse logarithmic) were compared with the data. The comparison suggested a mechanism in which oxidation of pure Pd proceeds by chemisorption and diffusion of oxygen to form a substoichiometric oxide, followed by the conversion of substoichiometric PdO to Pd{sup II}O. Oxidation of pure Pd is then probably limited by the diffusion of oxygen through the substoichiometric PdO and/or Pd{sup II}O. The addition of Ca increased the oxidation resistance of Pd most likely by inhibiting oxygen diffusion through the metal oxide layers surrounding the Pd.

  14. Cells containing solvated electron lithium negative electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, F.A.; Semkow, K.W.; Sammells, A.F. (Eltron Research, Incorporated, Aurora, IL (US))

    1989-12-01

    Preliminary work performed on a novel solvated electron lithium negative electrode which may have application in either high energy density secondary or reserve battery systems is discussed. The lithium electrode investigated consisted of lithium initially dissolved in liquid ammonia to give a solvated electron solution. Containment of this liquid negative active material from direct contact with a liquid nonaqueous electrolyte present in the cell positive electrode compartment was addressed via the use of a lithium intercalated electronically conducting ceramic membrane of the general composition Li{sub x}WO{sub 2}(0.1{lt}x{lt} 1.0). Secondary electrochemical cells having the general configuration Li,NH{sub 3}/Li{sub x}WO{sub 2}NAE/TiS{sub 2} using nonaqueous electrolytes (NAE) based upon both propylene carbonate and 2Me-THF. Depending upon initial lithium activity in the negative electrode compartments the cell possessed an initial open-circuit potential (OCP 3.44V). Both cells, which were operated at ambient pressure (low temperature) and ambient temperature (high pressure) showed evidence for electrochemical reversibility.

  15. Intern experience at Arkansas Nuclear One Steam Electric Station: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William Bruce, 1953-

    2013-03-13

    FGo- NDGLFOW R)eU)FFWU)e INTERN EXPERIENCE AT ARKANSAS NUCLEAR ONE STEAM ELECTRIC STATION I) T)oFW).iUa XFatWo cf SULLUOM BWDGF (ULLFW IaaWt8Fn O. ot .ofLF O)n Gt)oF)o cf- i t - (ey& tiu . l(FMcFW12 I 7 N T N E l(FMcFW1 l(FMcFW1 (Of rsms ABSTRACT... T)oFW) RVaFWUF)GF Oo IW4O).O. NDGLFOW K)F PoFOM RLFGoWUG PoOoUt) l(Of rsms1 SULLUOM BWDGF (ULLFW6 B2P26 5)U8FW.Uof td (U..tDWUvXtLLOy (2R)e26 EFVO. I * ( 5)U8FW.Uof uiOUWMO) td In8U.tWf utMMUooFF- wW2 gti) w2 XO)nOLL EiU. WFatWo U. O .DW8Ff td...

  16. High sensitivity double beta decay study of 116-Cd and 100-Mo with the BOREXINO Counting Test Facility (CAMEO project)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bellini; B. Caccianiga; M. Chen; F. A. Danevich; M. G. Giammarchi; V. V. Kobychev; B. N. Kropivyansky; E. Meroni; L. Miramonti; A. S. Nikolayko; L. Oberauer; O. A. Ponkratenko; V. I. Tretyak; S. Yu. Zdesenko; Yu. G. Zdesenko

    2000-07-11

    The unique features (super-low background and large sensitive volume) of the CTF and BOREXINO set ups are used in the CAMEO project for a high sensitivity study of 100-Mo and 116-Cd neutrinoless double beta decay. Pilot measurements with 116-Cd and Monte Carlo simulations show that the sensitivity of the CAMEO experiment (in terms of the half-life limit for neutrinoless double beta decay) is (3-5) 10^24 yr with a 1 kg source of 100-Mo (116-Cd, 82-Se, and 150-Nd) and about 10^26 yr with 65 kg of enriched 116-CdWO_4 crystals placed in the liquid scintillator of the CTF. The last value corresponds to a limit on the neutrino mass of less than 0.06 eV. Similarly with 1000 kg of 116-CdWO_4 crystals located in the BOREXINO apparatus the neutrino mass limit can be pushed down to m_nu<0.02 eV.

  17. "!#!#$&%'!)(0#12!#354762358@935#ACB3DFEG93H2!351 IQPSRUTWVYXa`cbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jiawei

    ¨¤o{nw Uo¡n¢wvv£ n¦n@wU@2¨¤¥¨¦§ n¨o¨nª©{mnwm©2 UoU¨ m@« ¤¨oUninn ¤¦w©{©2owv¬¨¨mw©wmumm«tinm @v{v{£¦j{¨®¯¨¨m¨¦v{nm¨¨wª °m©mwo0¤Uw {mn±³²Y´w¨wµµwm¦¨¨nwv{¨¨onwn¨¨nµew o©w@¶¨woCw¨Qv¨¨ª©{eª©{mmn@ªv0@v{v mn¨¨£5wiww{nn{wov·Qo¨vuw¤n¤}{v n¤o ©2n¤¥o¤¨¨'o¤¸w¤wvvninn¨µ±w¹jmn ªuw oom¦o¤h¨¨omwUm@oom¨jvvºiU»i¼i½'m o©w@¶¨wo´¦j¨nUoj¤Dmw2{mnomn

  18. Oscillation and collective conveyor of water-in-oil droplets by microfluidic bolus flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohmura, Takuya; Kamei, Ken-ichiro; Maeda, Yusuke T

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic techniques have been extensively developed to realize micro-total analysis systems in a small chip. For microanalysis, the trapping or arranging of objects in a line is a critical step. Physical effects such as inertial lift force have been utilized so far, however, hydrodynamic interaction in a many body system is yet to be explored despite its relevance to pattern formation. Here, we report water-in-oil (W/O) droplets can be transported with sequential order in the grid of one-dimensional array of another large W/O droplets. As each droplet comes close to an interspace of the large droplet array, while exhibiting persistent back-and-forth motion, it is conveyed at a velocity equal to the droplet array. The droplet also makes asymmetric orbit to and from the large droplet behind, suggesting vortex like stream was involved. We confirm the appearance of closed streamlines, which called bolus flow, in numerical simulation based on lattice Boltzmann method. The existence region of bolus flow account...

  19. Observation of a crossover in kinetic aggregation of Palladium colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ghafari; M. Ranjbar; S. Rouhani

    2014-12-27

    We use field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) to investigate the growth of palladium colloids over the surface of thin films of WO3/glass. The film is prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) at different temperatures. A PdCl2 (aq) droplet is injected on the surface and in the presence of steam hydrogen the droplet is dried through a reduction reaction process. Two distinct aggregation regimes of palladium colloids are observed over the substrates. We argue that the change in aggregation dynamics emerges when the measured water drop Contact Angel (CA) for the WO3/glass thin films passes a certain threshold value, namely CA = 46 degrees, where a crossover in kinetic aggregation of palladium colloids occurs. Our results suggest that the mass fractal dimension of palladium aggregates follows a power-law behavior. The fractal dimension (Df) in the fast aggregation regime, where the measured CA values vary from 27 up to 46 degrees, according to different substrate deposition temperatures, is Df = 1.75 (0.02). This value of Df is in excellent agreement with kinetic aggregation of other colloidal systems in fast aggregation regime. Whereas for the slow aggregation regime, with CA = 58 degrees, the fractal dimension changes abruptly to Df=1.92 (0.03). We have also used a modified Box-Counting method to calculate fractal dimension of gray-level images and observe that the crossover at around CA = 46 degrees remains unchanged.

  20. Electromagnetic calorimeter for the Heavy Photon Search Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Emma

    2014-11-01

    The Heavy Photon Search Experiment (HPS) seeks to detect a hypothesised hidden sector boson, the A', predicted to be produced in dark matter decay or annihilation. Theories suggest that the A' couples weakly to electric charge through kinetic mixing, allowing it, as a result, to decay to Standard Matter (SM) lepton pair, which may explain the electron and positron excess recently observed in cosmic rays. Measuring the lepton pair decay of the A' could lead to indirect detection of dark matter. The HPS experiment is a fixed target experiment that will utilize the electron beam produced at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). The detector set-up includes a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) and an Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECal). The ECal will provide the trigger and detect e+e- pairs and its construction and testing forms the focus of this thesis. The ECal consists of 442 PbWO4} tapered crystals with a length 16cm and a 1.6x1.6cm^2 cross-section, stacked into a rectangular array and are coupled to Large Area APDs and corresponding pre-amplifiers. Supplementary to the ECal is a Light Monitoring System (LMS) consisting of bi-coloured LEDs that will monitor changes in APD gain and crystal transparency due to radiation damage. Before construction of the ECal each of the components were required to be individually tested to determine a number of different characteristics. Irradiation tests were performed on PbWO4 ECal crystals and, as a comparison, one grown by a different manufacturer to determine their radiation hardness. A technique for annealing the radiation damage by optical bleaching, which involves injecting light of various wavelengths into the crystal, was tested using the blue LED from the LMS as a potential candidate. The light yield dependence on temperature was also measured for one of the PbWO4 crystal types. Each APD was individually tested to determine if they functioned correctly and within the requirements of the experiment, then arranged into groups of similar gain at chosen applied voltages, for connection to High Voltage (HV) supplies. Each bi-coloured LED was also tested to determine if they functioned within the specifications of the experiment; including their signal quality at high frequency and their radiation hardness. The HPS crystals were recycled from a previous Jefferson Lab detector, the Inner Calorimeter from CLAS, which needed to be dismantled and reconditioned using various removal and cleaning techniques. The HPS ECal was then constructed in a new formation using a combination of different gluing and construction techniques, and initial functionality tests were performed.

  1. Micro structural studies of PVA doped with metal oxide nanocomposites films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N. B. Rithin [Dept. of Physics, Srinivas School of Engineering, Mangalore-575025, Karnataka (India); Crasta, Vincent, E-mail: vcrasta@yahoo.com; Viju, F. [Dept. of Physics, St. Joseph Engineering College, Vamanjoor, Mangalore-575028, Karnataka (India); Praveen, B. M. [Dept. of Chemistry, Srinivas School of Engineering, Mangalore-575025, Karnataka (India); Shreeprakash, B. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Srinivas School of Engineering, Mangalore-575025, Karnataka (India)

    2014-04-24

    Nanostructured PVA polymer composites are of rapidly growing interest because of their sized-coupled properties. The present article deals with both ZnO and WO{sub 3} embedded in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix using a solvent casting method. These films were characterized using FTIR, XRD, and SEM techniques. The FTIR spectra of the doped PVA shows shift in the bands, which can be understood on the basis of intra/inter molecular hydrogen bonding with the adjacent OH group of PVA. The phase homogeneity and morphology of the polymer composites have been analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The crystal structure and crystallinity of polymer nanocomposites were studied by X-ray diffraction technique (XRD). Thus due to the interaction of dopant and complex formation, the structural repositioning takes place and crystallinity of the nanocomposites decreases.

  2. Digital Doppler radial velocity data compared objectively with digital reflectivity radar data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaver, Thomas Foster

    1980-01-01

    . , few components toward or away from the radar greater than -1 5 m s . However at 3 km and 4 km a def1n1te area of convergence is noted (Figs. 9 and 10). Although neither the ref lect1vity nor radial veloc1ty analyses at th1s time ind1cate any def1... I N 4 N CLI ILI IL O J ILI 6 0 ) Id CC OE IC + ILI IC I Vl ?T T W 0 0 0 LLI 0 Z 4( W 3 C- 7: LLI ri 4 4 I I N 0' 0 \\L III gQ ~ 4 N NZ WO 8 I 4l zj WN ~4I III W I- g I 0 R 0 O. I 0 0 ~ N 0 0 LI 0 0...

  3. Factors involved in the seasonal and geographical regulation of diapause in the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, W. L

    1966-01-01

    LL queT6 Qoqgoo eqg go soAggoexsxto qeqq poalLIuoSsy (/AT) gaesaspueg ~ MoyenoqeT eqg al sTTAseNL TToq qTnye SQTaeaa ~op EmgoegsTges ysasgrgsaoo stot goTp DTqZ, (TgGT) qoV*eLX yus guexLxoyueg gq ps~ocl@gx 48SeT seLC tfgoSDIx4 psesuosfoD yeeealcngeS...JBASJun aqua ahgAJna GQ O'boas -txl Eq yasn ett Esot sag~a asaqo Jo qXog '(gp6y 'pJnJyaqg) 1 SOaaug Qusosagntt at~ BS s Qual"QocX&hua Sqg J- Q-QQSJ'3$g -sss aqua oq S~yuodseJ ~sgtCrCysamrg you Bqy Eq auo queosaynb 8 woJg yeqs'gclScxggsgy sq Uso QDSOQf...

  4. Edge-states ferromagnetism of WS{sub 2} nanosheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huo, Nengjie; Li, Yan; Kang, Jun; Li, Renxiong; Xia, Qinglin; Li, Jingbo

    2014-05-19

    The multilayer WS{sub 2} nanosheets prepared from WO{sub 3} nanowires exhibit strong ferromagnetic behavior with saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) of 0.0058?emu/g and coercive field (H{sub C}) of 92?Oe at room temperature. By decreasing the temperature down to 3?K the H{sub c} is increased up to 1115 Oe, revealing the existence of long-range magnetic ordering. Density functional theory spin-polarized calculations predict that strong ferromagnetic moments in WS{sub 2} nanosheets are attributed to the zigzag edge sulphur S and tungsten W atoms. Our findings also suggest that the WS{sub 2} nanosheets with a high density of edge spins could be used to fabricate spintronics devices, which are circuits utilizing the spin of the electron to process and store information.

  5. Graphene - A rising star in view of scientometrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    We have carried out a scientometric analysis of the literature dealing with graphene, a material which has been identified as a new carbon allotrope. The investigation is based on the CAplus database of Chemical Abstracts Service, the INSPEC database of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Web of Science (WoS) of Thomson Reuters. The time evolution of the publications shows a dramatic increase since 2004 when graphene has been isolated for the first time. The graphene literature has been analyzed with respect to the most productive authors, research organizations, countries of authors, and the leading journals. Furthermore, the time evolution of the major graphene based research topics and the top 10 most productive research organizations with respect to their specific topics have been analyzed and are shown as heat maps. In addition, the graphene research landscape has been established using the analysis tool STN AnaVist. Finally, a brief citation analysis has been performed. The tim...

  6. Accuracy of the Water Vapour Content Measurements in the Atmosphere Using Optical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galkin, V D; Alekseeva, G A; Novikov, V V; Pakhomov, V P

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the accuracy and the errors of water vapour content measurements in the atmosphere using optical methods, especially starphotometer. After the general explanations of the used expressions for the star-magnitude observations of the water vapour absorption in section 3 the absorption model for the water vapour band will be discussed. Sections 4 and 5 give an overview on the technique to determine the model parameters both from spectroscopic laboratory and radiosonde observation data. Finally, the sections 6 and 7 are dealing with the details of the errors; that means errors of observable magnitude, of instrumental extraterrestrial magnitude, of atmospheric extinction determination and of water vapour content determination by radiosonde humidity measurements. The main conclusion is: Because of the high precision of the results the optical methods for water vapour observation are suited to validate and calibrate alternative methods (GPS, LIDAR, MICROWAVE) which are making constant progress wo...

  7. Systems and methods for detecting x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-05-02

    Systems and methods for detecting x-rays are disclosed herein. One or more x-ray-sensitive scintillators can be configured from a plurality of heavy element nano-sized particles and a plastic material, such as polystyrene. As will be explained in greater detail herein, the heavy element nano-sized particles (e.g., PbWO4) can be compounded into the plastic material with at least one dopant that permits the plastic material to scintillate. X-rays interact with the heavy element nano-sized particles to produce electrons that can deposit energy in the x-ray sensitive scintillator, which in turn can produce light.

  8. Hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of long-chain alkanes and polyolefins over metal-promoted anion-modified transition metal oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatesh, Koppampatti R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Hu, Jianli (Cranbury, NJ); Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A method of cracking a feedstock by contacting the feedstock with a metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst in the presence of hydrogen gas. The metal oxide of the catalyst is one or more of ZrO.sub.2, HfO.sub.2, TiO.sub.2 and SnO.sub.2, and the feedstock is principally chains of at least 20 carbon atoms. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of Pt, Ni, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, (Mn & Fe) or mixtures of them present between about 0.2% to about 15% by weight of the catalyst. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of SO.sub.4, WO.sub.3, or mixtures of them present between about 0.5% to about 20% by weight of the catalyst.

  9. Hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of long-chain alkanes and polyolefins over metal-promoted anion-modified transition metal oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatesh, Koppampatti R.; Hu, Jianli; Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving

    1996-12-01

    A method is described for cracking a feedstock by contacting the feedstock with a metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst in the presence of hydrogen gas. The metal oxide of the catalyst is one or more of ZrO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2}, and the feedstock is principally chains of at least 20 carbon atoms. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of Pt, Ni, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, (Mn and Fe) or mixtures of them present between about 0.2% to about 15% by weight of the catalyst. The metal-promoted anion-modified metal oxide catalyst contains one or more of SO{sub 4}, WO{sub 3}, or mixtures of them present between about 0.5% to about 20% by weight of the catalyst.

  10. !#"$%%&'%(0)123465798@! 7 ACB2D2EFBHG IQPRTSCUP9RTSQIVAWRYX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantarini, Nicoletta

    aide ad ai `e h se n w v hV cfs q F6F a&a h ©e se e qadc a sesgdsse t c u q¤ais tg u¤q¤ai mcf!gdsse pit ? t Wo?p ³ gh `e h se w z{X cFs q a Fh edsse h a ! e¨ê c ip@³ sVad gtÐ ?ð ì¹ñ ?¹ò ê ¢w p@³f¬ cfs q a eys F¦h edsse h a ! e?ê ? c p ³ sVad gtÐ p ³w ?yð ìñ ? ¤ ê ? q¤a¤a h

  11. STAG UK Newsletter Issue 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1974-01-01

    Lub in Europe.and in June we lJill ceLebrate our first birthday. WO/.J! what a day we had at the mini con! Has ANYONE Y'ecovcred 'jet?Our house stiLL isn't straight ??? not tn.ar; 'H evel' '(..0 r;r:nyway~ EVeI' had nightmares t,'.u.t if you open the deep... one lJill be. Cor!Give us a break. will yer?There wiLL be another one ??? promi8e8~p1'Omist::o; ?? but not until a./"teY' we've got the Bi{1 one ove r lJi th ! Pooh Dog says Hi!She Loved meeting eve:r'1Jone at t;~e mini con and faithfully promises...

  12. Determination of amino acids by use of the high frequency titrimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, John Warren

    1941-01-01

    )oat& ChamiatI. y By yoha 1agem gqhaacaL Ray lAX ]s+l WKSORLZgQR+I ThO WX'LCdl', 1igh08 40 8XpXISS hi@ 43955IN 40 QL'e fyWo QNL0%1 BIO ligsotc@ thia margxeh, far his suggestions sN aeetetanoo oa thhs ~ada CD4 i1L the VOWi810h Ot th%8 tlhMfSy Xatro4... THE TIVRKQU Oy' DISlSXO 4680 kSXDS Titrationo were yerfomed on the, Cibasio anCuo aside within ths frequency ra@go of 58' to Sdt sisaoyolese The NaxiRQu absorption by the dibasic amino acids occurs within this region, as is shown by the Cata and graph...

  13. Light dark matter in the light of CRESST-II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2012-03-01

    Recently the CRESST collaboration has published the long anticipated results of their direct Dark Matter (DM) detection experiment with a CaWO4 target. The number of observed events exceeds known backgrounds at more than 4? significance, and this excess could potentially be due to DM scattering. We confront this interpretation with null results from other direct detection experiments for a number of theoretical models, and find that consistency is achieved in non-minimal models such as inelastic DM and isospin-violating DM. In both cases mild tension with constraints remain. The CRESST data can, however, not be reconciled with the null results andmorewith the positive signals from DAMA and CoGeNT simultaneously in any of the models we study.less

  14. Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, S.

    1994-06-21

    Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity [>=]10[sup [minus]4] (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1], and preferably [>=]0.01 (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1]. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag[sup +] ions, as in Ag[sub 2]WO[sub 4], or to F[sup [minus

  15. Study of optical properties of Erbium doped Tellurite glass-polymer composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sushama, D., E-mail: sushasukumar@gmail.com [Research Awardee, LAMP, Dept. of Physics, Nit, Calicut, India and Dept. of Physics, M.S.M. College, Kayamkulam, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15

    Chalcogenide glasses have wide applications in optical device technology. But it has some disadvantages like thermal instability. Among them Tellurite glasses exhibits high thermal Stability. Doping of rare earth elements into the Tellurite glasses improve its optical properties. To improve its mechanical properties composites of this Tellurite glasses with polymer are prepared. Bulk samples of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped TeO{sub 2}?WO{sub 3}?La{sub 2}O{sub 3} Tellurite glasses are prepared from high purity oxide mixtures, melting in an alumina crucible in air atmosphere. Composites of this Tellurite glasses with polymer are prepared by powder mixing method and the thin films of these composites are prepared using polymer press. Variations in band gap of these composites are studied from the UV/Vis/NIR absorption.

  16. Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Composite Prepared by Sol-Gel Synthesis and Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2009-02-13

    Energetic composite powders consisting of sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition tested and results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta - WO{sub 3}) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g.cm{sup -3} or 93% relative density. In addition those parts were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus the sample retained its stored chemical energy.

  17. The Heavy Photon Search experiment at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celentano, Andrea [INFN-GENOVA

    2014-11-01

    The Heavy Photon Search experiment (HPS) at Jefferson Laboratory will search for a new U(1) massive gauge boson, or "heavy-photon", mediator of a new fundamental interaction, called "dark-force", that couples to ordinary photons through kinetic mixing. HPS has sensitivity in the mass range 20 MeV 1 GeV and coupling epsilon2 between 10?5 and 10?10. The HPS experiment will look for the e+e? decay of the heavy photon, by resonance search and detached vertexing, in an electron beam fixed target experiment. HPS will use a compact forward spectrometer, which employs silicon microstrip detectors for vertexing and tracking, and a PbWO4 electromagnetic calorimeter for energy measurement and fast triggering.

  18. A study of changes in expressed attitudes in the realm of Negro-White relations of Texas A. & M. freshmen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketch, Clarence Willard

    1955-01-01

    'Irrcu~Ce Q t9 g o o e +v wo Nct 0 bled 5 o'0 Bio m a e & ~ R'0 Act 0 8'0 n gb oe v vm V vg e 3L' Experimental: Church A Church B Church C Church D Church E Total Experimental Total Control 49 27 7 -- 15 13 2 1 -- 10 34 6 8 1 1 - 6... not on the questionnaire given the respondents. LIBRARY A A m COLLEGE OF TEXAS HOW WOULD YOU REACT TV THE POLLOWINO: (1ndioate by entering an x 1n the proper space) I" M + P Pyj 51ii ~5 5mIN l, 2 ~ 3 ~ $ ~ 6. 7 ~ 8 ~ 9. 10, 12 ' 1$ 14. The attempt...

  19. STAG UK Newsletter Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,ospccially where ld.,; bulovod engines are involved. In fact,hc is tho only person DboG1rcl who con tear the captmn off a strip or two m1il got away 'Ii th it. He is intens81y loyal to Kirk and the Enterprise. ECCOY /SCOTT. SCOTT!tWCOY. Scotty and HCC0Y...OD.cliinc ??? peaco ond 10vc fur all living things ..... . J LGK CLAY'l'ON: Spvck beine; in love ~Ii th Kirk ??? That' s stupicl and ridieulvus! Let's keep tho star Trek Party CloM,plenso! It's Science ~'ictivn quo. fnr o.wo.y plncos in deep spo.ce we...

  20. An intern experience at Texas A&M University and Texas A&M Research Foundation: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Blanc, Joseph Urlan, 1937-

    2013-03-13

    fe r in the College o f Geosciences. A t abou t the same time I app lied and was g ra n te d adm ission to bo th the G raduate College and Docto r o f E n g in ee r in g P rog ram in the E ng in ee r in g Co l? lege. I sub sequen... th a n ks to my two able a ss is ta n ts , M rs . J. Pate and M rs . S. H e r r ig , f o r wo rd p ro ce ss in g se rv ices and o th e r a dm in is t ra t iv e fu n c t io n s . Many th a n k s o f app re c ia t io n are also in o...

  1. Negative Thermal Expansion in ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}: Mechanisms, Rigid Unit Modes, and Neutron Total Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Matthew G. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Keen, David A. [Physics Department, Oxford University, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Wells, Stephen A. [Biological Physics, Bateman Physical Sciences Building, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Evans, John S.O. [Department of Chemistry, University Science Laboratories, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-16

    The local structure of the low-temperature ordered phase of the negative thermal expansion (NTE) material ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} has been investigated by reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling of neutron total scattering data. We obtain, for the first time, quantitative measurements of the extent to which the WO{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 6} polyhedra move as rigid units, and we show that these values are consistent with the predictions of rigid unit mode theory. We suggest that rigid unit modes are associated with the NTE. Our results do not support a recent interpretation of x-ray-absorption fine structure spectroscopy data in terms of a larger rigid structural component involving the Zr-O-W linkage.

  2. Results on light dark matter particles with a low-threshold CRESST-II detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angloher, G; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Defay, X; Erb, A; Feilitzsch, F v; Iachellini, N Ferreiro; Gorla, P; Gtlein, A; Hauff, D; Jochum, J; Kiefer, M; Kluck, H; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J C; Loebell, J; Mnster, A; Pagliarone, C; Petricca, F; Potzel, W; Prbst, F; Reindl, F; Schffner, K; Schieck, J; Schnert, S; Seidel, W; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Strauss, R; Tanzke, A; Thi, H H Trinh; Trko?lu, C; Uffinger, M; Ulrich, A; Usherov, I; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Wstrich, M; Zller, A

    2015-01-01

    The CRESST-II experiment uses cryogenic detectors to search for nuclear recoil events induced by the elastic scattering of dark matter particles in CaWO$_4$ crystals. Given the low energy threshold of our detectors in combination with light target nuclei, low mass dark matter particles can be probed with high sensitivity. In this letter we present the results from data of a single detector module corresponding to 52 kg live days. A blind analysis is carried out. With an energy threshold for nuclear recoils of 307 eV we substantially enhance the sensitivity for light dark matter. Thereby, we extend the reach of direct dark matter experiments to the sub-region and demonstrate that the energy threshold is the key parameter in the search for low mass dark matter particles.

  3. Studies on the amino acid requirements of horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Word, James Dewey

    1968-01-01

    in nzking digestib 1 il messur. . ? nw nts . R conf & y new ts ci;nf u. . ", hav ' b:r c ", s; ec . Ror creme] 4 inh L?!ii 1 iiy a iu grain portions of rice !io se rarrio i inl'o a si ngl? nc . "lr r wo?1r! hrilp assurri mrore occurs! e cn& n&tg 1.... l her cxLI Bc? was Itn&i i'i r: gr!8 1 &lc lr& tlir';c. '1 . ?Lid I'ac& c&il, Ti'ie i:a L . or I. 's, . ' v i appal \\ i&'L!)' 1 a, Le + '&r ! !ie p !! .teri rati n, bu' rate of. 6 in s:iri ef f icieiir y of fe c utiliza- Lier& were r&nt sf ic ted...

  4. The use of fecal nitrogen as an indicator of dietary protein content in white-tailed deer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascorro, Paul Eugene

    1982-01-01

    organic matter ( Table 1) nor acid-insoluble ash ( cable 2) in feed and Ol 4 OI Ql I cCI ~O O 0 Vi C" 0 IQ 'O QI IQ 0 Qt 4 0 0 Ol CI CO CTI I CO CO CO CII CO + 0 I 'U Ql C: 4 Ql a C: 4 Ql -II IQ E I 0 CO 0 0 d' rl' M d...' Ol CA Ql R G '0 IQ 0 Ql IH '0 I r0 QI '0 '0 IQ ~O C4 U QI '0 g QI Ql S Qt a 0 Ql I4 Ql I C3 Ql '0 D QI 0 0 '0 QI QI 0, QI 0 '0 QI H Ql "0 '0 Ql C Ql C4 Wo Ig Vl 4 I 0 P' &U 0 0 0 0 IO I Pl 0...

  5. The influence of worm age, duration of exposure and endpoint selection on bioassay sensitivity for Neanthes arenaceodentata (Annelida: Polychaeta)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridges, T.S. [Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Waterways Experiment Station; Farrar, J.D. [AScI Corp., Vicksburg, MS (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The influence of worm age, duration of exposure, and endpoint selection on bioassay sensitivity were evaluated for Neanthes arenaceodentata. Worms were exposed to contaminated sediment collected from Black Rock Harbor (BRH) near Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA. This sediment was diluted with clean control sediment to result in five experimental treatments: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% BRH. Three exposure scenarios were employed: (1) a 4-week exposure beginning with newly emerged juveniles (EJ-4w), (2) a 7-week exposure beginning with newly emerged juveniles (EJ-7w), and (3) a 4-week exposure beginning with 3-week-old juveniles (3WO-4w). Six measures of worm size were recorded at the conclusion of each exposure to evaluate differences among measurement endpoints. Survival was significantly reduced at the 25% BRH level for the EJ-7w scenario and at the 100% BRH level for the EJ-4w and 3WO-4w scenarios. Growth was significantly reduced at the 25% BRH level in each exposure scenario. Estimates based on the calculated minimum detectable difference indicated that considerably lower concentrations of BRH (6--10%) should be distinguishable by measuring effects on Neanthes growth. Worm size measured in terms of projected area, dry weight, and ash-free dry weight provided the most sensitive measures of effects. Increasing the length of exposure from 4 to 7 weeks and initiating exposures with emergent juveniles rather than 3-week-old worms increased the sensitivity of the bioassay. The results of this study demonstrate that N. arenacedentata is sensitive to the presence of sediment-associated contaminants and that test animal age, duration of exposure, and choice of endpoint can have a large effect on the magnitude of the toxic response observed.

  6. Soft x-ray free-electron laser induced damage to inorganic scintillators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burian, Tom; Hjkov, V?ra; Chalupsk, Jaromr; Vyn, Lud?k; Boh?ek, Pavel; P?e?ek, Martin; Wild, Jan; zkan, Cigdem; Coppola, Nicola; Farahani, Shafagh Dastjani; et al

    2015-01-07

    An irreversible response of inorganic scintillators to intense soft x-ray laser radiation was investigated at the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) facility. Three ionic crystals, namely, Ce:YAG (cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet), PbWO4 (lead tungstate), and ZnO (zinc oxide), were exposed to single 4.6 nm ultra-short laser pulses of variable pulse energy (up to 12 ?J) under normal incidence conditions with tight focus. Damaged areas produced with various levels of pulse fluences, were analyzed on the surface of irradiated samples using differential interference contrast (DIC) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effective beam area of 22.2 2.2 ?m2 was determinedmoreby means of the ablation imprints method with the use of poly(methyl methacrylate) - PMMA. Applied to the three inorganic materials, this procedure gave almost the same values of an effective area. The single-shot damage threshold fluence was determined for each of these inorganic materials. The Ce:YAG sample seems to be the most radiation resistant under the given irradiation conditions, its damage threshold was determined to be as high as 660.8 71.2 mJ/cm2. Contrary to that, the PbWO4 sample exhibited the lowest radiation resistance with a threshold fluence of 62.6 11.9 mJ/cm2. The threshold for ZnO was found to be 167.8 30.8 mJ/cm2. Both interaction and material characteristics responsible for the damage threshold difference are discussed in the article.less

  7. MULTIFUNCTIONAL (NOx/CO/O2) SOLID-STATE SENSORS FOR COAL COMBUSTION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2005-03-21

    Sensing properties of a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}- and WO{sub 3}-based potentiometric NO{sub x} sensor were investigated both in N{sub 2} and in a simulated exhaust gas. We performed temperature programmed reaction (TPR) and desorption (TPD) experiments to determine the reaction and adsorption characteristics of O{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and their mixtures on the electrodes, and related the results to sensor performance. The relative responses of the La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}-based sensor under varied concentrations of NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were studied. The results showed a very high sensitivity to CO and NO{sub 2} at 450 C in 3% O{sub 2}, whereas the response to O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases was negligible. The NO response at 400-500 C agreed with the NO adsorption behavior. The high NO{sub 2} sensitivity at 450 C was probably related to heterogeneous catalytic activity of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The adsorption of NO was not affected by the change of O{sub 2} concentration and thus the sensor showed selective detection of NO over O{sub 2}. However, the NO sensitivity was strongly influenced by the existence of CO, H{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}, as the adsorption behavior of NO was influenced by these gases. The WO{sub 3}-based sensor was able to selectively detect NO in the presence of CO{sub 2} in 3% O{sub 2} and at 650 C. The NO sensitivity, however, was affected by the variation of the NO{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2}O concentration. No gas-solid reactions were observed using TPR in the NO containing gas mixture, indicating that the NO response was not obtained by the conventionally accepted mixed-potential mechanism. At the same condition the sensor had high sensitivity to {approx}10 ppm NO{sub 2} and selectivity in the presence of CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O, showing it to be applicable to the monitoring of NO{sub 2}. Significantly different sensing properties of NO in simulated exhaust gas suggested the occurrence of gas composition change by the gas-phase and gas-solid reactions, and strong adsorption of water on the electrodes. The NO{sub 2} sensitivity in simulated exhaust gas was modified by O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, but not by CO and CO{sub 2}. A positive voltage response was obtained for NO{sub 2} but negative for NO at 650 C with the n-type semiconducting WO{sub 3}-based sensor. In contrast the opposite response direction for NO{sub x} was observed at 450 C with the La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} (p-type semiconductor).

  8. Assessment of Possible Cycle Lengths for Fully Encapsulated Microstructure fueled light water reactor Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sonat Sen; Michael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu

    2013-02-01

    The use of TRISO-particle-based dispersion fuel within SiC matrix and cladding materials has the potential to allow the design of extremely safe LWRs with failure-proof fuel. This paper examines the feasibility of LWR-like cycle length for such fuel with the imposed constraint of strictly retaining the original geometry of the fuel pins and assemblies. The motivation for retaining the original geometry is to provide the ability to incorporate the fuel as-is into existing LWRs while retaining their thermalhydraulic characteristics. Another mandatory constraint is use of low enriched uranium (at or below 20 w/o). The feasibility of using this fuel is assessed by looking at two factors: cycle lengths and fuel material failure rates. Other considerations (e.g., safety parameters such as reactivity coefficients, feedback, etc.) were not considered at this stage of the study. The study includes the examination of increases in the TRISO kernel sizes without changing the thickness of any of the coating layers. In addition, cases where the buffer layer thickness is allowed to vary are also considered. The study shows that a nave use of UO2 (even up to 20 w/o enrichment) results in cycle lengths too short to be practical for existing LWR designs and operational demands. Increasing fissile inventory within the fuel compacts shows that acceptable cycle lengths can be achieved. The increase of fissile inventory can be accomplished through multiple means, including higher particle packing fraction, higher enrichment, larger fuel kernel sizes, and the use of higher density fuels (that contain a higher number of U atoms per unit volume). In this study, starting with the recognized highest packing fraction practically achievable (44%), combinations of the other means have been evaluated. The models demonstrate cycle lengths comparable to those of ordinary LWRs. As expected, TRISO particles with extremely large kernels are shown to fail under all considered scenarios. In contrast, the designs that do not depart too drastically from those of the nominal NGNP HTR fuel TRISO particles are shown to perform satisfactorily and display a high rates of survival under all considered scenarios.

  9. Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juntao Wu

    2008-03-14

    This report summarizes work to develop a novel distributed fiber-optic micro-sensor that is capable of detecting common fossil fuel gases in harsh environments. During the 32-month research and development (R&D) program, GE Global Research successfully synthesized sensing materials using two techniques: sol-gel based fiber surface coating and magnetron sputtering based fiber micro-sensor integration. Palladium nanocrystalline embedded silica matrix material (nc-Pd/Silica), nanocrystalline palladium oxides (nc-PdO{sub x}) and palladium alloy (nc-PdAuN{sub 1}), and nanocrystalline tungsten (nc-WO{sub x}) sensing materials were identified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen; while the palladium doped and un-doped nanocrystalline tin oxide (nc-PdSnO{sub 2} and nc-SnO{sub 2}) materials were verified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to carbon monoxide. The fiber micro-sensor comprises an apodized long-period grating in a single-mode fiber, and the fiber grating cladding surface was functionalized by above sensing materials with a typical thickness ranging from a few tens of nanometers to a few hundred nanometers. GE found that the morphologies of such sensing nanomaterials are either nanoparticle film or nanoporous film with a typical size distribution from 5-10 nanometers. nc-PdO{sub x} and alloy sensing materials were found to be highly sensitive to hydrogen gas within the temperature range from ambient to 150 C, while nc-Pd/Silica and nc-WO{sub x} sensing materials were found to be suitable to be operated from 150 C to 500 C for hydrogen gas detection. The palladium doped and un-doped nc-SnO{sub 2} materials also demonstrated sensitivity to carbon monoxide gas at approximately 500 C. The prototyped fiber gas sensing system developed in this R&D program is based on wavelength-division-multiplexing technology in which each fiber sensor is identified according to its transmission spectra features within the guiding mode and cladding modes. The interaction between the sensing material and fossil fuel gas results in a refractive index change and optical absorption in the sensing layer. This induces mode coupling strength and boundary conditions changes and thereby shifts the central wavelengths of the guiding mode and cladding modes propagation. GE's experiments demonstrated that such an interaction between the fossil fuel gas and sensing material not only shifts the central wavelengths of the guide mode and cladding modes propagation, but also alters their power loss characteristics. The integrated fiber gas sensing system includes multiple fiber gas sensors, fiber Bragg grating-based temperature sensors, fiber optical interrogator, and signal processing software.

  10. Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensors by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-12-01

    Since the industrial revolution, detection and monitoring of toxic matter, chemical wastes, and air pollutants has become an important environmental issue. Thus, it leads to the development of chemical sensors for various environmental applications. The recent disastrous oil spills over the near-surface of ocean due to the offshore drilling emphasize the use of chemical sensors for prevention and monitoring of the processes that might lead to these mishaps.1, 2 Chemical sensors operated on a simple principle that the sensing platform undergoes a detectable change when exposed to the target substance to be sensed. Among all the types of chemical sensors, solid state gas sensors have attracted a great deal of attention due to their advantages such as high sensitivity, greater selectivity, portability, high stability and low cost.3, 4 Especially, semiconducting metal oxides such as SnO2, TiO2, and WO3 have been widely used as the active sensing platforms in solid state gas sensors.5 For the enhanced properties of solid state gas sensors, finding new sensing materials or development of existing materials will be needed. Thus, nanostructured materials such as nanotubes,6-8 nanowires,9-11 nanorods,12-15 nanobelts,16, 17 and nano-scale thin films18-23 have been synthesized and studied for chemical sensing applications.

  11. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown N. R.; Brown,N.R.; Baek,J.S; Hanson, A.L.; Cuadra,A.; Cheng,L.Y.; Diamond, D.J.

    2013-03-31

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. . The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). In addition, a summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented.

  12. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N. R.; Brown, N. R.; Baek, J. S; Hanson, A. L.; Cuadra, A.; Cheng, L. Y.; Diamond, D. J.

    2014-04-30

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-Enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size-Plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). A summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented. Fuel element tolerance assumptions and hot channel factors used in the safety analysis are also given.

  13. Structure, depositional environment, and pressure characteristics of the Vicksburg formation: Javelina and East McCook fields, Hidalgo County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, John Olcott

    1984-01-01

    seM L La& Z-L?q LeM ueqasa[M aq& uaqM ' L!0 L laqS gno-w~eg e uo wna Lougad Esca Lg Eq pa~anoos ip see p La ib oloogoW Wse3 '0/6 [ 'qsn6n[f us 'adage [ sueaE uaag~nog (2 a LqeJ. ) Eep/33W 00[K Jog OLL' pues ?X?5unqsoloin ua~o [ aqua ?(w 6[OS o...62) 1k OSL6 wouy a6ueu uo[qM sqgdap ~e (?2? 0+ ?6? ) sauoqspues 6unqsqo lh ua~ol u i sunooo 'uaAamoq ' uo igonpoud (w 2LSV) 4k 000'9 l "a" o o'4 (w 068 l) 1k 0029 wo"4 q&dap a5ueu eave qoogoW gse3/eu[[anep aug ui sauogspues 6unqsqv[n 'a1esuapuo...

  14. Coyote-prey interactions on an intensively managed south Texas ranch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Gary Scott

    1988-01-01

    'sexaI 'fiquncg syTag wT(' uc pageoog 'ea~ qoJeasaH eqtdo) e) eq f60'l aqZ uo gg6i fiyn(' qSnoJqZ yS6( aunp woJg paxonpuoo seA& qoJeasag V3HV I((flIS PRECIPITATION IN CM CD l Dl CD 3 cD CD CD CD C p ~ CD Cl Dl O CD ~ Cn 4 O 0 3 CD C... Ch 'O CD O CD cn O 2 CD CD O O CJ D CD Cn CD ID CD 0 O T 0 n 0 0 0 D N 0 0 Z 0 CC 3 V 0 Il 0 0 IO n N 0 0 0 0 0 0 CL 0 CI 0 a~om r(ggeTgueZsqng 9S6 ( 'SuTunp auTT-souse Zsanqqnos aqq Suoge sseoueo go pasodsTp aneq o...

  15. Transcriptional and functional studies of Human Endogenous Retrovirus envelope EnvP(b) and EnvV genes in human trophoblasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Amandine, E-mail: amandine.vargas@voila.fr; Thiery, Maxime, E-mail: thiery.maxime@courrier.uqam.ca; Lafond, Julie, E-mail: lafond.julie@uqam.ca; Barbeau, Benoit, E-mail: barbeau.benoit@uqam.ca

    2012-03-30

    HERV (Human Endogenous Retrovirus)-encoded envelope proteins are implicated in the development of the placenta. Indeed, Syncytin-1 and -2 play a crucial role in the fusion of human trophoblasts, a key step in placentation. Other studies have identified two other HERV env proteins, namely EnvP(b) and EnvV, both expressed in the placenta. In this study, we have fully characterized both env transcripts and their expression pattern and have assessed their implication in trophoblast fusion. Through RACE analyses, standard spliced transcripts were detected, while EnvV transcripts demonstrated alternative splicing at its 3 Prime end. Promoter activity and expression of both genes were induced in forskolin-stimulated BeWo cells and in primary trophoblasts. Although we have confirmed the fusogenic activity of EnvP(b), overexpression or silencing experiments revealed no impact of this protein on trophoblast fusion. Our results demonstrate that both env genes are expressed in human trophoblasts but are not required for syncytialization.

  16. Long-cycle-life solid-state solid-polymer electrolyte cells. Final report. Report on Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.; Semkow, K.W.; Cook, R.L.

    1986-07-01

    Experimental work was directed toward determining the viability of two complementary solid-state electrochemical cells incorporating Na/sup +/ and Li/sup +/ conducting solid polymer electrolytes (SPE). SPEs used included those based upon poly(ethylene oxide), poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(ethylene glycol) mixtures, and polyphosphazenes. For Li/sup +/ conducting SPEs, LixWO/sub 2/ was used for the negative and TiS/sub 2/ for the positive electrode. In cells utilizing Na+ conducting SPEs, homogeneous matrix electrodes based upon transition-metal-doped B'-alumina were used for the positive and negative electrodes. Here transition metals were incorporated into immobile A1/sup 3 +/ lattice sites within the B'-alumina structure, where changed in electrochemical potential upon cell charge/discharge cycling occurred via redox electrochemistry involving the doped immobile transition-metal species. Secondary cells were found to have respective open-circuit potentials of 2.2 and 1.5V, high electrochemical reversibility, and theoretical energy densities of 175 and 178 Wh/kg.

  17. Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 2, 13-18 October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Kashish Das

    ]v]s} sf/ 0fn] g]kfnsf s]xL dxTjk"0f{ klqsfn] ;/ sf/L k|jQmf 6+s 9sfnsf] 7f8f] cfb]zsf] e/df ;/sf/L cfly{s gfsfaGbLsf] ;fdgf ug'{ k/]sf] 5. oltdfq x}g klqsf jlu{s/ 0fdf ;d]t slxNo} g;f]lrPsf] lg0f{o ePsf] 5 . :d/0f /xf]; g]kfndf s v / u ju... sfnsf] df}lvs cfb]zsf] e/df cfly{s gfsfjGbLsf] ;fdgf ul//x]sf klqsfx?df b]zfGt/, ljdz{, xfFs, k|sfz, ;fF3' / a'waf/ ;fKtflxs /x]sf 5g\\ . pQm :j]R5frf/L lg0f{osf lj?2 kqsf/x? cfGbf]ngdf plqP/ k|]z sfplG;nsf cWoIf dfyj/ l;+x a:g]tn] t'?Gt /fh...

  18. Temperature threshold for nanorod structuring of metal and oxide films grown by glancing angle deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deniz, Derya; Lad, Robert J.

    2011-01-15

    Thin films of tin (Sn), aluminum (Al), gold (Au), ruthenium (Ru), tungsten (W), ruthenium dioxide (RuO{sub 2}), tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}), and tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) were grown by glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to determine the nanostructuring temperature threshold, {Theta}{sub T}, above which adatom surface diffusion becomes large enough such that nanorod morphology is no longer formed during growth. The threshold was found to be lower in metals compared to oxides. Films were grown using both dc and pulsed dc magnetron sputtering with continuous substrate rotation over the temperature range from 291 to 866 K. Film morphologies, structures, and compositions were characterized by high resolution scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Films were also grown in a conventional configuration for comparison. For elemental metals, nanorod structuring occurs for films with melting points higher than that of Al (933 K) when grown at room temperature with a rotation rate of {approx}5 rpm, corresponding to a value of {Theta}{sub T}{approx_equal}0.33{+-}0.01. For the oxide films, a value of {Theta}{sub T}{approx_equal}0.5 was found, above which GLAD nanorod structuring does not occur. The existence of a nanostructuring temperature threshold in both metal and oxide GLAD films can be attributed to greater adatom mobilities as temperature is increased resulting in nonkinetically limited film nucleation and growth processes.

  19. Theoretical study of collinear optical frequency comb generation under multi-wave, transient stimulated Raman scattering in crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smetanin, S N [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    Using mathematical modelling we have studied the conditions of low-threshold collinear optical frequency comb generation under transient (picosecond) stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and parametric four-wave coupling of SRS components in crystals. It is shown that Raman-parametric generation of an octave-spanning optical frequency comb occurs most effectively under intermediate, transient SRS at a pump pulse duration exceeding the dephasing time by five-to-twenty times. We have found the optimal values of not only the laser pump pulse duration, but also of the Raman crystal lengths corresponding to highly efficient generation of an optical frequency comb from the second anti-Stokes to the fourth Stokes Raman components. For the KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} (high dispersion) and Ba(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (low dispersion) crystals pumped at a wavelength of 1.064 ?m and a pulse duration five or more times greater than the dephasing time, the optimum length of the crystal was 0.3 and 0.6 cm, respectively, which is consistent with the condition of the most effective Stokes anti-Stokes coupling ?kL ? 15, where ?k is the wave detuning from phase matching of Stokes anti-Stokes coupling, determined by the refractive index dispersion of the SRS medium. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  20. Structure and Bonding of Tungsten Oxide Clusters on Nanostructured Cu-O Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Margareta; Surnev, Svetlozar; Ramsey, Michael; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Negreiros, Fabio R.; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Netzer, Falko P.

    2011-12-01

    (WO3)3 gas-phase clusters generated via vacuum sublimation are deposited under UHV and low temperature (5 K) conditions on a Cu(110) 'stripe' phase consisting of alternating Cu-O (2x1) and clean Cu regions. STM imaging shows that the clusters adsorb as intact units on both substrates, and the suggested adsorption geometries are confirmed by density-functional (DF) simulations. On the clean surface the overall distortion is minor and we are able to image the nodal structure of an individual molecular orbital in the STM at low bias, whereas on the Cu-O surface both the clusters and the substrate are significantly distorted, due to the strong oxygen affinity of W atoms. On both surfaces cluster and Cu electronic states are appreciably mixed, and electron charge is donated by the surface to the cluster. The experimentally STS-determined DOS signature of the adsorption complex consists in two peaks across the Fermi energy and is well reproduced by the DF calculations.

  1. Wireless sensor systems for sense/decide/act/communicate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Nina M.; Cushner, Adam; Baker, James A.; Davis, Jesse Zehring; Stark, Douglas P.; Ko, Teresa H.; Kyker, Ronald D.; Stinnett, Regan White; Pate, Ronald C.; Van Dyke, Colin; Kyckelhahn, Brian

    2003-12-01

    After 9/11, the United States (U.S.) was suddenly pushed into challenging situations they could no longer ignore as simple spectators. The War on Terrorism (WoT) was suddenly ignited and no one knows when this war will end. While the government is exploring many existing and potential technologies, the area of wireless Sensor networks (WSN) has emerged as a foundation for establish future national security. Unlike other technologies, WSN could provide virtual presence capabilities needed for precision awareness and response in military, intelligence, and homeland security applications. The Advance Concept Group (ACG) vision of Sense/Decide/Act/Communicate (SDAC) sensor system is an instantiation of the WSN concept that takes a 'systems of systems' view. Each sensing nodes will exhibit the ability to: Sense the environment around them, Decide as a collective what the situation of their environment is, Act in an intelligent and coordinated manner in response to this situational determination, and Communicate their actions amongst each other and to a human command. This LDRD report provides a review of the research and development done to bring the SDAC vision closer to reality.

  2. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1996-08-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 {+-} 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO{sub 4} at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. Studies on the effect of added LiNO{sub 3} or Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF{sub 6} content of WF{sub 6} gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF{sub 6}.

  3. Ultra-stable Molecule-Surface Architectures at Metal Oxides: Structure, Bonding, and Electron-transfer Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamers, Robert John

    2013-12-07

    Research funded by this project focused on the development of improved strategies for functionalization of metal oxides to enhance charge?transfer processes relevant to solar energy conversion. Initial studies included Fe2O3, WO3, TiO2, SnO2, and ZnO as model oxide systems; these systems were chosen due to differences in metal oxidation state and chemical bonding types in these oxides. Later studies focused largely on SnO2 and ZnO, as these materials show particularly promising surface chemistry, have high electron mobility, and can be readily grown in both spherical nanoparticles and as elongated nanorods. New molecules were synthesized that allowed the direct chemical assembly of novel nanoparticle ?dyadic? structures in which two different oxide materials are chemically joined, leading to an interface that enhances the separation of of charge upon illumination. We demonstrated that such junctions enhance photocatalytic efficiency using model organic compounds. A separate effort focused on novel approaches to linking dye molecules to SnO2 and ZnO as a way to enhance solar conversion efficiency. A novel type of surface binding through

  4. Interactions between drops of molten Al-Li alloys and liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyder, M.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Nelson, L.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Duda, P.M.; Hyndman, D.A. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, at the request of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), studied the interactions between single drops of molten aluminum-lithium alloys and water. Most experiments were performed with ``B`` alloy (3.1 w/o Li, balance A1). Objectives were to develop experimental procedures for preparing and delivering the melt drops and diagnostics for characterizing the interactions, measure hydrogen generated by the reaction between melt and water, examine debris recovered after the interaction, determine changes in the aqueous phase produced by the melt-water chemical reactions, and determine whether steam explosions occur spontaneously under the conditions studied. Although many H{sub 2} bubbles were generated after the drops entered the water, spontaneous steam explosions never occurred when globules of the ``B`` alloy at temperatures between 700 and 1000C fell freely through water at room temperature, or upon or during subsequent contact with submerged aluminum or stainless steel surfaces. Total amounts of H{sub 2} (STP) increased from about 2 to 9 cm{sup 3}/per gram of melt as initial melt temperature increased over this range of temperatures.

  5. X-rays from the oxygen-type Wolf-Rayet binary WR30a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhekov, S A

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of XMM-Newton X-ray data of WR30a (WO+O), a close massive binary that harbours an oxygen-rich Wolf-Rayet star. Its spectrum is characterized by the presence of two well-separated broad peaks, or `bumps', one peaking at energies between 1 and 2 keV and the other between 5 and 7 keV. A two-component model is required to match the observed spectrum. The higher energy spectral peak is considerably more absorbed and dominates the X-ray luminosity. For the currently accepted distance of 7.77 kpc, the X-ray luminosity of WR30a is L_X > 10^{34} erg s^{-1}, making it one of the most X-ray luminous WR+O binary amongst those in the Galaxy with orbital periods less than ~20 d. The X-ray spectrum can be acceptably fitted using either thermal or nonthermal models, so the X-ray production mechanism is yet unclear.

  6. MULTIFUNCTIONAL (NOx/CO/O2) SOLID-STATE SENSORS FOR COAL COMBUSTION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2005-05-29

    We have made great progress in both developing solid state sensors for coal combustion control and understanding the mechanism by which they operate. We have fabricated and tested numerous sensors and identified the role electrode microstructure plays in sensor response. We have developed both p-type (La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}) and n-type (WO{sub 3}) semiconducting NO{sub x} sensing electrodes. We have demonstrated their respective sensing behavior (sensitivities and cross-sensitivities), related this behavior to their gas adsorption/desorption behavior and catalytic activity, and in so doing verified that our proposed Differential Electrode Equilibria is a more comprehensive sensing mechanism. These investigations and their results are summarized below. The composition and microstructure of the sensing electrode is the key parameters that influence the sensing performance. We investigated the effect of electrode microstructure on the NO{sub x} sensitivity and response time using a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}-based potentiometric sensor. Temperature dependence, cross-sensitivity and selectivities of a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}- and WO{sub 3}-based potentiometric NO{sub x} sensor were investigated both in N{sub 2} and in a simulated exhaust gas. We performed temperature programmed reaction (TPR) and desorption (TPD) experiments to determine the reaction and adsorption characteristics of O{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and their mixtures on the electrodes, and related the results to sensor performance. In order to optimize the sensor electrode microstructure, powders were prepared using four different powder synthesis routes, resulting in different particle size distributions and BET surface areas. Different sintering conditions were also applied. The microstructure of electrodes, synthesized with the same composition, has a dramatic effect on both sensitivity and response time of potentiometric NO sensors, showing that large surface areas generate a porous morphology with smaller grain size, and that smaller grain size results in a sharper response and faster response time. The relative responses of the La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}-based sensor under varied concentrations of NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were studied. The results showed a very high sensitivity to NO, CO, and NO{sub 2} at 450 C in 3% O{sub 2}, whereas the response to O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases was negligible. The NO response at 400-500 C agreed with the NO adsorption behavior. The high NO{sub 2} sensitivity at 450 C was probably related to heterogeneous catalytic activity of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The adsorption of NO was not affected by the change of O{sub 2} concentration and thus the sensor showed selective detection of NO over O{sub 2}. However, the NO sensitivity was strongly influenced by the existence of CO, H{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}, as the adsorption behavior of NO was influenced by these gases. The WO{sub 3}-based sensor was able to selectively detect NO in the presence of CO{sub 2} in 3% O{sub 2} at 650 C. The NO sensitivity, however, was affected by the variation of the NO{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2}O concentration. No gas-solid reactions were observed using TPR in the NO-containing gas mixture, indicating that the NO response was not obtained by the conventionally accepted mixed-potential mechanism. At the same condition, the sensor had high sensitivity to {approx}10 ppm NO{sub 2} and selectivity in the presence of CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O, showing it to be applicable to the monitoring of NO{sub 2}. A lot different sensing properties of NO in simulated exhaust gas suggested the occurrence of gas composition change by the gas-phase and gas-solid reactions, and strong adsorption of water on the electrodes. The NO{sub 2} sensitivity in simulated exhaust gas was modified by O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, but not by CO and CO{sub 2}. A positive voltage response was obtained for NO{sub 2}, but negative for NO at 650 C with the n-type semiconducting WO{sub 3}-based sensor. In contrast, the opposite response direction for NO{sub x} was observed at 450 C with t

  7. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Yiping

    2014-12-05

    In this entire project period from 2005-2014, we have made significant progress in developing novel nanostructures of metal oxides (MOs) for solar hydrogen generation based on photoelectrochemical (PEC). Materials investigated are focused on 1D and 0D MO nanostructures of TiO2, WO3, ZnO, and Fe2O3 in conjunction with quantum dot (QD) sensitization and chemical doping (N or H) to alter their electronic band structures for both visible light absorption and for facilitating interfacial charge transport. In addition, we have used plasmonic metal nanostructures to enhance the PEC performance by improving light absorption of QDs via enhanced scattering of the plamonic metal. Most importantly, we have discovered a multipronged strategy for improving PEC performance: using plasmonic metal nanostructure to enhance light absorption, QDs to improve charge transfer, and chemical doping to increase charge transport in metal oxides for PEC. The combination is critical for overall high efficiency of PEC. This strategy is developed and demonstrated for the first time to our best knowledge.

  8. TREKisM Issue 56

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1988-01-01

    '?~-~ / \\ ADMIRAL 1{JE'lR ALN10ST OUT Of HOT tJll{ 1tVD (9tl~- 'PRo8J..E:M5/VO-rHINq Bur FkOB~ /"'cfY/5. jP6CI(/HflT HftT )sN), ~J"/ GOINq 10 LJOR.I< 61HeR" \\, 13 Crossword BY Lynn Mostafa ACROSS CLUES 2. Kruge 27. Pon Farr 3. Chekov's "Wessel" 29. Beauty IIke...OuR 6Cl Ii5) Bur 1iMr Hfff 15r/r qOltVq 10 (JOfwo S(01i~J)ItSN0 r. w'm lht4fd1' "~",sl~ _~I- 4...

  9. Blue diode-pumped solid-state-laser based on ytterbium doped laser crystals operating on the resonance zero-phonon transition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Marshall, Christopher D. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The invention provides an efficient, compact means of generating blue laser light at a wavelength near .about.493+/-3 nm, based on the use of a laser diode-pumped Yb-doped laser crystal emitting on its zero phonon line (ZPL) resonance transition at a wavelength near .about.986+/-6 nm, whose fundamental infrared output radiation is harmonically doubled into the blue spectral region. The invention is applied to the excitation of biofluorescent dyes (in the .about.490-496 nm spectral region) utilized in flow cytometry, immunoassay, DNA sequencing, and other biofluorescence instruments. The preferred host crystals have strong ZPL fluorecence (laser) transitions lying in the spectral range from .about.980 to .about.992 nm (so that when frequency-doubled, they produce output radiation in the spectral range from 490 to 496 nm). Alternate preferred Yb doped tungstate crystals, such as Yb:KY(WO.sub.4).sub.2, may be configured to lase on the resonant ZPL transition near 981 nm (in lieu of the normal 1025 nm transition). The laser light is then doubled in the blue at 490.5 nm.

  10. Sunlight-Driven Hydrogen Formation by Membrane-Supported Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Nathan S.

    2014-03-26

    This report describes the significant advances in the development of the polymer-supported photoelectrochemical water-splitting system that was proposed under DOE grant number DE-FG02-05ER15754. We developed Si microwire-array photoelectrodes, demonstrated control over the material and light-absorption properties of the microwire-array photoelectrodes, developed inexpensive processes for synthesizing the arrays, and doped the arrays p-type for use as photocathodes. We also developed techniques for depositing metal-nanoparticle catalysts of the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) on the wire arrays, investigated the stability and catalytic performance of the nanoparticles, and demonstrated that Ni-Mo alloys are promising earth-abundant catalysts of the HER. We also developed methods that allow reuse of the single-crystalline Si substrates used for microwire growth and methods of embedding the microwire photocathodes in plastic to enable large-scale processing and deployment of the technology. Furthermore we developed techniques for controlling the structure of WO3 films, and demonstrated that structural control can improve the quantum yield of photoanodes. Thus, by the conclusion of this project, we demonstrated significant advances in the development of all components of a sunlight-driven membrane-supported photoelectrochemical water-splitting system. This final report provides descriptions of some of the scientific accomplishments that were achieved under the support of this project and also provides references to the peer-reviewed publications that resulted from this effort.

  11. Development of a 5 kW Prototype Coal-Based Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Steven S.C.; Mirzababaei, Jelvehnaz; Rismanchian, Azadeh

    2014-01-20

    The University of Akron Fuel Cell Laboratory pioneered the development of a laboratory scale coal-based fuel cell, which allows the direct use of high sulfur content coal as fuel. The initial research and coal fuel cell technology development (Coal-based Fuel Cell, S. S. C. Chuang, PCT Int. Appl. 2006, i.e., European Patent Application, 35 pp. CODEN: PIXXD2 WO 2006028502 A2 20060316) have demonstrated that it is feasible to electrochemically oxidize carbon to CO2, producing electricity. The key innovative concept of this coal-based fuel cell technology is that carbon in coal can be converted through an electrochemical oxidation reaction into manageable carbon dioxide, efficiently generating electricity without involving coal gasification, reforming, and water-gas shift reaction. This study has demonstrated that electrochemical oxidation of carbon can take place on the Ni anode surface and the CO and CO2 product produced can further react with carbon to initiate the secondary reaction. A carbon injection system was developed to inject the solid fuel without bringing air into the anode chamber; a fuel cell stack was developed and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of the fuel cell stack. Further improvement of anode catalyst activity and durability is needed to bring this novel coal fuel cell to a highly efficient, super clean, multi-use electric generation technology, which promises to provide low cost electricity by expanding the utilization of U.S. coal supplies and relieving our dependence on foreign oil.

  12. Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon (9 S 706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

  13. Facile synthesis of MoS{sub 2} and Mo{sub x}W{sub 1-x}S{sub 2} triangular monolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhong; Thee, Michael T.; Elas, Ana Laura; Feng, Simin; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Perea-Lpez, Nstor; Carozo, Victor [Department of Physics and Center for 2Dimensional and Layered Materials, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Zhou, Chanjing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Terrones, Humberto [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 122180 (United States); Terrones, Mauricio, E-mail: mut11@psu.edu [Department of Physics and Center for 2Dimensional and Layered Materials, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Single- and few-layered transition metal dichalcogenides, such as MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2}, are emerging two-dimensional materials exhibiting numerous and unusual physico-chemical properties that could be advantageous in the fabrication of unprecedented optoelectronic devices. Here we report a novel and alternative route to synthesize triangular monocrystals of MoS{sub 2} and Mo{sub x}W{sub 1-x}S{sub 2} by annealing MoS{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} precursors, respectively, in the presence of sulfur vapor. In particular, the Mo{sub x}W{sub 1-x}S{sub 2} triangular monolayers show gradual concentration profiles of W and Mo whereby Mo concentrates in the islands center and W is more abundant on the outskirts of the triangular monocrystals. These observations were confirmed by atomic force microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, as well as Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The presence of tunable PL signals depending on the Mo{sub x}W{sub 1-x}S{sub 2} stoichiometries in 2D monocrystals opens up a wide range of applications in electronics and optoelectronics.

  14. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01

    Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25 diameter and 4.875 tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25 diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70F ( 5F) and 50% ( 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the cans falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 ?m and 20 ?m were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition ( lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

  15. The structure of the carbon black flame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, W. Kermi

    1945-01-01

    nvd1yS w.w, w. U w . ' jomvR ?Wdp jomvR ?Wdp jomvR ?Wdp w.'F w.U3F w.U*w w.U*O w.U*C w.U8O w.UCw w.Fw w..U3F w.U38 w.U8U w.U8* w.0wO w.'w ' w.*F w.U8w w.U8F w.'w ' w.'wO w.0w* w.'Uw U.ww w.U8C w.UCF w.'w0 w.'w0 w.'w8 w.'U3 U.'F w.UCw w.UCw w.0w0... w.'w0 w.'Uw w.'UO U.Fw w.UCw w.UCF w.'w0 w.'wF w.'U0 w.'w8 U.*F w.UC3 w.UC8 w.'wO w.'wF w.'UO w.0U8 ' .ww w.UC3 w.UC3 w.'w ' w .'w8 w.'UF w.0U8 '.'F w .UC8 w.UC3 w.'w ' w.'wO w.'U8 w.0U8 ' .Fw w.'wO w.'w3 w.'w8 w.0w3 w.'UC w.' 'U EO *w w.'w8 w...

  16. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. First quarterly report, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Yi Hua

    1997-05-01

    The Mn-W-Na/SiO{sub 2} catalyst was studied by running the methane coupling reactions at different methane to oxygen ratios, temperatures and dilution gas flow rates. For methane to oxygen ratios less than 3, the C{sub 2} yield was almost the same; and C{sub 2} yield began to decrease as the methane to oxygen ratio was further increased. The optimal temperature observed was around 800{degrees}C, where the C{sub 2} yield reached a maximum value. Increasing the dilution gas (helium) flow rate resulted in higher C{sub 2} selectivity; however, after a certain dilution gas flow rate the C{sub 2} yield began to decrease due to a decrease in methane conversion as a result of the reduced contact time. The stability study of the catalyst showed that, after five successive run cycles, the C{sub 2} yield obtained decreased from 24% to 19% at 780 {degrees}C, and methane, oxygen and helium flow rates of 12.2, 4.1, and 44. 3 mm/min, respectively. XRD analysis showed that, after the reaction, the XRD peaks of the cristabolite and Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} phases in the catalyst became smaller than those in the fresh catalyst, and that at least one new, unidentified phase was observed. Mn-W-Na/SiO{sub 2} catalyst was used as the methane oxidative coupling catalyst in a porous membrane reactor and its performance was compared with a packed reactor operated at similar conditions. Although the membrane reactor showed lower methane conversion at the same reaction conditions, it gave higher C{sub 2} selectivity and C{sub 2} yield at similar methane conversions.

  17. ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE CYCLE LENGTHS FOR FULLY-CERAMIC MICRO-ENCAPSULATED FUEL-BASED LIGHT WATER REACTOR CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sonat Sen; Michael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Kemal Pasamehmetoglu; Francesco Venneri

    2012-04-01

    The use of TRISO-particle-based dispersion fuel within SiC matrix and cladding materials has the potential to allow the design of extremely safe LWRs with failure-proof fuel. This paper examines the feasibility of LWR-like cycle length for such a low enriched uranium fuel with the imposed constraint of strictly retaining the original geometry of the fuel pins and assemblies. The motivation for retaining the original geometry is to provide the ability to incorporate the fuel 'as-is' into existing LWRs while retaining their thermal-hydraulic characteristics. The feasibility of using this fuel is assessed by looking at cycle lengths and fuel failure rates. Other considerations (e.g., safety parameters, etc.) were not considered at this stage of the study. The study includes the examination of different TRISO kernel diameters without changing the coating layer thicknesses. The study shows that a naive use of UO{sub 2} results in cycle lengths too short to be practical for existing LWR designs and operational demands. Increasing fissile inventory within the fuel compacts shows that acceptable cycle lengths can be achieved. In this study, starting with the recognized highest packing fraction practically achievable (44%), higher enrichment, larger fuel kernel sizes, and the use of higher density fuels have been evaluated. The models demonstrate cycle lengths comparable to those of ordinary LWRs. As expected, TRISO particles with extremely large kernels are shown to fail under all considered scenarios. In contrast, the designs that do not depart too drastically from those of the nominal NGNP HTR fuel TRISO particles are shown to perform satisfactorily and display a high rates of survival under all considered scenarios. Finally, it is recognized that relaxing the geometry constraint will result in satisfactory cycle lengths even using UO{sub 2}-loaded TRISO particles-based fuel with enrichment at or below 20 w/o.

  18. Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4}/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for novel bifunctional photocatalyst: One-pot synthesis, magnetically recyclable and enhanced photocatalytic property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jinxue; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Xiao Zhou, Xiaoyu; Hou, Wanguo

    2013-09-15

    Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4}/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composites were prepared for application of novel bifunctional photocatalyst via simple one-pot hydrothermal method, employing graphene oxide (GO), Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}, FeSO{sub 4} and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as the precursors. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) results indicate that the well-dispersed Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of RGO sheets homogeneously. Magnetic characterization reveals that Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4}/RGO show ferromagnetic behaviors. So this novel bifunctional photocatalyst could achieve magnetic separation and collection with the aid of external magnet. The composites exhibit enhanced photocatalytic performance on degradation of methyl orange (MO) compared with pure Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4} under low-power ultraviolet light irradiation due to the introduction of RGO. Moreover, this hybrid catalyst possesses long-term excellent photocatalytic performance due to its good thermal stability. This bifunctional photocatalyst, which combines magnetic property and excellent photocatalytic activity, would be a perfect candidate in applications of catalytic elimination of environmental pollutants and other areas. - Graphical abstract: Magnetically recyclable Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4}/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites with enhanced photocatalytic property Display Omitted - Highlights: ?Fe{sub 2.25}W{sub 0.75}O{sub 4} growth, deposition and GO reduction occurred simultaneously. ?Composite possessed ferromagnetic and enhanced photocatalytic properties. ?Composite is utilized as a magnetically separable and high-efficient photocatalyst. ?Photocatalyst showed good photocatalytic and thermal stability during cyclic use.

  19. Study of new states in visible light active W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sajjad, Ahmed Khan Leghari; Shamaila, Sajjad; Zhang, Jinlong

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Visible light efficient W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalysts are prepared by solgel. ? Oxygen vacancies are detected in the form of new linkages as N-Ti-O, N-W-O, Ti-O-N and W-O-N. ? W, N co-doped titania has new energy states which narrows the band gap effectively. ? Oxygen vacancies are proved to be the cause for high photo catalytic activity. ? W and N co-doping plays the major role to make the composite thermally stable. -- Abstract: The visible light efficient W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalysts are prepared by solgel method. New linkages of N, W and O are formed as N-Ti-O, N-W-O, Ti-O-N and W-O-N. Electron paramagnetic resonance illustrates the presence of oxygen vacancies in W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} acting as trapping agencies for electrons to produce active species. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of new energy states. New linkages and oxygen vacancies are proved to be the main cause for the improved photo catalytic performances. W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} has new energy states which narrow the band gap effectively. W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} is thermally stable and retains its anatase phase up to 900 C. 4.5% W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} showed superior activity for the degradation of Rhodamine B and 2,4-dichlorophenol as compared to pure titania, Degussa P-25, traditional N-doped TiO{sub 2} and pure WO{sub 3}.

  20. Low severity upgrading of F-T waxes with solid superacids. Quarterly report, June 1, 1993--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1993-12-01

    During the last quarter isomerization and hydrocracking of n-hexadecane were carried out in a continuous flow fixed bed reactor described in a previous report. Test runs showed that the temperature and pressure in this reactor can be controlled to within {+-} 1 C and {+-} 2 psig, respectively. The reaction conditions were 160 C and 350 psig constant hydrogen pressure. Interestingly, product distribution from isomerization and hydrocracking of n-hexadecane conducted in this reactor is similar to that obtained from the microreactor experiments. The long-term stability of the Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst was studied using this fixed bed reactor with n-hexadecane as a feedstock. Evidence was obtained that, in the presence of H{sub 2}, the Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst maintains its activity for as long as 96 hours with no evidence of deactivation. The effect of addition of transition metals on the activity of ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} was compared. Pt and Pd greatly enhanced the hydrotreating activity of ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4}. The activities of Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4}, Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/MoO{sub 4} and Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/WO{sub 4} catalysts were also compared; it was found that the Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst gave highest activity in isomerization and hydrocracking of long-chain paraffins. The authors also found that, even at high severity conditions, i.e., 300 C/600 psig and 250 C/1,200 psig, the Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst is active.

  1. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul G.; McKenzie, Bonnie B.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and significant plastic deformation during compressi on . On the other hand, the micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited brittle f racture in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 3um Al 2 O 3 particles fractured into pieces without observable plastic deformation in compression. Particle deformation behaviors will be used to inform Al 2 O 3 coating deposition parameters and particle - particle bonding in the consolidated Al 2 O 3 coatings.

  2. Design of a boiling water reactor equilibrium core using thorium-uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francois, J-L.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2004-10-06

    In this paper the design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium is presented; a heterogeneous blanket-seed core arrangement concept was adopted. The design was developed in three steps: in the first step two different assemblies were designed based on the integrated blanket-seed concept, they are the blanket-dummy assembly and the blanket-seed assembly. The integrated blanketseed concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned-out in a once-through cycle. In the second step, a core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the assembly. In the third step an in-house code was developed to evaluate the thorium equilibrium core under transient conditions. A stability analysis was also performed. Regarding the stability analysis, five operational states were analyzed; four of them define the traditional instability region corner of the power-flow map and the fifth one is the operational state for the full power condition. The frequency and the boiling length were calculated for each operational state. The frequency of the analyzed operational states was similar to that reported for BWRs; these are close to the unstable region that occurs due to the density wave oscillation phenomena in some nuclear power plants. Four transient analyses were also performed: manual SCRAM, recirculation pumps trip, main steam isolation valves closure and loss of feed water. The results of these transients are similar to those obtained with the traditional UO2 nuclear fuel.

  3. RELAP5-3D Restart and Backup Verification Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. George L Mesina

    2013-09-01

    Existing testing methodology for RELAP5-3D employs a set of test cases collected over two decades to test a variety of code features and run on a Linux or Windows platform. However, this set has numerous deficiencies in terms of code coverage, detail of comparison, running time, and testing fidelity of RELAP5-3D restart and backup capabilities. The test suite covers less than three quarters of the lines of code in the relap directory and just over half those in the environmental library. Even in terms of code features, many are not covered. Moreover, the test set runs many problems long past the point necessary to test the relevant features. It requires standard problems to run to completion. This is unnecessary for features can be tested in a short-running problem. For example, many trips and controls can be tested in the first few time steps, as can a number of fluid flow options. The testing system is also inaccurate. For the past decade, the diffem script has been the primary tool for checking that printouts from two different RELAP5-3D executables agree. This tool compares two output files to verify that all characters are the same except for those relating to date, time and a few other excluded items. The variable values printed on the output file are accurate to no more than eight decimal places. Therefore, calculations with errors in decimal places beyond those printed remain undetected. Finally, fidelity of restart is not tested except in the PVM sub-suite and backup is not specifically tested at all. When a restart is made from any midway point of the base-case transient, the restart must produce the same values. When a backup condition occurs, the code repeats advancements with the same time step. A perfect backup can be tested by forcing RELAP5 to perform a backup by falsely setting a backup condition flag at a user-specified-time. Comparison of the calculations of that run and those produced by the same input w/o the spurious condition should be identical. Backup testing is more difficult the other kinds of testing described above because it requires additional coding to implement. The testing system constructed and described in this document resolves all of these issues. A matrix of test features and short-running cases that exercise them is presented. A small information file that contains sufficient data to verify calculations to the last decimal place and bit is produced. This testing system is used to test base cases (called null testing) as well as restart and backup cases. The programming that implements these new capabilities is presented.

  4. Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor for Low Cost Bulk Production of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong

    2011-12-01

    INL developed a bench scale modular hybrid plasma system for gas phase nanomaterials synthesis. The system was being optimized for WO3 nanoparticles production and scale model projection to a 300 kW pilot system. During the course of technology development many modifications had been done to the system to resolve technical issues that had surfaced and also to improve the performance. All project tasks had been completed except 2 optimization subtasks. These 2 subtasks, a 4-hour and an 8-hour continuous powder production runs at 1 lb/hr powder feeding rate, were unable to complete due to technical issues developed with the reactor system. The 4-hour run had been attempted twice and both times the run was terminated prematurely. The modular electrode for the plasma system was significantly redesigned to address the technical issues. Fabrication of the redesigned modular electrodes and additional components had been completed at the end of the project life. However, not enough resource was available to perform tests to evaluate the performance of the new modifications. More development work would be needed to resolve these problems prior to scaling. The technology demonstrated a surprising capability of synthesizing a single phase of meta-stable delta-Al2O3 from pure alpha-phase large Al2O3 powder. The formation of delta-Al2O3 was surprising because this phase is meta-stable and only formed between 973-1073 K, and delta-Al2O3 is very difficult to synthesize as a single phase. Besides the specific temperature window to form this phase, this meta-stable phase may have been stabilized by nanoparticle size formed in a high temperature plasma process. This technology may possess the capability to produce unusual meta-stable nanophase materials that would be otherwise difficult to produce by conventional methods. A 300 kW INL modular hybrid plasma pilot scale model reactor had been projected using the experimental data from PPG Industries 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. The projected size of the INL 300 kW pilot model reactor would be about 15% that of the PPG 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. Including the safety net factor the projected INL pilot reactor size would be 25-30% of the PPG 300 kW hot wall plasma pilot reactor. Due to the modularity of the INL plasma reactor and the energy cascading effect from the upstream plasma to the downstream plasma the energy utilization is more efficient in material processing. It is envisioning that the material through put range for the INL pilot reactor would be comparable to the PPG 300 kW pilot reactor but the energy consumption would be lower. The INL hybrid plasma technology is rather close to being optimized for scaling to a pilot system. More near term development work is still needed to complete the process optimization before pilot scaling.

  5. Advanced Automotive Fuels Research, Development, and Commercialization Cluster (OH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linkous, Clovis; Hripko, Michael; Abraham, Martin; Balendiran, Ganesaratnam; Hunter, Allen; Lovelace-Cameron, Sherri; Mette, Howard; Price, Douglas; Walker, Gary; Wang, Ruigang

    2013-08-31

    Technical aspects of producing alternative fuels that may eventually supplement or replace conventional the petroleum-derived fuels that are presently used in vehicular transportation have been investigated. The work was centered around three projects: 1) deriving butanol as a fuel additive from bacterial action on sugars produced from decomposition of aqueous suspensions of wood cellulose under elevated temperature and pressure; 2) using highly ordered, openly structured molecules known as metal-organic framework (MOF) compounds as adsorbents for gas separations in fuel processing operations; and 3) developing a photocatalytic membrane for solar-driven water decomposition to generate pure hydrogen fuel. Several departments within the STEM College at YSU contributed to the effort: Chemistry, Biology, and Chemical Engineering. In the butanol project, sawdust was blended with water at variable pH and temperature (150 250{degrees}C), and heated inside a pressure vessel for specified periods of time. Analysis of the extracts showed a wide variety of compounds, including simple sugars that bacteria are known to thrive upon. Samples of the cellulose hydrolysate were fed to colonies of Clostridium beijerinckii, which are known to convert sugars to a mixture of compounds, principally butanol. While the bacteria were active toward additions of pure sugar solutions, the cellulose extract appeared to inhibit butanol production, and furthermore encouraged the Clostridium to become dormant. Proteomic analysis showed that the bacteria had changed their genetic code to where it was becoming sporulated, i.e., the bacteria were trying to go dormant. This finding may be an opportunity, as it may be possible to genetically engineer bacteria that resist the butanol-driven triggering mechanism to stop further fuel production. Another way of handling the cellulosic hydrolysates was to simply add the enzymes responsible for butanol synthesis to the hydrolytic extract ex-vivo. These enzymes are generally not available commercially, however, and those that are can be quite expensive. Accordingly, the genes responsible for enzyme synthesis were inserted into other microorganisms in order to accelerate enzyme production. This was demonstrated for two of the required enzymes in the overall series. In the MOF project, a number of new MOF compounds were synthesized and characterized, as well as some common MOFs well-known for their adsorption properties. Selectivity for specific gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} was demonstrated, although it was seen that water vapor would frequently act as an interferent. This work underscored the need to test MOF compounds under real world conditions, i.e., room temperature and above instead of liquid N{sub 2} temperature, and testing adsorption using blends of gases instead of pure components. In the solar membrane project, thin films of CdTe and WO{sub 3} were applied to steel substrates and used as p-type and n-type semiconductors, respectively, in the production of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. Testing with {sup 2}H and {sup 18}O isotopically labeled water enabled substantiation of net water-splitting.

  6. Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Walsh; Giang Tong; Neeles Bhopatkar; Thomas Gale; George Blankenship; Conrad Ingram; Selasi Blavo Tesfamariam Mehreteab; Victor Banjoko; Yohannes Ghirmazion; Heng Ban; April Sibley

    2009-09-14

    Laboratory measurements of mercury oxidation during selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide, simulation of pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash, and synthesis of new materials for simultaneous oxidation and adsorption of mercury, were performed in support of the development of technology for control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers and furnaces. Conversion of gas-phase mercury from the elemental state to water-soluble oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) enables removal of mercury during wet flue gas desulfurization. The increase in mercury oxidation in a monolithic V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalyst with increasing HCl at low levels of HCl (< 10 ppmv) and decrease in mercury oxidation with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio during SCR were consistent with results of previous work by others. The most significant finding of the present work was the inhibition of mercury oxidation in the presence of CO during SCR of NO at low levels of HCl. In the presence of 2 ppmv HCl, expected in combustion products from some Powder River Basin coals, an increase in CO from 0 to 50 ppmv reduced the extent of mercury oxidation from 24 {+-} 3 to 1 {+-} 4%. Further increase in CO to 100 ppmv completely suppressed mercury oxidation. In the presence of 11-12 ppmv HCl, increasing CO from 0 to {approx}120 ppmv reduced mercury oxidation from {approx}70% to 50%. Conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate also decreased with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio, but the effects of HCl and CO in flue gas on SO{sub 2} oxidation were unclear. Oxidation and adsorption of mercury by unburned carbon and fly ash enables mercury removal in a particulate control device. A chemical kinetic mechanism consisting of nine homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions for mercury oxidation and removal was developed to interpret pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash in experiments at pilot scale, burning bituminous coals (Gale, 2006) and blends of bituminous coals with Powder River Basin coal (Gale, 2005). The removal of mercury by fly ash and unburned carbon in the flue gas from combustion of the bituminous coals and blends was reproduced with satisfactory accuracy by the model. The enhancement of mercury capture in the presence of calcium (Gale, 2005) explained a synergistic effect of blending on mercury removal across the baghouse. The extent of mercury oxidation, on the other hand, was not so well described by the simulation, because of oversensitivity of the oxidation process in the model to the concentration of unburned carbon. Combined catalysts and sorbents for oxidation and removal of mercury from flue gas at low temperature were based on surfactant-templated silicas containing a transition metal and an organic functional group. The presence of both metal ions and organic groups within the pore structure of the materials is expected to impart to them the ability to simultaneously oxidize elemental mercury and adsorb the resulting oxidized mercury. Twelve mesoporous organosilicate catalysts/sorbents were synthesized, with and without metals (manganese, titanium, vanadium) and organic functional groups (aminopropyl, chloropropyl, mercaptopropyl). Measurement of mercury oxidation and adsorption by the candidate materials remains for future work.

  7. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Lance Cole

    2009-09-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers, working in conjunction with the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and selected universities, in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization. Its goal is to transfer Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic upstream petroleum industry, in particular to the small independent operators. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, and university/industry/government research and development (R&D) groups. From inception PTTC has received federal funding through DOE's oil and natural gas program managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). With higher funding available in its early years, PTTC was able to deliver well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000 or more attendees per year. Facing the reality of little or no federal funding in the 2006-2007 time frame, PTTC and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) worked together for PTTC to become a subsidiary organization of AAPG. This change brings additional organizational and financial resources to bear for PTTC's benefit. PTTC has now been 'powered by AAPG' for two full fiscal years. There is a clear sense that PTTC has stabilized and is strengthening its regional workshop and national technology transfer programs and is becoming more entrepreneurial in exploring technology transfer opportunities beyond its primary DOE contract. Quantitative accomplishments: PTTC has maintained its unique structure of a national organization working through Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) to deliver local, affordable workshops. During the contract period PTTC consolidated from 10 to six regions efficiency and alignment with AAPG sections. The number of workshops delivered by its RLOs during the contract period is shown below. Combined attendance over the period was approximately 32,000, 70% of whom were repeat attendees. Participant feedback established that 40% of them said they had applied a technology they learned of through PTTC. Central/Eastern Gulf Univ. of Alabama, LSU Center for Energy Studies 77 Eastern West Virginia University, Illinois Geological Survey, W. Michigan Univ. 99 Midcontinent University of Kansas, University of Tulsa, Okla. Geological Survey (past) 123 Rocky Mountains Colorado School of Mines 147 Texas/SE New Mexico Bureau of Economic Geology, U. of Texas at Austin 85 West Coast Conservation Committee of California O&G Producers, Univ. So. Cal. (past) 54 At the national level HQ went from an office in Houston to a virtual office in the Tulsa, Okla. area with AAPG providing any physical assets required. There are no employees, rather several full time and several part time contractors. Since inception, PTTC has produced quarterly and mailed the 16-page Network News newsletter. It highlights new advances in technology and has a circulation of 19,000. It also produces the Tech Connections Column in The American Oil & Gas Reporter, with a circulation of 13,000. On an approximate three-week frequency, the electronic Email Tech Alert goes out to 9,000 readers. The national staff also maintains a central website with information of national interest and individual sections for each of the six regions. The national organization also provides legal and accounting services, coordinates the RLO activities, exhibits at at least major national and other meetings, supports the volunteer Board as it provides strategic direction, and is working to restore the Producer Advisory Groups to bolster the regional presence. Qualitative Value: Three qualitative factors confirm PTTC's value to the domestic O&G producing industry. First, AAPG was willing to step in and rescue PTTC, believing it was of significant interest to its domestic membership and of potential value internationally. Second, through a period of turmoil and now with participant fees dramatically increased, industry participants 'keep coming back' to wo

  8. Principles of water oxidation and O2-based hydrocarbon transformation by multinuclear catalytic sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musaev, Djamaladdin G [Chemistry, Emory University; Hill, Craig L [Chemistry, Emory University; Morokuma, Keiji [Chemistry, Emory University

    2014-10-28

    Abstract The central thrust of this integrated experimental and computational research program was to obtain an atomistic-level understanding of the structural and dynamic factors underlying the design of catalysts for water oxidation and selective reductant-free O2-based transformations. The focus was on oxidatively robust polyoxometalate (POM) complexes in which a catalytic active site interacts with proximal metal centers in a synergistic manner. Thirty five publications in high-impact journals arose from this grant. I. Developing an oxidatively and hydrolytically stable and fast water oxidation catalyst (WOC), a central need in the production of green fuels using water as a reductant, has proven particularly challenging. During this grant period we have designed and investigated several carbon-free, molecular (homogenous), oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOCs, including the Rb8K2[{Ru4O4(OH)2(H2O)4}(?-SiW10O36)2]25H2O (1) and [Co4(H2O)2(?-PW9O34)2]10- (2). Although complex 1 is fast, oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOC, Ru is neither abundant nor inexpensive. Therefore, development of a stable and fast carbon-free homogenous WOC, based on earth-abundant elements became our highest priority. In 2010, we reported the first such catalyst, complex 2. This complex is substantially faster than 1 and stable under homogeneous conditions. Recently, we have extended our efforts and reported a V2-analog of the complex 2, i.e. [Co4(H2O)2(?-VW9O34)2]10- (3), which shows an even greater stability and reactivity. We succeeded in: (a) immobilizing catalysts 1 and 2 on the surface of various electrodes, and (b) elucidating the mechanism of O2 formation and release from complex 1, as well as the Mn4O4L6 cubane cluster. We have shown that the direct O-O bond formation is the most likely pathway for O2 formation during water oxidation catalyzed by 1. II. Oxo transfer catalysts that contain two proximal and synergistically interacting redox active metal centers in the active site form another part of considerable interest of our grant because species with such sites [including methane monooxygenase (MMO) and more] are some of the most effective oxygenase catalysts known. Our team conducted the following research on ?-M2-Keggin complexes: (a) investigated stability of the trimer [{Fe3(OH)3(H2O)2}3(?-SiW10O36)3]15-, 4, in water, and developed the chemistry and catalysis of the di-iron centered POM, [?(1,2)-SiW10{Fe(OH)}2O38]6-, 5, in organic solvents (Figure 2). We also study the thermodynamic and structural stability of ?-M2-Keggin in aqueous media for different Ms (d-electron metals). We have defined two structural classes of POMs with proximally bound d-electron metal centers. We refer to these structural isomers of the {?-M2SiW10} family of POMs as in-pocket and out-of pocket. We have elucidated the factors controlling the structure and stability of the V, Fe, Ru, Tc, Mo and Rh derivatives of [(SiO4)M2(OH)2W10O32]4- using a range of computational tools. We have: (a) demonstrated that heteroatom X in these polyanions may function as an internal switch for defining the ground electronic states and, consequently, the reactivity of the ?-M2-Keggin POM complexes; (b) elucidated reactivity of divacant lacunary species and polyperoxotungstates (PPTs), {Xn+O4[WO(O2)2]4}n-, which could be degradation products of ?-M2-Keggin complexes in aqueous media; (c) elucidated the role of the POM ligand in stabilization of {Ru2} and {(Ru-oxo)2} fragments in the reactant and product of the reaction of {?-[(Xn+O4)Ru2(OH)2W10O32]}(8-n)- (where X = Si4+, P5+ and S6+) with O2, and (d) the mechanisms of olefin epoxidation catalyzed by these di-d-transition metal substituted and divacant lacunary ?-M2-Keggin complexes. III. Complementing the efforts presented above was the development of less time-consuming but reasonably accurate computational methods allowing one to explore more deeply large catalytic systems. We developed Reactive Force Field (ReaxFF) to study interaction of the targeted POMs with water, pro

  9. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian

    2013-12-23

    The objectives of this project, covering two phases and an additional extension phase, were the development of thin film-based hybrid photovoltaic (PV)/photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices for solar-powered water splitting. The hybrid device, comprising a low-cost photoactive material integrated with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H or a-Si in short)-based solar cells as a driver, should be able to produce hydrogen with a 5% solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH) and be durable for at least 500 hours. Three thin film material classes were studied and developed under this program: silicon-based compounds, copper chalcopyrite-based compounds, and metal oxides. With the silicon-based compounds, more specifically the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC), we achieved a STH efficiency of 3.7% when the photoelectrode was coupled to an a-Si tandem solar cell, and a STH efficiency of 6.1% when using a crystalline Si PV driver. The hybrid PV/a-SiC device tested under a current bias of -3~4 mA/cm{sup 2}, exhibited a durability of up to ~800 hours in 0.25 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte. Other than the PV driver, the most critical element affecting the photocurrent (and hence the STH efficiency) of the hybrid PV/a-SiC device was the surface energetics at the a-SiC/electrolyte interface. Without surface modification, the photocurrent of the hybrid PEC device was ~1 mA/cm{sup 2} or lower due to a surface barrier that limits the extraction of photogenerated carriers. We conducted an extensive search for suitable surface modification techniques/materials, of which the deposition of low work function metal nanoparticles was the most successful. Metal nanoparticles of ruthenium (Ru), tungsten (W) or titanium (Ti) led to an anodic shift in the onset potential. We have also been able to develop hybrid devices of various configurations in a monolithic fashion and optimized the current matching via altering the energy bandgap and thickness of each constituent cell. As a result, the short-circuit photocurrent density of the hybrid device (measured in a 2-electrode configuration) increased significantly without assistance of any external bias, i.e. from ?1 mA/cm{sup 2} to ~5 mA/cm{sup 2}. With the copper chalcopyrite compounds, we have achieved a STH efficiency of 3.7% in a coplanar configuration with 3 a-Si solar cells and one CuGaSe{sub 2} photocathode. This material class exhibited good durability at a photocurrent density level of -4 mA/cm{sup 2} (5% STH equivalent) at a fixed potential (-0.45 VRHE). A poor band-edge alignment with the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) potential was identified as the main limitation for high STH efficiency. Three new pathways have been identified to solve this issue. First, PV driver with bandgap lower than that of amorphous silicon were investigated. Crystalline silicon was identified as possible bottom cell. Mechanical stacks made with one Si solar cell and one CuGaSe{sub 2} photocathode were built. A 400 mV anodic shift was observed with the Si cell, leading to photocurrent density of -5 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0VRHE (compared to 0 mA/cm{sup 2} at the same potential without PV driver). We also investigated the use of p-n junctions to shift CuGaSe{sub 2} flatband potential anodically. Reactively sputtered zinc oxy-sulfide thin films was evaluated as n-type buffer and deposited on CuGaSe{sub 2}. Ruthenium nanoparticles were then added as HER catalyst. A 250 mV anodic shift was observed with the p-n junction, leading to photocurrent density at 0VRHE of -1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Combining this device with a Si solar cell in a mechanical stack configuration shifted the onset potential further (+400 mV anodically), leading to photocurrent density of -7 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0VRHE. Finally, we developed wide bandgap copper chalcopyrite thin film materials. We demonstrated that Se can be substituted with S using a simple annealing step. Photocurrent densities in the 5-6 mA/cm{sub 2} range were obtained with red 2.0eV CuInGaS{sub 2} photocathodes. With the metal oxide compounds, we have demonstrated that a WO{sub 3}-based hybrid p