National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fcl superconducting transformer

  1. Superconducting FCL using a combined inducted magnetic field trigger and shunt coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

    2007-10-16

    A single trigger/shunt coil is utilized for combined induced magnetic field triggering and shunt impedance. The single coil connected in parallel with the high temperature superconducting element, is designed to generate a circulating current in the parallel circuit during normal operation to aid triggering the high temperature superconducting element to quench in the event of a fault. The circulating current is generated by an induced voltage in the coil, when the system current flows through the high temperature superconducting element.

  2. Fault Current Limiters (FCL) Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fault Current Limiters (FCL) Fact Sheet Fault Current Limiters (FCL) Fact Sheet Plugging America Into the Future of Power: Superconducting & Solid-state Power Equipment What are Fault Current Limiters Why do we need Fault Current Limiters What are the benefits to utilities Fault Current Limiter projects PDF icon Fault Current Limiters More Documents & Publications An Assessment of Fault Current Limiter Testing Requirements Superconductivity Program Overview Superconductivity for Electric

  3. Superconductivity Program Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Fault Current Limiters (FCL) Fact Sheet High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects U.S. Department of Energy and SuperPower, Inc. Increase Energy...

  4. Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shen, Stewart S.; Wilson, C. Thomas

    1988-01-01

    A transformer current sensor having primary turns carrying a primary current for a superconducting coil and secondary turns only partially arranged within the primary turns. The secondary turns include an active winding disposed within the primary turns and a dummy winding which is not disposed in the primary turns and so does not experience a magnetic field due to a flow of current in the primary turns. The active and dummy windings are wound in opposite directions or connected in series-bucking relationship, and are exposed to the same ambient magnetic field. Voltages which might otherwise develop in the active and dummy windings due to ambient magnetic fields thus cancel out. The resultant voltage is purely indicative of the rate of change of current flowing in the primary turns.

  5. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godeke, A.; Dietderich, D. R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lizarazo, J.; Prestemon, S. O.; Miller, G.; Weijers, H. W.

    2010-02-15

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10 464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples.

  6. Correlation between Fermi surface transformations and superconductivity in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the electron-doped high- T c superconductor Nd 2 - x Ce x CuO 4 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Correlation between Fermi surface transformations and superconductivity in the electron-doped high- T c superconductor Nd 2 - x Ce x CuO 4 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 31, 2016 Title: Correlation between Fermi surface transformations and superconductivity in the electron-doped high- T c superconductor Nd 2 - x Ce x

  7. Transformer current sensor for superconducting magnetic coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

    1985-04-16

    The present invention is a current transformer for operating currents larger than 2kA (two kiloamps) that is capable of detecting a millivolt level resistive voltage in the presence of a large inductive voltage. Specifically, the present invention includes substantially cylindrical primary turns arranged to carry a primary current and substantially cylindrical secondary turns arranged coaxially with and only partially within the primary turns, the secondary turns including an active winding and a dummy winding, the active and dummy windings being coaxial, longitudinally separated and arranged to mutually cancel voltages excited by commonly experienced magnetic fields, the active winding but not the dummy winding being arranged within the primary turns.

  8. Method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a high temperature super-conducting transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golner, Thomas M.; Mehta, Shirish P.

    2005-07-26

    A method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a super-conducting transformer is provided that includes a first super-conducting coil set, a second super-conducting coil set, and a third super-conducting coil set. The first, second and third super-conducting coil sets are connected via an insulated interconnect system that includes insulated conductors and insulated connectors that are utilized to connect the first, second, and third super-conducting coil sets to the high voltage leads.

  9. Point defects and ion migration in PbFCl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, M.S. )

    1990-04-01

    Atomistic simulation techniques have been applied to PbFCl in order to calculate the energetics of defect formation and ion transport mechanisms in the undoped material. Schottky-like disorder is computed to be the dominant ionic defect. The activation energies for a variety of anion vacancy migration mechanisms are calculated and found to be in good agreement with experiment.

  10. Superconducting qubit as a quantum transformer routing entanglement between a microscopic quantum memory and a macroscopic resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, Alexander; Saito, Shiro; Semba, Kouichi [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Munro, William J. [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); National Institute of Informatics 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan); Nemoto, Kae [National Institute of Informatics 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan)

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the creation and measurement of an entangled state between a microscopic two-level system (TLS), formed by a defect in an oxide layer, and a macroscopic superconducting resonator, where their indirect interaction is mediated by an artificial atom, a superconducting persistent current qubit (PCQB). Under appropriate conditions, we found the coherence time of the TLS, the resonator, and the entangled state of these two are significantly longer than the Ramsey dephasing time of PCQB itself. This demonstrates that a PCQB can be used as a quantum transformer to address high coherence microscopic quantum memories by connecting them to macroscopic quantum buses.

  11. Apparatus and method for controlling the temperature of the core of a super-conducting transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golner, Thomas; Pleva, Edward; Mehta, Shirish

    2006-10-10

    An apparatus for controlling the temperature of a core of a transformer is provided that includes a core, a shield surrounding the core, a cast formed between the core and the shield, and tubing positioned on the shield. The cast directs heat from the core to the shield and cooling fluid is directed through the tubing to cool the shield.

  12. New Advance in SuperConducting Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    Superconducting materials will transform the world's electrical infrastructure, saving billions of dollars once the technical details and installation are in place. At Los Alamos National Laborator...  

  13. Superconductive wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korzekwa, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Santa Fe, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  14. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  15. Superconducting Cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  16. Superconducting Structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  17. Superconducting structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  18. From Ions to Wires to the Grid: The Transformational Science of LANL Research in High-Tc Superconducting Tapes and Electric Power Applications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Marken, Ken [Superconductivity Technology Center, Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States

    2010-01-08

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been tasked to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to energy supplies. LANL has pioneered the development of coated conductors ? high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes ? which permit dramatically greater current densities than conventional copper cable, and enable new technologies to secure the national electric grid. Sustained world-class research from concept, demonstration, transfer, and ongoing industrial support has moved this idea from the laboratory to the commercial marketplace.

  19. New Advances in SuperConducting Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-08-12

    Superconducting materials will transform the world's electrical infrastructure, saving billions of dollars once the technical details and installation are in place. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, new materials science concepts are bringing this essential technology closer to widespread industrial use.

  20. Superconducting wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.; Singh, J.P.; Dos Santos, D.I.; Lumpp, J.K.; Dusek, J.T.; Goretta, K.C.

    1988-06-01

    The requirement of high critical current density has prompted extensive research on ceramic processing of high-T/sub c/ superconductors. An overview of wire fabrication techniques and the limitations they impose on component design will be presented. The effects of processing on microstructure and critical current density will also be discussed. Particle alignment has been observed in extruded samples which is attributed to high shear stresses during plastic forming. Composites of superconductor and silver in several configurations have been made with little deleterious effect on the superconducting properties. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Secrets of superconductivity revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed The superconducting material Cerium-Colbalt-Indium5 reveals new secrets about how superconductivity and magnetism can be related. January 3, 2014 Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the

  2. ENERGY DIVISION STATUS OF SUPERCONDUCTING POWER TRANSFORMER

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... 30% cost advantage when evaluated using a life cycle cost methodology. The break-even size w a s 350 MVA. The research included the following key results: 0 0 a The use of ...

  3. Superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  4. CX-003061: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act-Fault Current Limiting (FCL) Superconducting TransformerCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B4.11Date: 07/16/2010Location(s): Irvine, CaliforniaOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umans, Stephen D. (Belmont, MA)

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  6. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  7. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  8. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    copper, it's possible to make the topologically ordered electrons superconducting, dropping electrical resistance in the surface states all the way to zero. A Major(ana) Quantum...

  9. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a...

  10. Secrets of superconductivity revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and a second at Los Alamos in collaboration with the Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea, the superconducting material Cerium-Colbalt-Indium5...

  11. Alexei Abrikosov and Superconductivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Physics for his research in the area of superconductivity. ... Additional information about Alexei Abrikosov and his work ... New Developments in the Theory of HTSC High Temperature ...

  12. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    taken even further. Their studies showed that by doping the TI, bismuth selenide, with copper, it's possible to make the topologically ordered electrons superconducting, dropping...

  13. Superconducting VAR control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, Heinrich J. (Los Alamos, NM); Hassenzahl, William V. (Piedmont, CA)

    1982-01-01

    Static VAR control means employing an asymmetrically controlled Graetz bridge and a superconducting direct current coil having low losses and low cost characteristics.

  14. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  15. SciTech Connect: superconduct*

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    superconduct* Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: superconduct* Semantic Semantic Term Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator ...

  16. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  17. Superconductivity Program Overview High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SuperconducTiviTy program haS Three FocuS areaS: SuperconducTiviTy applicaTionS Developing HTS-based electric power equipment such as transmission and distribution cables and fault current limiters Second-generaTion Wire developmenT Developing high-performance, low-cost, second- generation HTS wire at long lengths STraTegic reSearch Supporting fundamental research activities to better understand relationships between the microstructure of HTS materials and their ability to carry large electric

  18. Fast Superconducting Switch for Superconducting Power Devices - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Fast Superconducting Switch for Superconducting Power Devices Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Fast high-temperature superconductor switch for high current applications. (1,424 KB) Conceptual drawing of the fast superconducting switch.<br type="_moz" /> Conceptual drawing of the fast superconducting switch. Technology Marketing Summary Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) offers

  19. Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Accelerator Cavities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Reece, Charlie

    2014-05-22

    Charlie Reece, an accelerator technology scientist, explains how superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities work.

  20. DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Superconductivity Program Stakeholders DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders Map showing the stakeholders involved in High Temperature Superconductivity work with the DOE. PDF...

  1. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  2. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  3. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  4. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, John D. (Eaton's Neck, NY); El-Genk, Mohamed S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  5. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

  6. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including transitions from magnetic to nonmagnetic phases in a broad pressure-temperature range; using X-ray methods including the newly developed RIXS high-pressure technique to explore pressure-tuned electronic excitations in strongly correlated 3d-materials; and advancing transport and magnetic techniques for measurements on small samples at very high pressures in a wide temperature range, with the application of focused ion beam technology and photolithography tailored to the design of microcircuits down to a nanoscale size, thus expanding the horizon in the search for novel physical phenomena at ultrahigh pressures. Apply new optical magnetic sensing techniques with NV- centers in diamond to detect superconductivity and magnetic transitions with unprecedented spatial resolution.

  7. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual

  8. Superconductive ceramic oxide combination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, D.K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Mir, J.M.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes the combination of a superconductive ceramic oxide which degrades in conductivity upon contact of ambient air with its surface and, interposed between the ceramic oxide surface and ambient air in the amount of at least 1 mg per square meter of surface area of the superconductive ceramic oxide, a passivant polymer selected from the group consisting of a polyester ionomer and an alkyl cellulose.

  9. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Kenneth E. (Naperville, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  10. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  11. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence (Seaford, VA); Elliott, Thomas S. (Yorktown, VA)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  12. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry L. (Seaford, VA); Elliott, Thomas S. (Yorktown, VA)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  13. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  14. High Temperature Superconductivity Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High Temperature Superconductivity Partners High Temperature Superconductivity Partners Map showing DOE's partners/stakeholders in the High Temperature Superconductivity Program PDF icon High Temperature Superconductivity Partners More Documents & Publications DOE Superconductivity Program Stakeholders DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System. June 27, 2007 High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects

  15. High temperature interfacial superconductivity (Patent) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: High temperature interfacial superconductivity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High temperature interfacial superconductivity High-temperature superconductivity ...

  16. Nonlinear terahertz superconducting plasmonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jingbo; Liang, Lanju; Jin, Biaobing E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi E-mail: tonouchi@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Wang, Huabing

    2014-10-20

    Nonlinear terahertz (THz) transmission through subwavelength hole array in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) film is experimentally investigated using intense THz pulses. The good agreement between the measurement and numerical simulations indicates that the field strength dependent transmission mainly arises from the nonlinear properties of the superconducting film. Under weak THz pulses, the transmission peak can be tuned over a frequency range of 145 GHz which is attributed to the high kinetic inductance of 50?nm-thick NbN film. Utilizing the THz pump-THz probe spectroscopy, we study the dynamic process of transmission spectra and demonstrate that the transition time of such superconducting plasmonic device is within 5 ps.

  17. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  18. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  19. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veklenko, B. A.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  20. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  1. Engineering Division Superconducting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Engineering Division Superconducting Magnet Technology for Fusion and Large Scale Applications Joseph V. Minervini Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Colloquium Princeton, NJ October 15, 2014 Technology & Engineering Division Contents * Fusion Magnets - Present and Future - Vision - State-of-the-art - New developments in superconductors * Advanced fusion magnet technology * Other large scale applications of

  2. Market Transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market transformation subprogram.

  3. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore » and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  4. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  5. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  6. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  7. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  8. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  9. Superconducting magnet wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL); Banerjee, Indrajit (San Jose, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  10. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Bernard R. (Avon, CT); Lynds, Jr., Lahmer (Glastonbury, CT)

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  11. Superconducting VAR control. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1980-12-05

    Static VAR control means are described employing an asymmetrically controlled Graetz bridge and a superconducting direct current coil having low losses and low cost characteristics.

  12. Superconducting magnet development in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasukochi, K.

    1983-05-01

    The present state of R and D works on the superconducting magnet and its applications in Japan are presented. On electrical rotating machines, 30 MVA superconducting synchronous rotary condenser (Mitsubishi and Fuji) and 50 MVA generator are under construction. Two ways of ship propulsion by superconducting magnets are developing. A superconducting magnetically levitated and linear motor propelled train ''MAGLEV'' was developed by the Japan National Railways (JNR). The superconducting magnet development for fusion is the most active field in Japan. The Cluster Test program has been demonstrated on a 10 T Nb/sub 3/Sn coil and the first coil of Large Coil Task in IEA collaboration has been constructed and the domestic test was completed in JAERI. These works are for the development of toroidal coils of the next generation tokamak machine. R and D works on superconducting ohmic heating coil are in progress in JAERI and ETL. The latter group has constructed 3.8 MJ pulsed coil. A high ramp rate of changing field in pulsed magnet, 200 T/s, has been tested successfully. High Energy Physics Laboratory (KEK) are conducting active works. The superconducting ..mu.. meson channel and ..pi.. meson channel have been constructed and are operating successfully. KEK has also a project of big accelerator named ''TRISTAN'', which is similar to ISABELLE project of BNL. Superconducting synchrotron magnets are developed for this project. The development of superconducting three thin wall solenoid has been started. One of them, CDF, is progressing under USA-Japan collaboration.

  13. Market Transformation

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet outlines current status and challenges in the market transformation of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

  14. Market Transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-02-15

    This Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet outlines current status and challenges in the market transformation of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

  15. High-Temperature Superconducting Composite Conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.; Groves, James R.; Jia, Quanxi; Ayala, Alicia

    2005-01-18

    Copper or excess copper is added to one or more layers of a superconducting composite structure to reduce migration of copper form a copper based superconducting layer.

  16. Superconductivity (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Superconductivity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Superconductivity Authors: Maiorov, Boris A. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National ...

  17. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  18. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-09-17

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings are disclosed. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures. 20 figs.

  19. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-09-23

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  20. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  1. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  2. SECTION V: SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... V-4 K. Hagel and R. Burch Commissioning of the superconducting solenoid rare isotope beamline......

  3. High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects A National Effort to Introduce New Technology into the Power Delivery Infrastructure PDF icon High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects More Documents & Publications HTS Cable Projects Superconductivity Program Overview Columbus HTS Power Cable

  4. Los Alamos scientists see new mechanism for superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    superconductivity Researchers have posited an explanation for superconductivity that may open the door to the discovery of new, unconventional forms of superconductivity. November...

  5. Nozzle for superconducting fiber production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Righi, Jamal

    1992-11-17

    A nozzle apparatus for producing flexible fibers of superconducting material receives melted material from a crucible for containing a charge of the superconducting material. The material is melted in the crucible and falls in a stream through a bottom hole in the crucible. The stream falls through a protecting collar which maintains the stream at high temperatures. The stream is then supplied through the downwardly directed nozzle where it is subjected to a high velocity air flow which breaks the melted superconducting material into ligaments which solidify into the flexible fibers. The fibers are collected by blowing them against a porous cloth.

  6. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

  7. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  9. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aized, Dawood (Marlboro, MA); Schwall, Robert E. (Northborough, MA)

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  10. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aized, Dawood (Marlboro, MA); Schwall, Robert E. (Northborough, MA)

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  11. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  12. EIS-0138: Superconducting Super Collider

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of constructing the Superconducting Super Collider, a large proton accelerator, at each of seven alternative locations.

  13. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  14. Smart monitoring system based on adaptive current control for superconducting cable test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Ballarino, Amalia; Montenero, Giuseppe; Daponte, Vincenzo; Svelto, Cesare

    2014-12-15

    A smart monitoring system for superconducting cable test is proposed with an adaptive current control of a superconducting transformer secondary. The design, based on Fuzzy Gain Scheduling, allows the controller parameters to adapt continuously, and finely, to the working variations arising from transformer nonlinear dynamics. The control system is integrated in a fully digital control loop, with all the related benefits, i.e., high noise rejection, ease of implementation/modification, and so on. In particular, an accurate model of the system, controlled by a Fuzzy Gain Scheduler of the superconducting transformer, was achieved by an experimental campaign through the working domain at several current ramp rates. The model performance was characterized by simulation, under all the main operating conditions, in order to guide the controller design. Finally, the proposed monitoring system was experimentally validated at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in comparison to the state-of-the-art control system [P. Arpaia, L. Bottura, G. Montenero, and S. Le Naour, Performance improvement of a measurement station for superconducting cable test, Rev. Sci. Instrum.83, 095111 (2012)] of the Facility for the Research on Superconducting Cables, achieving a significant performance improvement: a reduction in the system overshoot by 50%, with a related attenuation of the corresponding dynamic residual error (both absolute and RMS) up to 52%.

  15. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVault, Robert C. (Knoxville, TN); McConnell, Benjamin W. (Knoxville, TN); Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI)

    1996-01-01

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

  16. Electronic structure of superconductivity refined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic structure of superconductivity refined Electronic structure of superconductivity refined A team of physicists propose a new model that expands on a little understood aspect of the electronic structure in high-temperature superconductors. July 10, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  17. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVault, R.C.; McConnell, B.W.; Phillips, B.A.

    1996-07-02

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit. 6 figs.

  18. Process for producing clad superconductive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cass, Richard B. (Ringoes, NJ); Ott, Kevin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A process for fabricating superconducting composite wire by the steps of placing a superconductive precursor admixture capable of undergoing a self propagating combustion in stoichiometric amounts sufficient to form a superconductive product within a metal tube, sealing one end of said tube, igniting said superconductive precursor admixture whereby said superconductive precursor admixture endburns along the length of the admixture, and cross-section reducing said tube at a rate substantially equal to the rate of burning of said superconductive precursor admixture and at a point substantially planar with the burnfront of the superconductive precursor mixture, whereby a clad superconductive product is formed in situ, the product characterized as superconductive without a subsequent sintering stage, is disclosed.

  19. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  20. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Tolbert, Jerry (Newnan, GA)

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to 72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  1. Proximity effects of superconducting multilayer film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xueyu, C.; Daole, Y.

    1984-07-01

    The proximity effects of superconducting multilayer films composed of different metals are considered. The relationship between the critical temperature of a superconducting multilayer film with strong heterogeneity and its geometric structure is given.

  2. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  3. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  4. Superconducting PM undiffused machines with stationary superconducting coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.; Schwenterly, S. William

    2004-03-02

    A superconducting PM machine has a stator, a rotor and a stationary excitation source without the need of a ferromagnetic frame which is cryogenically cooled for operation in the superconducting state. PM material is placed between poles on the rotor to prevent leakage or diffusion of secondary flux before reaching the main air gap, or to divert PM flux where it is desired to weaken flux in the main air gap. The PM material provides hop-along capability for the machine in the event of a fault condition.

  5. Structural feature controlling superconductivity in compressed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: catalysis (heterogeneous), solar (photovoltaic), phonons, thermoelectric, energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), hydrogen and fuel cells, superconductivity, ...

  6. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D. (Greenbelt, MD); Muenchausen, Ross E. (Espanola, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.

  7. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhman, Thomas (Westhampton Beach, NY); Klamut, Carl J. (East Patchogue, NY); Suenaga, Masaki (Bellport, NY); Welch, David (Stony Brook, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  8. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhman, Thomas (Westhampton Beach, NY); Klamut, Carl J. (E. Patchogue, NY); Suenaga, Masaki (Bellport, NY); Welch, David (Stony Brook, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improves the strain characteristics of the wire.

  9. Strain tolerant microfilamentary superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finnemore, Douglas K. (Ames, IA); Miller, Theodore A. (Tuscon, AZ); Ostenson, Jerome E. (Ames, IA); Schwartzkopf, Louis A. (Mankato, MN); Sanders, Steven C. (Ames, IA)

    1993-02-23

    A strain tolerant microfilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments.

  10. Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmierer, Eric N.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2010-01-12

    A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

  11. Free-standing oxide superconducting articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-12-14

    A substrate-free, free-standing epitaxially oriented superconductive film including a layer of a template material and a layer of a ceramic superconducting material is provided together with a method of making such a substrate-free ceramic superconductive film by coating an etchable material with a template layer, coating the template layer with a layer of a ceramic superconductive material, coating the layer of ceramic superconductive material with a protective material, removing the etchable material by an appropriate means so that the etchable material is separated from a composite structure including the template layer.

  12. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-02-14

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

  13. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

  14. MICROSTRUCTURE OF SUPERCONDUCTING MGB(2).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHU,Y.; LI,Q.; WU,L.; VOLKOV,V.; GU,G.; MOODENBAUGH,A.R.

    2001-07-12

    Recently, Akimitsu and co-workers [1] discovered superconductivity at 39 K in the intermetallic compound MgB{sub 2}. This discovery provides a new perspective on the mechanism for superconductivity. More specifically, it opens up possibilities for investigation of structure/properties in a new class of materials. With the exceptions of the cuprate and C{sub 60} families of compounds, MgB{sub 2} possesses the highest superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}. Its superconductivity appears to follow the BCS theory, apparently being mediated by electron-phonon coupling. The coherence length of MgB{sub 2} is reported to be longer than that of the cuprates [2]. In contrast to the cuprates, grain boundaries are strongly coupled and current density is determined by flux pinning [2,3]. Presently, samples of MgB{sub 2} commonly display inhomogeneity and porosity on the nanoscale, and are untextured. In spite of these obstacles, magnetization and transport measurements show that polycrystalline samples may carry large current densities circulating across many grains [3,4]. Very high values of critical current densities and critical fields have been recently observed in thin films [5,6]. These attributes suggest possible large scale and electronic applications. The underlying microstructure can be intriguing, both in terms of basic science and in applied areas. Subsequent to the discovery, many papers were published [1-13], most dealing with synthesis, physical properties, and theory. There have yet been few studies of microstructure and structural defects [11, 14]. A thorough understanding of practical superconducting properties can only be developed after an understanding of microstructure is gained. In this work we review transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of sintered MgB{sub 2} pellets [14]. Structural defects, including second phase particles, dislocations, stacking faults, and grain boundaries, are analyzed using electron diffraction, electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), high resolution imaging, and structural modeling.

  15. Basic Research Needs for Superconductivity. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Superconductivity, May 8-11, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrao, J.; Kwok, W-K; Bozovic, I.; Mazin, I.; Seamus, J. C.; Civale, L.; Christen, D.; Horwitz, J.; Kellogg, G.; Finnemore, D.; Crabtree, G.; Welp, U.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Shapard, L.; Nault, R. M.

    2006-05-11

    As an energy carrier, electricity has no rival with regard to its environmental cleanliness, flexibility in interfacing with multiple production sources and end uses, and efficiency of delivery. In fact, the electric power grid was named ?the greatest engineering achievement of the 20th century? by the National Academy of Engineering. This grid, a technological marvel ingeniously knitted together from local networks growing out from cities and rural centers, may be the biggest and most complex artificial system ever built. However, the growing demand for electricity will soon challenge the grid beyond its capability, compromising its reliability through voltage fluctuations that crash digital electronics, brownouts that disable industrial processes and harm electrical equipment, and power failures like the North American blackout in 2003 and subsequent blackouts in London, Scandinavia, and Italy in the same year. The North American blackout affected 50 million people and caused approximately $6 billion in economic damage over the four days of its duration. Superconductivity offers powerful new opportunities for restoring the reliability of the power grid and increasing its capacity and efficiency. Superconductors are capable of carrying current without loss, making the parts of the grid they replace dramatically more efficient. Superconducting wires carry up to five times the current carried by copper wires that have the same cross section, thereby providing ample capacity for future expansion while requiring no increase in the number of overhead access lines or underground conduits. Their use is especially attractive in urban areas, where replacing copper with superconductors in power-saturated underground conduits avoids expensive new underground construction. Superconducting transformers cut the volume, weight, and losses of conventional transformers by a factor of two and do not require the contaminating and flammable transformer oils that violate urban safety codes. Unlike traditional grid technology, superconducting fault current limiters are smart. They increase their resistance abruptly in response to overcurrents from faults in the system, thus limiting the overcurrents and protecting the grid from damage. They react fast in both triggering and automatically resetting after the overload is cleared, providing a new, self-healing feature that enhances grid reliability. Superconducting reactive power regulators further enhance reliability by instantaneously adjusting reactive power for maximum efficiency and stability in a compact and economic package that is easily sited in urban grids. Not only do superconducting motors and generators cut losses, weight, and volume by a factor of two, but they are also much more tolerant of voltage sag, frequency instabilities, and reactive power fluctuations than their conventional counterparts. The challenge facing the electricity grid to provide abundant, reliable power will soon grow to crisis proportions. Continuing urbanization remains the dominant historic demographic trend in the United States and in the world. By 2030, nearly 90% of the U.S. population will reside in cities and suburbs, where increasingly strict permitting requirements preclude bringing in additional overhead access lines, underground cables are saturated, and growth in power demand is highest. The power grid has never faced a challenge so great or so critical to our future productivity, economic growth, and quality of life. Incremental advances in existing grid technology are not capable of solving the urban power bottleneck. Revolutionary new solutions are needed ? the kind that come only from superconductivity.

  16. Superconducting Cable Having A Felexible Former

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-03-15

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  17. Superconducting Cable Having A Flexible Former

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-08-30

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  18. Processing method for superconducting ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bloom, Ira D. (Bolingbrook, IL); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Flandermeyer, Brian K. (Cincinnati, OH)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing a superconducting ceramic and particularly YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta., where .delta. is in the order of about 0.1-0.4, is carried out using a polymeric binder which decomposes below its ignition point to reduce carbon residue between the grains of the sintered ceramic and a nonhydroxylic organic solvent to limit the problems with water or certain alcohols on the ceramic composition.

  19. Processing method for superconducting ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bloom, Ira D.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Flandermeyer, Brian K.

    1993-02-02

    A process for preparing a superconducting ceramic and particularly YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta., where .delta. is in the order of about 0.1-0.4, is carried out using a polymeric binder which decomposes below its ignition point to reduce carbon residue between the grains of the sintered ceramic and a nonhydroxylic organic solvent to limit the problems with water or certain alcohols on the ceramic composition.

  20. Superconducting thin films on potassium tantalate substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Roeland; Boatner, Lynn A.

    1992-01-01

    A superconductive system for the lossless transmission of electrical current comprising a thin film of superconducting material Y.sub.1 Ba.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x epitaxially deposited upon a KTaO.sub.3 substrate. The KTaO.sub.3 is an improved substrate over those of the prior art since the it exhibits small lattice constant mismatch and does not chemically react with the superconducting film.

  1. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S. (Albuquerque, NM); Beyer, James B. (Madison, WI); Nordman, James E. (Madison, WI); Hohenwarter, Gert K. G. (Madison, WI)

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  2. Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-11-16

    A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure. 7 figures.

  3. MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; SOLID STATE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Open problems in condensed matter physics, 1987 Falicov, L.M. 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; SOLID STATE PHYSICS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS;...

  4. Superconductivity, Glue, and the Pseudogap (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org: NSF Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Condensed Matter Physics, Superconductivity ...

  5. A potential Rosetta Stone of high temperature superconductivity...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    for the high temperature superconductivity. Summary Superconductivity enables the flow of electricity without any loss of energy, but this extremely-low temperature...

  6. Quasiparticle properties of the superconducting state of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quasiparticle properties of the superconducting state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model Title: Quasiparticle properties of the superconducting state of the two-dimensional ...

  7. High temperature interfacial superconductivity (Patent) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: High temperature interfacial superconductivity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High temperature interfacial superconductivity You are accessing a document ...

  8. Transforming a Transformative School | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transforming a Transformative School Transforming a Transformative School October 11, 2012 - 10:14am Addthis During a yearlong renovation, Harding Charter Preparatory school upgraded lighting fixtures, installed a new heating and cooling system, and replaced the entry doors. The new doors allow daylight into the school and restore the historical building envelope. | Photo courtesy of John Winkel, Energy Department. During a yearlong renovation, Harding Charter Preparatory school upgraded

  9. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.

    1998-05-01

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  10. SEP Success Story: Transforming a Transformative School | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transforming a Transformative School SEP Success Story: Transforming a Transformative ... Florida. | Photo by Amy Kidd SEP Success Story: Florida's SunSmart Program Helps ...

  11. Horizontal cryogenic bushing for the termination of a superconducting power-transmission line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minati, K.F.; Morgan, G.H.; McNerney, A.J.; Schauer, F.

    1982-07-29

    A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminated the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

  12. Termination for a superconducting power transmission line including a horizontal cryogenic bushing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minati, Kurt F. (Northport, NY); Morgan, Gerry H. (Patchogue, NY); McNerney, Andrew J. (Shoreham, NY); Schauer, Felix (Upton, NY)

    1984-01-01

    A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminates the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

  13. Molybdenum-rhenium superconducting suspended nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aziz, Mohsin; Christopher Hudson, David; Russo, Saverio

    2014-06-09

    Suspended superconducting nanostructures of MoRe 50%/50% by weight are fabricated employing commonly used fabrication steps in micro- and nano-meter scale devices followed by wet-etching with Hydro-fluoric acid of a SiO{sub 2} sacrificial layer. Suspended superconducting channels as narrow as 50?nm and length 3??m have a critical temperature of ?6.5?K, which can increase by 0.5?K upon annealing at 400?C. A detailed study of the dependence of the superconducting critical current and critical temperature upon annealing and in devices with different channel widths reveals that desorption of contaminants is responsible for the improved superconducting properties. These findings pave the way for the development of superconducting electromechanical devices using standard fabrication techniques.

  14. Exotic Superconductivity in Correlated Electron Systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mu, Gang; Sandu, Viorel; Li, Wei; Shen, Bing

    2015-05-25

    Over the past decades, the search for high-Tc superconductivity (SC) and its novel superconducting mechanisms is one of the most challenging tasks of condensed matter physicists and material scientists, wherein the most striking achievement is the discovery of high-c and unconventional superconductivity in strongly correlated 3d-electron systems, such as cuprates and iron pnictides/chalcogenides. Those exotic superconductors display the behaviors beyond the scope of the BCS theory (in the SC states) and the Landau-Fermi liquid theory (in the normal states). In general, such exotic superconductivity can be seen as correlated electron systems, where there are strong interplays among charge, spin, orbital,more » and lattice degrees of freedom. Thus, we focus on the exotic superconductivity in materials with correlated electrons in the present special issue.« less

  15. Free-standing oxide superconducting articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D. (Greenbelt, MD); Muenchausen, Ross E. (Espanola, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A substrate-free, free-standing epitaxially oriented superconductive film including a layer of a template material and a layer of a ceramic superconducting material is provided together with a method of making such a substrate-free ceramic superconductive film by coating an etchable material with a template layer, coating the template layer with a layer of a ceramic superconductive material, coating the layer of ceramic superconductive material with a protective material, removing the etchable material by an appropriate means so that the etchable material is separated from a composite structure including the template lay This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  16. Sandia Energy - Solar Market Transformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Market Transformation Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Solar Market Transformation Solar Market TransformationTara...

  17. Microelectronic superconducting crossover and coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

    1994-03-01

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3]; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps and which can be opened to the atmosphere between depositions. 13 figures.

  18. Superconducting coil and method of stress management in a superconducting coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter M. (College Station, TX); Shen, Weijun (Oak Ridge, TN); Diaczenko, Nick (College Station, TX); Gross, Dan A. (College Station, TX)

    1999-01-01

    A superconducting coil (12) having a plurality of superconducting layers (18) is provided. Each superconducting layer (18) may have at least one superconducting element (20) which produces an operational load. An outer support structure (24) may be disposed outwardly from the plurality of layers (18). A load transfer system (22) may be coupled between at least one of the superconducting elements (20) and the outer support structure (24). The load transfer system (22) may include a support matrix structure (30) operable to transfer the operational load from the superconducting element (20) directly to the outer support structure (24). A shear release layer (40) may be disposed, in part, between the superconducting element (20) and the support matrix structure (30) for relieving a shear stress between the superconducting element (20) and the support matrix structure (30). A compliant layer (42) may also be disposed, in part, between the superconducting element (20) and the support matrix structure (30) for relieving a compressive stress on the superconducting element (20).

  19. Method for making mirrored surfaces comprising superconducting material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, J.T.; Hargrove, R.S.

    1989-12-12

    Superconducting mirror surfaces are provided by forming a mirror surface from a material which is superconductive at a temperature above about 40 K and adjusting the temperature of the surface to that temperature at which the material is superconducting. The mirror surfaces are essentially perfect reflectors for electromagnetic radiation with photon energy less than the superconducting band gap.

  20. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form withmore » crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.« less

  1. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the worlds first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  2. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-03

    Transitionmetal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rocksalt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 1020 GPa. Here, we report highpressure synthesis of hexagonal ?MoN and cubic ?MoN through an ionexchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form withmorecrystallite sizes of 50 80 ?m. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal ?MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic ?MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded MoN network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for ?MoN and cubic ?MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.less

  3. Status of superconducting magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schermer, R.I.

    1993-09-01

    The arc sections of the High Energy Booster and the two Collider Rings will need more than 10,000, very large, superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets. Development work on these magnets was carried out at US/DOE laboratories in a program that began in the mid 1980`s. In 1991-1992, the technology was transferred to industry and twenty, full-length, Collider dipoles were successfully fabricated and tested. This program, along with HERA and Tevatron experience, has provided industry a data base to use in formulating detailed designs for the prototypes of the accelerator magnets, with an eye to reducing cost and enhancing producibility. Several model magnets from this latest phase of the industrial program have already been tested. The excessive ramp-rate sensitivity of the magnets is understood and solutions are under investigation.

  4. The integration of cryogenic cooling systems with superconducting electronic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-07-01

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been critical issue that has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the market place. Even though the performance of the superconducting circuit is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement for cryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a disadvantage. This report will talk about the various methods for refrigerating superconducting devices. Cryocooler types will be compared for vibration, efficiency, and cost. Some solutions to specific problems of integrating cryocoolers to superconducting devices are presented.

  5. Fluorinated Precursors of Superconducting Ceramics - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal <p> Structure of superconducting YBa<sub>2</sub>Cu<sub>3</sub>O<sub>7</sub></p> Structure of superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 Technology Marketing Summary Fluorinated precursors for superconducting ceramics typically increase the critical current in the superconductors they produce. Here the fluorinated precursors are obtained by combining salts of a rare earth, an alkaline earth, and copper in solution, spraying the solution onto a substrate,

  6. Subranging technique using superconducting technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Deepnarayan (Hawthorne, NY)

    2003-01-01

    Subranging techniques using "digital SQUIDs" are used to design systems with large dynamic range, high resolution and large bandwidth. Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) embodying the invention include a first SQUID based "coarse" resolution circuit and a second SQUID based "fine" resolution circuit to convert an analog input signal into "coarse" and "fine" digital signals for subsequent processing. In one embodiment, an ADC includes circuitry for supplying an analog input signal to an input coil having at least a first inductive section and a second inductive section. A first superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is coupled to the first inductive section and a second SQUID is coupled to the second inductive section. The first SQUID is designed to produce "coarse" (large amplitude, low resolution) output signals and the second SQUID is designed to produce "fine" (low amplitude, high resolution) output signals in response to the analog input signals.

  7. Cooling arrangement for a superconducting coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herd, K.G.; Laskaris, E.T.

    1998-06-30

    A superconducting device is disclosed, such as a superconducting rotor for a generator or motor. A vacuum enclosure has an interior wall surrounding a cavity containing a vacuum. A superconductive coil is placed in the cavity. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-conductive sheet has an inward-facing surface contacting generally the entire outward-facing surface of the superconductive coil. A generally-annularly-arranged coolant tube contains a cryogenic fluid and contacts a generally-circumferential portion of the outward-facing surface of the sheet. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-insulative coil overwrap generally circumferentially surrounds the sheet. The coolant tube and the inward-facing surface of the coil overwrap together contact generally the entire outward-facing surface of the sheet. 3 figs.

  8. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  9. Superconductivity with Stripes | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure in high-Tc superconductors was manipulated in high-pressure experiments at the APS. The physics of low-temperature superconductivity is fairly well understood, but the...

  10. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-03-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring.

  11. Towards a next theory of superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "High magnetic-field measurements of doped copper-oxide superconductors are paving the way to a new theory of superconductivity," said...

  12. Influence of optically quenched superconductivity on quasiparticle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Influence of optically quenched superconductivity on quasiparticle relaxation rates in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 + Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become...

  13. Towards a next theory of superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding high-temperature superconductivity Using magnetic fields to understand high-temperature superconductivity The eventual goal of the research would be to create a superconductor that operates at room temperature and needs no cooling at all March 26, 2015 Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist Brad Ramshaw conducts an experiment at the Pulsed Field Facility of the National High Magnetic Field Lab, exposing high-temperature superconductors to very high magnetic fields, changing the

  14. Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

  15. Armored spring-core superconducting cable and method of construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter M. (611 Montclair, College Station, TX 77840); Soika, Rainer H. (1 Hensel, #X4C, College Station, TX 77840)

    2002-01-01

    An armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) is provided. The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may include a spring-core (20), at least one superconducting strand (24) wound onto the spring-core (20), and an armored shell (22) that encases the superconducting strands (24). The spring-core (20) is generally a perforated tube that allows purge gases and cryogenic liquids to be circulated through the armored superconducting cable (12), as well as managing the internal stresses within the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12). The armored shell (22) manages the external stresses of the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) to protect the fragile superconducting strands (24). The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may also include a conductive jacket (34) formed outwardly of the armored shell (22).

  16. Abrupt Onset of a Second Energy Gap at the Superconducting Transition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) in conventional BCS superconductors. ... QUASI PARTICLES; SUPERCONDUCTIVITY; SUPERCONDUCTORS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TRANSITION ...

  17. BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; Ghosh, A.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; Muratore, A.; Wanderer, P.

    2011-09-12

    BNL developed Direct Wind magnet technology is used to create a variety of complex multi-functional multi-layer superconducting coil structures without the need for creating custom production tooling and fixturing for each new project. Our Direct Wind process naturally integrates prestress into the coil structure so external coil collars and yokes are not needed; the final coil package transverse size can then be very compact. Direct Wind magnets are produced with very good field quality via corrections applied during the course of coil winding. The HERA-II and BEPC-II Interaction Region (IR) magnet, J-PARC corrector and Alpha antihydrogen magnetic trap magnets and our BTeV corrector magnet design are discussed here along with a full length ILC IR prototype magnet presently in production and the coils that were wound for an ATF2 upgrade at KEK. A new IR septum magnet design concept for a 6.2 T combined-function IR magnet for eRHIC, a future RHIC upgrade, is introduced here.

  18. Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tesanovic, Zlatko [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

    2010-09-01

    Superconductivity is a stunning quantum phenomenon and among the deepest paradigms in all of physics. From fundamental theories of the universe to strange goings-on in exotic materials to medical imaging and cell phones, its conceptual and practical dimensions span a reach as wide as anything in science. Twenty-odd years ago, the discovery of copper oxides ushered in a new era of high-temperature superconductivity, and the joyous exuberance that followed - with physicists throwing everything from fancy gauge theories to synchrotron radiation into its kitchen sink - only recently began to show any signs of waning. In the spring of 2008, as if on cue, a new family of iron pnictide high-temperature superconductors burst on the scene, hinting at an alternative route to room-temperature superconductivity and all of its momentous consequences. Fueled by genuine excitement - and a bit of hype - the iron-based superconductivity turned into a science blockbuster of 2009. I will present a pedagogical review of this new field, contrast the physics of iron- and copper-based systems, and speculate on the microscopic origins of the two types of high-temperature superconductivity.

  19. Microsoft Word - FCL Testing Report Final.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the National Electrical ... standards from organizations such as IEEE or NEMA. Several international standards ...

  20. Microsoft Word - FCL Testing Report Final.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    An Assessment of Fault Current Limiter Testing Requirements Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Prepared by Brian Marchionini and Ndeye K. Fall, Energetics Incorporated Michael "Mischa" Steurer, Florida State University February 2009 Energetics Incorporated i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on

  1. Evolution of superconducting correlations within magnetic-field...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: phonons, thermal conductivity, energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), superconductivity, defects,...

  2. Method and means for separating and classifying superconductive particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jin Y. (Moscow, ID); Kearney, Robert J. (Moscow, ID)

    1991-01-01

    The specification and drawings describe a series of devices and methods for classifying and separating superconductive particles. The superconductive particles may be separated from non-superconductive particles, and the superconductive particles may be separated by degrees of susceptibility to the Meissner effect force. The particles may also be simultaneously separated by size or volume and mass to obtain substantially homogeneous groups of particles. The separation techniques include levitation, preferential sedimentation and preferential concentration. Multiple separation vector forces are disclosed.

  3. Los Alamos scientists see new mechanism for superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New mechanism for superconductivity Los Alamos scientists see new mechanism for superconductivity Researchers have posited an explanation for superconductivity that may open the door to the discovery of new, unconventional forms of superconductivity. November 24, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to

  4. Superfluid helium cryogenic systems for superconducting RF cavities at KEK

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Superfluid helium cryogenic systems for superconducting RF cavities at KEK Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Superfluid helium cryogenic systems for superconducting RF cavities at KEK Recent accelerator projects at KEK, such as the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) for R and D of the International Linear Collider (ILC) project and the compact Energy Recovery Linac (cERL), employ superconducting

  5. ORNL Publishes Study on Superconducting Wire Performance | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy ORNL Publishes Study on Superconducting Wire Performance ORNL Publishes Study on Superconducting Wire Performance August 23, 2013 - 4:06pm Addthis The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recently released a new study on advances in superconducting wire technology. A team led by ORNL's Amit Goyal demonstrated that the ability to control nanoscale imperfections in superconducting wires results in materials with excellent and customized performance. The team's

  6. HPC Transforms Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Debbie Bard » HPC Transforms Cosmology HPC Transforms Cosmology December 3, 2015 by Debbie Bard (originally posted in http://www.scientificcomputing.com/blogs/2015/10/hpc-transforms-cosmology) Visualization of dark matter in the Dark Sky Simulation, the first trillion-particle simulation to be made publicly available. It spans a region nearly 40 billion light-years across, and was produced using 80 million CPU hours on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Titan supercomputer. Courtesy of the Dark

  7. Sr2IrO4: Gateway to cuprate superconductivity?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-06-05

    High temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains a defining challenge in condensed matter physics. Recently, a new set of related compounds based on Ir rather than Cu has been discovered that may be on the verge of superconductivity themselves or be able to shed new light on the underlying interactions responsible for superconductivity in the cuprates.

  8. National Power Transformer Reserve

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request for Information National Power Transformer Reserve Department of Energy Offce of Electricity Delivery and Energy ... Infrastructure, April 2015 Reference 2: United States ...

  9. Impurity effects in superconducting UPt sub 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronson, M.C. (The Harrison M. Randall Laboratory of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (USA)); Vorenkamp, T.; Koziol, Z.; de Visser, A.; Bakker, K.; Franse, J.J.M. (Natuurkundig Laboratorium der Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam, The Netherlands (USA)); Smith, J.L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA))

    1991-04-15

    Superconducting UPt{sub 3} is characterized by a novel and complex magnetic field-temperature phase diagram, with two superconducting transitions at {ital T}{sub {ital c}1} and {ital T}{sub {ital c}2} in zero field. We have studied the effects of Pd and Y impurities on the zero field superconducting properties of UPt{sub 3}. Resistance measurements show that both dopants increase the residual resistivity and decrease the spin fluctuation temperature in the normal state. {ital T}{sub {ital c}1} is depressed by both dopants, but more effectively by Pd. {vert bar}{ital T}{sub {ital c}1} {minus} {ital T}{sub {ital c}2}{vert bar} is essentially unaffected by Y doping, but increases dramatically with Pd doping.

  10. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clem, J.R.

    1982-07-09

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  11. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clem, John R. (Ames, IA); Clem, John R. (Ames, IA)

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  12. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clem, J.R.; Clem, J.R.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped. 5 figs.

  13. Preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Capone, Donald W. (Bolingbrook, IL); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1991-01-01

    A polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0superconducting properties and is capable of conducting very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities.

  14. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples.

  15. Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, J.D.

    1993-12-07

    Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

  16. Influence of optically quenched superconductivity on quasiparticle

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    relaxation rates in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 + δ (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Influence of optically quenched superconductivity on quasiparticle relaxation rates in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 + δ Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on October 5, 2016 Title: Influence of optically quenched superconductivity on quasiparticle relaxation rates in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 + δ Authors: Smallwood, Christopher L. ; Zhang, Wentao ; Miller, Tristan L. ; Affeldt,

  17. Superconducting fault current controller/current controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Yung S.

    2004-06-15

    A superconducting fault current controller/current controller employs a superconducting-shielded core reactor (SSCR) with a variable impedance in a secondary circuit to control current in a primary circuit such as an electrical distribution system. In a second embodiment, a variable current source is employed in a secondary circuit of an SSCR to control current in the primary circuit. In a third embodiment, both a variable impedance in one secondary circuit and a variable current source in a second circuit of an SSCR are employed for separate and independent control of current in the primary circuit.

  18. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector on diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atikian, Haig A.; Burek, Michael J.; Choy, Jennifer T.; Lon?ar, Marko; Eftekharian, Amin; Jafari Salim, A.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2014-03-24

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors are fabricated directly on diamond substrates and their optical and electrical properties are characterized. Dark count performance and photon count rates are measured at varying temperatures for 1310?nm and 632?nm photons. A multi-step diamond surface polishing procedure is reported, involving iterative reactive ion etching and mechanical polishing to create a suitable diamond surface for the deposition and patterning of thin film superconducting layers. Using this approach, diamond substrates with less than 300?pm Root Mean Square surface roughness are obtained.

  19. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY); Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY)

    1999-03-23

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed.

  20. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.

    1999-03-23

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  1. Deployment & Market Transformation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    NREL's deployment and market transformation (D and MT) activities encompass the laboratory's full range of technologies, which span the energy efficiency and renewable energy spectrum. NREL staff educates partners on how they can advance sustainable energy applications and also provides clients with best practices for reducing barriers to innovation and market transformation.

  2. A superconducting focusing solenoid for the neutrino factory linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Green; V. Lebedev; B.R. Strauss

    2002-03-01

    The proposed superconducting linear accelerator that accelerates muons from 190 MeV to 2.45 GeV will use superconducting solenoids for focusing the muon beam. The accelerator will use superconducting RF cavities. These cavities are very sensitive to stay magnetic field from the focusing magnets. Superconducting solenoids can have large stray fields. This paper describes the 201.25-MHz acceleration system for the neutrino factory. This paper also describes a focusing solenoid that delivers almost no stray field to a neighboring superconducting RF cavity.

  3. Superconducting fault current-limiter with variable shunt impedance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Llambes, Juan Carlos H; Xiong, Xuming

    2013-11-19

    A superconducting fault current-limiter is provided, including a superconducting element configured to resistively or inductively limit a fault current, and one or more variable-impedance shunts electrically coupled in parallel with the superconducting element. The variable-impedance shunt(s) is configured to present a first impedance during a superconducting state of the superconducting element and a second impedance during a normal resistive state of the superconducting element. The superconducting element transitions from the superconducting state to the normal resistive state responsive to the fault current, and responsive thereto, the variable-impedance shunt(s) transitions from the first to the second impedance. The second impedance of the variable-impedance shunt(s) is a lower impedance than the first impedance, which facilitates current flow through the variable-impedance shunt(s) during a recovery transition of the superconducting element from the normal resistive state to the superconducting state, and thus, facilitates recovery of the superconducting element under load.

  4. DOE, Texas settle super(conducting) differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, M.

    1994-08-02

    The US DOE agreed to pay over $200 million in cash and transfer $510 million in property to Texas to settle the state`s claims against the federal government for cancellation of the Superconducting Super Collider. This article discusses the settlement and its history and what will be done with the facilities.

  5. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  6. Active superconducting devices formed of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S. (Madison, WI); Beyer, James B. (Madison, WI); Nordman, James E. (Madison, WI); Hohenwarter, Gert K. G. (Madison, WI)

    1991-05-28

    Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

  7. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  8. 119Sn-NMR investigations on superconducting Ca3Ir4Sn13: Evidence for multigap superconductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sarkar, R.; Petrovic, C.; Bruckner, F.; Gunther, M.; Wang, Kefeng; Biswas, P. K.; Luetkens, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Amato, A.; Klauss, H. -H.

    2015-09-25

    In this study, we report bulk superconductivity (SC) in Ca3Ir4Sn13 by means of 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Two classical signatures of BCS superconductivity in spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1), namely the Hebel–Slichter coherence peak just below the Tc, and the exponential decay in the superconducting phase, are evident. The noticeable decrease of 119Sn Knight shift below Tc indicates spin-singlet superconductivity. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 119(1/T1) is convincingly described by the multigap isotropic superconducting gap. NMR experiments do not witness any sign of enhanced spin fluctuations.

  9. Spin liquid polymorphism in a correlated electron system on the threshold of superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalinznyak, Igor; Savici, Andrei T.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Tsvelik, Alexei; Hu, Rongwei; Petrovic, Cedomir

    2015-08-18

    We report neutron scattering measurements which reveal spin-liquid polymorphism in an 11 iron chalcogenide superconductor. It occurs when a poorly metallic magnetic state of FeTe is tuned toward superconductivity by substitution of a small amount of tellurium with isoelectronic sulfur. We also observe a liquid-like magnetic response, which is described by the coexistence of two disordered magnetic phases with different local structures whose relative abundance depends on temperature. One is the ferromagnetic (FM) plaquette phase observed in undoped, nonsuperconducting FeTe, which preserves the C4 symmetry of the underlying square lattice and is favored at high temperatures, whereas the other is the antiferromagnetic plaquette phase with broken C4 symmetry, which emerges with doping and is predominant at low temperatures. These findings suggest the coexistence of and competition between two distinct liquid states, and a liquidliquid phase transformation between these states, in the electronic spin system of FeTe1-x(S,Se)x. We have thus discovered the remarkable physics of competing spin-liquid polymorphs in a correlated electron system approaching superconductivity. These results facilitate an understanding of large swaths of recent experimental data in unconventional superconductors. In particular, the phase with lower C2 local symmetry, whose emergence precedes superconductivity, naturally accounts for a propensity for forming electronic nematic states which have been observed experimentally, in cuprate and iron-based superconductors alike.

  10. Spin liquid polymorphism in a correlated electron system on the threshold of superconductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zalinznyak, Igor; Savici, Andrei T.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Tsvelik, Alexei; Hu, Rongwei; Petrovic, Cedomir

    2015-08-18

    We report neutron scattering measurements which reveal spin-liquid polymorphism in an 11 iron chalcogenide superconductor. It occurs when a poorly metallic magnetic state of FeTe is tuned toward superconductivity by substitution of a small amount of tellurium with isoelectronic sulfur. We also observe a liquid-like magnetic response, which is described by the coexistence of two disordered magnetic phases with different local structures whose relative abundance depends on temperature. One is the ferromagnetic (FM) plaquette phase observed in undoped, nonsuperconducting FeTe, which preserves the C4 symmetry of the underlying square lattice and is favored at high temperatures, whereas the other ismorethe antiferromagnetic plaquette phase with broken C4 symmetry, which emerges with doping and is predominant at low temperatures. These findings suggest the coexistence of and competition between two distinct liquid states, and a liquidliquid phase transformation between these states, in the electronic spin system of FeTe1-x(S,Se)x. We have thus discovered the remarkable physics of competing spin-liquid polymorphs in a correlated electron system approaching superconductivity. These results facilitate an understanding of large swaths of recent experimental data in unconventional superconductors. In particular, the phase with lower C2 local symmetry, whose emergence precedes superconductivity, naturally accounts for a propensity for forming electronic nematic states which have been observed experimentally, in cuprate and iron-based superconductors alike.less

  11. Series Transmission Line Transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buckles, Robert A.; Booth, Rex; Yen, Boris T.

    2004-06-29

    A series transmission line transformer is set forth which includes two or more of impedance matched sets of at least two transmissions lines such as shielded cables, connected in parallel at one end ans series at the other in a cascading fashion. The cables are wound about a magnetic core. The series transmission line transformer (STLT) which can provide for higher impedance ratios and bandwidths, which is scalable, and which is of simpler design and construction.

  12. Transforming Commercial Building Operations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs) *

  13. Torsional texturing of superconducting oxide composite articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christopherson, Craig John (Grafton, MA); Riley, Jr., Gilbert N. (Marlborough, MA); Scudiere, John (Bolton, MA)

    2002-01-01

    A method of texturing a multifilamentary article having filaments comprising a desired oxide superconductor or its precursors by torsionally deforming the article is provided. The texturing is induced by applying a torsional strain which is at least about 0.3 and preferably at least about 0.6 at the surface of the article, but less than the strain which would cause failure of the composite. High performance multifilamentary superconducting composite articles having a plurality of low aspect ratio, twisted filaments with substantially uniform twist pitches in the range of about 1.00 inch to 0.01 inch (25 to 0.25 mm), each comprising a textured desired superconducting oxide material, may be obtained using this texturing method. If tighter twist pitches are desired, the article may be heat treated or annealed and the strain repeated as many times as necessary to obtain the desired twist pitch. It is preferred that the total strain applied per step should be sufficient to provide a twist pitch tighter than 5 times the diameter of the article, and twist pitches in the range of 1 to 5 times the diameter of the article are most preferred. The process may be used to make a high performance multifilamentary superconducting article, having a plurality of twisted filaments, wherein the degree of texturing varies substantially in proportion to the radial distance from the center of the article cross-section, and is substantially radially homogeneous at any given cross-section of the article. Round wires and other low aspect ratio multifilamentary articles are preferred forms. The invention is not dependent on the melting characteristics of the desired superconducting oxide. Desired oxide superconductors or precursors with micaceous or semi-micaceous structures are preferred. When used in connection with desired superconducting oxides which melt irreversibly, it provides multifilamentary articles that exhibit high DC performance characteristics and AC performance markedly superior to any currently available for these materials. In a preferred embodiment, the desired superconducting oxide material is BSCCO 2223.

  14. The superconducting solenoid magnets for MICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.

    2002-12-22

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a channel of superconducting solenoid magnets. The magnets in MICE are around the RF cavities, absorbers (liquid or solid) and the primary particle detectors [1], [2]. The MICE superconducting solenoid system consists of eighteen coils that are grouped in three types of magnet assemblies. The cooling channel consists of two complete cell of an SFOFO cooling channel. Each cell consists of a focusing coil pair around an absorber and a coupling coil around a RF cavity that re-accelerates the muons to their original momentum. At the ends of the experiment are uniform field solenoids for the particle detectors and a set of matching coils used to match the muon beam to the cooling cells. Three absorbers are used instead of two in order to shield the detectors from dark currents generated by the RF cavities at high operating acceleration gradients.

  15. Critical parameters of superconducting materials and structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Dykes, J.W.; Mosley, W.D.; Chaiken, A.; Ralls, K.; Radousky, H.

    1995-02-01

    We report here the completion of a one year project to investigate the synthesis, electronic structure, defect structure, and physical transport properties of high temperature superconducting oxide materials. During the course of this project we produced some of the finest samples of single crystal detwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and stoichiometrically perfect (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3}. We deduced the Fermi surface of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, (La,Sr){sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, and (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3} through the recording of the electron momentum density in these materials as measured by positron annihilation spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission. We also performed extensive studies on Pr substituted (Y,Pr)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} so as to further understand the origin of the electron pairing leading to superconductivity.

  16. Superconductivity and magnetism in rapidly solidified perovskites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Handley, R.C.; Kalonji, G.

    1991-01-01

    The report is divided into six parts, reflecting major thrusts of our work since 1987. The six areas are: molecular orbital theory of high {Tc} superconductivity; rapid solidification processing of oxide superconductors; time dependent magnetic and superconducting properties of these inhomogeneous materials; excess Gd in Gd{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2-x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} perovskites; rapid solidification and directional annealing to achieve high Jc; and Mossbauer studies of T = Fe, Co and Ni site selection in YBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} and GdBa{sub 2}(CuT){sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}.

  17. Composite arrays of superconducting microstrip line resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohebbi, H. R. Miao, G. X.; Benningshof, O. W. B.; Taminiau, I. A. J.; Cory, D. G.

    2014-03-07

    A novel design of an array of half-wave superconductive microstrip resonators is described. The resonator is intended to be useful for electron spin resonance studies of thin film samples at cryogenic temperatures. It achieves a high quality factor, has a small mode-volume, and creates a uniform magnetic field in a plane above the resonator. The device is made of thin film Niobium on sapphire wafer and is tested with a static magnetic field. Variation of Q-factor versus the magnetic field's strength at different temperatures is reported and is in a good agreement with simulation when the loss due to the vortices is included. Also, the power-dependence response of the resonator is shown in experiments and is verified by capturing the nonlinearity associated with the surface impedance of the superconducting film into the circuit model of the device.

  18. HINS Superconducting Lens and Cryostat Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, T.M.; DiMarco, J.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is involved in the development of a 60 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. A prototype solenoid cryostat was built and tested at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. This paper discusses the test results of the prototype and compares the measured and estimated performance of the cryostat. We also present the methods and results for measuring and fiducializing the axis of the solenoid lens.

  19. Superconducting cuprate heterostructures for hot electron bolometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, B.; Yakobov, R.; Vitkalov, S. A.; Sergeev, A.

    2013-11-25

    Transport properties of the resistive state of quasi-two dimensional superconducting heterostructures containing ultrathin La{sub 2?x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} layers synthesized using molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The electron transport exhibits strong deviation from Ohm's law, ?V??I{sup 3}, with a coefficient ?(T) that correlates with the temperature variation of the resistivity d?/dT. Close to the normal state, analysis of the nonlinear behavior in terms of electron heating yields an electron-phonon thermal conductance per unit area g{sub e?ph}?1 W/K cm{sup 2} at T = 20 K, one-two orders of magnitude smaller than in typical superconductors. This makes superconducting LaSrCuO heterostructures to be attractive candidate for the next generation of hot electron bolometers with greatly improved sensitivity.

  20. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing (Albany, NY); Tekletsadik, Kasegn (Rexford, NY)

    2008-10-21

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  1. Sandia Energy - Past Market Transformation Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Past Market Transformation Activities Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Solar Market Transformation Past Market Transformation...

  2. Superconducting RF systems for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belomestnykh S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Hahn, H. et al

    2012-05-20

    The proposed electron-hadron collider eRHIC will consist of a six-pass 30-GeV electron Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and one of RHIC storage rings operating with energy up to 250 GeV. The collider design extensively utilizes superconducting RF (SRF) technology in both electron and hadron parts. This paper describes various SRF systems, their requirements and parameters.

  3. Fermilab | Science | Particle Accelerators | Advanced Superconducting Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerator Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility photo The Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) Facility is America's only test bed for cutting-edge particle beams and for accelerator research aimed at intensity frontier proton accelerators. FAST will also be unique in the United States as a particle beam research facility based on superconducting radio-frequency technology, on which nearly all proposed future accelerators in the world are based. The science

  4. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  5. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  6. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  7. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Wednesday, 26 April 2006 00:00 Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in

  8. Substrates suitable for deposition of superconducting thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Roeland; Boatner, Lynn A.

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting system for the lossless transmission of electrical current comprising a thin film of superconducting material Y.sub.1 Ba.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x epitaxially deposited upon a KTaO.sub.3 substrate. The KTaO.sub.3 is an improved substrate over those of the prior art since the it exhibits small lattice constant mismatch and does not chemically react with the superconducting film.

  9. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    boundaries in YBCO cuprates. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates. A major issue in the understanding of cuprate superconductors is the nature of the metallic state from which high temperature superconductivity emerges. Central to this issue is the pseudogap

  10. Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report Superconductivity for Electric Systems: 2008 Annual Peer Review Final Report The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) for Electric Systems Program's specific mission is to work in partnership with industry to develop HTS wire and perform other research and development activities leading to the commercialization of HTS-based

  11. Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pseudogaps, Polarons, and the Mystery of High-Tc Superconductivity Print Working at the ALS, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers at ALS and Stanford University has identified a pseudogap phase with a nodal-antinodal dichotomy in ferromagnetic manganese oxide materials (manganites). Even though ferromagnetism and superconductivity do not exist together, the pseudogap state found in these manganites is remarkably similar to that found in high-temperature superconducting copper

  12. Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetism and superconductivity exist in harmony Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony Physicists have observed, for the first time in a single exotic phase, a situation where magnetism and superconductivity are necessary for each other's existence. August 28, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable

  13. Method for manufacturing a rotor having superconducting coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Driscoll, David I. (South Euclid, OH); Shoykhet, Boris A. (Beachwood, OH)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing a rotor for use with a rotating machine is provided that employs a superconducting coil on the rotor. An adhesive is applied to an outer surface of the rotor body, which may include a groove disposed within an outer surface of the rotor body. A superconducting coil is then mounted onto the rotor body such that the adhesive bonds the superconducting coil to the rotor body.

  14. Rotatable superconducting cyclotron adapted for medical use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blosser, Henry G. (East Lansing, MI); Johnson, David A. (Williamston, MI); Riedel, Jack (East Lansing, MI); Burleigh, Richard J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A superconducting cyclotron (10) rotatable on a support structure (11) in an arc of about 180.degree. around a pivot axis (A--A) and particularly adapted for medical use is described. The rotatable support structure (13, 15) is balanced by being counterweighted (14) so as to allow rotation of the cyclotron and a beam (12), such as a subparticle (neutron) or atomic particle beam, from the cyclotron in the arc around a patient. Flexible hose (25) is moveably attached to the support structure for providing a liquified gas which is supercooled to near 0.degree. K. to an inlet means (122) to a chamber (105) around superconducting coils (101, 102). The liquid (34) level in the cyclotron is maintained approximately half full so that rotation of the support structure and cyclotron through the 180.degree. can be accomplished without spilling the liquid from the cyclotron. With the coils vertically oriented, each turn of the winding is approximately half immersed in liquid (34) and half exposed to cold gas and adequate cooling to maintain superconducting temperatures in the section of coil above the liquid level is provided by the combination of cold gas/vapor and by the conductive flow of heat along each turn of the winding from the half above the liquid to the half below.

  15. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A major issue in the understanding of cuprate superconductors is the nature of the metallic state from which high temperature superconductivity emerges. Central to this issue is ...

  16. A young person's view of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moya, A.

    1990-08-01

    This report gives a simple description of the Superconducting Super Collider, how it works, and what it is used for. (LSP)

  17. Friedel-Like Oscillations from Interstitial Iron in Superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The interstitial >2muB moment is surrounded by compensating ferromagnetic four ... Subject: 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 36 MATERIALS ...

  18. Using magnetic fields to understand high-temperature superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (high-Tc) superconductivity has been the issue as to whether a quantum critical point-a special doping value where quantum fluctuations lead to strong...

  19. Quasiparticle properties of the superconducting state of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quasiparticle properties of the superconducting state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quasiparticle properties of the ...

  20. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that extends from room temperature to the superconducting transition. Although polarized neutron scattering studies hint at magnetic order associated with the pseudogap, there is...

  1. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrasonic signatures...

  2. Anomalous Zeeman response of the coexisting superconducting and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous Zeeman response of the coexisting superconducting and spin-density-wave phases as a probe of extended s -wave pairing in ferropnictide superconductors Prev Next ...

  3. Systems Reiter, George 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Compton Scattering as a Probe of Hydrogen Bonded (and other) Systems Reiter, George 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND...

  4. History of the superconducting-magnet bubble chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrick, M.; Hyman, L.G.; Pewitt, E.G.

    1980-01-01

    This review covers the development of superconducting magnets, small bubble chambers, and the early history of the 12-foot bubble chamber. (MOW)

  5. J. Robert Schrieffer and the BCS Theory of Superconductivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    J. Robert Schrieffer and the BCS Theory of Superconductivity Resources with Additional Information J. Robert Schrieffer Courtesy of NHMFL Robert Schrieffer received his BS from ...

  6. Damping and support in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Sammamish, WA); McIver, Carl R. (Everett, WA); Mittleider, John A. (Kent, WA)

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses to provide improved auxiliary damping for superconducting bearings in superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. In a superconducting bearing, a cryostat housing the superconductors is connected to a ground state with a combination of a damping strip of material, a set of linkage arms to provide vertical support, and spring washers to provide stiffness. Alternately, the superconducting bearing may be supported by a cryostat connected to a ground state by posts constructed from a mesh of fibers, with the damping and stiffness controlled by the fiber composition, size, and mesh geometry.

  7. High temperature interfacial superconductivity (Patent) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. ...

  8. Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the more recently discovered iron-based superconductors (FeSC). They both have phase diagrams in which superconductivity emerges in proximity to other complex quantum...

  9. Tuning the Superconducting Properties of Magnesium Diboride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudeger Heinrich Theoderich Wilke

    2005-12-17

    This work is presented in the following order: A review of the relevant physics and discussion of theoretical predictions for a two gap superconducting compound is given in chapter 2. Chapter 3 provides a review of the basic properties of MgB{sub 2}. Details of sample synthesis and characterization are given in chapter 4. Chapter 5 presents normal state and superconducting properties of Mg(B{sub 1-x}C{sub x}){sub 2} wires. Attempts to increase critical current densities in filaments via titanium additions are discussed in chapter 6. In chapters 7 and 8 alternative methods for synthesizing doped MgB{sub 2} powders are explored. In chapter 7 we synthesize Mg(B{sub 1-x}C{sub x}){sub 2} up to x=0.069 using a mixture of Mg, B, and the binary compound B{sub 4}C. Chapter 8 explores an alternative method, plasma spray synthesis, to produce nanometer sized doped boron powders for powder-in-tube applications. The effects of neutron irradiation on pure MgB{sub 2} wires is discussed in chapter 9. This is followed by a study of the effects of neutron irradiation on Mg(B{sub .962}C{sub .038}){sub 2} wires, presented in chapter 10. I will summarize the results of all of these studies in chapter 11 and discuss future directions for research in understanding the physics behind this novel material as well as its development for practical applications. In this thesis I have presented the results of investigations into the changes in the superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2} as a function of carbon doping and neutron irradiation. The goal has been to understand the physics underlying this unique two-gap superconductor as different types of perturbations are made to the system. Such knowledge not only contributes to our understanding of two-gap superconductivity, but could potentially lead to the development of superconducting MgB{sub 2} wires for the use in power applications near 20 K.

  10. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.; Abdoud, R.G.

    1996-09-10

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure is disclosed. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing. 9 figs.

  11. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.; Uherka, Kenneth L.; Abdoud, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing.

  12. Superconducting articles, and methods for forming and using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knoll, Allan Robert; Lenseth, Kenneth Patrick

    2007-01-09

    A superconducting tape is disclosed, including a substrate having a first surface and a second surface opposite the first surface, the substrate including a plurality of indicia provided on the first surface spaced apart along a length of the substrate; and a superconductor layer overlying the second surface. Also disclosed are components incorporating superconducting tapes, methods for manufacturing same, and methods for using same.

  13. Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, Heinrich J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage coil connected in parallel between converters of two or more ac power systems provides load leveling and stability improvement to any or all of the ac systems. Control is provided to direct the charging and independently the discharging of the superconducting coil to at least a selected one of the ac power systems.

  14. EIS-0138-S: Superconducting Super Collider, Supplemental, Waxahatchie, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this supplementary statement to analyze the environmental impacts of design modifications to the Superconducting Super Collider that were made following the publication of the Record of Decision that selected Ellis County, Texas, as the location of the laboratory facility. This statement supplements DOE/EIS-0138, Superconducting Super Collider.

  15. Superconducting magnetic energy storage for asynchronous electrical systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boenig, H.J.

    1984-05-16

    It is an object of the present invention to provide superconducting magnetic energy storage for a plurality of asynchronous electrical systems. It is a further object of the present invention to provide load leveling and stability improvement in a plurality of independent ac systems using a single superconducting magnetic energy storage coil.

  16. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  17. Damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    2009-12-15

    Methods and apparatuses for improved damping in high-temperature superconducting levitation systems are disclosed. A superconducting element (e.g., a stator) generating a magnetic field and a magnet (e.g. a rotor) supported by the magnetic field are provided such that the superconducting element is supported relative to a ground state with damped motion substantially perpendicular to the support of the magnetic field on the magnet. Applying this, a cryostat housing the superconducting bearing may be coupled to the ground state with high damping but low radial stiffness, such that its resonant frequency is less than that of the superconducting bearing. The damping of the cryostat may be substantially transferred to the levitated magnetic rotor, thus, providing damping without affecting the rotational loss, as can be derived applying coupled harmonic oscillator theory in rotor dynamics. Thus, damping can be provided to a levitated object, without substantially affecting the rotational loss.

  18. Reduction/Transformation Operators

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    RTOp (reduction/transformation operators) is a collection of C++ software that provides the basic mechanism for implementinig vector operations in a flexible and efficient manner. This is the main interface utilized by Thyra to allow for the specification of specific vector reduction and/or transformation operations. The RTOp package contains three different types of software. (a) a small number of interoperability interfaces. (b) support software including code for the parallel SPMD mode based on only Teuchos::Comm(and notmore » MPl directly(, and (c) a library of pre-implemented RTOp subclasses for everything from simple AXPYs and norms, to more specialized vector operations. RTOp allows an algorithm developer to implement their own RTOp subclasses in a way that is independent from any specific serial, parallel, out-of-core or other type of vector implementation. RTOp is a required package by Thyra and MOOCHO. (c)« less

  19. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando; Ses, Javier; Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del; Snchez-Azqueta, Carlos; Majer, Johannes

    2014-10-20

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50?nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  20. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehy, B.; Altinbas, Z.; Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Laloudakis, N.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Schultheiss, C.; Seda,T.; Than, R.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.; Schultheiss, T.

    2011-03-28

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q{sub 0} of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  1. Aditya Wakhle National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wakhle, 4/15/15, Slide 1 Measuring Fusion with RIBs and Dependence of Quasifission on Neutron Richness Aditya Wakhle National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI A. Wakhle, 4/15/15, Slide 2 Fusion Measurements at ReA3 Multi-purpose Beam Line CFFD Chamber ReA3 experimental area EBIT Charge Breeder F r o m C y c l o t r o n , g a s c a t c h e r A. Wakhle, 4/15/15, Slide 3 Coincidence Fission Fragment Detector CFFD A. Wakhle, 4/15/15, Slide 4 Coincidence

  2. Clamshell microwave cavities having a superconductive coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D. Wayne (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Piel, Helmut (Wuppertal, DE)

    1994-01-01

    A microwave cavity including a pair of opposing clamshell halves, such halves comprised of a metal selected from the group consisting of silver, copper, or a silver-based alloy, wherein the cavity is further characterized as exhibiting a dominant TE.sub.011 mode is provided together with an embodiment wherein the interior concave surfaces of the clamshell halves are coated with a superconductive material. In the case of copper clamshell halves, the microwave cavity has a Q-value of about 1.2.times.10.sup.5 as measured at a temperature of 10K and a frequency of 10 GHz.

  3. Vacuum coupling of rotating superconducting rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoykhet, Boris A.; Zhang, Burt Xudong; Driscoll, David Infante

    2003-12-02

    A rotating coupling allows a vacuum chamber in the rotor of a superconducting electric motor to be continually pumped out. The coupling consists of at least two concentric portions, one of which is allowed to rotate and the other of which is stationary. The coupling is located on the non-drive end of the rotor and is connected to a coolant supply and a vacuum pump. The coupling is smaller in diameter than the shaft of the rotor so that the shaft can be increased in diameter without having to increase the size of the vacuum seal.

  4. Conceptual Design for Superconducting Planar Helical Undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Shigemi

    2004-05-12

    A preliminary consideration was made on a short-period superconducting planar helical undulator (SCHU) for circularly polarized radiation. The SCHU consists of coils and iron poles/yokes. There is no magnetic structure in the horizontal plane of the electron orbit. The SCHU would provide the large horizontal aperture needed to allow injection into the storage ring. The expected field strength is at least 30% larger than that by an APPLE-type permanent-magnet device with the same gap and the same period.

  5. Demonstration & Market Transformation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Peer Review Break-Out Presentation Jim Spaeth Program Manager Demonstration & Market Transformation March 23, 2015 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office DMT Portfolio Peer Review * Introduction of the DMT Peer Review Team * Peer Review Process - Ground rules for review process * DMT Approach to Project Management - Budget Periods * Changes Made in Response to the 2013 Peer Review - Lessons Learned / Best Practices * Portfolio Overview - FOA Status and History - Project Portfolio Changes since

  6. Nano-fabricated superconducting radio-frequency composites, method for producing nano-fabricated superconducting rf composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norem, James H.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2013-06-11

    Superconducting rf is limited by a wide range of failure mechanisms inherent in the typical manufacture methods. This invention provides a method for fabricating superconducting rf structures comprising coating the structures with single atomic-layer thick films of alternating chemical composition. Also provided is a cavity defining the invented laminate structure.

  7. Development of the conventional facilities of the Superconducting Super Collider. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toohig, T.E.

    1994-02-01

    This report discusses an overview of the construction of facilities at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  8. R&D to Enhance the Performance of Superconducting RF Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi

    2015-10-30

    This report proposes techniques on how to increase the performance and efficiency of superconducting RF structures.

  9. Superconducting 112 MHz QWR electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Boulware, C.H.; Chang, X.; Grimm, T.L.; Rao, T.; Siegel, B.; Skaritka, J.; Than, R.; Winowski, M.; Wu, Q.; Xin, T.; Xue, L.

    2011-07-25

    Brookhaven National Laboratory and Niowave, Inc. have designed and fabricated a superconducting 112 MHz quarter-wave resonator (QWR) electron gun. The first cold test of the QWR cryomodule has been completed at Niowave. The paper describes the cryomodule design, presents the cold test results, and outline plans to upgrade the cryomodule. Future experiments include studies of different photocathodes and use for the coherent electron cooling proof-of-principle experiment. Two cathode stalk options, one for multi-alkali photocathodes and the other one for a diamond-amplified photocathode, are discussed. A quarter-wave resonator concept of superconducting RF (SRF) electron gun was proposed at BNL for electron cooling hadron beams in RHIC. QWRs can be made sufficiently compact even at low RF frequencies (long wavelengths). The long wavelength allows to produce long electron bunches, thus minimizing space charge effects and enabling high bunch charge. Also, such guns should be suitable for experiments requiring high average current electron beams. A 112 MHz QWR gun was designed, fabricated, and cold-tested in collaboration between BNL and Niowave. This is the lowest frequency SRF gun ever tested successfully. In this paper we describe the gun design and fabrication, present the cold test results, and outline our plans. This gun will also serve as a prototype for a future SRF gun to be used for coherent electron cooling of hadrons in eRHIC.

  10. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  11. Substantial Transformation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Substantial Transformation Substantial Transformation PDF icon Substantial Transformation More Documents & Publications Questions and Answers for the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program: Frequently Asked Questions Questions and Answers for the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program: Buy American Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Grant Recipient Management Handbook

  12. Method for forming bismuth-based superconducting ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maroni, Victor A.; Merchant, Nazarali N.; Parrella, Ronald D.

    2005-05-17

    A method for reducing the concentration of non-superconducting phases during the heat treatment of Pb doped Ag/Bi-2223 composites having Bi-2223 and Bi-2212 superconducting phases is disclosed. A Pb doped Ag/Bi-2223 composite having Bi-2223 and Bi-2212 superconducting phases is heated in an atmosphere having an oxygen partial pressure not less than about 0.04 atmospheres and the temperature is maintained at the lower of a non-superconducting phase take-off temperature and the Bi-2223 superconducting phase grain growth take-off temperature. The oxygen partial pressure is varied and the temperature is varied between about 815.degree. C. and about 835.degree. C. to produce not less than 80 percent conversion to Pb doped Bi-2223 superconducting phase and not greater than about 20 volume percent non-superconducting phases. The oxygen partial pressure is preferably varied between about 0.04 and about 0.21 atmospheres. A product by the method is disclosed.

  13. Abrupt Onset of a Second Energy Gap at the Superconducting Transition of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Underdoped Bi2212 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Abrupt Onset of a Second Energy Gap at the Superconducting Transition of Underdoped Bi2212 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Abrupt Onset of a Second Energy Gap at the Superconducting Transition of Underdoped Bi2212 The superconducting gap--an energy scale tied to the superconducting phenomena--opens on the Fermi surface at the superconducting transition temperature ({Tc}) in conventional BCS superconductors. In underdoped

  14. Discharging a superconducting store into an inverting converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrianov, V.V.; Zenkevich, V.B.; Popkov, O.V.; Sergeyenkov, B.N.; Sukhorukov, A.G.

    1983-11-01

    It is possible to invert the energy stored in a superconducting solenoid with both a constant mean value of the inverted power, and a constant mean value of the voltage in the leads of the solenoid, which is equal to the mean value of the opposing voltage (counter emf) of the inverter. The operation of a superconducting inductive store together with a high speed semiconductor switch and a three phase inverter is considered. Graphs show changes in currents and voltages on the compacitor, the current flowing through the superconducting solenoid, the current flowing through the capacitor, and that flowing through the controlled rectified.

  15. System and method for cooling a super-conducting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bray, James William (Niskayuna, NY); Steinbach, Albert Eugene (Schenectady, NY); Dawson, Richard Nils (Voorheesville, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Schenectady, NY); Huang, Xianrul (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-01-08

    A system and method for cooling a superconductive rotor coil. The system comprises a rotatable shaft coupled to the superconductive rotor coil. The rotatable shaft may comprise an axial passageway extending through the rotatable shaft and a first passageway extending through a wall of the rotatable shaft to the axial passageway. The axial passageway and the first passageway are operable to convey a cryogenic fluid to the superconductive rotor coil through the wall of the rotatable shaft. A cryogenic transfer coupling may be provided to supply cryogenic fluid to the first passageway.

  16. Friedel-Like Oscillations from Interstitial Iron in Superconducting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fe1+yTe0.62Se0.38 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Friedel-Like Oscillations from Interstitial Iron in Superconducting Fe1+yTe0.62Se0.38 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Friedel-Like Oscillations from Interstitial Iron in Superconducting Fe1+yTe0.62Se0.38 Using polarized and unpolarized neutron scattering we show that interstitial Fe in superconducting Fe$$_{1+y}$$Te$$_{1-x}$$Se$_x$ induces a magnetic Friedel-like oscillation that diffracts at $${\bf

  17. System and method for cooling a superconducting rotary machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Robert Adolf (Schenectady, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Schenectady, NY); Huang, Xianrui (Clifton Park, NY); Bray, James William (Niskayuna, NY)

    2011-08-09

    A system for cooling a superconducting rotary machine includes a plurality of sealed siphon tubes disposed in balanced locations around a rotor adjacent to a superconducting coil. Each of the sealed siphon tubes includes a tubular body and a heat transfer medium disposed in the tubular body that undergoes a phase change during operation of the machine to extract heat from the superconducting coil. A siphon heat exchanger is thermally coupled to the siphon tubes for extracting heat from the siphon tubes during operation of the machine.

  18. Silver-bearing, high-temperature, superconducting (HTS) paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrando, W.A.

    1990-02-15

    A substantial set of device applications awaits development of a workable, durable, high-temperature superconducting (HTS) paint. Such a paint should be truly superconducting with its critical temperature T sub c>77K. For most of these applications, a high critical current (J sub c) is not required, although probably desirable. A process is described which can be used to produce silver-bearing HTS paint coatings on many engineering materials. Preliminary tests have shown good adherence to several ceramics and the ability to meet the superconducting criteria. Moreover, the coatings withstand multiple thermal cycling and stability under laboratory ambient storage conditions for periods of at least several months.

  19. Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

    2011-11-04

    Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, <1 {mu}s, pulsed power source and a TE013-like mode copper cavity, we have been measuring critical magnetic fields of superconductors for accelerator cavity applications. This device can eliminate both thermal and field emission effects due to a short pulse and no electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

  20. Method of preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA); Finnemore, Douglas K. (Ames, IA); Ostenson, Jerome E. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Owen, Charles V. (Ames, IA)

    1985-08-06

    An improved method of preparing composite multifilament superconducting wire of Nb.sub.3 Sn in a copper matrix which eliminates the necessity of coating the drawn wire with tin. A generalized cylindrical billet of an alloy of copper containing at least 15 weight percent niobium, present in the copper as discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles, is provided with at least one longitudinal opening which is filled with tin to form a composite drawing rod. The drawing rod is then drawn to form a ductile composite multifilament wire containing a filament of tin. The ductile wire containing the tin can then be wound into magnet coils or other devices before heating to diffuse the tin through the wire to react with the niobium forming Nb.sub.3 Sn. Also described is an improved method for making large billets of the copper-niobium alloy by consumable-arc casting.

  1. DARHT Delivers Cibola Takes Flight Plutonium Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    663 DARHT Delivers Cibola Takes Flight Plutonium Superconductivity Not for the Birds l o S a l a m o S N a T i o N a l l a B o r a T o r y loS alamoS SCieNCe aND TeChNology magaziNe may 2007 1 663 From Terry Wallace About Our Name: During World War II, all that the outside world knew of Los Alamos and its top-secret laboratory was the mailing address-P . O. Box 1663, Santa Fe, New Mexico. That box number, still part of our address, symbolizes our historic role in the nation's service. Located on

  2. Self field triggered superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

    2008-02-19

    A superconducting fault current limiter array with a plurality of superconductor elements arranged in a meanding array having an even number of supconductors parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to an odd number of the plurality of superconductors, where the odd number of supconductors are parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to the even number of the plurality of superconductors, when viewed from a top view. The even number of superconductors are coupled at the upper end to the upper end of the odd number of superconductors. A plurality of lower shunt coils each coupled to the lower end of each of the even number of superconductors and a plurality of upper shunt coils each coupled to the upper end of each of the odd number of superconductors so as to generate a generally orthoganal uniform magnetic field during quenching using only the magenetic field generated by the superconductors.

  3. Levitation pressure and friction losses in superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting bearing having at least one permanent magnet magnetized with a vertical polarization. The lower or stator portion of the bearing includes an array of high-temperature superconducting elements which are comprised of a plurality of annular rings. An annular ring is located below each permanent magnet and an annular ring is offset horizontally from at least one of the permanent magnets. The rings are composed of individual high-temperature superconducting elements located circumferentially along the ring. By constructing the horizontally-offset high-temperature superconducting ring so that the c-axis is oriented in a radial direction, a higher levitation force can be achieved. Such an orientation will also provide substantially lower rotational drag losses in the bearing.

  4. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilbert, C.; Martinis, J.M.; Clarke, J.

    1984-04-27

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifer, using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID and an input coil are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield, with the input coil inductively coupled to the superconducting ring of the dc SQUID. A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield is applied to the input coil, and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield. A power gain of 19.5 +- 0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0 +- 0.4 K at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  5. Evidence for charge Kondo effect in superconducting Tl-doped...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence for charge Kondo effect in superconducting Tl-doped PbTe We report results of low-temperature thermodynamic and transport ...

  6. J. Robert Schrieffer and the BCS Theory of Superconductivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and his research is available in full-text and on the Web. Documents: Microscopic Theory of Superconductivity; Physical Review, Vol. 106, Issue 1: 162-164, April 1, 1957...

  7. Kondo Physics and Unconventional Superconductivity in the U Intermetal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Kondo Physics and Unconventional Superconductivity in the U Intermetallic U2PtC2 Revealed by NMR Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Kondo Physics and ...

  8. Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and helium. "It's really a question of the chicken and the egg," said coauthor Eric Bauer of Los Alamos. "Does superconductivity need magnetism in this state, or does magnetism...

  9. Cryogenic deformation of high temperature superconductive composite structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Peter R. (Groton, MA); Michels, William (Brookline, MA); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An improvement in a process of preparing a composite high temperature oxide superconductive wire is provided and involves conducting at least one cross-sectional reduction step in the processing preparation of the wire at sub-ambient temperatures.

  10. Photoinduced changes of the chemical potential in superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Photoinduced changes of the chemical potential in superconducting Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 + Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on...

  11. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilbert, Claude (Berkeley, CA); Martinis, John M. (Berkeley, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifier (10), using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID (11) and an input coil (12) are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield (13), with the input coil (12) inductively coupled to the superconducting ring (17) of the dc SQUID (11). A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield (13) is applied to the input coil (12), and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring (17) and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield (13). A power gain of 19.5.+-.0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0.+-.0.4 K. at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  12. A small-bore high-field superconducting quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H.; Lobb, C.T.; Menzel, M.T. ); Walstrom, P.L. )

    1990-01-01

    A prototype superconducting quadrupole magnet was designed and built for use in superconducting coupled-cavity linacs where the use of permanent magnets is ruled out by consideration of trapped flux losses. The magnet has a clear bore diameter of 1.8 cm and outside diameter of 11 cm and length of 11 cm. The magnet was operated at a temperature of 4.2 K and obtained a peak quadrupole field gradient of 320 T/m.

  13. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet.

  14. Quasiparticle properties of the superconducting state of the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    two-dimensional Hubbard model (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Quasiparticle properties of the superconducting state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model Title: Quasiparticle properties of the superconducting state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model Authors: Gull, E. ; Millis, A. J. Publication Date: 2015-02-20 OSTI Identifier: 1180695 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-05CH11231 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 91;

  15. Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting films in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless state (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting films in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless state Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting films in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless state The effects of microwave radiation on transport properties of atomically thin La2-xSrxCuO₄ films were studied in the

  16. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cavities (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the

  17. Electro-thermal simulation of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsili, F.; Najafi, F.; Herder, C.; Berggren, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    We developed an electrothermal model of NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs) on sapphire substrates. SNAPs are single-photon detectors consisting of the parallel connection of N superconducting nanowires. We extrapolated the physical constants of the model from experimental data and we simulated the time evolution of the device resistance, temperature and current by solving two coupled electrical and thermal differential equations describing the nanowires. The predictions of the model were in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting films in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless state (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting films in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless state Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting films in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless state The effects of microwave radiation on transport properties of atomically thin La2-xSrxCuO₄ films were studied in the

  19. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource powders. Special emphasis will be given to the possible ways to differentiate between ferromagnetic- from superconducting-like signals when the magnetic moments of interest remain small in comparison with the large diamagnetic backgrounds. Recently done transport and persistent currents experiments at room temperature on graphite flakes embedded in alkanes and their reproducibility. All the experimental evidence as a whole suggests the existence of superconductivity at very high

  20. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource powders [7]. Special emphasis will be given to the possible ways to differentiate between ferromagnetic- from superconducting-like signals when the magnetic moments of interest remain small in comparison with the large diamagnetic backgrounds. Recently done transport and persistent currents experiments at room temperature on graphite flakes embedded in alkanes and their reproducibility. All the experimental evidence as a whole suggests the existence of superconductivity at very

  1. Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting films in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless state (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting films in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless state Title: Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting films in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless state The effects of microwave radiation on transport properties of atomically thin La2-xSrxCuO₄ films were studied in the 0.1-20 GHz frequency range. Resistance changes induced by

  2. Wire rope superconducting cable for diurnal load leveling SMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a wire rope cable for a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit is discussed. The superconducting wires in the rope permit the passage of large currents in the relatively small conductors of the windings and hence cause large electromagnetic forces to act on the rope. The diameter of the rope, from a strength point of view, can be considerably reduced by supporting the rope at various points along its length.

  3. 2D barrier in a superconducting niobium square

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joya, Miryam R. Barba-ortega, J.; Sardella, Edson

    2014-11-05

    The presence of barriers changes the vortex structure in superconducting Nb square in presence of a uniform applied magnetic field. The Cooper pair configurations in a mesoscopics superconducting square of Nb with a barrier are calculated within the nonlinear Ginzburg Landau equations. We predict the nucleation of multi-vortex states into the sample and a soft entry of the magnetic field inside and around into the barrier. A novel and non-conventional vortex configurations occurs at determined magnetic field.

  4. 7-forming, superconducting filaments through bicomponent dry spinning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuominen, Olli P. (Ogden, UT); Morgan, Carol W. (Asheville, NC); Burlone, Dominick A. (Asheville, NC); Blankenship, Keith V. (Asheville, NC)

    2001-01-01

    Fibers which contain potentially superconducting material are dry spun by the steps of preparing a suspension of potentially superconducting powder in a thickened solvent; preparing a solution of fiber-forming polymer; supplying the suspension and the solution to a spinning apparatus; in the spinning apparatus, arranging the solution and the suspension in a bicomponent arrangement; extruding the arranged solution and suspension from a spinneret as a bicomponent filament; and removing the solvent from the filament.

  5. Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

    2013-08-20

    A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

  6. DOE Science Showcase - Superconductivity | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Scientific and Technical Information Superconductivity "Harnessing the power of superconductivity, or the ability of certain materials to conduct electricity with zero energy loss, is one of the most exciting possibilities for creating a more energy-efficient future. But because most superconductors only work at very low temperatures-just a few degrees above absolute zero, or -273 degrees Celsius-they are not yet useful for everyday life. The discovery in the 1980s of

  7. Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors Wednesday, April 30, 2014 HTSC Figure 1 Fig. 1. Measured electronic structure of underdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 in the orthorhombic spin-density-wave (SDW) ordered state. The antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic directions are indicated by arrows. High-temperature superconductivity (HTSC), one of the long-standing unsolved mysteries of condensed matter physics, is a beautiful example of

  8. Project Fact Sheet Columbus HTS Power Cable Superconductivity

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Columbus HTS Power Cable Superconductivity Partnerships with Industry www.oe.energy.gov Phone: 202 \ 586-1411 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585 Plugging America Into the Future of Power This project involves field-testing of a long-length high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable under real environmental stresses and real electrical loads. The cable system forms an important electrical

  9. Transformational Manufacturing | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transformational Manufacturing Argonne's new Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D Program focuses on scalable process R&D to produce advanced battery...

  10. Interplay between superconductivity and magnetism in iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chubukov, Andrey V

    2015-06-10

    This proposal is for theoretical work on strongly correlated electron systems, which are at the center of experimental and theoretical activities in condensed-matter physics. The interest to this field is driven fascinating variety of observed effects, universality of underlying theoretical ideas, and practical applications. I propose to do research on Iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), which currently attract high attention in the physics community. My goal is to understand superconductivity and magnetism in these materials at various dopings, the interplay between the two, and the physics in the phase in which magnetism and superconductivity co-exist. A related goal is to understand the origin of the observed pseudogap-like behavior in the normal state. My research explores the idea that superconductivity is of electronic origin and is caused by the exchange of spin-fluctuations, enhanced due to close proximity to antiferromagnetism. The multi-orbital/multi-band nature of FeSCs opens routes for qualitatively new superconducting states, particularly the ones which break time-reversal symmetry. By all accounts, the coupling in pnictdes is below the threshold for Mott physics and I intend to analyze these systems within the itinerant approach. My plan is to do research in two stages. I first plan to address several problems within weak-coupling approach. Among them: (i) what sets stripe magnetic order at small doping, (ii) is there a preemptive instability into a spin-nematic state, and how stripe order affects fermions; (iii) is there a co-existence between magnetism and superconductivity and what are the system properties in the co-existence state; (iv) how superconductivity emerges despite strong Coulomb repulsion and can the gap be s-wave but with nodes along electron FSs, (v) are there complex superconducting states, like s+id, which break time reversal symmetry. My second goal is to go beyond weak coupling and derive spin-mediated, dynamic interaction between fermions, understand what sets the upper scale for attractive interaction, compute T_c, and then obtain and solve matrix non-linear gap equation for spin-mediated pairing and study various feedbacks from the pairing on fermions on ARPES spectra, optical and thermal conductivity, and other observables, The problems I have chosen are quite generic, and the understanding of magnetically-mediated superconductivity in the strong-coupling regime will not only advance the theory of superconductivity in FeSCs, but will contribute to a generic understanding of the pairing of fermions near quantum-critical points -- the problems ranging from s-wave pairing by soft optical phonons to to color superconductivity of quarks mediated by a gluon exchange.

  11. Superconductivity for Large Scale Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Fair; W. Stautner; M. Douglass; R. Rajput-Ghoshal; M. Moscinski; P. Riley; D. Wagner; J. Kim; S. Hou; F. Lopez; K. Haran; J. Bray; T. Laskaris; J. Rochford; R. Duckworth

    2012-10-12

    A conceptual design has been completed for a 10MW superconducting direct drive wind turbine generator employing low temperature superconductors for the field winding. Key technology building blocks from the GE Wind and GE Healthcare businesses have been transferred across to the design of this concept machine. Wherever possible, conventional technology and production techniques have been used in order to support the case for commercialization of such a machine. Appendices A and B provide further details of the layout of the machine and the complete specification table for the concept design. Phase 1 of the program has allowed us to understand the trade-offs between the various sub-systems of such a generator and its integration with a wind turbine. A Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) analysis have been completed resulting in the identification of high risk components within the design. The design has been analyzed from a commercial and economic point of view and Cost of Energy (COE) calculations have been carried out with the potential to reduce COE by up to 18% when compared with a permanent magnet direct drive 5MW baseline machine, resulting in a potential COE of 0.075 $/kWh. Finally, a top-level commercialization plan has been proposed to enable this technology to be transitioned to full volume production. The main body of this report will present the design processes employed and the main findings and conclusions.

  12. Method of constructing a superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  13. Cryostat design for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicol, T.H.

    1990-09-01

    The cryostat of an SSC dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the cold mass assembly. It serves to support the cold mass accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation (MLI) system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their 25 year expected life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC collider dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the thermal, structural, and dynamic considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Superconducting microcircuitry by the microlithgraphic patterning of superconducting compounds and related materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coppa, Nicholas V. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting microcircuits including a thin layer of Ba.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.5+x (0superconducting patterns of YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x, or Pr.sub.2 O.sub.3 for insulator patterns of PrBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x. These layers are covered with a layer of photoresist, which is exposed to light through a mask having a pattern for a desired circuit. The photoresist is then developed to reveal a pattern of the thin dopant layer which will be etched away. The microcircuit is then etched and stripped to remove the unneeded portion of the thin dopant layer. Finally, the microcircuit is heated at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to diffuse and react the dopant layer with the thin layer of Ba.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.5+x, forming a pattern of superconductor or insulator.

  15. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharacharya, Raghuthan (Littleton, CO); Parilla, Philip A. (Lakewood, CO); Blaugher, Richard D. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01

    A process for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material.

  16. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharacharya, R.; Parilla, P.A.; Blaugher, R.D.

    1995-12-19

    A process is disclosed for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material. 3 figs.

  17. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-05-01

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of “key” transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturer’s factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCB’s actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  18. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-08-01

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of “key” transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturer’s factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCB’s actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  19. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-05-01

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of key transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturers factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCBs actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  20. Effects of phase transformation on the microstructures and magnetostri...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Subject: 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; DOMAIN STRUCTURE; FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS; FERROMAGNETISM; GALLIUM ALLOYS; IRON BASE ALLOYS; ...

  1. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, William J. (Berkeley, CA); Maple, M. Brian (Del Mar, CA); Geballe, Theodore H. (Woodside, CA)

    1988-01-01

    Shock wave formation of superconductive ceramic oxide electric and magnetic circuit elements with improved microstructures and mechanical properties.

  2. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, William J. (Berkeley, CA); Geballe, Theodore H. (Woodside, CA); Maple, M. Brian (Del Mar, CA)

    1988-01-01

    Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures.

  3. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, W.J.; Maple, M.B.; Geballe, T.H.

    1987-10-23

    Shock wave formation of superconductive ceramic oxide electric and magnetic circuit elements with improved microstructures and mechanical properties. 10 figs.

  4. New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind Turbine

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Generators | Department of Energy Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind Turbine Generators New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind Turbine Generators September 12, 2014 - 11:08am Addthis AML Superconductivity and Magnetics, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory, recently announced that their superconducting magnet system passed a landmark reliability test, demonstrating its potential suitability

  5. Advances on MHD superconducting magnets design and construction in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negrini, F.; Blasio, P.; Martinelli, G.; Molfino, P.

    1993-12-31

    The paper illustrates the activities developed in the frame of the Progetto Finalizzato {open_quotes}Superconducting and Cryogenic Technologies: superconducting magnets for MHD{close_quotes}. This five years Italian national program on MHD superconducting magnets is near the completions. Many important targets have been obtained in very good agreement with the initial hypotheses. The MHD s.c. prototype is now under fabrication at the Ansaldo workshop in Genova. One of the main effort of the project is the development and production of the 8800 metres of NbTi copper stabilised cable in conduit ({open_quotes}rope in a pipe{close_quotes} type) in single lengths of 300 m average. This cable is now under production at Europa Metalli (Fornaci di Barga, Italy). In the present contribution the main problems that had to be solved after and during the production by the designer and the manufacturer, are described.

  6. Controllable quantum information network with a superconducting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Feng-yang, E-mail: zhangfy@mail.dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Liu, Bao [Beijing Computational Science Research Center (CSRC), Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Zi-hong [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wu, Song-lin [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Song, He-shan [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-07-15

    We propose a controllable and scalable architecture for quantum information processing using a superconducting system network, which is composed of current-biased Josephson junctions (CBJJs) as tunable couplers between the two superconducting transmission line resonators (TLRs), each coupling to multiple superconducting qubits (SQs). We explicitly demonstrate that the entangled state, the phase gate, and the information transfer between any two selected SQs can be implemented, respectively. Lastly, numerical simulation shows that our scheme is robust against the decoherence of the system. -- Highlights: An architecture for quantum information processing is proposed. The quantum information transfer between any two selected SQs is implemented. This proposal is robust against the decoherence of the system. This architecture can be fabricated on a chip down to the micrometer scale.

  7. Method for producing strain tolerant multifilamentary oxide superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finnemore, Douglas K. (Ames, IA); Miller, Theodore A. (Tucson, AZ); Ostenson, Jerome E. (Ames, IA); Schwartzkopf, Louis A. (Mankato, MN); Sanders, Steven C. (Ames, IA)

    1994-07-19

    A strain tolerant multifilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments.

  8. Uniformly wound superconducting coil and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mookerjee, Sumit (Cedar Hill, TX); Weijun, Shen (Beijun, CN); Yager, Billy (Waxahachie, TX)

    1994-01-01

    A coil of superconducting wire for a superconducting magnet having a relaely dense and uniformly spaced winding to enhance the homogeneity and strength of the magnetic field surrounding the coil and a method of winding the same wherein the mandrel used to wind said coil comprises removable spacers and retainers forming a plurality of outwardly opening slots, each of said slots extending generally about the periphery of the mandrel and being sized to receive and outwardly align and retain successive turns of the superconducting wire within each slot as the wire is wound around and laterally across the mandrel to form a plurality of wire ribbons of a predetermined thickness laterally across the mandrel.

  9. Uniformly wound superconducting coil and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mookerjee, S.; Weijun, S.; Yager, B.

    1994-03-08

    A coil of superconducting wire for a superconducting magnet is described having a relatively dense and uniformly spaced winding to enhance the homogeneity and strength of the magnetic field surrounding the coil and a method of winding the same wherein the mandrel used to wind said coil comprises removable spacers and retainers forming a plurality of outwardly opening slots, each of said slots extending generally about the periphery of the mandrel and being sized to receive and outwardly align and retain successive turns of the superconducting wire within each slot as the wire is wound around and laterally across the mandrel to form a plurality of wire ribbons of a predetermined thickness laterally across the mandrel. 8 figures.

  10. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  11. Method for producing strain tolerant multifilamentary oxide superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finnemore, D.K.; Miller, T.A.; Ostenson, J.E.; Schwartzkopf, L.A.; Sanders, S.C.

    1994-07-19

    A strain tolerant multifilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments. 6 figs.

  12. The LASS (Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.; Bienz, T.; Bierce, R.; Bird, F.; Bird, L.; Blockus, D.; Carnegie, R.K.; Chien, C.Y.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K and K interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly.

  13. Mechanical stabilization of BSCCO-2223 superconducting tapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.G.; Grey, D.A.; Mantone, A.

    1996-12-31

    A system to provide mechanical stabilization to high temperature BSCCO-2223 superconducting tape by laminating 0.081 mm thick, spring hard, copper foil to both sides with lead-tin eutectic solder has been successfully optimized. This system has been applied as a method to create a strong, windable composite from pure silver BSCCO tapes with a minimum of critical current (I{sub c}) degradation. The {open_quotes}as received{close_quotes} conductor is evaluated for physical consistency of width and thickness over the 3000 meters that were later strengthened, insulated and wound into a demonstration coil. Electrical degradation in the strengthened tape as a result of lamination was found to average 24 percent with a range from 4 to 51 percent. This was less than the degradation that would have occurred in an unstrengthened tape during subsequent insulation and coil winding processes. Additional work was performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the strengthened tapes. The copper can double the ultimate tensile strength of the pure silver tapes. Additionally, pure silver and dispersion strengthened silver matrix tapes are laminated with 0.025 mm thick copper and 304 stainless steel foil to investigate minimization of the cross sectional area of the strengthening component. The stainless steel can increase the UTS of the pure silver tapes sixfold. Metallography is used to examine the laminate and the conductor. Mechanical properties and critical currents of these tapes are also reported both before and after strengthening. The I{sub c} is also measured as a function of strain on the laminated tapes.

  14. National Symposium on Market Transformation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) and the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE), this three-day conference features speakers covering topics within the scope of market transformation.

  15. Transform Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Transform Solar Place: Boise, Idaho Product: Idaho-based PV module maker and joint venture between Micron and Origin Energy. Coordinates: 43.60698, -116.193409...

  16. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print Wednesday, 29 January 2014 00:00 A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other.

  17. Market Transformation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Transformation Market Transformation Significant research and development progress has paved the way for fuel cells to enter today's commercial marketplace for a variety of applications, including specialty vehicles and stationary and portable power. The growing number of commercial products, in combination with the federal and state financial incentives available now, are instrumental in supporting the role that fuel cells play in our nation's energy portfolio. Through its market

  18. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J.S.

    1992-11-03

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet. 6 figs.

  19. Critical current of the dispersion superconducting phase, obtained during aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanov, Y.P.; Smirnov, L.V.; Sadovskiy, V.D.; Volkenshteyn, N.V.

    1983-12-01

    High critical parameters of plastic superconductors on a base of solid solutions are obtained as a result of plastic deformation and heat treatment. At the same time, the critical current and field of monocrystalline samples turn out to be significantly lower. The preservation of superconducting in high magnetic fields is conditioned by the presence of a dense network of very thin intersecting filaments, which remain superconducting during the conversion of the main mass of the material into the normal state with the help of an electron microscope. A lamellar threddike structure was determined which was conditioned by plastic deformation and the breakdown of a solid solution.

  20. Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation Authors: Dakovski, Georgi L. ; Lee, Wei-Sheng ; Hawthorn, David G. ; Garner,

  1. Buffer layers for REBCO films for use in superconducting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyal, Amit; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2014-06-10

    A superconducting article includes a substrate having a biaxially textured surface. A biaxially textured buffer layer, which can be a cap layer, is supported by the substrate. The buffer layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different transition metal cations. A biaxially textured superconductor layer is deposited so as to be supported by the buffer layer. A method of making a superconducting article is also disclosed.

  2. Enhancement of Superconductivity of Lanthanum and Yttrium Sesquicarbide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krupka, M. C.; Giorgi, A. L.; Krikorian, N. H.; Szklarz, E. G.

    1972-06-22

    A method of enhancing the superconductivity of body-centered cubic lanthanum and yttrium sesquicarbide through formation of the sesquicarbides from ternary alloys of novel composition (N/sub x/M/sub 1-x/)C/sub z/, where N is yttrium or lanthanum, M is thorium, any of the Group IV and VI transition metals, or gold, germanium or silicon, and z is approximately 1.2 to 1.6. These ternary sesquicarbides have superconducting transition temperatures as high as 17.0/sup 0/K.

  3. Superconducting properties in single crystals of the topological nodal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    semimetal PbTaSe 2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Superconducting properties in single crystals of the topological nodal semimetal PbTaSe 2 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on February 21, 2017 Title: Superconducting properties in single crystals of the topological nodal semimetal PbTaSe 2 Authors: Zhang, Cheng-Long ; Yuan, Zhujun ; Bian, Guang ; Xu, Su-Yang ; Zhang, Xiao ; Hasan, M. Zahid ; Jia, Shuang Publication Date: 2016-02-22 OSTI

  4. High temperature superconducting composite conductor and method for manufacturing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Bingert, John F.

    2002-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting composite conductor is provided including a high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, the high temperature superconducting composite conductor characterized as having a fill factor of greater than about 40. Additionally, the conductor can be further characterized as containing multiple cores of high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, said multiple cores characterized as having substantially uniform geometry in the cross-sectional dimensions. Processes of forming such a high temperature superconducting composite conductor are also provided.

  5. Segmented superconducting tape having reduced AC losses and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Wang, Haiyan (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-09-22

    A superconducting tape having reduced AC losses. The tape has a high temperature superconductor layer that is segmented. Disruptive strips, formed in one of the tape substrate, a buffer layer, and the superconducting layer create parallel discontinuities in the superconducting layer that separate the current-carrying elements of the superconducting layer into strips or filament-like structures. Segmentation of the current-carrying elements has the effect of reducing AC current losses. Methods of making such a superconducting tape and reducing AC losses in such tapes are also disclosed.

  6. National Electric Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming the Grid to Revolutionize Electric Power in North America National Electric Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming the Grid to ...

  7. Market Transformation: Fuel Cell Early Adoption (Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transformation: Fuel Cell Early Adoption (Presentation) Market Transformation: Fuel Cell Early Adoption (Presentation) Presented at the DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop held ...

  8. Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Advances would boost security screening systems, infrared thermal cameras,...

  9. Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange This report...

  10. Two-dimensional lattice gauge theories with superconducting quantum circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcos, D.; Widmer, P.; Rico, E.; Hafezi, M.; Rabl, P.; Wiese, U.-J.; Zoller, P.

    2014-12-15

    A quantum simulator of U(1) lattice gauge theories can be implemented with superconducting circuits. This allows the investigation of confined and deconfined phases in quantum link models, and of valence bond solid and spin liquid phases in quantum dimer models. Fractionalized confining strings and the real-time dynamics of quantum phase transitions are accessible as well. Here we show how state-of-the-art superconducting technology allows us to simulate these phenomena in relatively small circuit lattices. By exploiting the strong non-linear couplings between quantized excitations emerging when superconducting qubits are coupled, we show how to engineer gauge invariant Hamiltonians, including ring-exchange and four-body Ising interactions. We demonstrate that, despite decoherence and disorder effects, minimal circuit instances allow us to investigate properties such as the dynamics of electric flux strings, signaling confinement in gauge invariant field theories. The experimental realization of these models in larger superconducting circuits could address open questions beyond current computational capability.

  11. Superconducting articles of manufacture and method of producing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newkirk, Lawrence R. (Los Alamos, NM); Valencia, Flavio A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1980-01-01

    Bulk coatings of Nb.sub.3 Ge with high superconducting transition temperatures bonded to metallic substrates and a chemical vapor deposition method for producing such coatings on metallic substrates are disclosed. In accordance with the method, a Nb.sub.3 Ge coating having a transition temperature in excess of 21.5 K may be tightly bonded to a copper substrate.

  12. Sandia, Los Alamos, Superconducting Technologies Inc., & Superpower:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solution Deposition Planarization Los Alamos, Superconducting Technologies Inc., & Superpower: Solution Deposition Planarization - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power

  13. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-08-05

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap. 4 figs.

  14. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-10-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap. 4 figs.

  15. Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Capone, D.W.; Dunlap, B.D.; Veal, B.W.

    1990-07-17

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]X] (where 0 < X < 0.5) exhibits superconducting properties and is capable of conducting very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. The highly anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of the polycrystalline metal oxide material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state. 4 figs.

  16. Superconducting Super Collider Magnet System requirements. Revision A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1986-10-23

    This report discusses the Superconducting Super Collider magnet system requirements when the following categories: Functions; operational performance requirements; system configuration and essential features; structural requirements; availability/reliability; instrumentation and control requirements; design life; environment; maintenance requirements; interface systems; quality assurance; safety; and applicable codes and standards.

  17. Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Capone, Donald W. (Bolingbrook, IL); Dunlap, Bobby D. (Bolingbrook, IL); Veal, Boyd W. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1990-01-01

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0superconducting properties and is capable of conducting very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. The highly anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of the polycrystalline metal oxide material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state.

  18. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  19. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  20. Phase Transformations in Confined Nanosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shield, Jeffrey E.; Belashchenko, Kirill

    2014-04-29

    This project discovered that non-equilibrium structures, including chemically ordered structures not observed in bulk systems, form in isolated nanoscale systems. Further, a generalized model was developed that effectively explained the suppression of equilibrium phase transformations. This thermodynamic model considered the free energy decrease associated with the phase transformation was less than the increase in energy associated with the formation of an interphase interface, therefore inhibiting the phase transformation. A critical diameter exists where the system transitions to bulk behavior, and a generalized equation was formulated that successfully predicted this transition in the Fe-Au system. This provided and explains a new route to novel structures not possible in bulk systems. The structural characterization was accomplished using transmission electron microscopy in collaboration with Matthew Kramer of Ames Laboratory. The PI and graduate student visited Ames Laboratory several times a year to conduct the experiments.

  1. Efficient transformer for electromagnetic waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, R.B.

    A transformer structure for efficient transfer of electromagnetic energy from a transmission line to an unmatched load provides voltage multiplication and current division by a predetermined constant. Impedance levels are transformed by the square of that constant. The structure includes a wave splitter, connected to an input transmission device and to a plurality of output transmission devices. The output transmission devices are effectively connected in parallel to the input transmission device. The output transmission devices are effectively series connected to provide energy to a load. The transformer structure is particularly effective in increasing efficiency of energy transfer through an inverting convolute structure by capturing and transferring energy losses from the inverter to the load.

  2. SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science SPOT Suite brings advanced algorithms, high performance computing and data management to the masses August 18, 2014 Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov als.jpg Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Berkeley Lab (Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt) Some mysteries of science can only be explained on a nanometer scale -even smaller than a single strand of human DNA, which is about 2.5 nanometers wide. At this scale, scientists

  3. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014.The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 kVA transformer passed the impulse test in KEMA high-voltage laboratories. Additional products include: nine papers published in the IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, one patent has been filed, three PhD students were supported from beginning to graduation, five postdoctoral fellows, and three MSc students were partially supported. The electrical characteristics of our dry-type toroidal transformers are similar to those of the oil-immersed pole mounted transformers currently in use by many utilities, but toroids have higher efficiency. The no-load losses of the 50 kVA prototype are only 45 W. A standard transformer has no-load losses between 90 and 240 W. Thus, even the finest transformer built today with standard technology has double the amount of no-load losses than the prototype toroidal transformer. When the manufacturing process is prepared for mass production, the cost of a dry-type toroidal transformer would be similar to the price of an oil-filed standard design. However, because of the greatly reduced losses, the total ownership cost of a toroidal transformer could be about half of a traditional design. We got a grant from Power Bridge NY in the amount of $149,985 from June 2014 to May 2015 to continue developing the transformer with commercialization objectives. We are considering the possibility to incorporate a company to manufacture the transformers and have contacted investors. The current status of the real life testing is as follows: after several months of silence, Con Edison has re-started conversations and has shown willingness to test the transformer. Other companies, PSE&G and National Grid have recently also shown interest and we will present our product to them soon.

  4. Marketing and Market Transformation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Transformation Marketing and Market Transformation Presents how going green will grow your business, as well as how programs can overcome appraisal challenges. PDF icon Marketing and Market Transformation Presentation More Documents & Publications Marketing and Market Transformation Working with the Real Estate Sector Trends in Real Estate and Energy Efficiency

  5. Considerations on the design of front-end electronics for silicon calorimetry for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wintenberg, A.L.; Bauer, M.L.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Kennedy, E.J.; Todd, R.A. ); Berridge, S.C.; Bugg, W.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Some considerations are described for the design of a silicon-based sampling calorimetry detector for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The use of silicon as the detection medium allows fast, accurate, and fine-grained energy measurements -- but for optimal performance, the front-end electronics must be matched to the detector characteristics and have the speed required by the high SSC interaction rates. The relation between the signal-to-noise ratio of the calorimeter electronics and the charge collection time, the preamplifier power dissipation, detector capacitance and leakage, charge gain, and signal shaping and sampling was studied. The electrostatic transformer connection was analyzed and found to be unusable for a tightly arranged calorimeter because of stray capacitance effects. The method of deconvolutional sampling was developed as a means for pileup correction following synchronous sampling and analog storage. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Superconducting microcircuitry by the microlithographic patterning of superconducting compounds and related materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coppa, N.V.

    1993-08-24

    A method is described of producing superconducting microcircuits comprising the steps of: depositing a thin film of Ba[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 5+x](O < x < 1) onto a substrate; depositing a thin film of a dopant onto said thin film of Ba[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 5+x]; depositing a photoresist onto said thin film of a dopant; shining light through a mask containing a pattern for a desired circuit configuration and onto said photoresist; developing said photoresist to remove portions of said photoresist shined by the light and to selectively expose said dopant film; etching said selectively exposed dopant film from said thin film of Ba[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 5+x] to form a pattern of dopant; and heating said substrate at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to diffuse and react said pattern of dopant with said thin film of Ba[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 5+x].

  7. Resonance at the Rabi frequency in a superconducting flux qubit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, Ya. S.; Il'ichev, E.; Oelsner, G.; Shevchenko, S. N.

    2014-10-15

    We analyze a system composed of a superconducting flux qubit coupled to a transmission-line resonator driven by two signals with frequencies close to the resonator's harmonics. The first strong signal is used for exciting the system to a high energetic state while a second weak signal is applied for probing effective eigenstates of the system. In the framework of doubly dressed states we showed the possibility of amplification and attenuation of the probe signal by direct transitions at the Rabi frequency. We present a brief review of theoretical and experimental works where a direct resonance at Rabi frequency have been investigated in superconducting flux qubits. The interaction of the qubit with photons of two harmonics has prospects to be used as a quantum amplifier (microwave laser) or an attenuator.

  8. Spin-Lattice Coupling and Superconductivity in Fe Pnictides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egami, T.; Fine, B. V.; Parshall, D.; Subedi, A.; Singh, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We consider strong spin-lattice and spin-phonon coupling in iron pnictides and discuss its implications on superconductivity. Strong magneto-volume effect in iron compounds has long been known as the Invar effect. Fe pnictides also exhibit this effect, reflected in particular on the dependence of the magnetic moment on the atomic volume of Fe defined by the positions of the nearest neighbor atoms. Through the phenomenological Landau theory, developed on the basis of the calculations by the density functional theory (DFT) and the experimental results, we quantify the strength of the spin-lattice interaction as it relates to the Stoner criterion for themore »onset of magnetism. We suggest that the coupling between electrons and phonons through the spin channel may be sufficiently strong to be an important part of the superconductivity mechanism in Fe pnictides.« less

  9. Method of manufacturing a niobium-aluminum-germanium superconductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, John L. (San Francisco, CA); Pickus, Milton R. (Oakland, CA); Douglas, Kent E. (Redondo Beach, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A method for manufacturing flexible Nb.sub.3 (Al,Ge) multifilamentary superconductive material in which a sintered porous niobium compact is infiltrated with an aluminum-germanium alloy and thereafter deformed and heat treated in a series of steps at different successively higher temperatures preferably below 1000.degree. C. to produce filaments composed of Nb.sub.3 (Al,G3) within the compact. By avoiding temperatures in excess of 1000.degree. C. during the heat treatment, cladding material such as copper can be applied to facilitate a deformation step preceding the heat treatment and can remain in place through the heat treatment to also serve as a temperature stabilizer for supeconductive material produced. Further, these lower heat treatment temperatures favor formation of filaments with reduced grain size and, hence with more grain boundaries which in turn increase the current-carrying capacity of the superconductive material.

  10. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-07-03

    Design, analysis, and low-power tests are described on a ferroelectric tuner concept that could be used for controlling external coupling to RF cavities for the superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the electron cooler of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner configuration utilizes several small donut-shaped ferroelectric assemblies, which allow the design to be simpler and more flexible, as compared to previous designs. Design parameters for 704 and 1300 MHz versions of the tuner are given. Simulation results point to efficient performance that could reduce by a factor-of-ten the RF power levels required for driving superconducting cavities in the BNL ERL.

  11. Superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus structural support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Withers, Gregory J. (Bolingbrook, IL); Meier, Stephen W. (Bolingbrook, IL); Walter, Robert J. (Batavia, IL); Child, Michael D. (Naperville, IL); DeGraaf, Douglas W. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus comprising a cylindrical superconducting coil; a cylindrical coil containment vessel enclosing the coil and adapted to hold a liquid, such as liquefied helium; and a cylindrical vacuum vessel enclosing the coil containment vessel and located in a restraining structure having inner and outer circumferential walls and a floor; the apparatus being provided with horizontal compression members between (1) the coil and the coil containment vessel and (2) between the coil containment vessel and the vacuum vessel, compression bearing members between the vacuum vessel and the restraining structure inner and outer walls, vertical support members (1) between the coil bottom and the coil containment vessel bottom and (2) between the coil containment vessel bottom and the vacuum vessel bottom, and external supports between the vacuum vessel bottom and the restraining structure floor, whereby the loads developed by thermal and magnetic energy changes in the apparatus can be accommodated and the structural integrity of the apparatus be maintained.

  12. Superconductivity Distorted by the Coexisting Pseudogap in the Antinodal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Region of Bi1.5Pb0.55Sr1.6La0.4CuO6+\delta: A Photon-Energy-Dependent Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Superconductivity Distorted by the Coexisting Pseudogap in the Antinodal Region of Bi1.5Pb0.55Sr1.6La0.4CuO6+\delta: A Photon-Energy-Dependent Angle-Resolved Photoemission Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Superconductivity Distorted by the Coexisting Pseudogap in the Antinodal Region of Bi1.5Pb0.55Sr1.6La0.4CuO6+\delta: A

  13. Design of Superconducting Parallel Bar Deflecting and Crabbing rf Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jean Delayen, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    A new concept for a deflecting and crabbing rf structure based on half-wave resonant lines was introduced recently*. It offers significant advantages to existing designs and, because of it compactness, allows low frequency operation. This concept has been further refined and optimized for superconducting implementation. Results of this optimization and application to a 400 MHz crabbing cavity and a 499 MHz deflecting cavity are presented.

  14. Synthesis of superconducting Nb3Sn coatings on Nb substrates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barzi, E.; Franz, S.; Reginato, F.; Turrioni, D.; Bestetti, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the present work the electrochemical and thermal syntheses of superconductive Nb3Sn films are investigated. The Nb3Sn phase is obtained by electrodeposition of Sn layers and Cu intermediate layers onto Nb substrates followed by high temperature diffusion in inert atmosphere. Electrodeposition was performed from aqueous solutions at current densities in the 20 to 50 mA/cm2 range and at temperatures between 40 and 50°C. Subsequent thermal treatments were realized to obtain the Nb3Sn superconductive phase. Glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) demonstrated that after thermal treatment interdiffusion of Nb and Sn occurred across a thickness of about 13 μm. Scanning Electronmore » Microscopy (SEM) allowed accurately measuring the thickness of the Nb3Sn phase, whose average for the various types of film samples was between 5.7 and 8.0 μm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed the presence of a cubic Nb3Sn phase (A15 structure) having (210) preferred orientation. The maximum obtained Tc was 17.68 K and the Bc20 ranged between 22.5 T and 23.8 T. With the procedure described in the present paper, coating complex shapes cost-effectively becomes possible, which is typical of electrochemical techniques. Furthermore, this approach can be implemented in classical wire processes such as "Jelly Roll" or "Rod in Tube", or directly used for producing superconducting surfaces. In conclusion, the potential of this method for Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) structures is also outlined.« less

  15. Antenna-coupled high T[sub c] superconducting microbolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Q.

    1992-12-15

    A device is provided for measuring radiant energy, the device comprising a substrate; a bolometer formed from a high T[sub c] superconducting material disposed on the substrate in an area that is about 1[times]5 [mu]m[sup 2] and about 0.02 [mu]m in depth; and a planar antenna disposed on the substrate and coupled to receive radiation and to impart the received radiation to the bolometer. 5 figs.

  16. Antenna-coupled high T.sub.c superconducting microbolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Qing (Boston, MA)

    1992-01-01

    A device is provided for measuring radiant energy, the device comprising a substrate; a bolometer formed from a high T.sub.c superconducting material disposed on the substrate in an area that is about 1.times.5 .mu.m.sup.2 and about 0.02 .mu.m in depth; and a planar antenna disposed on the substrate and coupled to receive radiation and to impart the received radiation to the bolometer.

  17. Complex States, Emergent Phenomena & Superconductivity in Intermetallic &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal-like Compounds | The Ames Laboratory States, Emergent Phenomena & Superconductivity in Intermetallic & Metal-like Compounds Research Personnel Updates Publications Using Disorder to Study How Electrons Pair in Iron-Based Superconductors Read More A 3D Superconductor in 1D Clothing Read More The Space Between: Superconductor Energy Gap Structures Read More Previous Pause Next Synthesis The specific scientific question to be addressed by this FWP is: how can we develop, discover,

  18. High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Heavy-Ions| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation / Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown

  19. biomass-to-biofuels transformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass-to-biofuels transformation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  20. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  1. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  2. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise for use in

  3. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  4. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  5. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  6. Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals Print A superionic material is a multi-component solid with simultaneous characteristics of both a solid and a liquid. Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one of the atomic species in the material will exhibit liquid-like ionic conductivity and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Discovered by Michael Faraday almost 200 years ago, superionic materials today hold promise

  7. Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age Superconductivity is a stunning quantum phenomenon and among the deepest paradigms in all of physics. From fundamental theories of the universe to strange goings-on in exotic materials to medical imaging and cell phones, its conceptual and practical dimensions span a reach as wide as anything in science. Twenty-odd years ago, the discovery of copper oxides ushered in a

  8. Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age Superconductivity is a stunning quantum phenomenon and among the deepest paradigms in all of physics. From fundamental theories of the universe to strange goings-on in exotic materials to medical imaging and cell phones, its conceptual and practical dimensions span a reach as wide as anything in science. Twenty-odd years ago, the discovery of copper oxides

  9. Audit of controls over Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory subcontractor expenditures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-22

    In January 1989 the Department of Energy contracted with Universities Research Association, Inc. to design, construct, manage, operate, and maintain the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. Through Fiscal Year 1992, costs for subcontractor goods and services accounted for about 75 percent of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory expenditures. The Office of Inspector General evaluated the adequacy of controls in place to ensure that subcontractor costs were reasonable, as required by the contract. The following conclusions were drawn from the audit. The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory did not consistently exercise prudent business judgment in making subcontractor expenditures. As a result, $60 million in expenditures already made and $128 million planned with commercial subcontractors were, in the authors opinion, unnecessary, excessive, or represented uncontrolled growth. The audit also found inadequate justifications, accountability, and cost controls over $143 million in expenditures made and $47 million planned with other Department of Energy laboratories. Improvements were needed in subcontract administration and internal controls, including appropriate audit coverage of the subcontracts. In addition, Department of Energy guidance concerning procurement actions between the laboratories needed to be established.

  10. Acoustic plane wave preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolt, Thomas L. (North Olmsted, OH); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1991-01-01

    A polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0superconducting properties and is capable of conducting very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. With the superconducting metal oxide in the form of a ceramic slip which has not yet set, orientation of the crystal basal planes parallel with the direction of desired current flow is accomplished by an applied acoustic plane wave in the acoustic or ultrasonic frequency range (either progressive or standing) in applying a torque to each crystal particle. The ceramic slip is then set and fired by conventional methods to produce a conductor with preferentially oriented grains and substantially enhanced current carrying capacity.

  11. Stress dependent oxidation of sputtered niobium and effects on superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Henry, M. Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Clark, Blythe G.; Shaner, Eric; Jarecki, Robert

    2014-02-28

    We report on the suppression of room temperature oxidation of DC sputtered niobium films and the effects upon the superconductive transition temperature, T{sub c}. Niobium was sputter-deposited on silicon dioxide coated 150?mm wafers and permitted to oxidize at room temperature and pressure for up to two years. Resistivity and stress measurements indicate that tensile films greater than 400?MPa resist bulk oxidation with measurements using transmission electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry confirming this result. Although a surface oxide, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, consumed the top 610?nm, we measure less than 1 at.% oxygen and nitrogen in the bulk of the films after the oxidation period. T{sub c} measurements using a SQUID magnetometer indicate that the tensile films maintained a T{sub c} approaching the dirty superconductive limit of 8.4?K after two years of oxidation while maintaining room temperature sheet resistance. This work demonstrates that control over niobium film stress during deposition can prevent bulk oxidation by limiting the vertical grain boundaries ability to oxidize, prolonging the superconductive properties of sputtered niobium when exposed to atmosphere.

  12. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C.

    1994-12-31

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  13. Superconducting laser photocathode RF gun at BNL | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Superconducting laser photocathode RF gun at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science ...

  14. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program, January 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.D. (comp.)

    1982-02-01

    Work reported is on the development of a 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit for use by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to stabilize power oscillations on their Pacific AC Intertie. The 30 MJ superconducting coil manufacture was completed. Design of the seismic mounting of the coil to the nonconducting dewar lid and a concrete foundation is complete. The superconducting application VAR (SAVAR) control study indicated a low economic advantage and the SAVAR program was terminated. An economic and technological evaluation of superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) was completed and the results are reported.

  15. 2016 National Symposium on Market Transformation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Symposium on Market Transformation 2016 National Symposium on Market Transformation March 20, 2016 9:00AM EDT to March 22, 2016 5:00PM EDT Hyatt Regency Baltimore ...

  16. Sandia Energy - Energy Supply Transformation Needed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Distribution Grid Integration News & Events Systems Analysis Energy Assurance Microgrid Transmission Grid Integration Systems Engineering Energy Supply Transformation...

  17. Solar Energy Technologies Program: Market Transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-26

    Fact sheet summarizing the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market transformation subprogram

  18. Market Transformation Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Transformation Fact Sheet Market Transformation Fact Sheet This fact sheet describes the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's Market Transformation strategies and activities, which are aimed at accelerating early market adoption and advancing pre-competitive technologies. PDF icon Market Transformation More Documents & Publications Early Markets: Fuel Cells for Material Handling Equipment Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Markets Early Markets:

  19. Mechanisms of cellular transformation by carcinogenic agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grunberger, D.; Goff, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: DNA Modification by Chemical Carcinogens; Role of DNA Lesions and Repair in the Transformation of Human Cells; The Induction and Regulation of Radiogenic Transformation In Vitro: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms; Cellular Transformation by Adenoviruses; and The fos Gene.

  20. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  1. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  2. Computing Instantaneous Frequency by normalizing Hilbert Transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Norden E.

    2005-05-31

    This invention presents Normalized Amplitude Hilbert Transform (NAHT) and Normalized Hilbert Transform(NHT), both of which are new methods for computing Instantaneous Frequency. This method is designed specifically to circumvent the limitation set by the Bedorsian and Nuttal Theorems, and to provide a sharp local measure of error when the quadrature and the Hilbert Transform do not agree. Motivation for this method is that straightforward application of the Hilbert Transform followed by taking the derivative of the phase-angle as the Instantaneous Frequency (IF) leads to a common mistake made up to this date. In order to make the Hilbert Transform method work, the data has to obey certain restrictions.

  3. Synthesis of high T.sub.C superconducting coatings and patterns by melt writing and oxidation of metallic precursor alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gao, Wei (Somerville, MA); Vander Sande, John B. (Newbury, MA)

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for fabrication of superconducting oxides and superconducting oxide composites and for joining superconductors to other materials. A coating of a molten alloy containing the metallic elements of the oxide is applied to a substrate surface and oxidized to form the superconducting oxide. A material can be contacted to the molten alloy which is subsequently oxidized joining the material to the resulting superconducting oxide coating. Substrates of varied composition and shape can be coated or joined by this method.

  4. Superconductivity and Physical Properties of CaPd2Ge2 Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, V K; Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, Makariy A; Prozorov, Ruslan; Johnston, David C

    2014-10-08

    We present the superconducting and normal state properties of CaPd2Ge2 single crystals investigated by magnetic susceptibility ?, isothermal magnetization M, heat capacity Cp, in-plane electrical resistivity ? and London penetration depth ? versus temperature T and magnetic field H measurements. Bulk superconductivity is inferred from the ?(T) and Cp(T) data. The ?(T) data exhibit metallic behavior and a superconducting transition with Tc onset = 1.98 K and zero resistivity at Tc 0 = 1.67 K. The ?(T) reveals the onset of superconductivity at 2.0 K. For T > 2.0 K, the ?(T) and M(H) are weakly anisotropic paramagnetic with ?ab > ?c. The Cp(T) data confirm the bulk superconductivity below Tc = 1.69(3) K. The superconducting state electronic heat capacity is analyzed within the framework of a single-band ?-model of BCS superconductivity and various normal and superconducting state parameters are estimated. Within the ?-model, the Cp(T) data and the ab plane ?(T) data consistently indicate a moderately anisotropic s-wave gap with ?(0)/kBTc ? 1.6, somewhat smaller than the BCS value of 1.764. The relationship of the heat capacity jump at Tc and the penetration depth measurement to the anisotropy in the s-wave gap is discussed.

  5. Ceramic superconductor/metal composite materials employing the superconducting proximity effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, Matthew J. (Manhattan Beach, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting composite materials having particles of superconducting material disposed in a metal matrix material with a high electron-boson coupling coefficient (.lambda.). The superconducting particles can comprise any type of superconductor including Laves phase materials, Chevrel phase materials, A15 compounds, and perovskite cuprate ceramics. The particles preferably have dimensions of about 10-500 nanometers. The particles preferably have dimensions larger than the superconducting coherence length of the superconducting material. The metal matrix material has a .lambda. greater than 0.2, preferably the .lambda. is much higher than 0.2. The metal matrix material is a good proximity superconductor due to its high .lambda.. When cooled, the superconductor particles cause the metal matrix material to become superconducting due to the proximity effect. In cases where the particles and the metal matrix material are chemically incompatible (i.e., reactive in a way that destroys superconductivity), the particles are provided with a thin protective metal coating. The coating is chemically compatible with the particles and metal matrix material. High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cuprate ceramic particles are reactive and therefore require a coating of a noble metal resistant to oxidation (e.g., silver, gold). The proximity effect extends through the metal coating. With certain superconductors, non-noble metals can be used for the coating.

  6. Electromagnetically superconducting phase of QCD vacuum induced by strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chernodub, M. N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2011-05-23

    In this talk we discuss our recent suggestion that the QCD vacuum in a sufficiently strong magnetic field (stronger than 10{sup 16} Tesla) may undergo a spontaneous transition to an electromagnetically superconducting state. The possible superconducting state is anisotropic (the vacuum exhibits superconductivity only along the axis of the uniform magnetic field) and inhomogeneous (in the transverse directions the vacuum structure shares similarity with the Abrikosov lattice of an ordinary type-II superconductor). The electromagnetic superconductivity of the QCD vacuum is suggested to occur due to emergence of specific quark-antiquark condensates which carry quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons. A Lorentz-covariant generalization of the London transport equations for the magnetic-field-induced superconductivity is given.

  7. Microelectronic superconducting device with multi-layer contact

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-26

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3] ; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps. The photolithographic process is used to separately pattern the high T[sub c] superconductor thin films. 14 figures.

  8. Simulated Performance of the Wisconsin Superconducting Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.A. Bosch, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    The Wisconsin superconducting electron gun is modeled with multiparticle tracking simulations using the ASTRA and GPT codes. To specify the construction of the emittance-compensation solenoid, we studied the dependence of the output bunch's emittance upon the solenoid's strength and field errors. We also evaluated the dependence of the output bunch's emittance upon the bunch's initial emittance and the size of the laser spot on the photocathode. The results suggest that a 200-pC bunch with an emittance of about one mm-mrad can be produced for a free-electron laser.

  9. Competing charge, spin, and superconducting orders in underdoped

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    YBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript y] (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect YBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript y] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Competing charge, spin, and superconducting orders in underdoped YBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript y] Authors: Hucker, M. ; Christensen, N.B. ; Holmes, A.T. ; Blackburn, E. ; Forgan, E.M. ; Liang, Ruixing ; Bonn, D.A. ; Hardy, W.N. ; Gutowski, O. ; Zimmermann, M.v. ; Hayden, S.M. ; Chang, J. [1] ; Denmark) [2] ;

  10. Method for fabricating multi-strand superconducting cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, A.R.

    1985-04-01

    Multi-strand superconducting cables adapted to be used, for example, to wind a magnet are fabricated by directing wire strands inwardly from spools disposed on the perimeter of a rotating disk and wrapping them diagonally around a tapered mandrel with a flattened cross-sectional shape with a core having a wedge-shaped channel. As the cable is pulled axially, flexibly coupled wedge-shaped pieces are continuously passed through the channel in the mandrel and inserted into the cable as an internal support therefor.

  11. Superconducting Higher Harmonic RF Cavity for the APS Upgrade Electron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Rings | Argonne National Laboratory Superconducting Higher Harmonic RF Cavity for the APS Upgrade Electron Storage Rings March 14, 2016 3:30PM to 4:30PM Presenter Sanghoon Kim, Physics Division Location Building 203, Room R150 Type Seminar Series Physics Division Seminar Abstract: A new trend in electron storange rings is the use of a "nulti-bend achromat" (MBA) lattice to reduce the electron beam emittance. The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade (APS-U) MBA lattice improves

  12. Superconducting focusing quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabbi, G.L.; Faltens, A.; Leitner, M.; Lietzke, A.; Seidl, P.; Barnard, J.; Lund, S.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Radovinsky, A.; Schultz, J.; Meinke, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is developing superconducting focusing magnets for both near-term experiments and future driver accelerators. In particular, single bore quadrupoles have been fabricated and tested for use in the High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The next steps involve the development of magnets for the planned Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) and the fabrication of the first prototype multi-beam focusing arrays for fusion driver accelerators. The status of the magnet R&D program is reported, including experimental requirements, design issues and test results.

  13. Control Surveys for Underground Construction of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greening, W.J.Trevor; Robinson, Gregory L.; Robbins, Jeffrey S.; Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    Particular care had to be taken in the design and implementation of the geodetic control systems for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) due to stringent accuracy requirements, the demanding tunneling schedule, long duration and large size of the construction effort of the project. The surveying requirements and the design and implementation of the surface and underground control scheme for the precise location of facilities which include approximately 120 km of bored tunnel are discussed. The methodology used for the densification of the surface control networks, the technique used for the transfer of horizontal and vertical control into the underground facilities, and the control traverse scheme employed in the tunnels is described.

  14. Project Fact Sheet Long Island HTS Power Cable Superconducting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Long Island HTS Power Cable Superconducting Power Equipment www.oe.energy.gov Phone: 202-586-1411 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585 Plugging America Into the Future of Power What is the status of the Project? The cable was energized April 22, 2008 and serves the equivalent of 300,000 homes. It is the first HTS power cable to operate at transmission voltage in the grid. LIPA plans to retain

  15. Ceramic/metal and A15/metal superconducting composite materials exploiting the superconducting proximity effect and method of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, Matthew J. (Manhattan Beach, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A composite superconducting material made of coated particles of ceramic superconducting material and a metal matrix material. The metal matrix material fills the regions between the coated particles. The coating material is a material that is chemically nonreactive with the ceramic. Preferably, it is silver. The coating serves to chemically insulate the ceramic from the metal matrix material. The metal matrix material is a metal that is susceptible to the superconducting proximity effect. Preferably, it is a NbTi alloy. The metal matrix material is induced to become superconducting by the superconducting proximity effect when the temperature of the material goes below the critical temperature of the ceramic. The material has the improved mechanical properties of the metal matrix material. Preferably, the material consists of approximately 10% NbTi, 90% coated ceramic particles (by volume). Certain aspects of the material and method will depend upon the particular ceramic superconductor employed. An alternative embodiment of the invention utilizes A15 compound superconducting particles in a metal matrix material which is preferably a NbTi alloy.

  16. Development of a superconducting connection for niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Kneisel; Gianluigi Ciovati; Jacek Sekutowicz; Waldemar Singer; Xenia Singer; Axel Matheisen

    2007-06-18

    Several, partially successful attempts have been made in the past to develop a superconducting connection between adjacent niobium cavities with the capability to carry up to 30 mT of the magnetic flux. Such a connection would be particularly of great benefit to layouts of long accelerators like ILC because it would shorten the distances between structures and therefore the total length of an accelerator with the associated cost reductions. In addition the superconducting connection would be ideal for a super-structure two multi-cell cavities connected through a half wavelength long beam pipe providing the coupling. Two welded prototypes of super-structure have been successfully tested with the beam at DESY. The chemical treatment and water rinsing was rather complicated for these prototypes because of the length of the assembly. We have engaged in a program to develop such a connection, initially based on the Nb55Ti material. Several options are pursued such as e.g. a two-cell cavity is being used to explore the reachable magnetic flux for the TESLA like connection with a squeezed niobium gasket between the flanges. Other materials, such as NbZr or NbN are also being considered. In this contribution, we will report about the progress of our investigations.

  17. Development of a superconducting connection for niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Kneisel; Gianluigi Ciovati; Jacek Sekutowicz; Waldemar Singer; Xenia Singer; Axel Matheisen

    2007-06-22

    Several, partially successful attempts have been made in the past to develop a superconducting connection between adjacent niobium cavities with the capability to carry up to 30 mT of the magnetic flux. Such a connection would be particularly of great benefit to layouts of long accelerators like ILC because it would shorten the distances between structures and therefore the total length of an accelerator with the associated cost reductions. In addition the superconducting connection would be ideal for a super-structure two multi-cell cavities connected through a half wavelength long beam pipe providing the coupling. Two welded prototypes of super-structure have been successfully tested with the beam at DESY. The chemical treatment and water rinsing was rather complicated for these prototypes because of the length of the assembly. We have engaged in a program to develop such a connection, initially based on the Nb55Ti material. Several options are pursued such as e.g. a two-cell cavity is being used to explore the reachable magnetic flux for the TESLA like connection with a squeezed niobium gasket between the flanges. Other materials, such as NbZr or NbN are also being considered. In this contribution, we will report about the progress of our investigations.

  18. Preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials by mechanical means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Capone, Donald W. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1990-01-01

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0<.times.<0.5) is capable of accommodating very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu--O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the metal oxide material to accommodate high current densities. The orthorhombic crystalline particles have a tendency to lie down on one of the longer sides, i.e., on the a- or b-direction. Aligning the crystals in this orientation is accomplished by mechanical working of the material such as by extrusion, tape casting or slip casting, provided a single crystal powder is used as a starting material, to provide a highly oriented, e.g., approximately 90% of the crystal particles have a common orientation, superconducting matrix capable of supporting large current densities.

  19. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, X. K.; Zheng, S. X.; Bradshaw, Thomas; Baynham, Elwyn; Cobb, John; Lau, Wing; Lau, Peter; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-09-09

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) consists of a target, a beam line, a pion decay channel, the MICE cooling channel. Superconducting magnets are used in the pion decay channel and the MICE cooling channel. This report describes the MICE cooling channel magnets and the progress in the design and fabrication of these magnets. The MICE cooling channel consists of three types of superconducting solenoids; the spectrometer solenoids, the coupling solenoids and the focusing solenoids. The three types of magnets are being fabricated in he United States, China, and the United Kingdom respectively. The spectrometer magnets are used to analyze the muon beam before and after muon cooling. The coupling magnets couple the focusing sections and keep the muon beam contained within the iris of the RF cavities that re used to recover the muon momentum lost during ionization cooling. The focusing magnets focus the muon beam in the center of a liquid hydrogen absorber. The first of the cooling channel magnets will be operational in MICE in the spring of 2010.

  20. Construction and Test of a Novel Superconducting RF Electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisognano, Joseph J.

    2014-04-16

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison has completed installation of a superconducting electron gun. Its concept was optimized to be the source for a CW free electron laser facility with multiple megahertz repetition rate end stations. This VHF superconducting configuration holds the promise of the highest performance for CW injectors. Initial commissioning efforts show that the cavity can achieve gradients of 35 MV/m at the cathode position. With the cathode inserted CW operation has been achieved at 20 MV/m with good control of microphonics, negligible dark current, and Q0 > 3×109 at 4 K. Bunch charges of ~100 pC have been delivered, and first simple beam measurements made. These preliminary results are very encouraging for production of 100s pC bunches with millimeter-milliradian or smaller normalized emittances. Plans are in place to carry out more definitive studies to establish the full capabilities. However, since the grant was not renewed, the electron gun is currently mothballed, and without supplemental fund the opportunity for further work will be lost.

  1. Preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials by mechanical means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Capone, D.W.

    1990-11-27

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]X] (where 0 < X < 0.5) is capable of accommodating very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the metal oxide material to accommodate high current densities. The orthorhombic crystalline particles have a tendency to lie down on one of the longer sides, i.e., on the a- or b-direction. Aligning the crystals in this orientation is accomplished by mechanical working of the material such as by extrusion, tape casting or slip casting, provided a single crystal powder is used as a starting material, to provide a highly oriented, e.g., approximately 90% of the crystal particles have a common orientation, superconducting matrix capable of supporting large current densities. 3 figs.

  2. Extrusion of metal oxide superconducting wire, tube or ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dusek, Joseph T. (Lombard, IL)

    1993-01-01

    A process for extruding a superconducting metal oxide composition YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x provides a wire (tube or ribbon) having a cohesive mass and a degree of flexibility together with enhanced electrical properties. Wire diameters in the range of 6-85 mils have been produced with smaller wires on the order of 10 mils in diameter exhibiting enhanced flexibility for forming braided, or multistrand, configurations for greater current carrying capacity. The composition for extrusion contains a polymeric binder to provide a cohesive mass to bind the particles together during the extrusion process with the binder subsequently removed at lower temperatures during sintering. The composition for extrusion further includes a deflocculent, an organic plasticizer and a solvent which also are subsequently removed during sintering. Electrically conductive tubing with an inner diameter of 52 mil and an outer diameter of 87-355 mil has also been produced. Flat ribbons have been produced in the range of 10-125 mil thick by 100-500 mil wide. The superconducting wire, tube or ribbon may include an outer ceramic insulating sheath co-extruded with the wire, tubing or ribbon.

  3. Extrusion of metal oxide superconducting wire, tube or ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dusek, Joseph T.

    1993-10-05

    A process for extruding a superconducting metal oxide composition YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x provides a wire (tube or ribbon) having a cohesive mass and a degree of flexibility together with enhanced electrical properties. Wire diameters in the range of 6-85 mils have been produced with smaller wires on the order of 10 mils in diameter exhibiting enhanced flexibility for forming braided, or multistrand, configurations for greater current carrying capacity. The composition for extrusion contains a polymeric binder to provide a cohesive mass to bind the particles together during the extrusion process with the binder subsequently removed at lower temperatures during sintering. The composition for extrusion further includes a deflocculent, an organic plasticizer and a solvent which also are subsequently removed during sintering. Electrically conductive tubing with an inner diameter of 52 mil and an outer diameter of 87-355 mil has also been produced. Flat ribbons have been produced in the range of 10-125 mil thick by 100-500 mil wide. The superconducting wire, tube or ribbon may include an outer ceramic insulating sheath co-extruded with the wire, tubing or ribbon.

  4. Geometry-dependent critical currents in superconducting nanocircuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clem, John R.; Berggren, Karl K.

    2011-11-18

    In this paper, we calculate the critical currents in thin superconducting strips with sharp right-angle turns, 180{sup o} turnarounds, and more complicated geometries, where all the line widths are much smaller than the Pearl length {Lambda} = 2{lambda}{sup 2}/d. We define the critical current as the current that reduces the Gibbs-free-energy barrier to zero. We show that current crowding, which occurs whenever the current rounds a sharp turn, tends to reduce the critical current, but we also show that when the radius of curvature is less than the coherence length, this effect is partially compensated by a radius-of-curvature effect. We propose several patterns with rounded corners to avoid critical-current reduction due to current crowding. These results are relevant to superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors, where they suggest a means of improving the bias conditions and reducing dark counts. These results also have relevance to normal-metal nanocircuits, as these patterns can reduce the electrical resistance, electromigration, and hot spots caused by nonuniform heating.

  5. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Wang, Kefeng; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (SR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field SR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field SR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ?? with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap valuemoreof 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.less

  6. Superconducting composite with multilayer patterns and multiple buffer layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D. (Greenbelt, MD); Muenchausen, Ross E. (Espanola, NM)

    1993-01-01

    An article of manufacture including a substrate, a patterned interlayer of a material selected from the group consisting of magnesium oxide, barium-titanium oxide or barium-zirconium oxide, the patterned interlayer material overcoated with a secondary interlayer material of yttria-stabilized zirconia or magnesium-aluminum oxide, upon the surface of the substrate whereby an intermediate article with an exposed surface of both the overcoated patterned interlayer and the substrate is formed, a coating of a buffer layer selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, yttrium oxide, curium oxide, dysprosium oxide, erbium oxide, europium oxide, iron oxide, gadolinium oxide, holmium oxide, indium oxide, lanthanum oxide, manganese oxide, lutetium oxide, neodymium oxide, praseodymium oxide, plutonium oxide, samarium oxide, terbium oxide, thallium oxide, thulium oxide, yttrium oxide and ytterbium oxide over the entire exposed surface of the intermediate article, and, a ceramic superco n FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of superconducting articles having two distinct regions of superconductive material with differing in-plane orientations whereby the conductivity across the boundary between the two regions can be tailored. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  7. Energy Technology Solutions: Public-Private Partnerships Transforming...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Technology Solutions: Public-Private Partnerships Transforming Industry, November 2010 Energy Technology Solutions: Public-Private Partnerships Transforming Industry,...

  8. NEMA Distribution Transformers, CCE Overview and Update presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distribution Transformers, CCE Overview and Update presentation, dated 05242011 NEMA Distribution Transformers, CCE Overview and Update presentation, dated 05242011 This...

  9. One-way transformation of information

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, James A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for one-way transformation of data according to multiplication and/or exponentiation modulo a prime number. An implementation of the invention permits the one way residue transformation, useful in encryption and similar applications, to be implemented by n-bit computers substantially with no increase in difficulty or complexity over a natural transformation thereby, using a modulus which is a power of two.

  10. Articles about Market Transformation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Transformation Articles about Market Transformation RSS Below are stories about market transformation featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program. September 29, 2015 New Report Shows Domestic Offshore Wind Industry Potential, 21 Projects Planned in U.S. Waters The Energy Department today released a new report showing strong progress for the U.S. offshore wind market-including the start of construction of the nation's first commercial-scale offshore wind farm, one of 21

  11. Wavelet transform techniques and signal analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, R.B.; Mattingly, J.K. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Perez, J.S. . Facultad de Informatica)

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally, the most widely used signal analysis tool is the Fourier transform which, by producing power spectral densities (PSDs), allows time dependent signals to be studied in the frequency domain. However, the Fourier transform is global -- it extends over the entire time domain -- which makes it ill-suited to study nonstationary signals which exhibit local temporal changes in the signal's frequency content. To analyze nonstationary signals, the family of transforms commonly designated as short-time Fourier transforms (STFTs), capable of identifying temporally localized changes in the signal's frequency content, were developed by employing window functions to isolate temporal regions of the signal. For example, the Gabor STFT uses a Gaussian window. However, the applicability of STFTs is limited by various inadequacies. The Wavelet transform (NW), recently developed by Grossman and Morlet and explored in depth by Daubechies (2) and Mallat, remedies the inadequacies of STFTs. Like the Fourier transform, the WT can be implemented as a discrete transform (DWT) or as a continuous (integral) transform (CWT). This paper briefly illustrates some of the potential applications of the wavelet transform algorithms to signal analysis.

  12. Wavelet transform techniques and signal analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, R.B.; Mattingly, J.K. |; Perez, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    Traditionally, the most widely used signal analysis tool is the Fourier transform which, by producing power spectral densities (PSDs), allows time dependent signals to be studied in the frequency domain. However, the Fourier transform is global -- it extends over the entire time domain -- which makes it ill-suited to study nonstationary signals which exhibit local temporal changes in the signal`s frequency content. To analyze nonstationary signals, the family of transforms commonly designated as short-time Fourier transforms (STFTs), capable of identifying temporally localized changes in the signal`s frequency content, were developed by employing window functions to isolate temporal regions of the signal. For example, the Gabor STFT uses a Gaussian window. However, the applicability of STFTs is limited by various inadequacies. The Wavelet transform (NW), recently developed by Grossman and Morlet and explored in depth by Daubechies (2) and Mallat, remedies the inadequacies of STFTs. Like the Fourier transform, the WT can be implemented as a discrete transform (DWT) or as a continuous (integral) transform (CWT). This paper briefly illustrates some of the potential applications of the wavelet transform algorithms to signal analysis.

  13. Ecology Action: Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review More Documents & Publications Assessment of Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification Methods - 2014 ...

  14. Investigating Processes of Nanocrystal Formation and Transformation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Investigating Processes of Nanocrystal Formation and Transformation via Liquid Cell TEM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Investigating Processes of Nanocrystal Formation...

  15. Marketing and Market Transformation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marketing and Market Transformation Presents how going green will grow your business, as well as how programs can overcome appraisal challenges. PDF icon Marketing and Market ...

  16. Titanium ? - ? phase transformation pathway and a predicted...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Titanium - phase transformation pathway and a predicted metastable structure Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on January 14,...

  17. 500 kV Spare Transformer Procurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Procurement capital project is for the acquisition of five, 500 kV spare transformers, which are to be strategically located throughout the system, and for the...

  18. CSV to ISO XML metadata transformation tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-01

    Django app for converting CSV records to XML metadata documents. This transformation from the metadata content model to parsed ISO XML documents allows for metadata integration into NGDS.

  19. Ad Lucem: Modeling Market Transformation Pathways Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This white paper summarizes the information discussed during the Ad Lucem: Modeling Market Transformation Pathways Workshop, Feb. 17, 2012, in Berkeley, California.

  20. Crystal growth and annealing study of fragile, non-bulk superconductivity in YFe2Ge 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, H.; Ran, S.; Mun, E. D.; Hodovanets, H.; Tanatar, M. A.; Prozorov, R.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-02-05

    In this study, we investigated the occurrence and nature of superconductivity in single crystals of YFe2Ge2 grown out of Sn flux by employing X-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity and specific heat measurements. We found that the residual resistivity ratio (RRR) of single crystals can be greatly improved, reaching as high as ~60, by decanting the crystals from the molten Sn at ~350°C and/or by annealing at temperatures between 550°C and 600°C. We found that the samples with RRR ≳ 34 showed resistive signatures of superconductivity with the onset of the superconducting transition Tc ≈ 1.4K. RRR values vary between 35 andmore » 65 with, on average, no systematic change in value Tc, indicating that the systematic changes in RRR do not lead to comparable changes in Tc. Specific heat measurements on samples that showed the clear resistive signatures of a superconducting transition did not show any signature of a superconducting phase transition, which suggests that the superconductivity observed in this compound is either some sort of filamentary, strain-stabilized superconductivity associated with small amounts of stressed YFe2Ge2 (perhaps at twin boundaries or dislocations) or is a second crystallographic phase that is present at level below detection capability of conventional powder X-ray techniques.« less

  1. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Superconducting Nanocrystalline MgB 2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Jun; Xiao, Zhili; Lin, Qiyin; Claus, Helmut; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB 2 ) is considered a promising material for practical application in superconducting devices, with a transition temperature near 40 K. In the present paper, nanocrystalline MgB 2 with an average particle size of approximately 70 nm is synthesized by reacting LiBH 4 with MgH 2 at temperatures as low as 450 ° C. This synthesis approach successfully bypasses the usage of either elemental boron or toxic diborane gas. The superconductivity of the nanostructures is confirmed by magnetization measurements, showing a superconducting critical temperature of 38.7 K.

  2. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, Fred (Livermore, CA); Hoard, Ronald W. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  3. Spin-polaron theory of high-{Tc} superconductivity: I, spin polarons and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    high-{Tc} pairing (Conference) | SciTech Connect Spin-polaron theory of high-{Tc} superconductivity: I, spin polarons and high-{Tc} pairing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spin-polaron theory of high-{Tc} superconductivity: I, spin polarons and high-{Tc} pairing The concept of a spin polaron is introduced and contrasted with the more familiar ionic polaron picture. A brief review of aspects of ionic bipolaronic superconductivity is given with particular emphasis on the real-space

  4. Single-photon detectors based on ultra-narrow superconducting nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsili, F.; Najafi, F.; Dauler, E.; Bellei, F.; Hu, X.; Molnar, R.; Berggren, K. K.

    2011-05-11

    We report efficient single-photon detection (? = 20% at 1550 nm wavelength) with ultranarrow (20 and 30 nm wide) superconducting nanowires, which were shown to be more robust to constrictions and more responsive to 1550 nm wavelength photons than standard superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors, based on 90 nm wide nanowires. We also improved our understanding of the physics of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors, which we used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of ultranarrow-nanowire detectors by a factor of 4, thus relaxing the requirements on the read-out circuitry and making the devices suitable for a broader range of applications.

  5. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Superconducting NanocrystallineMgB2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Jun; Xiao, Zhili; Lin, Qiyin; Claus, Helmut; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered a promising material for practical application in superconducting devices, with a transition temperature near 40?K. In the present paper, nanocrystalline MgB2with an average particle size of approximately 70?nm is synthesized by reacting LiBH4with MgH2at temperatures as low as 450C. This synthesis approach successfully bypasses the usage of either elemental boron or toxic diborane gas. The superconductivity of the nanostructures is confirmed by magnetization measurements, showing a superconducting critical temperature of 38.7?K.

  6. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  7. Biochemical transformation of solid carbonaceous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY); Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY)

    2001-09-25

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed.

  8. Enterprise transformation :lessons learned, pathways to success.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slavin, Adam M.; Woodard, Joan Brune

    2006-05-01

    In this report, we characterize the key themes of transformation and tie them together in a ''how to'' guide. The perspectives were synthesized from strategic management literature, case studies, and from interviews with key management personnel from private industry on their transformation experiences.

  9. Demonstration & Market Transformation Plenary Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plenary Presentation Jim Spaeth Program Manager Demonstration & Market Transformation March 23, 2015 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office DMT Plenary - Outline * Goals and Objectives * Key Barriers * Approach to Overcoming Barriers * Key Accomplishments * Portfolio * Budget History * Funding Opportunity Announcements * Coordination Efforts * Future Directions * BETO Staff * Reviewers 3 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Introduction to Demonstration & Market Transformation The Demonstration

  10. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-07-04

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

  11. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murduck, James M. (Lisle, IL); Lepetre, Yves J. (Lauris, FR); Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

  12. Optimization of the AGS superconducting helical partial snake strength.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin,F.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A.U.; Roser, T.

    2008-06-23

    Two helical partial snakes, one super-conducting (a.k.a cold snake) and one normal conducting (a.k.a warm snake), have preserved the polarization of proton beam up to 65% in the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the extraction energy from 85% at injection. In order to overcome spin resonances, stronger partial snakes would be required. However, the stronger the partial snake, the more the stable spin direction tilted producing a stronger horizontal intrinsic resonance. The balance between increasing the spin tune gap generated by the snakes and reducing the tilted stable spin direction has to be considered to maintain the polarization. Because the magnetic field of the warm snake has to be a constant, only the cold snake with a maximum 3T magnetic field can be varied to find out the optimum snake strength. This paper presents simulation results by spin tracking with different cold snake magnetic fields. Some experimental data are also analyzed.

  13. Nano-superconducting quantum interference devices with suspended junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2014-04-14

    Nano-Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (nano-SQUIDs) are usually fabricated from a single layer of either Nb or Al. We describe here a simple method for fabricating suspended nano-bridges in Nb/Al thin-film bilayers. We use these suspended bridges, which act as Josephson weak links, to fabricate nano-SQUIDs which show critical current oscillations at temperatures up to 1.5?K and magnetic flux densities up to over 20?mT. These nano-SQUIDs exhibit flux modulation depths intermediate between all-Al and all-Nb devices, with some of the desirable characteristics of both. The suspended geometry is attractive for magnetic single nanoparticle measurements.

  14. Implications of fast radio bursts for superconducting cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Yun-Wei; Cheng, Kwong-Sang; Shiu, Gary; Tye, Henry E-mail: hrspksc@hku.hk E-mail: iastye@ust.hk

    2014-11-01

    Highly beamed, short-duration electromagnetic bursts could be produced by superconducting cosmic string (SCS) loops oscillating in cosmic magnetic fields. We demonstrated that the basic characteristics of SCS bursts such as the electromagnetic frequency and the energy release could be consistently exhibited in the recently discovered fast radio bursts (FRBs). Moreover, it is first showed that the redshift distribution of the FRBs can also be well accounted for by the SCS burst model. Such agreements between the FRBs and SCS bursts suggest that the FRBs could originate from SCS bursts and thus they could provide an effective probe to study SCSs. The obtained values of model parameters indicate that the loops generating the FRBs have a small length scale and they are mostly formed in the radiation-dominated cosmological epoch.

  15. Shock-induced synthesis of high temperature superconducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.; Venturini, E.L.

    1987-06-18

    It has now been determined that the unique features of the high pressure shock method, especially the shock-induced chemical synthesis technique, are fully applicable to high temperature superconducting materials. Extraordinarily high yields are achievable in accordance with this invention, e.g., generally in the range from about 20% to about 99%, often in the range from about 50% to about 90%, lower and higher yields, of course, also being possible. The method of this invention involves the application of a controlled high pressure shock compression pulse which can be produced in any conventional manner, e.g., by detonation of a high explosive material, the impact of a high speed projectile or the effect of intense pulsed radiation sources such as lasers or electron beams. Examples and a discussion are presented.

  16. Superconducting radio-frequency modules test faciilty operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R&D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service Fermilab SRF R&D needs. The first stage of the project has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

  17. Cosmological and astrophysical constraints on superconducting cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, Koichi; Nakayama, Kazunori E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on superconducting cosmic strings (SCSs). SCS loops emit strong bursts of electromagnetic waves, which might affect various cosmological and astrophysical observations. We take into account the effect on the CMB anisotropy, CMB blackbody spectrum, BBN, observational implications on radio wave burst and X-ray or ?-ray events, and stochastic gravitational wave background measured by pulsar timing experiments. We then derive constraints on the parameters of SCS from current observations and estimate prospects for detecting SCS signatures in on-going observations. As a result, we find that these constraints exclude broad parameter regions, and also that on-going radio wave observations can probe large parameter space.

  18. SUPERCONDUCTING RF-DIPOLE DEFLECTING AND CRABBING CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delayen, Jean; De Silva, Paygalage Subashini

    2013-09-01

    Recent interests in designing compact deflecting and crabbing structures for future accelerators and colliders have initiated the development of novel rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance, the absence of lower order modes and widely separated higher order modes. Two rf-dipole designs of 400 MHz and 499 MHz have been designed, fabricated and tested as proof-of-principle designs of compact deflecting and crabbing cavities for the LHC high luminosity upgrade and Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The first rf tests have been performed on the rf-dipole geometries at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in a vertical test assembly with excellent results. The cavities have achieved high gradients with high intrinsic quality factors, and multipacting levels were easily processed.

  19. A-15 Superconducting composite wires and a method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suenaga, Masaki (Bellport, NY); Klamut, Carl J. (East Patchogue, NY); Luhman, Thomas S. (Westhampton Beach, NY)

    1984-01-01

    A method for fabricating superconducting wires wherein a billet of copper containing filaments of niobium or vanadium is rolled to form a strip which is wrapped about a tin-alloy core to form a composite. The alloy is a tin-copper alloy for niobium filaments and a gallium-copper alloy for vanadium filaments. The composite is then drawn down to a desired wire size and heat treated. During the heat treatment process, the tin in the bronze reacts with the niobium to form the superconductor niobium tin. In the case where vanadium is used, the gallium in the gallium bronze reacts with the vanadium to form the superconductor vanadium gallium. This new process eliminates the costly annealing steps, external tin plating and drilling of bronze ingots required in a number of prior art processes.

  20. Wrapping process for fabrication of A-15 superconducting composite wires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suenaga, M.; Klamut, C.J.; Luhman, T.S.

    1980-08-15

    A method for fabricating superconducting wires wherein a billet of copper containing filaments of niobium or vanadium is rolled to form a strip which is wrapped about a tin-alloy core to form a composite. The alloy is a tin-copper alloy for niobium filaments and a gallium-copper alloy for vanadium filaments. The composite is then drawn down to a desired wire size and heat treated. During the heat treatment process, the tin in the bronze reacts with the niobium to form the superconductor niobium tin. In the case where vanadium is used, the gallium in the gallium bronze reacts with the vanadium to form the superconductor vanadium gallium. This new process eliminates the costly annealing steps, external tin plating and drilling of bronze ingots required in a number of prior art processes.

  1. Superconducting DC and RF Properties of Ingot Niobium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashupati Dhakal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Peter Kneisel, Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2011-07-01

    The thermal conductivity, DC magnetization and penetration depth of large-grain niobium hollow cylindrical rods fabricated from ingots, manufactured by CBMM subjected to chemical and heat treatment were measured. The results confirm the influence of chemical and heat-treatment processes on the superconducting properties, with no significant dependence on the impurity concentrations in the original ingots. Furthermore, RF properties, such as the surface resistance and quench field of the niobium rods were measured using a TE{sub 011} cavity. The hollow niobium rod is the center conductor of this cavity, converting it to a coaxial cavity. The quench field is limited by the critical heat flux through the rods' cooling channel.

  2. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-03-01

    Analysis and modeling is presented for a fast microwave tuner to operate at 700 MHz which incorporates ferroelectric elements whose dielectric permittivity can be rapidly altered by application of an external voltage. This tuner could be used to correct unavoidable fluctuations in the resonant frequency of superconducting cavities in accelerator structures, thereby greatly reducing the RF power needed to drive the cavities. A planar test version of the tuner has been tested at low levels of RF power, but at 1300 MHz to minimize the physical size of the test structure. This test version comprises one-third of the final version. The tests show performance in good agreement with simulations, but with losses in the ferroelectric elements that are too large for practical use, and with issues in bonding of ferroelectric elements to the metal walls of the tuner structure.

  3. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Finnemore, Douglas K. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA); Ostenson, Jerome E. (Ames, IA)

    1983-03-29

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and orientated dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritric particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  4. Superconducting magnets in high-radiation environment at supercolliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Chichili, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Van Sciver, S.; Zeller, A.

    2006-07-01

    The principal challenges arising from beam-induced energy deposition in superconducting (SC) magnets at high-energy high-luminosity hadron and lepton colliders are described. Radiation constraints are analyzed that include quench stability, dynamic heat loads on the cryogenic system, radiation damage limiting the component lifetime, and residual dose rates related to hands-on maintenance. These issues are especially challenging for the interaction regions (IR), particularly for the considered upgrade layouts of the Large Hadron Collider. Up to a few kW of beam power can dissipate in a single SC magnet, and a local peak power density can substantially exceed the quench levels. Just formally, the magnet lifetime is limited to a few months under these conditions. Possible solutions and the ways to mitigate these problems are described in this paper along with R&D needed.

  5. Flexible A-15 superconducting tape via the amorphous state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clapp, M.T.; Shi, D.

    1985-05-15

    The melt spinning technique was used to rapidly solidify superconducting materials. In the Ti/sub 3/Nb/sub 6/Mo/sub 3/Si/sub 4/ alloy system, it was possible to form metastable A-15 and amorphous ribbons as the quenching rate was increased. The liquid-quenched A-15 ribbons were extremely brittle, which is typical of this crystal structure. The metastable A-15 phase could also be formed by annealing the amorphous ribbons. These, however, were far more flexible, their percent elongation being up to 30 times greater than that of the liquid quenched A-15's. The flexibility appeared to depend on grain size, and increased as the grain size decreased. This is consistent with behavior observed in other brittle materials of a brittle to ductile transition as a function of grain size.

  6. Cerenkov Radiator Driven by a Superconducting RF Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poole, B R; Harris, J R

    2011-03-07

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Niowave, Inc., and Boeing have recently demonstrated operation of the first superconducting RF electron gun based on a quarter wave resonator structure. In preliminary tests, this gun has produced 10 ps long bunches with charge in excess of 78 pC, and with beam energy up to 396 keV. Initial testing occurred at Niowave's Lansing, MI facility, but the gun and diagnostic beam line are planned for installation in California in the near future. The design of the diagnostic beam line is conducive to the addition of a Cerenkov radiator without interfering with other beam line operations. Design and simulations of a Cerenkov radiator, consisting of a dielectric lined waveguide will be presented. The dispersion relation for the structure is determined and the beam interaction is studied using numerical simulations. The characteristics of the microwave radiation produced in both the short and long bunch regimes will be presented.

  7. Cryogenic performance of a cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuerst, J. D.; Doose, C.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2014-01-29

    A cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator has been installed and operated with beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The device consists of a dual-core 42-pole magnet structure that is cooled to 4.2 K with a system of four cryocoolers operating in a zero-boil-off configuration. This effort represents the culmination of a development program to establish concept feasibility and evaluate cryostat design and cryocooler-based refrigeration. Cryostat performance is described including cool-down/warm-up, steady-state operation, cooling margin, and the impact of beam during operation in the APS storage ring. Plans for future devices with longer magnets, which will incorporate lessons learned from the development program, are also discussed.

  8. Efficient incorporation of silver to improve superconducting fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Richard A.; LaCount, Dale F.; Finnemore, Douglas K.

    1994-04-26

    An improved method for the efficient incorporation of a metal such as silver in a superconducting material includes blending the metal with a high temperature superconductor or precursor powder and consolidating the same into pellets. The pellets are charged directly into a heating assembly where it is melted and heated sufficiently to a uniform temperature prior to fiberization. Droplets of the melted blend fall through a collar into a nozzle where they are subjected to a high velocity gas to break the melted material into ligaments which solidify into improved flexible fibers having the metal homogeneously dis This invention was made with Government support under a contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) and Ames Laboratory, Contract No. SC-91-225, our reference No. CRD-1272. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  9. Superconducting solenoids for muon-cooling in the neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, M.A.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

    2001-05-12

    The cooling channel for a neutrino factory consists of a series of alternating field solenoidal cells. The first section of the bunching cooling channel consists of 41 cells that are 2.75-m long. The second section of the cooling channel consists of 44 cells that are 1.65-m long. Each cell consists of a single large solenoid with an average diameter of 1.5 m and a pair of flux reversal solenoids that have an average diameter of 0.7 to 0.9 meters. The magnetic induction on axis reaches a peak value of about 5 T at the end of the second section of the cooling channel. The peak on axis field gradients in flux reversal section approaches 33 T/m. This report describes the two types of superconducting solenoid magnet sections for the muon-cooling channel of the proposed neutrino factory.

  10. Feasibility of SF6 Gas-Insulated Transformers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feasibility of SF 6 Gas-Insulated Transformers Brandon Bouwman, P.E. Electrical Engineer, Generation Equipment Section Hydroelectric Design Center 14 June 2012 BUILDING STRONG ® PORTLAND DISTRICT 2 Outline  Transformer Background & Basics  Oil-filled transformers  Oil-filled transformer concerns  Gas-insulated transformers (GIT)  Gas-insulated transformer benefits  Gas-insulated transformer concerns  Risks and Unknowns  Questions? BUILDING STRONG ® PORTLAND DISTRICT

  11. Experimental determination of electrical characteristics and circuit models of superconducting dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedley, K.M. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Shafer, R.E. )

    1994-09-01

    Superconducting magnets are used very extensively in modern science and technology to produce high intensity magnetic fields. In many application, magnets are used in non-dc conditions and are subject to current ramping. The magnets studied in this paper were intended to be used in the Superconducting Supercollider with a ramping rate of 4A/sec and a maximum current of 7000A. Due to the effects of eddy currents and parasitic capacitance, the electrical characteristics of superconducting magnets are not completely inductive; instead, they are frequency dependent functions. This paper develops a method of accurately measuring the ac characteristics and determining the circuit models of superconducting magnets that characterize the eddy currents and the parasitic capacitance. This measurement method can be used to analyze eddy current and the resulting circuit model can be used to study the transmission line effect of long magnet strings.

  12. High Current-Carrying Capability in c -Axis-Oriented Superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Current-Carrying Capability in c -Axis-Oriented Superconducting MgBsub 2 Thin Films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Current-Carrying Capability in c ...

  13. Method and etchant to join Ag-clad BSSCO superconducting tape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, U.; Iyer, A.N.; Huang, J.Y.

    1999-03-16

    A method of removing a silver cladding from high temperature superconducting material clad in silver (HTS) is disclosed. The silver clad HTS is contacted with an aqueous solution of HNO{sub 3} followed by an aqueous solution of NH{sub 4}OH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for a time sufficient to remove the silver cladding from the superconducting material without adversely affecting the superconducting properties of the superconducting material. A portion of the silver cladding may be masked with a material chemically impervious to HNO{sub 3} and to a combination of NH{sub 4}OH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to preserve the Ag coating. A silver clad superconductor is disclosed, made in accordance with the method discussed. 3 figs.

  14. Superconducting thin films of (100) and (111) oriented indium doped topological crystalline insulator SnTe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Si, W.; Zhang, C.; Wu, L.; Ozaki, T.; Gu, G.; Li, Q.

    2015-09-01

    Recent discovery of the topological crystalline insulator SnTe has triggered a search for topological superconductors, which have potential application to topological quantum computing. The present work reports on the superconducting properties of indium doped SnTe thin films. The (100) and (111) oriented thin films were epitaxially grown by pulsed-laser deposition on (100) and (111) BaF2 crystalline substrates respectively. The onset superconducting transition temperatures are about 3.8 K for (100) and 3.6 K for (111) orientations, slightly lower than that of the bulk. Magneto-resistive measurements indicate that these thin films may have upper critical fields higher than that of the bulk.more » With large surface-to-bulk ratio, superconducting indium doped SnTe thin films provide a rich platform for the study of topological superconductivity and potential device applications based on topological superconductors.« less

  15. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedrich, Stephan (San Jose, CA); , Niedermayr, Thomas R. (Oakland, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-11-04

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  16. Method and etchant to join ag-clad BSSCO superconducting tape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL); Iyer, Anand N. (Downers Grove, IL); Huang, Jiann Yuan (Hsinchu, TW)

    1999-01-01

    A method of removing a silver cladding from high temperature superconducting material clad in silver (HTS) is disclosed. The silver clad HTS is contacted with an aqueous solution of HNO.sub.3 followed by an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and H.sub.2 O.sub.2 for a time sufficient to remove the silver cladding from the superconducting material without adversely affecting the superconducting properties of the superconducting material. A portion of the silver cladding may be masked with a material chemically impervious to HNO.sub.3 and to a combination of NH.sub.4 OH and H.sub.2 O.sub.2 to preserve the Ag coating. A silver clad superconductor is disclosed, made in accordance with the method discussed.

  17. Center for Emergent Superconductivity (CES) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Center for Emergent Superconductivity (CES) Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers EFRC External Websites Research Science Highlights News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home Centers Center for Emergent Superconductivity (CES) Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page CES Header Director Peter Johnson Lead Institution Brookhaven National Laboratory Year Established 2009 Mission To discover new high-temperature superconductors and improve the

  18. "ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY", Dr. Michael Norman, Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 10, 2012, 9:30am Science On Saturday "ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY", Dr. Michael Norman, Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY PPPL Entrance Procedures Visitor Information, Directions, Security at PPPL As a federal facility, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is operating under heightened security measures because of the events of

  19. Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced Superconducting Gaps in Trilayer High-Temperature Bi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta) Cuprate Superconductor Authors: Ideta, S ; Takashima, K. ; Hashimoto, M. ; Yoshida, T. ; Fujimori, A. ; Anzai, H. ; Fujita, T. ; Nakashima, Y. ;

  20. Superconductivity at Dawn of the Iron Age (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Superconductivity is a stunning quantum phenomenon and among the deepest paradigms in all of physics. From fundamental theories of the universe to strange goings-on in exotic materials to medical imaging and cell phones, its conceptual and practical dimensions span a reach as wide as anything in science. Twenty-odd years ago, the discovery of copper oxides ushered in a new era of high-temperature superconductivity, and the joyous exuberance that followed - with physicists throwing everything

  1. Superconductivity in semimetallic B i 3 O 2 S 3 (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Superconductivity in semimetallic B i 3 O 2 S 3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Superconductivity in semimetallic B i 3 O 2 S 3 Authors: Li, L. ; Parker, D. ; Babkevich, P. ; Yang, L. ; Ronnow, H. M. ; Sefat, A. S. Publication Date: 2015-03-12 OSTI Identifier: 1180544 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 91; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121 Publisher: American Physical Society

  2. Dependence of superconductivity in CuxBi?Se? on quenching conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schneeloch, J. A.; Zhong, R. D.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2015-04-20

    Topological superconductivity, implying gapless protected surface states, has recently been proposed to exist in the compound CuxBi?Se?. Unfortunately, low diamagnetic shielding fractions and considerable inhomogeneity have been reported in this compound. In an attempt to understand and improve on the finite superconducting volume fractions, we have investigated the effects of various growth and post-annealing conditions. With a melt-growth (MG) method, diamagnetic shielding fractions of up to 56% in Cu???Bi?Se? have been obtained, the highest value reported for this method. We investigate the efficacy of various quenching and annealing conditions, finding that quenching from temperatures above 560C is essential for superconductivity,morewhereas quenching from lower temperatures or not quenching at all is detrimental. A modified floating zone (FZ) method yielded large single crystals but little superconductivity. Even after annealing and quenching, FZ-grown samples had much less chance of being superconducting than MG-grown samples. From the low shielding fractions in FZ-grown samples and the quenching dependence, we suggest that a metastable secondary phase having a small volume fraction in most of the samples may be responsible for the superconductivity.less

  3. Dependence of superconductivity in CuxBi2Se3 on quenching conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schneeloch, J. A.; Zhong, R. D.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2015-04-20

    Topological superconductivity, implying gapless protected surface states, has recently been proposed to exist in the compound CuxBi₂Se₃. Unfortunately, low diamagnetic shielding fractions and considerable inhomogeneity have been reported in this compound. In an attempt to understand and improve on the finite superconducting volume fractions, we have investigated the effects of various growth and post-annealing conditions. With a melt-growth (MG) method, diamagnetic shielding fractions of up to 56% in Cu₀̣₃Bi₂Se₃ have been obtained, the highest value reported for this method. We investigate the efficacy of various quenching and annealing conditions, finding that quenching from temperatures above 560°C is essential for superconductivity,more »whereas quenching from lower temperatures or not quenching at all is detrimental. A modified floating zone (FZ) method yielded large single crystals but little superconductivity. Even after annealing and quenching, FZ-grown samples had much less chance of being superconducting than MG-grown samples. Thus, from the low shielding fractions in FZ-grown samples and the quenching dependence, we suggest that a metastable secondary phase having a small volume fraction in most of the samples may be responsible for the superconductivity.« less

  4. Darboux transformation for the NLS equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aktosun, Tuncay; Mee, Cornelis van der

    2010-03-08

    We analyze a certain class of integral equations associated with Marchenko equations and Gel'fand-Levitan equations. Such integral equations arise through a Fourier transformation on various ordinary differential equations involving a spectral parameter. When the integral operator is perturbed by a finite-rank perturbation, we explicitly evaluate the change in the solution in terms of the unperturbed quantities and the finite-rank perturbation. We show that this result provides a fundamental approach to derive Darboux transformations for various systems of ordinary differential operators. We illustrate our theory by providing the explicit Darboux transformation for the Zakharov-Shabat system and show how the potential and wave function change when a simple discrete eigenvalue is added to the spectrum, and thus we also provide a one-parameter family of Darboux transformations for the nonlinear Schroedinger equation.

  5. 2010 Solar Market Transformation Analysis and Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the DOE-funded solar market transformation analysis and tools under development in Fiscal Year 2010 so that stakeholders can access available resources and get engaged where interested.

  6. Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    clathrates (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates The pressure induced crystalline collapse at 14.7 GPa and polyamorphic structures of the semiconductor clathrate Sr8Ga16Ge30 are reported up to 35 GPa. In-situ total scattering measurements under pressure allow the direct microscopic inspection

  7. Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    clathrates (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates Authors: Tulk, C.A. ; dos Santos, A.M. ; Neuefeind, J.C. ; Molaison, J.J. ; Sales, B.C. ; Honkimäki, V. [1] ; ESRF) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (ORNL) ( Publication Date: 2015-09-22 OSTI Identifier: 1221429 Resource Type: Journal Article

  8. Transforming PV Installations toward Dispatchable, Schedulable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solutions | Department of Energy Transforming PV Installations toward Dispatchable, Schedulable Energy Solutions Transforming PV Installations toward Dispatchable, Schedulable Energy Solutions Advanced Energy logo.png Advanced Energy (AE) will address three important needs in the further deployment of photovoltaic (PV) systems: 1) demonstrating and commercializing a new anti-islanding method utilizing Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs), 2) demonstrating a set of advanced grid support

  9. How Atomic Vibrations Transform Vanadium Dioxide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Atomic Vibrations Transform Vanadium Dioxide How Atomic Vibrations Transform Vanadium Dioxide Calculations Confirm Material's Potential for Next-Generation Electronics, Energy November 10, 2014 Contact: Dawn Levy, levyd@ornl.gov, 865.576.6448 Budaivibe Vanadium atoms (blue) have unusually large thermal vibrations that stabilize the metallic state of a vanadium dioxide crystal. Red depicts oxygen atoms. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory For more than 50 years, scientists have

  10. Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Metamaterial flexible sheets could transform optics Advances would boost security screening systems, infrared thermal cameras, energy harvesting, and radar systems June 5, 2013 A burst of laser energy 50 times greater than the worldwide output of electrical power slams into an extremely thin foil target to produce neutrons at Los Alamos National Laboratory's TRIDENT laser facility during a recent experiment, which proved that laser-driven

  11. Department of Energy/ National Power Transformer Reserve

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy/ National Power Transformer Reserve "National Power Transformer Reserve" This refers to the Request for Information No. 5 (Procurement and Management): From a non-discriminatory standpoint, the procurement process needs to be transparent and consistent with established purchasing practices considering all qualified manufacturers and not limited to only US manufacturers. It is recommended that to be considered a qualified manufacturer; the manufacturer must have prior experience

  12. Synthesis of high {Tc} superconducting coatings and patterns by melt writing and oxidation of metallic precursor alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gao, W.; Vander Sande, J.B.

    1998-07-28

    A method is provided for fabrication of superconducting oxides and superconducting oxide composites and for joining superconductors to other materials. A coating of a molten alloy containing the metallic elements of the oxide is applied to a substrate surface and oxidized to form the superconducting oxide. A material can be contacted to the molten alloy which is subsequently oxidized joining the material to the resulting superconducting oxide coating. Substrates of varied composition and shape can be coated or joined by this method. 5 figs.

  13. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Transformations...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transformations, Inc. Net Zero Energy Communities (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Transformations, Inc. Net Zero Energy Communities (Fact Sheet)...

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Transformation Inc., Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transformation Inc., Production House, Devens, MA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Transformation Inc., Production House, Devens, MA Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready ...

  15. Phase coexistence and transformations in field-cooled ternary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phase coexistence and transformations in field-cooled ternary piezoelectric single ... Title: Phase coexistence and transformations in field-cooled ternary piezoelectric single ...

  16. The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation Activity The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation Activity Download the presentation slides...

  17. Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water ...

  18. Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient...

  19. Metal Ion-Assisted Transformations of 2-Pyridinealdoxime and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal Ion-Assisted Transformations of 2-Pyridinealdoxime and Hexafluorophosphate Metal Ion-Assisted Transformations of 2-Pyridinealdoxime and Hexafluorophosphate Print Monday, 05...

  20. 2015 Peer Review Presentations-Demonstration and Market Transformation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration and Market Transformation 2015 Peer Review Presentations-Demonstration and Market Transformation The Bioenergy Technologies Office hosted its 2015 Project Peer Review...

  1. Y-12 and the 2000 decade ? Modernization to Transformation,...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transformation, part 2 As we continue with Tom Smith's account of the transition from "Modernization" to "Transformation" he notes, "The original plan was to put three new special...

  2. Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE of the NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE Report of the ADVANCED NUCLEAR TRANSFORMATION TECHNOLOGY...

  3. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - an Energy Frontier Research Center The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) employs a...

  4. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientific roadblocks to U.S. energy security. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)...

  5. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-05-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  6. The first tunnel section of the Superconducting Super Collider project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundin, T.K.; Laughton, C.; Nelson, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project will be constructed for the United States Department of Energy at a competitively-selected site in Ellis County, Texas, about 30 mile (50 km) south of the central business district of Dallas. The injector system and main collider ring will be housed in 70 mile (110 km) of tunnel, and the project will include additional shafts and underground enclosures with clear spans up to 30 ft (10 m) at depths of more than 250 ft (75 m). The first tunnel segment to be designed and constructed will include approximately 5.9 mile (9.4 km) of 12 ft (3.7 m) finished internal diameter tunnel, four shafts up to 55 ft (16.8 m) diameter, and various connecting tunnels and adits. Construction will be in weak rock lithologies, including mudstones, marls, and chalks with compressive strengths typically between 300 and 2500 psi (2.0 and 17.2 MPa). Design is underway, with an expected bid date before the end of 1990, and with start of construction following in the spring of 1991. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Potential benefits of superconductivity to transportation in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rote, D.M.; Johnson, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Research in US transportation applications of superconductors is strongly motivated by a number of potential national benefits. These include the reduction of dependence on petroleum-based fuels, energy savings, substantially reduced air and noise pollution, increased customer convenience, and reduced maintenance costs. Current transportation technology offers little flexibility to switch to alternative fuels, and efforts to achieve the other benefits are confounded by growing congestion at airports and on urban roadways. A program has been undertaken to identify possible applications of the emerging superconducting applications to transportation and to evaluate potential national benefits. The current phase of the program will select the most promising applications for a more detailed subsequent study. Transportation modes being examined include highway and industrial vehicles, as well as rail, sea, air transport and pipelines. Three strategies are being considered: (1) replacing present components with those employing superconductors, (2) substituting new combinations of components or systems for present systems, and (3) developing completely new technologies. Distinctions are made between low-, medium-, and near-room-temperature superconductors. The most promising applications include magnetically levitated passenger and freight vehicles; replacement of drive systems in locomotives, self-propelled rail cars, and ships; and electric vehicles inductively coupled to electrified roadways.

  8. Method and apparatus for making multistrand superconducting cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Royet, John M. (Oakland, CA); Armer, Rollin A. (Orinda, CA)

    1990-01-01

    Improved multistrand Rutherford-type superconducting cable (42) is produced in a flattened form with two layers of helically wound strands (33) and in which the strands are alternately twisted about their lengths equally and in opposite directions to provide a flat cable with improved stability. In particular, the cable (42) is made by guiding multifilament wire strands (33) from spools (32) on a rotating turret (11) to a fixed tapered forming mandrel (22) where they are wound diagonally around the mandrel and then rolled into a flattened shape. The spools (32) are located around the periphery of the turret and are rotatable about axes in a plane parallel to the turret (11) to unroll the wire. Sprocket assemblies (48 and 49) are driven by drive chains (68 and 76) to rotate alternate spools (32) equally and in opposite directions relative to the forming mandrel (22) so that the wire strands (33) are twisted prior to being wound on the mandrel (22). The rate of rotation of the spools (32) in one direction is different than the rate of rotation of the spools (32) in the opposite direction to compensate for the rate of rotation of the turret (11) so that all strands (33) have the same degree of twist about their lengths.

  9. Method and apparatus for making superconductive magnet coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, A.R.

    1983-11-07

    A curved, shell-type magnet coil, adapted to be used in a superconducting magnet, is wound by providing a mandrel having a tubular cylindrical mid-portion terminating at both ends in tapered end portions formed with longitudinal slots having flexible fingers therebetween. An elongated electrical conductor is wound around an elongated oval-shaped pole island engaged with the outside of the cylindrical mid-portion, to form a multiplicity of oval-shaped turns engaged with a 180-degree segment of the mandrel. The coil turns have longitudinal portions with curved portions therebetween, engaging the tapered end portions of the mandrel. Upon completion of the winding, tapered expansion members are fully inserted into the tapered end portions, to displace the flexible fingers outwardly into a cylindrical form and to displace the curved portions of the turns into a shape conforming to such cylindrical form while also exerting increased tension upon the turns to minimize draping of the turns and to enhance the mechanical integrity of the coil. A half cylinder clamp may then be employed to clamp the coil, whereupon the coil may be solidified by the use of an epoxy adhesive.

  10. Highly textured oxypnictide superconducting thin films on metal substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iida, Kazumasa, E-mail: iida@nuap.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kurth, Fritz; Grinenko, Vadim; Hnisch, Jens [Institute for Metallic Materials, IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Chihara, Masashi; Sumiya, Naoki; Hatano, Takafumi; Ikuta, Hiroshi [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ichinose, Ataru; Tsukada, Ichiro [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan); Matias, Vladimir [iBeam Materials, Inc., 2778A Agua Fria Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87507 (United States); Holzapfel, Bernhard [Institute for Technical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann von Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-10-27

    Highly textured NdFeAs(O,F) thin films have been grown on ion beam assisted deposition-MgO/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Hastelloy substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The oxypnictide coated conductors showed a superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}) of 43?K with a self-field critical current density (J{sub c}) of 7.010{sup 4}?A/cm{sup 2} at 5?K, more than 20 times higher than powder-in-tube processed SmFeAs(O,F) wires. Albeit higher T{sub c} as well as better crystalline quality than Co-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} coated conductors, in-field J{sub c} of NdFeAs(O,F) was lower than that of Co-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. These results suggest that grain boundaries in oxypnictides reduce J{sub c} significantly compared to that in Co-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and, hence biaxial texture is necessary for high J{sub c.}.

  11. Superconducting Accelerating Cavity Pressure Sensitivity Analysis and Stiffening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodnizki, J [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Ben Aliz, Y [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Grin, A [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Horvitz, Z [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Perry, A [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Weissman, L [Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel; Davis, G Kirk [JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion Universtiy

    2014-12-01

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) design is based on a 40 MeV 5 mA light ions superconducting RF linac. Phase-I of SARAF delivers up to 2 mA CW proton beams in an energy range of 1.5 - 4.0 MeV. The maximum beam power that we have reached is 5.7 kW. Today, the main limiting factor to reach higher ion energy and beam power is related to the HWR sensitivity to the liquid helium coolant pressure fluctuations. The HWR sensitivity to helium pressure is about 60 Hz/mbar. The cavities had been designed, a decade ago, to be soft in order to enable tuning of their novel shape. However, the cavities turned out to be too soft. In this work we found that increasing the rigidity of the cavities in the vicinity of the external drift tubes may reduce the cavity sensitivity by a factor of three. A preliminary design to increase the cavity rigidity is presented.

  12. Status of the plasma generator of the superconducting proton linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronberger, M.; Lettry, J.; Paoluzzi, M.; Pereira, H.; Arias, J. Sanchez; Schmitzer, C.; Scrivens, R.; Faircloth, D.

    2012-02-15

    In the framework of the superconducting proton linac (SPL) study at CERN, a new non-cesiated H{sup -} plasma generator driven by an external 2 MHz RF antenna has been developed and successfully operated at repetition rates of 50 Hz, pulse lengths of up to 3 ms, and average RF powers of up to 3 kW. The coupling efficiency of RF power into the plasma was determined by the cooling water temperatures and the analysis of the RF forward and reflected power and the antenna current and amounts to 50%-60%. The plasma resistance increases between 10 kW and 40 kW RF power from about 0.45 {Omega} to 0.65 {Omega}. Measurements of RF power dissipated in the ferrites and the magnets on a test bench show a 5-fold decrease of the power losses for the magnets when they are contained in a Cu box, thus validating the strategy of shielding the magnets with a high electrical conductivity material. An air cooling system was installed in the SPL plasma generator to control the temperatures of the ferrites despite hysteresis losses of several Watts.

  13. Cryogenic system for the MYRRHA superconducting linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevalier, Nicolas R.; Junquera, Tomas; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre; Romo, Luis Medeiros; Vandeplassche, Dirk

    2014-01-29

    SCK?CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, is designing MYRRHA, a flexible fast spectrum research reactor (80 MW{sub th}), conceived as an accelerator driven system (ADS), able to operate in sub-critical and critical modes. It contains a continuous-wave (CW) superconducting (SC) proton accelerator of 600 MeV, a spallation target and a multiplying core with MOX fuel, cooled by liquid lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi). From 17 MeV onward, the SC accelerator will consist of 48 ?=0.36 spoke-loaded cavities (352 MHz), 34 ?=0.47 elliptical cavities (704 MHz) and 60 ?=0.65 elliptical cavities (704 MHz). We present an analysis of the thermal loads and of the optimal operating temperature of the cryogenic system. In particular, the low operating frequency of spoke cavities makes their operation in CW mode possible both at 4.2 K or at 2 K. Our analysis outlines the main factors that determine at what temperature the spoke cavities should be operated. We then present different cryogenic fluid distribution schemes, important characteristics (storage, transfer line, etc.) and the main challenges offered by MYRRHA in terms of cryogenics.

  14. Cryogenic System for a High Temperature Superconducting Power Transmission Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, J.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Martin, R.; Sinha, U.; Stovall, J.P.

    1999-07-12

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems for power transmission are under development that will use pressurized liquid nitrogen to provide cooling of the cable and termination hardware. Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been operating a prototype HTS cable system that contains many of the typical components needed for a commercial power transmission application. It is being used to conduct research in the development of components and systems for eventual commercial deployment. The cryogenic system was built by Air Products and Chemicals, Allentown, Pennsylvania, and can circulate up to 0.35 kg/s of liquid nitrogen at temperatures as low as 67 K at pressures of 1 to 10 bars. Sufficient cooling is provided for testing a 5-m-long HTS transmission cable system that includes the terminations required for room temperature electrical connections. Testing of the 5-m HTS transmission cable has been conducted at the design ac conditions of 1250 A and 7.5 kV line to ground. This paper contains a description of the essential features of the HTS cable cryogenic system and performance results obtained during operation of the system. The salient features of the operation that are important in large commercial HTS cable applications will be discussed.

  15. D0 Cryogenic System Superconducting Solenoid Platform I/O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1997-10-09

    The Dzero detector is scheduled for a major upgrade between 1996 and 1999. This note describes the specifications and configuration of the physical Input/Output devices and instrumentation of the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid. The Solenoid and the VLPC cryostats both reside on the detector platform and are cooled by the Dzero Helium Refrigerator. The cryogenic process control s for these two components will be an extension of the TI565 programmable logic controller system used for other Dzero cryogenic controls. Two Input/Output Bases will be installed on the Dzero detector platform near the cryo corner. These I/O bases will handle all the sensor input and process control output devices from the Solenoid and VLPC cryostats. Having the I/O bases installed on the detector platform makes the connecting cabl ing to the platform much easier . All the instruments are wired directly to the I/O base. The bases have only one communications network cabl e that must be routed off the platform to the South side of the Dzero building.

  16. Ga lithography in sputtered niobium for superconductive micro and nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, M. David; Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Lewis, Rupert

    2014-08-18

    This work demonstrates the use of focused ion beam (FIB) implanted Ga as a lithographic mask for plasma etching of Nb films. Using a highly collimated Ga beam of a FIB, Nb is implanted 12?nm deep with a 14?nm thick Ga layer providing etch selectivity better than 15:1 with fluorine based etch chemistry. Implanted square test patterns, both 10??m by 10??m and 100??m by 100??m, demonstrate that doses above than 7.5??10{sup 15?}cm{sup ?2} at 30?kV provide adequate mask protection for a 205?nm thick, sputtered Nb film. The resolution of this dry lithographic technique is demonstrated by fabrication of nanowires 75?nm wide by 10??m long connected to 50??m wide contact pads. The residual resistance ratio of patterned Nb films was 3. The superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c})?=?7.7?K was measured using a magnetic properties measurement system. This nanoscale, dry lithographic technique was extended to sputtered TiN and Ta here and could be used on other fluorine etched superconductors such as NbN, NbSi, and NbTi.

  17. Three-cell traveling wave superconducting test structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; /Euclid Techlabs, Solon; Kazakov, Sergey; Solyak, Nikolay; Wu, Genfa; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell rather than a standing wave structure may provide a significant increase of the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing wave cavities. The STWA allows also longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed, manufactured and successfully tested demonstrating the possibility of a proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. These results open way to take the next step of the TW SC cavity development: to build and test a travelingwave three-cell cavity with a feedback waveguide. The latest results of the single-cell cavity tests are discussed as well as the design of the test 3-cell TW cavity.

  18. Method and apparatus for making superconductive magnet coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, Albert R. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A curved, shell-type magnet coil, adapted to be used in a superconducting magnet, is wound by providing a mandrel having a tubular cylindrical mid-portion terminating at both ends in tapered end portions formed with longitudinal slots having flexible fingers therebetween. An elongated electrical conductor is wound around an elongated oval-shaped pole island engaged with the outside of the cylindrical mid-portion, to form a multiplicity of oval-shaped turns engaged with a 180-degree segment of the mandrel. The coil turns have longitudinal portions with curved portions therebetween, engaging the tapered end portions of the mandrel. Upon completion of the winding, tapered expansion members are fully inserted into the tapered end portions, to displace the flexible fingers outwardly into a cylindrical form and to displace the curved portions of the turns into a shape conforming to such cylindrical form while also exerting increased tension upon the turns to minimize draping of the turns and to enhance the mechanical integrity of the coil. A half cylinder clamp may then be employed to clamp the coil, whereupon the coil may be solified by the use of an epoxy adhesive.

  19. Superconducting RF Linac Technology for ERL Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Tennant

    2005-08-01

    Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) offer an attractive alternative as drivers for light sources as they combine the desirable characteristics of both storage rings (high efficiency) and linear accelerators (superior beam quality). Using superconducting RF technology allows ERLs to operate more efficiently because of the inherent characteristics of SRF linacs, namely that they are high gradient-low impedance structures and their ability to operate in the long pulse or CW regime. We present an overview of the physics challenges encountered in the design and operation of ERL based light sources with particular emphasis on those issues related to SRF technology. These challenges include maximizing a cavity???????¢????????????????s Qo to increase cryogenic efficiency, maintaining control of the cavity field in the presence of the highest feasible loaded Q and providing adequate damping of the higher-order modes (HOMs). If not sufficiently damped, dipole HOMs can drive the multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability which ERLs are particularly susceptible to. Another challenge involves efficiently extracting the potentially large amounts of HOM power that are generated when a bunch traverses the SRF cavities and which may extend over a high range of frequencies. We present experimental data from the Jefferson Lab FEL Upgrade, a 10 mA ERL light source presently in operation, aimed at addressing some of these issues. We conclude with an outlook towards the future of ERL based light sources.

  20. Subgap biasing of superconducting tunnel junctions without a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segall, K.; Moyer, J.; Mazo, Juan J.

    2008-08-15

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) have been successfully used as single-photon detectors but require the use of a magnetic field to operate. A recent paper has proposed the idea to use a circuit of three junctions in place of a single junction in order to achieve the necessary biasing without applying a magnetic field. The nonlinear interaction between the different junctions in the circuit causes the existence of a stable subgap state for one of the junctions, which acts as the detector junction. In this paper, we present the first measurements demonstrating the existence of such a biasing state feasible for STJ detectors. Single junction measurements with an applied magnetic field help determine the functional form of the subgap current versus voltage; then the operating point of a three-junction circuit is measured and fit to theory. The excellent match between theory and experiment demonstrates the existence of the subgap biasing state. The outlook for possible use in detector applications is discussed.