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1

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating Organizations 3 Incentive and Objectives FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Objectives: Reduce the risk associated with implementing the FBSR NAS waste form as a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Conduct test with actual tank wastes Use the best science to fill key data gaps Linking previous and new results together 4 Outline FBSR NAS waste form processing scales FBSR NAS waste form data/key assumptions FBSR NAS key data gaps FBSR NAS testing program 5 FBSR NAS Waste Form Processing

2

Microsoft PowerPoint - 9-03 Jantzen FBSR EM TECH EX SLIDES-JANTZEN-PIERCE.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form For Hanford LAW and Secondary Waste C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 17, 2010 Print Close 2 FY10: Participating Organizations Print Close 3 Incentive and Objectives FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW and/or Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) Objectives:

3

Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) With Hanford Low Activity Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750?C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Burket, P. R.; Bannochie, C. J.; Daniel, W. G.; Nash, C. A.; Cozzi, A. D.; Herman, C. C.

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

4

Single Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) Test Results of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Forms used for LAW Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One such immobilization technology being considered is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) tests at various flow rates have been conducted with the granular products fabricated using these two methods. Results show that the materials exhibit a relatively low forward dissolution rate on the order of 10-3 g/(m2d) with the material made in the laboratory giving slightly higher values.

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Strandquist, Sara C.; Dage, DeNomy C.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

5

DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) WASTE FORMS  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium aqueous radioactive wastes. The addition of clay and a catalyst as co-reactants converts high sodium aqueous low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford and Idaho DOE sites to a granular ''mineralized'' waste form that may be made into a monolith form if necessary. Simulant Hanford and Idaho high sodium wastes were processed in a pilot scale FBSR at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The durability of the FBSR waste form products was tested in order to compare the measured durability to previous FBSR waste form testing on Hanford Envelope C waste forms that were made by THOR Treatment Technologies (TTT) and to compare the FBSR durability to vitreous LAW waste forms, specifically the Hanford low activity waste (LAW) glass known as the Low-activity Reference Material (LRM). The durability of the FBSR waste form is comparable to that of the LRM glass for the test responses studied.

Jantzen, C

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer System. Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) More Documents & Publications Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment

7

Stabilization of Savannah River National Laboartory (SRNL) Aqueous Waste by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) in Aiken, South Carolina. Research and development programs have been conducted at SRNL for {approx}50 years generating non-radioactive (hazardous and non-hazardous) and radioactive aqueous wastes. Typically the aqueous effluents from the R&D activities are disposed of from each laboratory module via the High Activity Drains (HAD) or the Low Activity Drains (LAD) depending on whether they are radioactive or not. The aqueous effluents are collected in holding tanks, analyzed and shipped to either H-Area (HAD waste) or the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) (LAD waste) for volume reduction. Because collection, analysis, and transport of LAD and HAD waste is cumbersome and since future treatment of this waste may be curtailed as the F/H-Area evaporators and waste tanks are decommissioned, SRNL laboratory operations requested several proof of principle demonstrations of alternate technologies that would define an alternative disposal path for the aqueous wastes. Proof of principle for the disposal of SRNL HAD waste using a technology known as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is the focus of the current study. The FBSR technology can be performed either as a batch process, e.g. in each laboratory module in small furnaces with an 8'' by 8'' footprint, or in a semi-continuous Bench Scale Reformer (BSR). The proof of principle experiments described in this study cover the use of the FBSR technology at any scale (pilot or full scale). The proof of principle experiments described in this study used a non-radioactive HAD simulant.

Jantzen, C

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWO-SPT-2007-00249 LWO-SPT-2007-00249 Rev. 1 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) For Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) November, 2007 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) LWO-SPT-2007-00249 Rev. 1 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DEA-AC09-96SR18500 and is an account of work performed under that contract. Neither the United States Department of Energy, nor WSRC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, or product or process

9

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING WITH ACUTAL HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES VERIFYING FBSR AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the cleanup mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplementary treatments being considered. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and other secondary wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates/nitrites, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, and/or radio-nuclides like I-129 and Tc-99. Radioactive testing of Savannah River LAW (Tank 50) shimmed to resemble Hanford LAW and actual Hanford LAW (SX-105 and AN-103) have produced a ceramic (mineral) waste form which is the same as the non-radioactive waste simulants tested at the engineering scale. The radioactive testing demonstrated that the FBSR process can retain the volatile radioactive components that cannot be contained at vitrification temperatures. The radioactive and nonradioactive mineral waste forms that were produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process are shown to be as durable as LAW glass.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

10

MINERALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR): COMPARISONS TO VITREOUS WASTE FORMS, AND PERTINENT DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to generate a document for the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cover the following topics: (1) A description of the mineral structures produced by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) of Hanford type Low Activity Waste (LAW including LAWR which is LAW melter recycle waste) waste, especially the cage structured minerals and how they are formed. (2) How the cage structured minerals contain some contaminants, while others become part of the mineral structure (Note that all contaminants become part of the mineral structure and this will be described in the subsequent sections of this report). (3) Possible contaminant release mechanisms from the mineral structures. (4) Appropriate analyses to evaluate these release mechanisms. (5) Why the appropriate analyses are comparable to the existing Hanford glass dataset. In order to discuss the mineral structures and how they bond contaminants a brief description of the structures of both mineral (ceramic) and vitreous waste forms will be given to show their similarities. By demonstrating the similarities of mineral and vitreous waste forms on atomic level, the contaminant release mechanisms of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous (glass) waste forms can be compared. This will then logically lead to the discussion of why many of the analyses used to evaluate vitreous waste forms and glass-ceramics (also known as glass composite materials) are appropriate for determining the release mechanisms of LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms and how the durability data on LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms relate to the durability data for LAW/LAWR glasses. The text will discuss the LAW mineral waste form made by FBSR. The nanoscale mechanism by which the minerals form will be also be described in the text. The appropriate analyses to evaluate contaminant release mechanisms will be discussed, as will the FBSR test results to date and how they compare to testing performed on LAW glasses. Other details about vitreous waste form durability and impacts of REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) on durability are given in Appendix A. Details about the FBSR process, various pilot scale demonstrations, and applications are given in Appendix B. Details describing all the different leach tests that need to be used jointly to determine the leaching mechanisms of a waste form are given in Appendix C. Cautions regarding the way in which the waste form surface area is measured and in the choice of leachant buffers (if used) are given in Appendix D.

Jantzen, C

2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48 RADIOACTIVE WASTE SAMPLE USING FBSR TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC DESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

Hammond, C; William Pepper, W

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

12

Durability Testing of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Products  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes but especially aqueous high sodium wastes at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The FBSR technology converts organic compounds to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, converts nitrate/nitrite species to N{sub 2}, and produces a solid residue through reactions with superheated steam, the fluidizing media. If clay is added during processing a ''mineralized'' granular waste form can be produced. The mineral components of the waste form are primarily Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The cage and ring structured minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc{sup 99} and Cs{sup 137} and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals appear to stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Durability testing of the FBSR products was performed using ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The FBSR mineral products (bed and fines) evaluated in this study were found to be two orders of magnitude more durable than the Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass requirement of 2 g/m{sup 2} release of Na{sup +}. The PCT responses for the FBSR samples tested were consistent with results from previous FBSR Hanford LAW product testing. Differences in the response can be explained by the minerals formed and their effects on PCT leachate chemistry.

JANTZEN, CAROL M.; PAREIZS, JOHN M.; LORIER, TROY H.; MARRA, JAMES C.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on November 18th, 2010. High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda Journey to Excellence Goal 2 and Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Fate of Tc99 at WTP and Current Work on Capture Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification Impacts of Feed Composition and Recycle on Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glass Mass Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification Salt Waste Processing Initiatives Recap and Conclusions to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations

14

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18/10 18/10 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on November 18th, 2010. High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda Journey to Excellence Goal 2 and Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Fate of Tc99 at WTP and Current Work on Capture Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification Impacts of Feed Composition and Recycle on Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glass Mass Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification Salt Waste Processing Initiatives Recap and Conclusions to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations Tank Closure More Documents & Publications

15

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO{sub 2} and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N{sub 2}. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the <2g/m{sup 2} durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form.

Jantzen, C

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

16

Experimental determination of the speciation, partitioning, and release of perrhenate as a chemical surrogate for pertechnetate from a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form  

SciTech Connect

A key component to closing the nuclear fuel cycle is the storage and disposition of nuclear waste in geologic systems. Multiphase ceramic waste forms have been studied extensively as a potential host matrix for nuclear waste. Understanding the speciation, partitioning, and release behavior of radionuclides immobilized in multiphase ceramic waste forms is a critical aspect of developing the scientific and technical basis for nuclear waste management. In this study, we evaluated a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form (i.e., fluidized-bed steam reform sodium aluminosilicate [FBSR NAS] product) as a potential host matrix for long-lived radionuclides, such as technetium (99Tc). The FBSR NAS material consists primarily of nepheline (ideally NaAlSiO4), anion-bearing sodalites (ideally M8[Al6Si6O24]X2, where M refers to alkali and alkaline earth cations and X refers to monovalent anions), and nosean (ideally Na8[AlSiO4]6SO4). Bulk X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the multiphase ceramic waste form, suggest rhenium (Re) is in the Re(VII) oxidation state and has partitioned to a Re-bearing sodalite phase (most likely a perrhenate sodalite Na8[Al6Si6O24](ReO4)2). Rhenium was added as a chemical surrogate for 99Tc during the FBSR NAS synthesis process. The weathering behavior of the FBSR NAS material was evaluated under hydraulically unsaturated conditions with deionized water at 90 ?C. The steady-state Al, Na, and Si concentrations suggests the weathering mechanisms are consistent with what has been observed for other aluminosilicate minerals and include a combination of ion exchange, network hydrolysis, and the formation of an enriched-silica surface layer or phase. The steady-state S and Re concentrations are within an order of magnitude of the nosean and perrhenate sodalite solubility, respectively. The order of magnitude difference between the observed and predicted concentration for Re and S may be associated with the fact that the anion-bearing sodalites contained in the multiphase ceramic matrix are present as mixed-anion sodalite phases. These results suggest the multiphase FBSR NAS material may be a viable host matrix for long-lived, highly mobilie radionuclides which is a critical aspect in the management of nuclear waste.

Pierce, Eric M.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Fitts, Jeff. P.; Jantzen, Carol. M.; Tang, G.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Army Asks NAS Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Army Asks NAS Review ... The Army has asked the National Academy of Sciences to review the military's controversial plan to ship obsolete CBW agents across the country from Colorado to New Jersey and thence to a burial ground in the sea. ...

1969-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

18

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE (WTP-SW) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford’s WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular products (both simulant and radioactive) were tested and a subset of the granular material (both simulant and radioactive) were stabilized in a geopolymer matrix. Extensive testing and characterization of the granular and monolith material were made including the following: ? ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) testing of granular and monolith; ? ASTM C1308 accelerated leach testing of the radioactive monolith; ? ASTM C192 compression testing of monoliths; and ? EPA Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The significant findings of the testing completed on simulant and radioactive WTP-SW are given below: ? Data indicates {sup 99}Tc, Re, Cs, and I

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

19

Pressure dependence of melt viscosity in the system NaAlSi3O8-CaMgSi2O6  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...melts-an application of synchroton X-ray fluorexcence analysis...235-248. Sharma, S.K., Wang, Z., and van der Laan...an application of synchroton X-ray fluorexcence analysis...235248. Sharma, S.K., Wang, Z., and van der Laan...

Harald Behrens; Frank Schulze

20

UESC Success Stories at NAS Pensacola  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 2008 April 2008 NAVFAC Southeast - PWD UESC Success Stories @ NAS Pensacola - Andy Saleh, PE (REM, Sain Engineering Associates) - Alice Oberhausen (Contracting Officer, NAVFAC Pensacola) April 15, 2008 2 UESC (9 Step) Process enabled by BOAs with Gulf Power (electric) and Energy Services of Pensacola (natural gas) Project identified and / or initiated by - Billing Analysis Walkthrough Audit Tenant Request

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21

Porting the NAS-NPB Conjugate Gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Porting the NAS-NPB Conjugate Gradient Benchmark to CUDA NVIDIA Corporation #12;Outline ! Overview of CG benchmark ! Overview of CUDA Libraries ! CUSPARSE ! CUBLAS ! Porting Sequence ! Algorithm Analysis ! Data/Code Analysis This porting approach uses CUDA Libraries exclusively. (We will not write

Crawford, T. Daniel

22

Experimental studies on atmospheric Stirling engine NAS-2  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric hot air Stirling engine NAS-1 and 2 have a simple flat rubber sheet diaphragm as their power piston, and they have been experimentally studied at Nihon University for several years continuously, with the target of to get more than 100 watts shaft power by atmospheric air with simple construction and cheap material. The first NAS-1 was intended to be a solar heated engine using television glass and wood for cheap cost, but it failed by thermal break of glass, so the improved NAS-2 is changed to be heated by gas burner, using metallic materials in all parts except rubber power piston. Other than this rubber sheet diaphragm, NAS-2 has many features as using James Watt crank mechanism, high finny copper tube for conventional commercial heat exchanger, and two kinds of hot gas heaters, etc. About the rubber sheet for the power piston, the thickness of the sheet was changed from 2 mm to 6 mm gradually to known what thickness is best, and it is found that about 5 mm is best for this engine. After trying many improvements on this engine, NAS-2 has produced about 130 watt shaft power with indicated power of 350 watt at 1994. In this paper detail of many features, history, results and experiments of these NAS engines are reported.

Watanabe, Hiroichi [Nihon Univ., Koriyama (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Isshiki, Naotsugu [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Ohtomo, Michihiro [Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Sendai (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - airspace system nas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USAEurope Air Traffic Management Research and Development Seminar (ATM2009) A Comparison of Algorithm Generated Summary: for the National Airspace System (NAS), ns(NAS), at...

24

TITLE: The NAS Parallel Benchmarks AUTHOR: David H Bailey1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this organization was subsequently changed to the Numerical Aerospace Sim- ulation Program, and more recently to the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Center, although the acronym remains "NAS." The developers of the original and Technology Research, Division of Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences of the U.S. Department

Bailey, David H.

25

E-Print Network 3.0 - adotadas nas maternidades Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lenoticia.ph... 1 de 4 24-07-2008 18:23 12;Wrana Pazzini: distribuio desigual de sexo nas reas de conhecimento... menos mulheres do que homens nas posies mais altas da...

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliovalentes nas propriedades Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

os surfistas nas ondas do mar, tambm os electres Source: Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica - Polo de Lisboa (Institute for Systems and Robotics, Lisbon pole) Portugal...

27

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 149150 Symmetry of Nonlinear Schrodinger Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 149­150 Symmetry of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: appmath

Popovych, Roman

28

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 341342. On -Wild Algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 341­342. On -Wild Algebras S. KALUTSKII Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, Kyiv, Ukraine

Popovych, Roman

29

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 137140. Construction of Invariants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 137 KUZMENKO Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: kuz

Popovych, Roman

30

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 364370. -Algebras Associated with Quadratic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 364­370. C Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, Kyiv, Ukraine In this paper we

Popovych, Roman

31

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 229233 Conditional Symmetry Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 229 of Geophysics of NAS of Ukraine, 32 Palladina Avenue, Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: itsyfra@imath.kiev.ua We obtain

Popovych, Roman

32

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 178183 Lie, Partially Invariant,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 178­183 Lie of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., Kyiv 4, Ukraine E-mail: appmath

Popovych, Roman

33

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 13011307 Second Order Differential Operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1301­1307 Second of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: fdl@ln.ua The procedure

Popovych, Roman

34

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 256262 Differential Invariants and Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 256 of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., Kyiv 4, Ukraine E-mail: iyegorch@imath.kiev.ua New

Popovych, Roman

35

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 149152 Conservation Laws and Potential Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 149 of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: ivanova@imath.kiev.ua We

Popovych, Roman

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - activities score nas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

land areas that are multi-cropped with rice. NAS data for most countries (all except India Source: New Hampshire, University of - Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and...

37

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" April 29, 2008 - 11:31am Addthis Remarks As Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Tom for that kind introduction. And I want to commend you, Norm Augustine and Chuck Vest for your continued leadership on these issues. You are powerful voices for urgent and sustained action to preserve this nation's technological preeminence - and our economic competitiveness. It's a pleasure to be here with you all, and with my good friends Margaret and Carlos. It strikes me that we are in the fortunate position of

38

GaNAsP: An intermediate band semiconductor grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

Dilute nitride GaNAsP thin films were grown via a GaAsP metamorphic buffer on GaP(100) substrate with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The compositions of this III-V-V-V compound were determined by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis. Photoreflectance shows two distinctive transitions from the valence band to the split conduction bands due to N incorporation. Photoluminescence and optical absorption show the fundamental bandgap of Ga(N)AsP is largely tailored by the small amount of N. The observed multiband characteristics and the bandgap tunability of GaNAsP are two merits that fit into the intermediate-band solar cell roadmap, and GaNAsP of high crystal quality provides a strong candidate for intermediate band solar cell materials.

Kuang, Y. J. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W. [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kudrawiec, R. [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze, Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Luce, A. V. [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ting, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tu, C. W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

39

An Evaluation of the NaS Battery Storage Potential for Providing Regulation Service in California  

SciTech Connect

Sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries can provide energy storage, real-time dispatch, regulation, frequency response, and other essential services to the power grids. This study presents the technical characteristics, modeling approach, methodologies, and results for providing regulation services in the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) market. Two different scenarios were studied and compared: a scenario without intermittent renewable-energy resource penetration (base case) and a scenario with significant renewable-energy resource penetration (including wind) reaching 20% of CAISO’s energy supply. In addition, breakeven cost analyses were developed for four cases. Based on the results of the technical and cost analyses, the opportunities for the NaS battery providing the regulation services are discussed, design improvements for the battery’s physical characteristics are recommended, and modifications of the regulation signals sent to NaS batteries are proposed.

Lu, Ning; Weimar, Mark R.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Loutan, Clyde

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

40

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 12021206 Spinor Representation of Lie Algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1202­1206 Spinor Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv University, 6 Academician Glushkov Ave., 03127 Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: usenko@phys.univ.kiev.ua Institute of Physics of NAS of Ukraine, 46 Nauky Ave., 03028 Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: lev@iop.kiev.ua Spinor

Popovych, Roman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 290297 Group Classification with Respect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 290­297 Group Classification with Respect to Hidden Symmetry Irina YEHORCHENKO Institute of Mathematics of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: iyegorch@imath.kiev.ua We present approaches to systematic

Popovych, Roman

42

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 146150. Towards a Classification of Realizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 146­150. Towards Ostrogradskogo Street, 314000 Poltava, Ukraine E-mail: laggo@poltava.bank.gov.ua Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, 01004 Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: renat@imath.kiev.ua We classify

Popovych, Roman

43

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 102110 Nonlinear Diffusion-Convection Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 102­110 Nonlinear of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: cherniha@imath.kiev.ua Dept. of Math., Technical University, 24 Pershotravnevyi Prospekt, Poltava 1, Ukraine A class

Popovych, Roman

44

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 266270 Symmetry Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 266­270 Symmetry, 2 Akademicka Str., Bialystok, Poland; Institute of Geophysics of NAS of Ukraine, 32 Palladin Ave., Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: tsyfra@math.uwb.edu.pl We propose the symmetry reduction method of partial

Popovych, Roman

45

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 231238. Modelling System for Relaxing Media.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 231­238. Modelling.A. VLADIMIROV Division of Geodynamics of Explosion, Subbotin Institute of Geophysics, NAS of Ukraine, Khmelnicki Str. 63-B, Kyiv 54, Ukraine E-mail: vsan@ambernet.kiev.ua A model describing non-equilibrium processes

Popovych, Roman

46

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 424429 On Calculation of Finite-Gap Spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 424. KOROSTIL Institute of Magnetism of NAS Ukraine, 36-b Vernadskii Ave., 03142 Kyiv-142, Ukraine E-mail: amk

Popovych, Roman

47

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 14741479 Long-Range Order in Classical Lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1474­1479 Long of Mathematics of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: skrypnik

Popovych, Roman

48

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 234239 On the Localized Invariant Traveling Wave Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 234 Subbotin Institute of Geophysics of NAS of Ukraine, 63-B Khmelnicki Str., 03142 Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: skur

Popovych, Roman

49

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 11841191 On the LiouvilleArnold Integrable Flows Related  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1184 of Mathematics of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: sam@imath.kiev.ua 2 Dept´ow, Poland; Dept. of Nonlinear Math. Analysis at the Institute of APMM of NAS of Ukraine, 3b Naukova Str

Popovych, Roman

50

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 245248. On Symmetry of a Class  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 245 of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: iyegorch@imath.kiev.ua The problem of group

Popovych, Roman

51

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 333340. Poincare Parasuperalgebra with Central Charges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 333­340. Poincar of Mathematics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., Kyiv, Ukraine E

Popovych, Roman

52

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 249254. On Some New Classes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 249­254. On Some of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: zhaliy@imath.kiev.ua We communicate some recent

Popovych, Roman

53

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 330332. Operators on (A, )-Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 330­332. Operators of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: vit-bond@imath.kiev.ua In the paper we consider

Popovych, Roman

54

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 4751 Nonlocal Symmetry and Integrable Classes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 47­51 Nonlocal of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: boyko@imath.kiev.ua We suggest

Popovych, Roman

55

CLEARANCE OF BULK MATERIALS FROM D&D - LIFE AFTER THE NAS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Lack of consistent free release standards for solid materials has been an issue that has been around for several decades. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has had specific and dose-based standards for the release of liquids and gases for several decades, but no regulatory mechanisms for the release of solid materials from a nuclear power plant. Even though free releases of small quantities of solid materials continue under existing guidelines from operating plants, the regulatory void creates major difficulties for the bulk materials that result from decommissioning projects. For the nation's fleet of nuclear reactors the cost of this regulatory void could be as high as $10 billion. The NRC has recently resumed the enhanced rulemaking process that was originally initiated in 1999 but was deferred pending a study by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS)/National Research Council. The NAS report and recommendations were issued in March 2002 and the NRC decided in October 2002 to resume the rulemaking process. This paper provides an overview of the developments in this area. It specifically discusses the applicability of ANSI N13.12 as a consensus standard that should be seriously considered for adoption as a regulatory standard.

Devgun, Jas S., Ph.D.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

56

December 1415, 2007 Meeting BOARD ON PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY Tel 202-334-3520 Fax 202-334-3575 E-mail bpa@nas.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-334-3575 · E-mail bpa@nas.edu Committee to Review U.S. ITER Science Participation Planning Process (CRISPPP

57

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 652658 Canonical Realization of Poincare Algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 652­658 Canonical for Condensed Matter Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii Str., 79011 Lviv, Ukraine E-mail: andy@icmp.lviv.ua The canonical realization of the Poincar´e group for the systems

Popovych, Roman

58

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 252255 Transformation of Scientific System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 252 Physics Alla VOROBYOVA Mykolayiv Pedagogical University, Mykolayiv, Ukraine E-mail: alla on application of symmetry methods to partial differential equations. There is some advancement in Ukraine

Popovych, Roman

59

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 461465 On Four Orthogonal Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 461­465 On Four and Anatolii KYRYCHENKO National Academy of Security Service of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine Kyiv National University of Building and Architecture, 31 Povitroflotsky Prosp., Kyiv 03037, Ukraine E-mail: AAKirichenko

Popovych, Roman

60

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 162166 Subgroups of Extended Poincare Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 162­166 Subgroups State Pedagogical University, 2 Ostrogradskoho Str., Poltava, Ukraine E-mail: laggo@poltava.bank.gov.ua Kyiv National University of Civil Aviation, 1 Komarova Avenue, Kyiv-54, Ukraine Using three

Popovych, Roman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Theoretical studies of optical gain tuning by hydrostatic pressure in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells  

SciTech Connect

In order to describe theoretically the tuning of the optical gain by hydrostatic pressure in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs), the optical gain calculations within kp approach were developed and applied for N-containing and N-free QWs. The electronic band structure and the optical gain for GaInNAs/GaAs QW were calculated within the 10-band kp model which takes into account the interaction of electron levels in the QW with the nitrogen resonant level in GaInNAs. It has been shown that this interaction increases with the hydrostatic pressure and as a result the optical gain for GaInNAs/GaAs QW decreases by about 40% and 80% for transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes, respectively, for the hydrostatic pressure change from 0 to 40 kilobars. Such an effect is not observed for N-free QWs where the dispersion of electron and hole energies remains unchanged with the hydrostatic pressure. This is due to the fact that the conduction and valence band potentials in GaInAs/GaAs QW scale linearly with the hydrostatic pressure.

Gladysiewicz, M.; Wartak, M. S. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27 (Poland); Department of Physics and Computer Science, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); Kudrawiec, R. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27 (Poland)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 204209. One-Dimensional FokkerPlanck Equation Invariant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 204­209. One STOGNII Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: spichak@apmat.freenet.kiev.ua National Technical University of Ukraine "Kyiv Polytechnic Institute

Popovych, Roman

63

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 14481453 Quantum Phase Space in Relativistic Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1448­1453 Quantum and C.V. USENKO Institute of Physics of NAS of Ukraine, 46 Nauky Ave., 03028 Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: sem., 03127 Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: usenko@phys.univ.kiev.ua Mathematical method of quantum phase space is very

Popovych, Roman

64

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 466468 Realizations of Real 4-Dimensional Solvable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 466 Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., Kyiv 4, Ukraine E-mail: rop@imath.kiev.ua Poltava State Pedagogical University, 2 Ostrogradskoho Str., Poltava, Ukraine E-mail: lutfullin@beep.ru We

Popovych, Roman

65

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 10641070 On 2 + 2 Locally Compact Quantum Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1064­1070 On 2 + 2 of Mathematics of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: yc@imath.kiev.ua, kalyuz@imath.kiev.ua Institute of Applied System Analysis, National Technical University of Ukraine ("KPI"), 37 Pobedy Ave

Popovych, Roman

66

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 4046 The Structure of Lie Algebras and the Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 40 Poltava, Ukraine E-mail: lvi@pdpu.septor.net.ua, laggo@poltava.bank.gov.ua § Institute of Mathematics of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: magda@imath.kiev.ua We have

Popovych, Roman

67

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 3439 Solitary Wave Solutions for Heat Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 34­39 Solitary Pedagogical University, 2 Ostrogradsky Str., 36003 Poltava, Ukraine E-mail: slpoltva@e-mail.pl.ua Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: nikitin

Nikitin, Anatoly

68

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 12361243 Regularity Properties of Infinite-Dimensional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1236 Vict. ANTONIOUK Institute of Mathematics of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: antoniouk@imath.kiev.ua In this paper we discuss the C properties of evolution

Popovych, Roman

69

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 125130 Symmetry Classification of KdV-Type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 125�130 Symmetry Poltava, Ukraine E-mail: lvi@pdpu.septor.net.ua, laggo@poltava.bank.gov.ua � Institute of Mathematics of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereschenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: renat@imath.kiev.ua This paper

Popovych, Roman

70

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 298303 Sets of Conditional Symmetry Operators and Exact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 298­303 Sets and Alla VOROBYOVA Institute of Mathematics of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: iyegorch@imath.kiev.ua Mykolayiv Petro Mogyla State Humanities University, Mykolaiv

Popovych, Roman

71

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 2, 870872 D-Branes, Helices, and Proton Decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 2, 870­872 D-Branes, Helices, and Proton Decay Yu.M. MALYUTA and T.V. OBIKHOD Institute for Nuclear Research of NAS Ukraine, 03022 Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: malyuta@mail.kar.net Proton decay is investigated by methods of category

Popovych, Roman

72

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 140144 On Differential Invariants of First-and Second-Order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 140 and Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3b Naukova Str., Lviv 79601, Ukraine E-mail: vas fedorchuk@yahoo.com Franko Lviv National University, 1 Universytetska Str., Lviv 79000, Ukraine E-mail: fedorchukv

Popovych, Roman

73

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 616622 Equation for Particles of Spin 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 616­622 Equation for Particles of Spin 3 2 with Anomalous Interaction Alexander GALKIN Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: galkin@imath.kiev.ua We consider tensor

Popovych, Roman

74

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 1724 Mykhailo Vasyl'ovych Ostrohrads'kyi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 17­24 Mykhailo Vasyl'ovych Ostrohrads'kyi Anatoly M. SAMOILENKO Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: sam@imath.kiev.ua The paper describes life and research

Popovych, Roman

75

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 271276 On Applications of Non-Point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 271., Bialystok, Poland; Intitute of Geophysics of NAS of Ukraine, 32 Palladina Ave., 03142 Kyiv-142, Ukraine E-94, Ukraine E-mail: vtretynyk@yahoo.com Combination of non-point and conditional symmetries

Popovych, Roman

76

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 12141218 On Certain Quotient of TemperleyLieb Algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1214­1218 On Certain Quotient of Temperley­Lieb Algebra Mariya O. VLASENKO Institute of Mathematics of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: mariyka@imath.kiev.ua We consider a certain quotient

Popovych, Roman

77

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 13081313 On the BBGKY Hierarchy Solutions for Many-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1308 , T.V. RYABUKHA , M.O. STASHENKO Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: gerasym@imath.kiev.ua, vyrtum@imath.kiev.ua Volyn State University, 13

Popovych, Roman

78

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 469473 Positive Conjugacy for Simple Dynamical Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 469­473 Positive Conjugacy for Simple Dynamical Systems Tatiana Yu. MAISTRENKO Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: tanya@imath.kiev.ua In the article the question of topological

Popovych, Roman

79

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 516523. Weyl-Type Quantization Rules and N-Particle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 516­523. Weyl-Time V. SHPYTKO Institute for Condensed Matter Physics of NAS of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii Str., Lviv, Ukraine E­mail: shpytko@icmp.lviv.ua Quantization of canonical realization of the Poincar´e algebra p(1, 1

Popovych, Roman

80

Nonlinear absorption edge properties of 1.3-m GaInNAs saturable R. Grange,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-starting and stable operation of the laser at tens of GHz repetition rates.4 So far, InGaAsP,5 InGaAs,6,7 and AlNonlinear absorption edge properties of 1.3- m GaInNAs saturable absorbers R. Grange,a A. Rutz, V above the PL peak and R scales with the linear absorption even in the bandtail. The product R

Keller, Ursula

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nitrogen-concentration control in GaNAs/AlGaAs quantum wells using nitrogen ?-doping technique  

SciTech Connect

GaNAs/Al{sub 0.35}Ga{sub 0.65}As multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with nitrogen ?-doping were fabricated on GaAs (100) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High controllability of nitrogen-concentrations in the MQWs was achieved by tuning nitrogen ?-doping time. The maximum nitrogen concentration in the MQWs was 2.8%. The MQWs exhibit intense, narrow photoluminescence emission.

Mano, Takaaki; Jo, Masafumi; Kuroda, Takashi; Noda, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Sakuma, Yoshiki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Elborg, Martin; Sakoda, Kazuaki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 490494 On Involutions which Preserve Natural Filtration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 490 of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: sav@imath.kiev.ua In this work we study

Popovych, Roman

83

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 357363. On Generalization of the Cuntz Algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 357 Analysis, Institute of Mathematics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: helen@imath.kiev.ua Institute of Economics, Management and Business Laws, 30

Popovych, Roman

84

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 127130. Oscillation of Solutions of Ordinary Differential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 127 Algebra Lyudmyla V. KHOMCHENKO Institute of Mathematics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., Kyiv, Ukraine The class of nonlinear second order systems having oscillation solutions

Popovych, Roman

85

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 11011107 Classical Dynamical YangBaxter Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1101, Ukraine; Institute for Low Temperature Physics & Engineering, 47 Lenin Ave., 61103 Kharkiv, Ukraine E Kharkiv, Ukraine § Department of Mathematics, University of G¨oteborg, SE-412 96 G¨oteborg, Sweden E

Popovych, Roman

86

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 14101414 Symmetry Analysis in Spikes (Bursts) Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1410­1414 Symmetry and Igor TETKO Institute of Applied System Analysis, National Technical University of Ukraine (KPI), 37 Peremogy Ave., Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: makalex@mmsa.ntu-kpi.kiev.ua, apolixus@yahoo.com Institute

Popovych, Roman

87

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 177179. A Class of Non-Lie Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 177­179. A Class of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: appmath@imath.kiev.ua New class of exact of Sciences of Ukraine, 1998, V.19, 166­173. [2] Fushchych W.I., Zhdanov R.Z. and Reven

Popovych, Roman

88

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 2, 939946 Charge Fractionalization in a Planar System with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 2, 939­946 Charge, Ukraine E-mail: yusitenko@bitp.kiev.ua Department of Physics, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 6 Academician Glushkov Ave., 03680 Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: gorka@univ.kiev.ua States

Popovych, Roman

89

The Navy seeks to identify responsible sources and obtain information in regard to purchasing renewable power for Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, located in Fallon, NV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) for Renewable Generation REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) for Renewable Generation Opportunities at NAWS China Lake, NAS Fallon, MCAGCC 29 Palms, and MCAS Yuma The Department of Navy (DoN) intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) in early 2009 for renewable energy generation opportunities at Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake, California; Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada; Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) Twentynine Palms, California, and Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Yuma, Arizona. The DoN will consider opportunities for the purchase of renewable power, developer wholesale generation, distributed generation, and the combination of those opportunities. Specifically, the Navy will provide Government land on these installations for large

90

nas82d5.tmp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: Early Government Support ENRICHED PRODUCT '1 - + DEPLETED MATERIAL Schematic Diamrn of Flow of Process Gas in Gaseous Diffusion Cl&de. Reprinted from Richard G. Hewlett and...

91

Experimental Determination of the Effect of the Ratio of B/Al...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Effect of the Ratio of BAl on Glass Dissolution along the Nepheline (NaAlSiO4) – Experimental Determination of the Effect of the Ratio of BAl on Glass Dissolution along...

92

Multiband GaNAsP Quaternary Alloys  

SciTech Connect

We have synthesized GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-y}P{sub y} alloys (x {approx} 0.3-1% and y = 0-0.4) using nitrogen N ion implantation into GaAsP epilayers followed by pulsed laser melting and rapid thermal annealing techniques. As predicted by the band anticrossing model, the incorporation of N splits the conduction band (E{sub M}) of the GaAs{sub 1-y}P{sub y} substrate, and strong optical transitions from the valence band to the lower (E{sub -}) and upper (E{sub +}) conduction subbands are observed. The relative strengths of the E{sub -} and E{sub +} transition change as the localized N level E{sub N} emerges from the conduction band forming narrow intermediate band for y > 0.3. The results show that GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x-y}P{sub y} alloys with y > 0.3 is a three band semiconductor alloy with potential applications for high-efficiency intermediate band solar cells.

Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Bour, D.; Farshchi,R.; Dubon, O.D.; Li, S.X.; Sharp, I.D.; Haller, E.E.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

93

NATIVE AMERICAN www.nas.pdx.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Anthropology Homepage: http://web.pdx.edu/~tthornto Don Tyree (Cherokee), Prof. Emeritus of English Tabitha

94

NAS-NS-3008[Rev.) NUCLEARSCIENCESERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory FL P. Schuman Atomic Ensrgy Division Phillips Petroleum Company (Idaho Fall&) A. W. Fairhrdl E. P Massachusetts Institute of Technology #12;Radiochemistry of Rhodium James C. Armstrong, Jr. Florida State i

95

NAS-NS-3002[Rev.) NUCLEARSCIENCESERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Scientific Reeeweh J. Howard Mcbfillen Nationn.1Sctence Foundation smmmllmm~ N. E. -U, Chairman W. E. Nervlk.awrence Hadiatloo Laboratory Phillipe Petroleum Company (Idaho Falls) A W. Fsdrhell E. P. Steinberg Urdversity--National Research Council Printed in USA. Price $1.00. Available from the Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific

96

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on SRS Low Activity Waste (LAW) modified to simulate Hanford waste....

97

SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Project More Documents & Publications Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) Technology Maturation...

98

N.A.S. Organization: July 1, 1957  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fysikalisk-Kemiska Institutionen, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Sverdrup, Harald Ulrik, (1945)* 1952 (13), Norsk Polarinstitutt, Observatoriegt 1, Oslo, Norway Taylor, Sir Geoffrey Ingram, 1945 (1), Trinity College, Cambridge...

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

NAS Report and Microsite Trace SSL Evolution and Future Promise...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a valuable tool to the cause of consumer education, providing a fast-and-easy primer on SSL and its energy-saving promise. Addthis Related Articles Secretary of Energy...

100

N.A.S. Organization: July 1, 1957  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...D. L. Weisskopf, V. F. Wheeler, J. A. Wigner, E. P...Botany-42 members Esau, Katherine Fred, E. B Hollaender, A...Epstein, P. S. Esau, Katherine Evans, G. C. Evans, H...6823 N. A. S. ORGANIZATION Wheeler, J. A. Whitney, Hassler...

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Comparison of leading parallel NAS file systems on commodity hardware  

SciTech Connect

High performance computing has experienced tremendous gains in system performance over the past 20 years. Unfortunately other system capabilities, such as file I/O, have not grown commensurately. In this activity, we present the results of our tests of two leading file systems (GPFS and Lustre) on the same physical hardware. This hardware is the standard commodity storage solution in use at LLNL and, while much smaller in size, is intended to enable us to learn about differences between the two systems in terms of performance, ease of use and resilience. This work represents the first hardware consistent study of the two leading file systems that the authors are aware of.

Hedges, R; Fitzgerald, K; Gary, M; Stearman, D M

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

N.A.S. Organization: July 1, 1957  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cam- bridge 38, Massachusetts Seaborg, Glenn Theodore, 1948 (5), Department...George Schlesinger, H. I. Seaborg, G. T. Shedlovsky, Theodore...Ross, F. E. Schiff, L. I. Seaborg, G. T. Seares, F. H. Segri...

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

NAS study on radiation takes the middle road  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...giga-watt-year of nuclear generated electricity...These numbers make nuclear power seem attractive, but...the hazards posed by terrorism; that little is known...devel-oped a good fix on the risks ofa major nuclear plant leak. This study adopts...

E Marshall

1979-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

104

NUCLEAR ARMS DISMANTLING NAS urges steps to safeguard plutonium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plutonium from tens of thousands of nuclear weapons being dismantled by the U.S. and the former Soviet Union presents "a clear and present danger" to international security, warns a report issued last week by a National Academy of Sciences panel.Steps ...

1994-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Summary - Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ng (FBSR). Th deciding which ng the Tank 48 he TRA Team m determined t ts (CTEs) and t ess Level (TRL) on Process: stem (TRL3) atment System RA reports, please v govPages...

106

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR THE BENCH STEAM REFORMER TEST  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing. The type, quantity and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluid bed steam reformer (FBSR). A determination of the adequacy of the FBSR process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the FBSR process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used to test the FBSR process. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the testing criteria.

BANNING DL

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105 And AN-103) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation  

SciTech Connect

One of the immobilization technologies under consideration as a Supplemental Treatment for Hanford’s Low Activity Waste (LAW) is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). The FBSR technology forms a mineral waste form at moderate processing temperatures thus retaining and atomically bonding the halides, sulfates, and technetium in the mineral phases (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite). Additions of kaolin clay are used instead of glass formers and the minerals formed by the FBSR technology offers (1) atomic bonding of the radionuclides and constituents of concern (COC) comparable to glass, (2) short and long term durability comparable to glass, (3) disposal volumes comparable to glass, and (4) higher Na2O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings than glass. The higher FBSR Na{sub 2}O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings contribute to the low disposal volumes but also provide for more rapid processing of the LAW. Recent FBSR processing and testing of Hanford radioactive LAW (Tank SX-105 and AN-103) waste is reported and compared to previous radioactive and non-radioactive LAW processing and testing.

Jantzen, Carol; Herman, Connie; Crawford, Charles; Bannochie, Christopher; Burket, Paul; Daniel, Gene; Cozzi, Alex; Nash, Charles; Miller, Donald; Missimer, David

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

108

Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - ar nas unidades Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

para sistemas homogneos... . Ensembles representativos. Campo mdio. Modelo de Ising. UNIDADE III: Mecnica estatstica quntica Source: Levin, Yan - Instituto de...

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente nas cidades Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a qualidade ... Source: Camara, Gilberto - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (Brasil) Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences ; Environmental Sciences...

111

Crédito e Confiança: a influência das normas sociais nas relações de crédito  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Brazil. MIT Press, 2005. BRASIL. Código Civil. São Paulo:da República Federativa do Brasil. Brasília: Senado, 2006.na Nota do Banco Central do Brasil de 25-08-2008). Edição de

Flores Filho, Edgar Gastón Jacobs; Lopes, Lucas Miotto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - aleitamento materno nas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anthology Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 2 ROBERTA MARIA PEREIRA LEITE CICLO ESTRAL E MENSTRUAL: REPERCUSSO DA Summary: houve alterao da...

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - alto impacto nas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 58Artigos Tcnico-Cientficos Natureza & Conservao -vol. 4 -n1 -Abril 2006 -pp. 58-63 Mauro Galetti -Ivan Sazima Summary: Galetti - Ivan Sazima INTRODUO A introduo de...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - atendimento nas unidades Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mathematics 92 Universidade de Braslia Decanato de Extenso Summary: sistemas de aquaponia Rodrigo Diana Navarro GUILHERME CRISPIM HUNDLEY Atendimento Clnico e Cirrgico......

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - autores nas revistas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instituto de Qumica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas Collection: Chemistry 4 CURRICULUM VITAE ET STUDIORUM Nombre: Felix Ritort Farran Summary: -Glass Model REVISTA: Journal...

116

NPB-MPJ: NAS Parallel Benchmarks Implementation for Message-Passing in Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of HPC infrastructures. These systems are usually programmed with native languages using message- passing libraries, especially MPI [1], which are targeted to distributed memory systems. However, the hybrid architec- ture (shared/distributed memory) of the multi-core systems demands the use of hybrid programming

Touriño, Juan

117

An Integrated Approach to Evaluating Risk Mitigation Measures for UAV Operational Concepts in the NAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integrated approach is outlined in this paper to evaluate risks posed by operating Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace System. The approach supports the systematic evaluation of potential risk mitigation ...

Weibel, Roland E

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced supercomputing nas Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. Nanostructure electronics 3. Atomic chain electronics 4. Quantum optoelectronics (Web page: ... Source: Biegel, Bryan - Advanced Supercomputing Division, NASA...

119

Thermoelectric and electrical characterization of Si nanowires and GaNAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1.2 Peltier and Thompson effects . . . . . . . . . . 1.2and (b) Peltier cooler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .leading to larger |S|. Peltier and Thompson effects The

Pichanusakorn, Paothep

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINI/STRATION CONTRACT NO. NAS 7-918 ~  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propulsion Laboratory. NPO-20377 i Low-Energy Interplanetary Transfers Using Lagrangian Points #12;9975 20377

Lo, Martin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

E-Print Network 3.0 - agulha fina nas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Escolano, Francisco - Departamento de Ciencia de la Computacin e Inteligencia Artificial, Universitat d'Alacant Collection: Engineering Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << <...

122

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

fortunate position of "preaching to the choir" today. After all, there are few things we care more passionately about than the need to strengthen America's position in the world...

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - area rural nas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Friday, November 19, 2010 Summary: areas." Even without the changes caused by health care reform, Hart says the nation's rural areas have... showed that while more than 20...

124

NAS battery demonstration at American Electric Power:a study for the DOE energy storage program.  

SciTech Connect

The first U.S. demonstration of the NGK sodium/sulfur battery technology was launched in August 2002 when a prototype system was installed at a commercial office building in Gahanna, Ohio. American Electric Power served as the host utility that provided the office space and technical support throughout the project. The system was used to both reduce demand peaks (peak-shaving operation) and to mitigate grid power disturbances (power quality operation) at the demonstration site. This report documents the results of the demonstration, provides an economic analysis of a commercial sodium/sulfur battery energy storage system at a typical site, and describes a side-by-side demonstration of the capabilities of the sodium/sulfur battery system, a lead-acid battery system, and a flywheel-based energy storage system in a power quality application.

Newmiller, Jeff (Endecon Engineering, San Ramon, CA); Norris, Benjamin L. (Norris Energy Consulting Company, Martinez, CA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - achados tomograficos nas Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nos Summary: sintomas, achados no exame fsico e alteraes eletrocardiogrficas (ECG) caractersticas. Em 49-76% os... ) Gravidade - Classe I: incio recente -...

126

E-Print Network 3.0 - agressividade nas pessoas Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VISGRAF Instituto de Matematica Pura e Aplicada Summary: Lucinelma Pessoa Albuquerque Luiz Velho (orientador) Technical Report TR-02-04 Relatorio Tecnico June... Lucinelma...

127

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

128

Uso de etileno no desverdecimento da tangerina Poncã produzida nas regiões Norte e Zona da Mata de Minas Gerais.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work was to promote the degreening, without losing internal fruit quality, of Poncã tangerine from two regions of Minas Gerais. Two… (more)

Marcio Gama dos Santos da Costa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 540547 Quantum Algebras, Particle Phenomenology,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Algebras, Particle Phenomenology, and (Quasi)Supersymmetry A.M. GAVRILIK Bogolyubov Institute, within the application of quantum algebras Uq(sun) [1, 2] to phenomenological description (see [3, 4, 7 for the Gi, ¯Gi) have been utilized. By means of #12;Quantum Algebras, Particle Phenomenology

Popovych, Roman

130

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC12.DeAngelis [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SYNTHESIS SYNTHESIS of SODALITE SYNTHESIS OF SODALITE FROM NEPHELINE FOR CONDITIONING CHLORIDE SALT WASTES G. De Angelis, C. Fedeli, M. Capone ENEA - C.R. Casaccia, Roma, Italy M. Da Ros, F. Giacobbo, E. Macerata, M. Mariani Politecnico di Milano - Milano, Italy IPRC 2012, Fontana, Wisconsin, USA SYNTHESIS of SODALITE Synthesis of LiK.SODALITE through Pressureless Consolidation process SYNTHESIS of SODALITE PC Process at ANL Process flow diagram for Pressureless Consolidation process at ANL SYNTHESIS of SODALITE Pressureless Consolidation Can Assembly (left) and Production-scale CWF furnace (right) PC Process at ANL SYNTHESIS of SODALITE Al 2 Si 2 O 7 . 2H 2 O --- NaOH NaAlSiO 4 LiCl-KCl Melting Freezing Crushing Simulated Waste Salt Nepheline PC process Ar glove-box Air 773 K room temp. Heating Mixing Nepheline Kaolinite Glass frit Mixing SYNTHESIS of SODALITE SYNTHESIS of SODALITE Mixing

131

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 23, 2010 September 23, 2010 CX-004179: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench Scale Testing on the Cesium Nitric Acid Recovery Evaporator (CNP) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office September 23, 2010 CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Bench-Scale Steam Reformer (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office September 23, 2010 CX-004176: Categorical Exclusion Determination Making Nepheline (NaAlSiO4), Phase Pure Standards CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

132

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 25870 of 31,917 results. 61 - 25870 of 31,917 results. Download CX-004258: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Spacer Dampers Along the Ostrander-McLaughlin Number 1 500-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/29/2010 Location(s): Clackamas County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004258-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004174: Categorical Exclusion Determination Heavy Water Disposition Offsite, K-Area CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004174-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004176: Categorical Exclusion Determination Making Nepheline (NaAlSiO4), Phase Pure Standards

133

 

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Analytical Development has been requested to make Nepheline (Sodium Aluminum Silicate) to support the Sludge Batch 4 work. The Nepheline will be Analytical Development has been requested to make Nepheline (Sodium Aluminum Silicate) to support the Sludge Batch 4 work. The Nepheline will be used in the x-ray diffraction laboratory as a standard to quantify the amount of nepheline in samples which are received. Rev 1 - Analytical Development has been requested to make Phase Pure Standards, I sodalite, Re sodalite, F sodalite, Cl sodalite, Nepheline, and Nosean, to support the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming project. These standards will be used in the x-ray diffraction laboratory as standards to quantify the amount of these materials in the samples which are received. Making Nepheline (NaAlSiO4), Phase Pure Standards Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC - A - 2006 - 090, Rev.1 Sep 23, 2010

134

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 18180 of 29,416 results. 71 - 18180 of 29,416 results. Download Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Fluidized Bed... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/technology-maturation-plan-tmp-fluidized-bed-steam-reforming-fbsr Download Audit of Shutdown and Transition of the Mound Plant, IG-0408 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-shutdown-and-transition-mound-plant-ig-0408 Download HQFMSP Chapter 11, Incidents of Security Concern 2013 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 11, Incidents of Security Concern Describes DOE Headquarters procedures for reporting, investigating, and

135

DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of both experimental and modeling studies performed using Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulants and FBSR product from Tank 48 simulant testing in order to develop higher levels of coal-carbon that can be managed by DWPF. Once the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process starts up for treatment of Tank 48 legacy waste, the FBSR product stream will contribute higher levels of coal-carbon in the sludge batch for processing at DWPF. Coal-carbon is added into the FBSR process as a reductant and some of it will be present in the FBSR product as unreacted coal. The FBSR product will be slurried in water, transferred to Tank Farm and will be combined with sludge and washed to produce the sludge batch that DWPF will process. The FBSR product is high in both water soluble sodium carbonate and unreacted coal-carbon. Most of the sodium carbonate is removed during washing but all of the coal-carbon will remain and become part of the DWPF sludge batch. A paper study was performed earlier to assess the impact of FBSR coal-carbon on the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) operation and melter off-gas flammability by combining it with SB10-SB13. The results of the paper study are documented in Ref. 7 and the key findings included that SB10 would be the most difficult batch to process with the FBSR coal present and up to 5,000 mg/kg of coal-carbon could be fed to the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. In the present study, a bench-scale demonstration of the DWPF CPC processing was performed using SB10 simulants spiked with varying amounts of coal, and the resulting seven CPC products were fed to the DWPF melter cold cap and off-gas dynamics models to determine the maximum coal that can be processed through the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. Based on the results of these experimental and modeling studies, the presence of coal-carbon in the sludge feed to DWPF is found to have both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off-gas flammability safety basis limits during the 9X/5X off-gas surge for normal bubbled melter

Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 478485 Jacobson Generators of (Quantum) sl(n + 1|m).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generators of (Quantum) sl(n + 1|m). Related Statistics T.D. PALEV , N.I. STOILOVA and J. VAN der JEUGT superalgebra sl(n + 1|m) via a new set of generators, called Jacobson generators, is given. It provides an alternative to the canonical description of Uq[sl(n+1|m)] in terms of Chevalley generators. The Jacobson

Popovych, Roman

137

Vulnerabilidade natural e avaliação de risco de contaminação dos sistemas de aqüíferos nas áreas degradadas pela extração de carvão na bacia hidrográfica do Rio Mãe Luzia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A bacia hidrográfica do Rio Mãe Luzia está localizada dentro da bacia carbonífera catarinense, no sul do estado de Santa Catarina, em uma região muito… (more)

Lucas Rubbo Gonçalves

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 219223 Lie Symmetries of (1+1)-Dimensional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Theorem 1. Any operator Q = tt + xx + + from the maximal Lie invariance algebra Amax(V ) of equation (1 + x Vx + t tV = 0. (3) #12;220 R.O. Popovych, N.M. Ivanova and H. Eshraghi Note 1. The linear span fields. Since for any Q A where (t, x) = (0, 0) we can find V satisfying condition (3) then A = V Amax

Popovych, Roman

139

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 6268 Non-Lie Reductions of Nonlinear Reaction-Diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ b1U1 ) + U1-1 (h1 + c1V 2 ), Vt = d2(V 2 Vx)x + V (a2 + b2V 2 ) + V 1-2 (h2 + c2U1 ) (1, Vt = (V Vx)x + V (a2 + b2V ) + h2 + c2U. (2) One can note that system (2) is a system of LotkaUV are replaced by the terms h1 + c1V and h2 + c2U, respectively. Hereafter this RD system

Popovych, Roman

140

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 2, 843849 Nonlinear Amplitude MaxwellDirac Equations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Thus, NME is written as a set of Nonlinear Dirac Equations (NDE). Exact solutions of NDE with classical that the optical analogy of the Nonlinear Dirac Equations of field (NDE) leads to a nonlinear part only in the first coupled equation. This result allows to solve the NDE by separation of variables and to obtain

Popovych, Roman

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141

Entre consensos e dissensos â a tessitura do atendimento a crianÃas e adolescentes em situaÃÃo de moradia nas ruas de Fortaleza.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Esta dissertaÃÃo versa sobre o desvendamento das prÃticas interconexas que compÃem a rede de atendimento Equipe Interinstitucional de Abordagem de Rua. Esta se apresenta como… (more)

NatÃlia Pinheiro Xavier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

143

My Documents\\Presentations\\IFE\\NAS\\JCF_IFE_NAS_LANL_V4Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Slide 1  

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for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Slide 1 Prospects for Inertial Fusion A S S I F I E D Slide 2 · Addressing NRC committee charge ­ Power generation prospects ­ Challenges, cost, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Slide 3 LANL fully supports

144

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on a composite of two caustic Hanford A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on a composite of two caustic Hanford tank waste streams (AZ101 and AZ102). The tests will be performed in SRNL 773-A Shielded Cells, A-block with portions being completed in B-wing and in the Analytical Development labs. Approximately, 1.5 L of each waste stream will be fed to the process over the course of ~15 runs (<100 mL of waste per run). Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Hanford Sample E Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC-A-2011-0004, Rev.0 Feb 10, 2011 Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2011.03.16 14:24:12

145

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 mL of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This project will be conducted under a Hazardous Treatability Study. The process operates at ~ 700 degrees C and at -6 inwc pressure. The process will generate ~ 25 g of solid sodium-alumino-silicate mineralized product per run. This mineral product contains RCRA metals. The process also produces ~ 0.07 moles of gaseous NOx per run. Other constituents of the off-gas stream include CO, CO2, H2, H2O and N2. Approximately 860 mL of steam

146

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 mL of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This project will be conducted under a Hazardous Waste Treatability Study. The process operates at ~ 700 degrees C and at -6 inwc pressure. The process will generate ~ 25 g of solid sodium-alumino-silicate mineralized, granular product per run. This mineral product contains RCRA metals. The process also produces ~ 0.07 moles of gaseous NOx per run. Other constituents of the off-gas stream include CO, CO2, H2, H2O and N2.

147

Performance of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product Under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Currently, several candidates for secondary waste immobilization at the Hanford site in the State of Washington, USA are being considered. To demonstrate the durability of the product in the unsaturated Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the site, a series of tests have been performed one of the candidate materials using the Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) system. The material that was tested was the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) granular product and the granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix. The FBSR product is composed primarily of an insoluble sodium aluminosilicate matrix with the dominant phases being feldspathoid minerals mostly nepheline, sodalite, and nosean. The PUF test method allows for the accelerated weathering of materials, including radioactive waste forms, under hydraulically unsaturated conditions, thus mimicking the open-flow and transport properties that most likely will be present at the IDF. The experiments show a trend of decreasing tracer release as a function of time for several of the elements released from the material including Na, Si, Al, and Cs. However, some of the elements, notably I and Re, show a steady release throughout the yearlong test. This result suggests that the release of these minerals from the sodalite cage occurs at a different rate compared with the dissolution of the predominant nepheline phase.

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Rod, Kenton A.; Bowden, Mark E.; Brown, Christopher F.; Pierce, Eric M.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 mL of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This project will be conducted under a Hazardous Waste Treatability Study. The process operates at ~ 700 degrees C and at -6 inwc pressure. The process will generate ~ 25 g of solid sodium-alumino-silicate mineralized, granular product per run. This mineral product contains RCRA metals. The process also produces ~ 0.07 moles of gaseous NOx per run. Other constituents of the off-gas stream include CO, CO2, H2, H2O and N2.

149

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 mL of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This project will be conducted under a Hazardous Treatability Study. The process operates at ~ 700 degrees C and at -6 inwc pressure. The process will generate ~ 25 g of solid sodium-alumino-silicate mineralized product per run. This mineral product contains RCRA metals. The process also produces ~ 0.07 moles of gaseous NOx per run. Other constituents of the off-gas stream include CO, CO2, H2, H2O and N2. Approximately 860 mL of steam

150

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT FOR HANFORD'S LOW ACTIVITY WASTE AND SECONDARY WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of I-125/129 and Tc-99 to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Ninety six grams of radioactive product were made for testing. The second campaign commenced using SRS LAW chemically trimmed to look like Hanford's LAW. Six hundred grams of radioactive product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Cozzi, A.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Daniel, G.

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

151

Nepheline Formation Potential in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) and Its Impact on Durability: Selecting Glasses for a Phase 2 Study  

SciTech Connect

The likelihood for the formation of nepheline in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) glass systems and the potential impact of nepheline on the durability of these systems is part of the frit development efforts for SB4. The effect of crystallization on glass durability is complex and depends on several interrelated factors including the change in residual glass composition, the formation of internal stress or microcracks, and the preferential attack at the glass-crystal interface. Perhaps one of the most significant effects is the type and extent (or fraction) of crystallization and the change to the residual glass composition. A strong increase in glass dissolution (or decrease in durability) has been observed in previous studies in glasses that formed aluminum-containing crystals, such as NaAlSiO{sub 4} (nepheline) and LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and crystalline SiO{sub 2}. Although it is well known that the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to borosilicate glasses enhances the durability of the waste form (through creation of network-forming tetrahedral Na{sup +}-[AlO{sub 4/2}]{sup -} pairs), the combination of high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O can lead to the formation of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}). Given the projected high concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in SB4 and the potential use of a high Na{sub 2}O based frit to improve melt rate and a high Na{sub 2}O sludge due to settling problems, the potential formation of nepheline in various SB4 systems continues to be assessed. The most recent compositional projections from the Closure Business Unit (CBU) for SB4 may be framed around three decision areas: the sodium molarity of the sludge (at values of 1M Na and 1.6M Na), the SB3 heel that will be included in the batch (expressed in inches of SB3 sludge with values of 0, 40, and 127''), and the introduction of an ARP stream into the sludge (which is represented by six options: no ARP, ARPa, ARPe, ARPk, ARPm, and ARPv). Candidate frits are being identified for these options via a paper study approach with the intent of downselecting to a set of key frits whose operating windows (i.e., waste loading intervals that meet Product Composition Control System (PCCS) Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) criteria) are robust to and/or selectively optimal for these sludge options. The primary or key frits that appear attractive on paper (i.e., down selected via the paper study) will be transferred into SRNL's experimental studies supporting SB4; specifically, the melt-rate studies, chemical process cell flowsheet runs and, if needed, a glass variability study.

Peeler, D

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Nepheline Formation Potential in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)  

SciTech Connect

The effect of crystallization on glass durability is complex and depends on several interrelated factors including the change in residual glass composition, the formation of internal stress or microcracks, and the preferential attack at the glass-crystal interface. Perhaps one of the most significant effects is the type and extent (or fraction) of crystallization and the resulting change to the residual glass composition. A strong increase in glass dissolution (or decrease in durability) has been observed in previous studies in glasses that formed aluminum-containing crystals, such as NaAlSiO{sub 4} (nepheline) and LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and crystalline SiO{sub 2}. Although the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to borosilicate glasses enhances the durability of the waste form (through creation of network-forming tetrahedral Na{sup +}-[AlO{sub 4/2}]{sup -} pairs), the combination of high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O can lead to the formation of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}). Given the projected high concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in SB4 and the potential use of a high Na{sub 2}O based glass (as a result of the use of a high Na{sub 2}O frit and/or a less washed sludge) to improve melt rate, the potential formation of nepheline in various SB4 systems is being assessed. Li et al. (2003) indicate that sodium alumino-borosilicate glasses are prone to nepheline crystallization if their compositions projected on the Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} ternary fall within the nepheline primary phase field. In particular, durable glasses with SiO{sub 2}/(SiO{sub 2}+Na{sub 2}O+ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) > 0.62, where the oxides are expressed as mass fractions in the glass, do not precipitate nepheline as their primary phase. Twelve SB4-based glasses have been identified or classified as ''prone to nepheline formation'' using a ''less conservative'' discriminator value of 0.65. Ten of the 12 glasses are Frit 320 based, and 8 of these 10 target a 40% WL-independent of the SB4 blending scenario used. This is not unexpected due to the higher alkali content of Frit 320 (12% Na{sub 2}O) relative to Frit 418 (8% Na{sub 2}O) and the fact that as WLs increase, the Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations increase and the SiO{sub 2} concentrations decrease in this series of glasses. Using the ''less conservative'' value as a guide will not only increase the probability of forming nepheline but will also allow the assessment of several different blending scenarios, both frits, and different WLs which will provide valuable insight into the frit selection process for SB4. More specifically, blending strategies, frit compositions, and WLs that avoid nepheline formation could be used to guide the frit selection process or to make compositional adjustments to the frit. The durability of these 12 glasses (of both quenched and centerline canister cooled versions) will be measured with the results being documented in a subsequent report.

PEELER, D

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

CX-003967: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67: Categorical Exclusion Determination 67: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003967: Categorical Exclusion Determination Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Hanford Samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on two caustic Hanford waste streams (SX-105 and An-103). The tests will be performed in Savannah River National Laboratory 773-A Shielded Cells, A-block with portions being completed in B-wing and in the Analytical Development laboratories. Approximately, 1 Liter of each waste stream will be fed to the process over the course of 8 runs (250 milliliter of waste per run). DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

154

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1-06 Subramanian Sams11-12.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WP Technical Exchange WP Technical Exchange Hanford/SRS Tank Waste Path Forward Karthik Subramanian, SRR Terry Sams, WRPS 11/16/2010 SRR-MS-2010-00249 Print Close 2 Overview * Technology Deployment Vision * Tank Waste Strategy and Life-Cycle Benefits - Transformational Technology Scenarios * Hanford - Vitrification Technologies - Salt Processing: LAW Pretreatment and Immobilization * Rotary Microfiltration/Small Column Ion Exchange (RMF/SCIX) * Alternate LLW: Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) - Accelerated SST Retrieval * SRS - Vitrification Technologies - Salt Processing * Rotary Microfiltration/Small Column Ion Exchange (RMF/SCIX) * Next Generation Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Print Close 3 Technology Deployment * Goal-oriented technology deployment process to integrate and manage resources through collaboration

155

CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45: Categorical Exclusion Determination 45: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/25/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in Savannah River National Laboratory High Level Caves (HLC), A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 milliliters (mL) of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs.

156

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

48 Business Decision Criteria 48 Business Decision Criteria Renee H. Spires Technology Development May 21, 2009 5/21/09 2 Tank 48 Business Decision Criteria Technology development for the treatment of Tank 48 was invested in two alternatives - Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) - Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Systems engineering processes were used to identify, define and weigh a set of criteria to perform selection of alternatives - Designed with flexibility so that the criteria can be applied to the Tank 48 technology selection at any time The business decision will result in the design, deployment and operation of the selected alternative for the treatment of Tank 48 5/21/09 3 Agenda Tank 48 Background and Importance Development of Criteria Comparison to Past Evaluations Status

157

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 6150 of 26,764 results. 41 - 6150 of 26,764 results. Photo Gallery LED Lighting on the National Mall http://energy.gov/photos/led-lighting-national-mall Download Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 1- January 2013 The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Division of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) to... http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/energy-emergency-preparedness-quarterly-vol-2-issue-1-january-2013 Download Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for

158

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 18070 of 28,560 results. 61 - 18070 of 28,560 results. Download Financial and Activity Report- February 19, 2010 http://energy.gov/downloads/financial-and-activity-report-february-19-2010 Download Financial and Activity Report- March 26, 2010 http://energy.gov/downloads/financial-and-activity-report-march-26-2010 Download Financial and Activity Report- April 09, 2010 http://energy.gov/downloads/financial-and-activity-report-april-09-2010 Download Financial and Activity Report- August 20, 2010 http://energy.gov/downloads/financial-and-activity-report-august-20-2010 Download Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for

159

CX-005511: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

511: Categorical Exclusion Determination 511: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005511: Categorical Exclusion Determination Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Hanford Sample E CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on a composite of two caustic Hanford tank waste streams (AZ101 and AZ102). The tests will be performed in Savannah River National Laboratory 773-A Shielded Cells, A-block with portions being completed in B-wing and in the Analytical Development labs. Approximately, 1.5 liters of each waste stream will be fed to the process over the course of ~15 runs ( DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

160

CX-004173: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004173: Categorical Exclusion Determination Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Savannah River Site Low Activity Waste (LAW) (Module B) CX(s) Applied: B3/6 Date: 09/30/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on Savannah River Site Low Activity Waste (LAW) modified to simulate Hanford waste. The tests will be performed in Savannah River National Laboratory 773-A Shielded Cells, A-block with portions being completed in B-wing, C-wing, and in the Analytical Development laboratories. Approximately 2 liters of sample will be fed to the process.

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161

Savannah River Site - Tank 48 Briefing on SRS Tank 48 Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank 48 Tank 48 Independent Technical Review August 2006 2 SRS Tank 48 ITR SRS Tank 48 ITR Key ITR Observation Two distinct problems: Removing tetraphenylborate (TPB) waste and then cleaning the tank sufficiently to support return to service Processing contents to eliminate TPB hazard August 2006 3 SRS Tank 48 ITR SRS Tank 48 ITR Overarching ITR Conclusions 1. TPB Processing is on the right track - DOE/WSRC have selected the most promising candidates - Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is the most technically attractive and mature of the candidate processes August 2006 4 SRS Tank 48 ITR SRS Tank 48 ITR Overarching Conclusions (continued) 2. Heel removal and tank cleanout will be a very challenging task. Compounding issues: - Physical difficulties in cleanout (access, congestion, etc.)

162

CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Bench-Scale Steam Reformer (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in Savannah River National Laboratory High Level Caves, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 milliliters (mL) of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This

163

Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) Documents Available for Download November 1, 2007 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer System. November 1, 2007 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Wet Air Oxidation.

164

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

National Research Council NUCLEAR SCIENCE SERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.00 Alumlnum and G.sllium, NAS-NS-3032 [1961] , $4.50 Americium and Curium, NAS-NS-3006 [ 1960] , $4

166

EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product, which is one of the objectives of this current study, is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. FBSR testing of a Hanford LAW simulant and a WTP-SW simulant at the pilot scale was performed by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC at Hazen Research Inc. in April/May 2008. The Hanford LAW simulant was the Rassat 68 tank blend and the target concentrations for the LAW was increased by a factor of 10 for Sb, As, Ag, Cd, and Tl; 100 for Ba and Re (Tc surrogate); 1,000 for I; and 254,902 for Cs based on discussions with the DOE field office and the environmental regulators and an evaluation of the Hanford Tank Waste Envelopes A, B, and C. It was determined through the evaluation of the actual tank waste metals concentrations that some metal levels were not sufficient to achieve reliable detection in the off-gas sampling. Therefore, the identified metals concentrations were increased in the Rassat simulant processed by TTT at HRI to ensure detection and enable calculation of system removal efficiencies, product retention efficiencies, and mass balance closure without regard to potential results of those determinations or impacts on product durability response such as Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). A WTP-SW simulant based on melter off-gas analyses from Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was also tested at HRI in the 15-inch diameter Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) dual reformer at HRI in 2008. The target concentrations for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were increased by 16X for Se, 29X for Tl, 42X for Ba, 48X for Sb, by 100X for Pb and Ni, 1000X for Ag, and 1297X for Cd to ensure detection by the an

Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

167

Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Understanding the mechanisms that control the durability of nuclear waste glass is paramount if reliable models are to be constructed so that the glass dissolution rate in a given geological repository can be calculated. Presently, it is agreed that (boro)silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4) with higher [H4SiO4] leading to lower dissolution rates. Once the reaction has slowed as a result of the buildup of H4SiO4, another increase in the rate has been observed that corresponds to the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products. However, it has also been observed that the concentration of silica-bearing solution species does not significantly decrease, indicating saturation, while other glass tracer elements concentrations continue to increase, indicating that the glass is still dissolving. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a representative zeolitic silica-bearing alteration product, analcime [Na(AlSi2O6)?H2O]. To simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix for amorphous silica was substituted for the glass pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix because it has been shown that silicate glasses act as a silica-only solid with respect to kinetic considerations. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. From the simulations we conclude, firstly, that the rate of glass dissolution is dependent on the kinetics of formation of the zeolitic phase. Therefore, the kinetics of secondary phase formation is an important parameter that should be taken into account in future glass dissolution modeling efforts. Secondly, the results indicate that, in the absence of a gel layer, the glass dissolution rate controls the rate of analcime precipitation in the long term. The meaning of these results pertinent to long-term glass durability is discussed.

Denis M. Strachan; James J. Neeway

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Summary - Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S Wet Air Savan contain liquid w contain potent to the option tank w Bed S condu be pur The as Techn Techn as liste * W o o The Ele Site: S roject: S P Report Date: J ited States Savanna Why DOE r Oxidation Proc nnah River Tan ning approxima waste. The wa ns tetraphenylb tially flammable tank head spa s have been id waste: Wet Air O team Reformin cted to aid in d rsued for treatin What th ssessment team ology Element ology Readine ed below: Wet Air Oxidatio Reactor sys Offgas Trea To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Savannah Rive SRS Tank 48H Project July 2007 Departmen ah River E-EM Did This cess k 48H is a 1.3 ately 250, 000 aste is a salt so borate (TPB), w e concentration ce. Two poten dentified for this Oxidation (WAO ng (FBSR). Th deciding which ng the Tank 48

169

DEVELOPMENT QUALIFICATION AND DISPOSAL OF AN ALTERNATIVE IMMOBILIZED LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE FORM AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Demonstrating that a waste form produced by a given immobilization process is chemically and physically durable as well as compliant with disposal facility acceptance criteria is critical to the success of a waste treatment program, and must be pursued in conjunction with the maturation of the waste processing technology. Testing of waste forms produced using differing scales of processing units and classes of feeds (simulants versus actual waste) is the crux of the waste form qualification process. Testing is typically focused on leachability of constituents of concern (COCs), as well as chemical and physical durability of the waste form. A principal challenge regarding testing immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) forms is the absence of a standard test suite or set of mandatory parameters against which waste forms may be tested, compared, and qualified for acceptance in existing and proposed nuclear waste disposal sites at Hanford and across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. A coherent and widely applicable compliance strategy to support characterization and disposal of new waste forms is essential to enhance and accelerate the remediation of DOE tank waste. This paper provides a background summary of important entities, regulations, and considerations for nuclear waste form qualification and disposal. Against this backdrop, this paper describes a strategy for meeting and demonstrating compliance with disposal requirements emphasizing the River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site and the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) mineralized low-activity waste (LAW) product stream.

SAMS TL; EDGE JA; SWANBERG DJ; ROBBINS RA

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

170

Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

171

E-Print Network 3.0 - atendidas em unidade Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mathematics 29 O desmatamento nas Unidades de Conservao em Mato Grosso1,2 Roberta dos Santos Summary: O desmatamento nas Unidades de Conservao em Mato Grosso1,2 Roberta dos...

172

E-Print Network 3.0 - acroqueratosis verruciforme diagnosticada...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nas reas ... Source: Camara, Gilberto - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (Brasil) Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences ; Environmental Sciences...

173

Jesuit Proposals for a Regulated Society in a Colonial World: The Cases of Antonio Ruiz de Montoya and Antonio Vieira  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reform: Os indios, que moram em suas aldeias com títulos demais cativos que os que moram nas casas particulares dos

Gomez, Fernando

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

EDITAL N. 03/2012 EM 6 DE JUNHO DE 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

backup, redes de armazenamento SAN e NAS, infraestrutura de rede de dados e desenvolvimento de scripts em

175

Engine Design for LIFE Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/NAE, January 2011NIF-0111-20839s2.ppt 2 #12;The LIFE "chamber" is an unsealed, segmented array sitting within a low pressure gas environment Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011NIF Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011NIF-0111-20839s2.ppt 4 #12;Once moved to the engine bay, cooling

176

Influence of liquid structure on diffusive isotope separation in molten silicates and aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect

Molecular diffusion in natural volcanic liquids discriminates between isotopes of major ions (e.g., Fe, Mg, Ca, and Li). Although isotope separation by diffusion is expected on theoretical grounds, the dependence on mass is highly variable for different elements and in different media. Silicate liquid diffusion experiments using simple liquid compositions were carried out to further probe the compositional dependence of diffusive isotopic discrimination and its relationship to liquid structure. Two diffusion couples consisting of the mineral constituents anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}; denoted AN), albite (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}; denoted AB), and diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}; denoted DI) were held at 1450°C for 2 h and then quenched to ambient pressure and temperature. Major-element as well as Ca and Mg isotope profiles were measured on the recovered quenched glasses. In both experiments, Ca diffuses rapidly with respect to Si. In the AB–AN experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 20 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Ca is much greater than in natural liquid experiments where D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 1. In the AB–DI experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 6 and the efficiency of isotope separation is between that of the natural liquid experiments and the AB–AN experiment. In the AB–DI experiment, D{sub Mg}/D{sub Si} ~ 1 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Mg is smaller than it is for Ca yet similar to that observed for Mg in natural liquids. The results from the experiments reported here, in combination with results from natural volcanic liquids, show clearly that the efficiency of diffusive separation of Ca isotopes is systematically related to the solvent-normalized diffusivity—the ratio of the diffusivity of the cation (D{sub Ca}) to the diffusivity of silicon (D{sub Si}). The results on Ca isotopes are consistent with available data on Fe, Li, and Mg isotopes in silicate liquids, when considered in terms of the parameter D{sub cation}/D{sub Si}. Cations diffusing in aqueous solutions display a similar relationship between isotopic separation efficiency and D{sub cation} =D{sub H 2 O} , although the efficiencies are smaller than in silicate liquids. Our empirical relationship provides a tool for predicting the magnitude of diffusive isotopic effects in many geologic environments and a basis for a more comprehensive theory of isotope separation in liquid solutions. We present a conceptual model for the relationship between diffusivity and liquid structure that is consistent with available data.

Watkins, J.M.; DePaolo, D.J.; Ryerson, F.J.; Peterson, B.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

National Policy Assurances - October 2004  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

(NAS) "Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals" (1996), including the Public Health Service Policy and Government Principles Regarding the Care and Use of Animals in...

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidente nuclear em Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EUA em relao ao programa nuclear de seu pas e analisa acidentes areos no Brasil >> No incomum... Meshkati um especialista em segurana industrial nas reas...

179

Primeira-Dama Tropical: A cidade e o corpo feminino na ficção de Júlia Lopes de Almeida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e polémicas literarias no Brasil. São Paulo: Companhia dase Terra, 1984. Telles, Norma. Brasil. "Escritoras, escritas,também segundo Bárbara Brasil XXXV (2006) participou nas

Eisenhart, Vanina

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - autoral brasileira como Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 5 100 anos de queimadas nas Razes do Brasil 05Julho2007 Summary: provvel que nenhum outro autor tenha dado tanta ateno ...

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181

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental das atividades Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Sistemas de Gerncia de Workflows: Caractersticas, Distribuio e Luiz Antnio M. Pereira Summary: ;8 ambiente operacional e colocao das vrias atividades nas...

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - aos entrelugares fluidos Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uma simplificacao das equacoes de Navier-Stokes resulta nas equacoes de Boussinesq, as quais... ) Determine a solucao que satisfaz a condicao inicial u(0, x) (...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - aphididae em plantas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JrJr Summary: capaz de: 1. Descrever padres de assimetria e aninhamento em redes ecolgicas 12;ContedoContedo 1... Assimetria nas interaes Estrutura II...

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobarco em plantas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JrJr Summary: capaz de: 1. Descrever padres de assimetria e aninhamento em redes ecolgicas 12;ContedoContedo 1... Assimetria nas interaes Estrutura II...

185

Montagem e caracterização de unidade de eletrodiálise em escala de laboratório para tratamento de soluções salinas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A escassez de água nos grandes centros urbanos deve se agravar nos próximos anos. Novas fontes de água são necessárias para suprir a demanda. Nas… (more)

Thales Pires Dias Galuchi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

ION PAIRING AND pH: A REPLY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

960. COMMENT. ( 1970) found experimentally that NaS04- ion pairs dissociate with increased pressure under conditions appropriate to the deep ocean.

1999-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

The rate of germination and growth of certain range grasses under experimental conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rap. 200 R. F. 8)1 No. of Samples Height Depth ~ 73 Above- ground It. Nas. Relow- ground b't. Nas. Root- shoot Ratio , 003 1. 667 No. of Samples Height 1. 8t 1, 88 Above- ground '( to gas ~ . 007 ~ 002 . 011 Relow- ground Wti... Rap. 200 R. F. 8)1 No. of Samples Height Depth ~ 73 Above- ground It. Nas. Relow- ground b't. Nas. Root- shoot Ratio , 003 1. 667 No. of Samples Height 1. 8t 1, 88 Above- ground '( to gas ~ . 007 ~ 002 . 011 Relow- ground Wti...

Oxnam, Herbert Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$4. Wind electrolysis-derived hydrogen would cost about $7-Electrolysis 24,000 kg/day NAS/NRC, 2004 Note: Delivered hydrogen costs

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Geothermal Update NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES / NOVEMBER 4,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES NOVEMBER 4, 2013 Geothermal Update NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES NOVEMBER 4, 2013 GTO-NAS.pdf More Documents & Publications GEA Geothermal...

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - algodoeiro em portugal Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

patente nas memrias dos portugueses, quando em Agosto do ano... passado o Dr. Duro Barroso permutou inesperadamente So Bento por Bruxelas. Portugal bambaleou... estupefacto,...

191

Preparing Residents in Training to Become Health-Care Leaders: A Pilot Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to describe a successful and exportable training module that addresses Next Accreditation System (NAS) behavioral milestones for leadership competencies.

Ronald J. Gurrera; Rodney Dismukes; Matthew Edwards; Usama Feroze…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

O corpo na transversal do tempo: da sociedade disciplinar à sociedade de controle ou da analítica de "um corpo que cai.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??No fluxo de acontecimentos que revolveram as certezas e regimes de verdade nas últimas décadas, a tese O Corpo na Transversal do Tempo: da sociedade… (more)

Edivaldo Vieira da Silva

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Universidade de Braslia Instituto de Cincias Biolgicas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, nas seguintes Linhas de Pesquisa: a) Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação para Sustentabilidade da Região

Maier, Rudolf Richard

194

Mercados externos pesam 20% do negcio da Gatewit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projectos de investigação nas áreas de tec- nologia de informação e sustentabilidade aplicáveis à actividade

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - apresentadas pelos pacientes Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Universidade de Braslia Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 20 Um sexo impensvel : A identificao dos hermafroditas na Frana do sculo XIX Summary: insiste nas...

196

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation,...

197

Training trust in automation within a NextGen environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The projected increase in air traffic density has led to the development of NextGen that is expected to revolutionize the way the NAS is… (more)

Higham, Tiana-Lynn M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Effects of Levels of Automation on Air Traffic Controller Situation Awareness and Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To meet the increasing demands of air traffic, the Joint Planning and Development Office has proposed initiatives to modernize the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS).… (more)

Sethumadhavan, Arathi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Zita Martins Astrobiloga portuguesa do Imperial College de Londres "Estamos mais perto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- que nós defendemos -- afirma que a vida tem origem nas moléculas orgânicas extra- terrestres. O que

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

200

Universidades querem passar a escolher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existem sistemas com "numerus clausus" em áreas como a Me- dicina, enquanto nas restantes áreas não tem

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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201

Práticas discursivas sobre o espanhol através da comunicação mediada por computador: la lengua mía, la lengua tuya, la lengua nuestra.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Proponho-me, nesta pesquisa, detalhar os contextos de interação em língua espanhola nas listas de discussão internacionais da Internet (em que participam, em geral, pessoas de… (more)

Valesca Brasil Irala

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Formação continuada e trabalho pedagógico : o caso de uma professora egressa do curso de pedagogia para professores em exercício no início de escolarização-PIE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Este estudo pautou-se nas reflexões sobre a prática pedagógica de uma professora egressa do curso PIE e objetivou analisar as concepções que fundamentam o processo… (more)

Jacira Chaves Ribeiro

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

População de rua em juiz de fora: uma reflexão a partir da questão social.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Quem são essas pessoas que vivem nas ruas das cidades expressando uma situação de pobreza extrema? Em que lugar e em que momento do processo… (more)

Viviane Souza Pereira

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Forensic Sites | The Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forensic Sites Meetings, Conferences, and Short Courses MFRC Training Calendar Reports of Interest NAS Report A Guide for Forensic Science Laboratories, Educational Institutions...

205

Group classification and exact solutions of nonlinear wave equations State Pedagogical University, 2 Ostrogradskogo Street, 36000 Poltava, Ukraine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University, 2 Ostrogradskogo Street, 36000 Poltava, Ukraine R. Zhdanov Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine O. Magda Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine Abstract We perform complete group classification

Zhdanov, Renat

206

R.Z. Zhdanov \\Lambda , I.M. Tsyfra y , and R.O. Popovych z A precise definition of reduction of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of partial differential equations Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, 252004 Kyiv, Ukraine E­mail: \\Lambda renat@imath.kiev.ua, y ivan@apmat.freenet.kiev.ua, z roman. Zhdanov Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, 252004 Kyiv, Ukraine E

Zhdanov, Renat

207

Thermodynamically Stable Dispersions of Quantum Dots in a Nematic Liquid Crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*, State Scientific Institution "Institute for Single Crystals", NAS of Ukraine, 60, Lenin Ave., Kharkov, 61001, Ukraine Faculty of Pharmacy, UMR CNRS 7213, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France § Institute of Physics, NAS of Ukraine, 46, Nauki Ave., Kiev, 03039, Ukraine North Carolina A&T State

Reznikov, Yuri

208

Collection of Abstracts of the XIII Christmas Conference on Liquid Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Department of Liquid Crystals, Institute of Physics, NAS of Ukraine 14-15 , 2014 , January 14-15, 2014 Kiev, Ukraine #12;2 Highly viscous chiral thin films for optical detection of small rotations and submicron displacements A. Iljin1 , P.V. Shibaev2 1 Insitute of Physics, NAS of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine 2 Department

Reznikov, Yuri

209

Exploring global changes in nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in agriculture induced by livestock production over the 1900–2050 period  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for increasing per-capita overall consumption...However, the demand for animal...production in more energy- and nutrient-efficient...NAS SAS OCE GDP a. b. Fig...in Fig. 1. Caput = head. Bouwman...NAS SAS OCE Per capita cereal production...

Lex Bouwman; Kees Klein Goldewijk; Klaas W. Van Der Hoek; Arthur H. W. Beusen; Detlef P. Van Vuuren; Jaap Willems; Mariana C. Rufino; Elke Stehfest

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 1, Cell and battery safety  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD&D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH&S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

Ohi, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAS Battery Performance NAS Battery Performance at Charleston, WV October 17, 2005 Ali Nourai American Electric Power November 2, 2006 A Presentation to DOE Peer Review Program 2 Partners American Electric Power * Owner & Operator of DESS * Project Management * Site Work * Permits NGK Insulators * Manufacturer of NAS Battery System S&C Electric Company * PCS * System Integration DOE/Sandia * Partial Sponsor A Collaboration to Launch Distributed Energy Storage System 3 Overview- First MW-Scale NAS Application Outside Japan Nine Months to Deploy the First Unit Went into Contract with NGK and S&C Sept 2005 The Storage Unit Started Operation in June 2006 4 Distributed Energy Storage System (DESS) Project It was Justified Main Function 1.2 MW Peak Shaving Justifications 1) Corporate Strategy 2) Distribution Capital Deferral

212

Navy Technology Validation (Techval)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Technology Validation (Techval) FUPWG Spring Meeting 2008 April 15, 2008 Destin, FL Paul Kistler, PE CEM NAVFAC Engineering Service Center Port Hueneme CA Navy Techval CURRENT PROJECTS * Cool Roof reflective roof coating  NS Pearl Harbor HI * Thermal Destratifiers  NAS Oceana VA * Boiler Combustion Controls  USNA Annapolis MD * Sand Filters  NAS Lemoore CA * Spectrally Enhanced Lighting  Navy Yard Washington DC * Desuperheater  NS Norfolk VA  NAS North Island CA * HVAC CO2 Controls  NAB Little Creek VA  NAVSUPPACT Mid-South TN  NB Kitsap Bremerton WA *HVAC Occupancy Controls NAS Oceana VA *Electromagnetic Pulse Water Treatment NADEP San Diego CA NSY Puget Sound WA *LED Parking Lot Lighting NBVC Port Hueneme CA Techval

213

DC Current in 4-N-Pentyl-40 -Cyanobiphenyl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine 2 Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA of Physics, NAS of Ukraine, 46, Nauka Ave., Kyiv 03680, Ukraine. Tel.: þ38-044-5250820; Fax: þ38

Reznikov, Yuri

214

Nasa’s Information Power Grid Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NASA’s four Strategic Enterprises have bold goals that for achievement require orders-of-magnitude forward leaps in technology. Information systems technology is the key to enabling such breakthroughs, and so NAS...

Catherine H. Schulbach

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.07/kWh has on hydrogen cost for electrolysis type station.3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station,3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station, NAS

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.07/kWh has on hydrogen cost for electrolysis type station.3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station,3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station, NAS

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCCCapture Division FY14-15 1012013 - 9302015 Steve Mascaro Research Triangle Park, Durham, NC Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for...

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente protegido sobre Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering 62 O desmatamento nas Unidades de Conservao em Mato Grosso1,2 Roberta dos Santos Summary: Indgenas. O Estado do Mato Grosso possui 41 mil km (cerca de 4,6%)...

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente da unidade Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Fusion 2 O desmatamento nas Unidades de Conservao em Mato Grosso1,2 Roberta dos Santos Summary: , no interior das UCs, cerca de 68% deste total foram desmatamentos...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - admitidos em unidades Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: O desmatamento nas Unidades de Conservao em Mato Grosso1,2 Roberta dos Santos Laurent Micol... Indgenas. O Estado do Mato Grosso possui 41 mil km (cerca de...

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221

ESTADO DO PAR PODER JUDICIRIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barroso, nº 3.089, Bairro Souza, Belém/PA, nas seguintes datas e horários, conforme convocação constante

Maier, Rudolf Richard

222

Two-Meter Temperature Surveys for Geothermal Exploration Project...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Two-Meter Temperature Surveys for Geothermal Exploration Project at NAS Fallon Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Two-Meter...

223

CX-010908: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09252013...

224

CX-010909: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09252013...

225

Review and evaluation of national airspace system models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract from Technical Report Documentation Page: This report is intended to serve as a guide to the availability and capability of state-of-the-art analytical and simulation models of the National Airspace System (NAS). ...

Odoni, Amedeo R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A fast-time study on increasing the capacity of continuous descent approaches through airborne precision spacing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to projectedincrea ses in air traffic, there are several research efforts underway to evaluate ways to safely increase the capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS), improve operational efficiency, andre duce aircraft noise. At NASA Langley...

Weitz, Lesley Anne

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Dispersive micro-solid phase extraction combined with gas chromatography–chemical ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of N-nitrosamines in swimming pool water samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple sample pretreatment technique, dispersive micro-solid phase extraction, was applied for the extraction of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and other four N-nitrosamines (NAs) from samples of swimming pool w...

Ssu-Chieh Fu; Shin-Hwa Tzing; Hsin-Chang Chen…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydroxide LCOE levelized cost of energy LHV lower heating value LPG liquefied petroleum gas MP mass production MYPP Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan NaS...

229

Evaluating the depiction of complex RNAV/RNP procedures and analyzing a potential de-cluttering technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance Based Navigation (PBN) is a key element of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) NextGen Program. In order to increase National Airspace System (NAS) capacity and efficiency, PBN routes and procedures are ...

Butchibabu, Abhizna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Effects of reduced IFR arrival-arrival wake vortex separation minima and improved runaway operations sequencing on flight delay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) 65.6% and 67.0% and the average NAS delay by 24.3% and 24.7% relative to the FIFO and Serve-the-Longest-Queue algorithms respectively.

Bly, Elizabeth, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated gaas surface Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Materials Science 8 Dissimilar and Nanomaterials for Optoelectronic Devices Summary: ) on GaAs Diluted-N-based QW Sb-based QW (GaInNAsSb) QD-based active...

232

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1 Jenny Heimberg [Read-Only  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of NAS Reports 36 Workshop-related links * Workshop Summary - http:www.nap.educatalog.php?recordid18747 search "nap.edu best practices risk-informed" * Workshop 1...

233

Nano-antennes optiques pour l'inspection des structures photoniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??L'objectif de cette thèse est de concevoir et élaborer des outils innovants, baptisés nano-antennes (NAs), pour sonder le champ électromagnétique optique au voisinage des structures… (more)

Abdoulkader Ibrahim, Idriss

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - aniba rosaeodora ducke Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-- NAS Z YDELISa,c, *, DANIEL ESLERa , MOLLY KIRKa and W. SEAN BOYDb a Centre... . The interaction between off-bottom, suspended oyster farming and wintering sea ducks in...

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid acylated heparin Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chromatography... profile in cpm was arachidonic acid 14356, 1-O-acyl-NAS 7050, and sn2-arachidonoyl-PE 1652. The lyso... -acetylsphingosine. The incubation was carried out...

236

SAS Honors Seminar 256: Extraterrestrial Life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Leaving the solar system... termination shock = where solar wind begins to slow down Pioneer 10: March 3 for Tuesday (11/29) COSPAR (2002, 2005) Planetary Protection Policy: "Preamble" and "Policy" only NAS (2006

Baker, Andrew J.

237

Workshops & Conferences Archive | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

link Denver, CO June 13-14, 2011 NAS Board on Research Data and Information (BRDI) BRDI web page External link Washington, DC BRDI May 9-20, 2011 INCITS External link DM32 Data...

238

Formação continuada e trabalho pedagógico : o caso de uma professora egressa do curso de pedagogia para professores em exercício no início de escolarização-PIE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dissertação (mestrado)—Universidade de Brasília, Faculdade de Educação, 2006. Este estudo pautou-se nas reflexões sobre a prática pedagógica de uma professora egressa do curso PIE e… (more)

Ribeiro, Jacira Chaves

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

A CIESIN Thematic Guide to Social Science Applications of Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Earth scientists and the national security community. Early civilian satellite instruments were designed) of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center under contract NAS5

Columbia University

240

Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and Energy at Naval Air Station Oceana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location at NAS Oceana. Location at NAS Oceana. by these changes, including bachelor housing, hangers, the galley, office buildings, the chapel, and maintenance facilities. This ESPC also included installing ground source heat pumps in three buildings, adding digital control systems to increase heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) efficiency, efficient lighting retrofits, and other water conservation measures. These other water conservation measures include over 5,000 water efficient domestic fixtures, includ- ing faucets, showerheads, and toilets

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent CO2 Capture Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0013865 Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is continuing the development process for a non-aqueous solvent (NAS)-based CO2 capture process that was originated at laboratory scale under an ARPA-E project. This project will conduct bench-scale testing to show the potential of the technology to reduce the parasitic energy penalty. Key technical and economic challenges and uncertainties to be addressed include solvent makeup cost, scalable regenerator design, development of a complete NAS process arrangement, and improved confidence in the capital cost estimate that will enable the scale up of the process. One major focus is identification of best-candidate NAS formulations. This will entail reducing solvent makeup costs by reducing the formulation cost. In addition, efforts will be made to reduce evaporative and degradation losses while maintaining the desired CO2 absorption chemistry. A second focus area involves advancing the design of the process. This will be done by developing and evaluating the effectiveness of two process units specific to NASs - the NAS Recovery/Wash Section and NAS Regenerator. As the project proceeds, the testing campaign will evaluate thermal regeneration energy requirements [kJt / kg CO2] and develop a detailed understanding of the operation of the process. Preliminary analyses indicate that the NAS process can reduce energy consumption by 30 to 50 percent compared to current state of the art CO2 capture processes.

242

Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and Energy at Naval Air Station Oceana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Location at NAS Oceana. Location at NAS Oceana. by these changes, including bachelor housing, hangers, the galley, office buildings, the chapel, and maintenance facilities. This ESPC also included installing ground source heat pumps in three buildings, adding digital control systems to increase heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) efficiency, efficient lighting retrofits, and other water conservation measures. These other water conservation measures include over 5,000 water efficient domestic fixtures, includ- ing faucets, showerheads, and toilets

243

Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase entrapped in nano gold particles-ionic liquid-N,N-dimethylformamide composite film on glassy carbon electrode and glucose sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase (GOD) entrapped in nano gold particles (NAs)-N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)-1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluophosphate (BMIMPF6) composite film on a glassy carbon electrode (NAs-DMF-GOD (BMIMPF6)/GC) has been investigated for first time. The immobilized GOD exhibits a pair of well-defined reversible peaks in 0.050 M pH 5 phosphate solutions (PS), resulting from the redox of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in GOD. The peak currents are three times as large as those of GOD-NAs-DMF film coated GC electrode (i.e. NAs-DMF-GOD (water)/GC). In addition, the NAs-DMF-GOD (BMIMPF6) composite material has higher thermal stability than NAs-DMF-GOD (water). Results show that ionic liquid BMIMPF6, DMF and \\{NAs\\} are requisite for GOD to exhibit a pair of stable and reversible peaks. Without any of them, the peaks of GOD become small and unstable. Upon the addition of glucose, the peak currents of GOD decrease and a new cathodic peak occurs at ?0.8 V (versus SCE), which corresponds to the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated by the catalytic oxidation of glucose. The peak current of the new cathodic peak and the glucose concentration show a linear relationship in the ranges of 1.0 × 10?7 to 1.0 × 10?6 M and 2.0 × 10?6 to 2.0 × 10?5 M. The kinetic parameter Imax of H2O2 is estimated to be 1.19 × 10?6 A and the apparent Km (Michaelis–Menten constant) for the enzymatic reaction is 3.49 ?M. This method has been successfully applied to the determination of glucose in human plasma and beer samples, and the average recoveries are 97.2% and 99%, respectively.

Jiangwen Li; Jingjing Yu; Faqiong Zhao; Baizhao Zeng

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48H RADIOACTIVEWASTE SAMPLE USING FLUIDIZED BED STEAMREFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANICDESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

Crawford, C

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract The goal of this study is to map and characterize Quaternary faults in southern Dixie Valley for the Department of the Navy Geothermal Program Office's NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project. We will use this information to better characterize the regional structure and geothermal resource potential of the area,with a focus on determining the structural

246

OpenSHMEM Performance and Potential: A NPB Experimental Study  

SciTech Connect

OpenSHMEM is a recently introduced open stan- dard for all SHMEM libraries. In this paper we discuss the dif- ferent aspects of porting the NAS parallel benchmarks from their MPI 1 implementations to those that use the new OpenSHMEM library API. We compare performance and scalability of these unoptimized OpenSHMEM NAS benchmarks with their MPI 1, and in some cases, MPI 2 counter parts. Through the perfor- mance results of the OpenSHMEM NAS parallel benchmarks on three different platforms that use different OpenSHMEM library implementations we show that even without optimizations these benchmarks have performance comparable to MPI 1 and better than MPI 2 on more mature library implementations. We also do an in-depth analysis of the performance and expect that with hardware support and better implementation of collectives the OpenSHMEM implementations can outperform MPI.

Pophale, Swaroop [University of Houston, Houston] [University of Houston, Houston; Nanjegowda, Ramachandra [University of Houston, Houston] [University of Houston, Houston; Curtis, Anthony R [ORNL] [ORNL; Chapman, Barbara [University of Houston, Houston] [University of Houston, Houston; Jin, Haoqiang [NASA Ames Research Center] [NASA Ames Research Center; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Removal of organic compounds and trace metals from oil sands process-affected water using zero valent iron enhanced by petroleum coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The oil production generates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), referring to the water that has been in contact with oil sands or released from tailings deposits. There are concerns about the environmental impacts of the release of OSPW because of its toxicity. Zero valent iron alone (ZVI) and in combination with petroleum coke (CZVI) were investigated as environmentally friendly treatment processes for the removal of naphthenic acids (NAs), acid-extractable fraction (AEF), fluorophore organic compounds, and trace metals from OSPW. While the application of 25 g/L ZVI to OSPW resulted in 58.4% removal of \\{NAs\\} in the presence of oxygen, the addition of 25 g petroleum coke (PC) as an electron conductor enhanced the \\{NAs\\} removal up to 90.9%. The increase in ZVI concentration enhanced the removals of NAs, AEF, and fluorophore compounds from OSPW. It was suggested that the electrons generated from the oxidation of ZVI were transferred to oxygen, resulting in the production of hydroxyl radicals and oxidation of NAs. When OSPW was de-oxygenated, the \\{NAs\\} removal decreased to 17.5% and 65.4% during treatment with ZVI and CZVI, respectively. The removal of metals in ZVI samples was similar to that obtained during CZVI treatment. Although an increase in ZVI concentration did not enhance the removal of metals, their concentrations effectively decreased at all ZVI loadings. The Microtox® bioassay with Vibrio fischeri showed a decrease in the toxicity of ZVI- and CZVI-treated OSPW. The results obtained in this study showed that the application of ZVI in combination with PC is a promising technology for OSPW treatment.

Parastoo Pourrezaei; Alla Alpatova; Kambiz Khosravi; Przemys?aw Drzewicz; Yuan Chen; Pamela Chelme-Ayala; Mohamed Gamal El-Din

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A study of the multiplication and rooting in vitro of shoot tips from mature guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of flowering in guayule. HortScience 24(6): 939-941 3. Ball A E (1981) Final Report No. JPL-9950-477; NAS1. 26: 168926. Monitor: NASA-CR-168926. 4. Bultman J D, Beal R H, Schloman W W, Bailey C A (1986) The evaluation of guayule resin and a pesticide... of flowering in guayule. HortScience 24(6): 939-941 3. Ball A E (1981) Final Report No. JPL-9950-477; NAS1. 26: 168926. Monitor: NASA-CR-168926. 4. Bultman J D, Beal R H, Schloman W W, Bailey C A (1986) The evaluation of guayule resin and a pesticide...

Callin, Jeffrey Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

249

TEPPC Meeting November 2-3, 2011 San Diego, CA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2013 6, 2013 Jim Williams, staff, WIEB, High-Level Radioactive Waste Committee The Proposed BNSF Settlement Agreement: Background & WIEB Comments Outline: Proposed BNSF Settlement Agreement & WIEB Comments 1. Background 2. National interest in dedicated trains * Explicitly stated by NAS in 2006 * Advantages expressed by NAS 3. WIEB concerns & comments (4) * Section of settlement agreement * Basis for WIEB comment * Joint Reply from BNSF / DOE / DOD 4. Overarching points in Joint Reply & WIEB's Response to Joint Reply 5. Status 2 The Proposed BNSF Settlement Agreement: Background 1983: DOE/DOD sue 21 major railroads (see, Union Pacific, Balt & Ohio; Aberdeen & Rockfish) Re: the common carrier obligation to carry SNF/HLW in

250

HMNewsFall09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTENTS CONTENTS Japan's R&D Program ..................1 Hydrate in Nature..........................7 HYFLUX Expedition ......................12 Sub Sampling for GH ................ 16 Gas Production Geomechanical Implications ................................. 18 Announcements ...................... 23 * Database Now Available * Global Assessment * NETL-NAS Fellowship * New Zealand Workshop * EGU 2010 Abstracts

251

Texas Tech Embraces National Academies Report on Laboratory Safety By: M. Duane Nellis, President; Lawrence Schovanec, Provost and Senior Vice President;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Culture of Safety in Academic Chemical Research was released July 31. See the NAS/NRC news release and support systems that reinforce a strong safety culture and enable strong scholarship, teaching and service laboratories, there are lessons to be learned about safety culture and behaviors for any research space. Our

Zhang, Yuanlin

252

Eos, Vol. 87, No. 6, 7 February 2006 In his 31 January State of the Union  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the need for information on them to be centralized. The report compiled research on the cur- rent status."The NAS 2005 report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter on petroleum. --MOHI KUMAR, Staff Writer PAGE 62 Bush Pledges Increased Science Research and Education Funding

253

Neutron and gamma-ray nondestructive examination of contact-handled transuranic waste at the ORNL TRU Waste Drum Assay Facility  

SciTech Connect

A nondestructive assay system, which includes the Neutron Assay System (NAS) and the Segmented Gamma Scanner (SGS), for the quantification of contact-handled (<200 mrem/h total radiation dose rate at contact with container) transuranic elements (CH-TRU) in bulk solid waste contained in 208-L and 114-L drums has been in operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory since April 1982. The NAS has been developed and demonstrated by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for use by most US Department of Energy Defense Plant (DOE-DP) sites. More research and development is required, however, before the NAS can provide complete assay results for other than routine defense waste. To date, 525 ORNL waste drums have been assayed, with varying degrees of success. The isotopic complexity of the ORNL waste creates a correspondingly complex assay problem. The NAS and SGS assay data are presented and discussed. Neutron matrix effects, the destructive examination facility, and enriched uranium fuel-element assays are also discussed.

Schultz, F.J.; Coffey, D.E.; Norris, L.B.; Haff, K.W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Teorema de Frobenius e Aplica,c"oes O objetivo deste texto 'e unificar algumas situa,c"oes que aparecem em geom*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algumas situa,c"oes que aparecem em geom* *etria dife- rencial nas quais se usa o teorema de Frobenius identificamos 1-formas e campos vetorias em Rn. Esta 'e uma EDP particular* *mente simples j'a que a inc para um dado campo vetorial F em um aberto U Rn. Sabemos que tal potencial existir'a localmente

Tausk, Daniel Victor

255

Nicole Slevin Marketing & Public Relations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nicole Slevin Marketing & Public Relations nas96@cornell.edu 64 Ferndale-Loomis Rd Liberty, NY Project Opportunity CALLICOON, NY--Sullivan County families, youth, and land owners are invited to explore in Callicoon, NY. Youth interested in becoming involved in a livestock educational project or families

Keinan, Alon

256

AAAS News and Notes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ability to document human rights abuses via a virtual ‘eye in the sky...prevent future human rights abuses from occurring in Zimbabwe...personal computers and the Internet have made the data more available...published by NAS and AAAS to young scholars, working scientists...

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

For additional information, contact: Department of Native American Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the nation. Focal Point for American Indian Issues The Department of Native American Studies is the focal point for most Indian students at Immersion School 2 LeeAnna Muzquiz, a graduate with a minor in NAS, is a physician on the Flathead Indian

Maxwell, Bruce D.

258

1264 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 49, NO. 3, JUNE 2002 Electron Trapping Variations in Single-Crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the -ray interaction depth [4], the interaction location and energy deposition can be obtained November 5, 2001. This work was supported in part by NASA STTR under Contract NAS5 00205 and Constellation is with Constellation Technology Corporation, Largo, FL 33777 USA (e-mail: devito@contech.com). Publisher Item

He, Zhong

259

Adaptao ao inevitvel: aco nacional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

domina a paisagem � e, do mesmo modo, tamb�m as redes de diques que regulam a corrente. Nas zonas��ess�bitas,seoMekongest�maischeio.Na tentativa de manter as �guas afastadas, os agricultores sustentam, com o seu trabalho, v�rias redes de

260

Institute for Condensed Matter Physics National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute for Condensed Matter Physics National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine 1 Svientsitskii Street Phone nr. +38 097 6601138 (UA) Lviv, Ukraine 79011 e-mail: romanik@icmp.lviv.ua Mr. Roman Romanik Current position: junior researcher at ICMP of NAS of Ukraine (since 11/2012) Personal information: Born

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

List of Participants 1. Igor ANDERS (Institute for Low Temperature Physics, Kharkov, UKRAINE),  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

List of Participants 1. Igor ANDERS (Institute for Low Temperature Physics, Kharkov, UKRAINE), e-mail: anders@ilt.kharkov.ua 2. Andrey ANDREYTSEV (Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Kyiv, UKRAINE), e (Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, UKRAINE), e-mail: vasilinka@pi.net.ua 6. Peter BASARAB

Popovych, Roman

262

The International Journal of Time-Critical Computing Systems, 20, 2749, 2001 c 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured in The Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specifications by translating them into timed transition systems. A shutdown system in Korean nuclear power-time systems, formal specifications, timing constraints 1. Introduction The Software Cost Reduction (SCR), and the nuclear power plants in Canada (van Schouwen, Par- nas, and Madey, 1993), and Belgium (Courtois and Parnas

263

NASA Contractor Report 194949 ICASE Report No. 94-59  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA Contractor Report 194949 ICASE Report No. 94-59 ?_7¢ S MULTIRESOLUTION REPRESENTATION AND NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS: A BRIEF REVIEW Ami Harten (NASA-CR-I94949) MULTIRESOLUTION REPRESENTATICN ANO - 18605 and NAS 1-19480 October 1994 Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering NASA

Frey, Pascal

264

NASA/TM2014218280 Analysis of Well-Clear Boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA/TM�2014�218280 Analysis of Well-Clear Boundary Models for the Integration of UAS in the NAS Research Center, Hampton, Virginia June 2014 #12;NASA STI Program . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA scientific

Muñoz, César A.

265

Proceedings of the Third International Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Editor-in-Chief A.M. Samoilenko Institute of Mathematics National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine Kyiv, Ukraine Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine Volume 30 Conference SYMMETRY in Nonlinear Mathematical Physics Part 1 Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine Kyiv

Popovych, Roman

266

Influenza Virus Neuraminidases with Reduced Enzymatic Activity That Avidly Bind Sialic Acid Receptors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reaction, the catalytic efficiency (k cat/Km ) is...enhancement of the catalytic efficiency of avian NAs by binding...the governments of Egypt and the United States...S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Stanford...

Xueyong Zhu; Ryan McBride; Corwin M. Nycholat; Wenli Yu; James C. Paulson; Ian A. Wilson

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

267

Submitted to 5th Integrated Communications Navigation and Surveillance Conference --ICNS 2011, May 10-12, 2011 --Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the NAS. Airline Operation Centers (AOCs) will use SWIM to determine their preferred route sequence, but in theory, SWIM could provide AOCs with own-ship information as well as aggregated, de. This paper describes a case study of the effects of SWIM on airline route choice for COPT. The AOCs choose

268

Status of Energy in Nevada  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

barrelsday)(bbld) Sparks, NV (6") to NAS Fallon, NV (10,000 bbld) Storage: 19 Tanks holding 360,300 barrels owned by K-M 1 tank with 9,050 barrels of ethanol owned by K-M...

269

Sandia National Laboratories Develops Tool for Evaluating Wind Turbine-Radar Impacts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The TSPEAR toolkit supports energy developers that wish to design, analyze, track the progress of wind energy projects. Initially designed to support wind energy development by assessing the interaction between turbines and constraining factors, such as the NAS radar systems, TSPEAR is partially populated with information from existing databases and can integrate custom models and tools used throughout the development process.

270

Adaptive architectures for peak power management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iq fq ialu falu ldst ic dc ipr fpr g721d mesa-texgen epiciq fq ialu falu ldst ic dc ipr fpr perim big mst treeaddNas iq fq ialu falu ldst ic dc ipr fpr mg.big ft.big sp.big

Kontorinis, Vasileios

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Captain Erik Stohlmann graduated from high school in Fort Worth, TX before attending the United States Naval Academy. He was commissioned in 1992 after earning a Bachelor of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science. Following the Naval Academy, he was assigned to NAS Pensacola, FL for Flight Training. After flown during OPERATION IRAQI FREEDOM as well as numerous contingency operations in the CENTCOM AOR. He was selected for redesignation as a Navy Foreign Area Officer. Captain Stohlmann' s staff assignments include

272

GikiCLEF: Crosscultural issues in multilingual information access Diana Santos*, Luis Miguel Cabral*, Corina Forascu**, Pamela Forner***, Fredric Gey****  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GikiCLEF: Crosscultural issues in multilingual information access Diana Santos*, Lu´is Miguel Osenova£, Anselmo Pe~nas$, ´Alvaro Rodrigo$, Julia Schulz*****, Yvonne Skalban&, Erik Tjong Kim Sang, &Univ. Wolverhampton, %Univ. Groningen Diana.Santos@sintef.no, Luis.M.Cabral@sintef.no, corinfor

Sang, Erik Tjong Kim

273

RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols Nuno Neves W. Kent that allows the rapid testing of checkpoint protocols with standard benchmarks. To achieve this goal, RENEW evaluated using the RENEW envi- ronment with SPEC and NAS benchmarks on a network of workstations connected

Neves, Nuno

274

RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols Nuno Neves W. Kent that allows the rapid testing of checkpoint protocols with standard benchmarks. To achieve this goal, RENEW evaluated using the RENEW envi­ ronment with SPEC and NAS benchmarks on a network of workstations connected

Neves, Nuno

275

Grid Computing: Application to Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- 17 Athlon XP 1900+ Hybrid MD/QM simulation on a Grid of distributed PC clusters in the US & Japan MDGrid Computing: Application to Science Aiichiro Nakano Collaboratory for Advanced Computing Science University of Southern California Email: anakano@usc.edu #12;Grid Computing NASA NAS IPG · World

Southern California, University of

276

U.S. Fusion Road Map Study D. Meade, A. Garofalo, D. Hill, C. Kessel, B. Lipschultz(D. Whyte),  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and assess three aggressive technically feasible paths for the US Fusion Program mo). - Technical Readiness Levels - EU Road Map used TRLs for materials and technology - NAS IFE Assessment 2013 Power Plant (FPP) - Use recent ARIES Study to define general characteristics of DEMO/FPP - Mission

277

For Immediate Release --Friday, February 28, 2014 Advisory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engagements on Wednesday, Mar. 5 (12 p.m. in W570 and 6 p.m. in PE264). All.m. - The Ten Grandmothers Project ~ Dr. Linda Many Guns NAS W570 12 p -- 30 -- Contact: Trevor Kenney, News & Information Manager 403

Seldin, Jonathan P.

278

Characteristic signatures in the thermal emission from accreting binary black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......HEC) Program through the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) Division at Ames Research Center and by the High Performance Computing resources at New York University Abu Dhabi. We acknowledge support from NASA grant NNX11AE05G (to ZH and AM......

Brian D. Farris; Paul Duffell; Andrew I. MacFadyen; Zoltán Haiman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

148 American EntomologistFall 2012 man Resources. 2012. Plant and Enviromental Protection Sciences.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Wildlife in Chernobyl We have been studying the impacts of nuclear accidents on wildlife for more than 12, as a consequence of human release of radioactive material such as during nuclear testing and the operations of nuclear power plants (NAS 2012), and from nuclear accidentssuchasthoseatthe

Mousseau, Timothy A.

280

Helen Conover and Kathryn Regner InformationTechnology & Systems Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

working relationship with NSIDC DAAC is governed by: Interface Control Documents Operations Agreement, Integration & Test Sun Storage 7310 With J4400 Disk Array 8TB NAS Storage Buildout Completed July 2009 10 by the Science Team Processing automation controlled by SIPS scripts Pass processing is data driven L3 product

Christian, Eric

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281

766 VOLUME 112 | NUMBER 6 | May 2004 Environmental Health Perspectives Children's Health | Article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a radioactive isotope or naturally occurring arsenic, population mixing, or a new infectious agent, potentially radiation, Down syn- drome, and certain inherited and congenital conditions (Little 1999). However, known- ter of leukemia cases occurring near the naval air station in Fallon (NAS Fallon), Churchill County

California at Berkeley, University of

282

Forest ecology Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest ecology Introduction Forest ecology is a part of ecology that is con- cerned with forests as opposed to grasslands, savan- nas, or tundra. Ecology is the study of the processes of interaction among organisms and between organ- isms and their environment. Ecology is often subdi- vided into physiological

Johnson, Edward A.

283

24 Jan 2007 Institute of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, 2007 1 Laser Intra-cavity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As GaInP InGaAs GaInNAs InGaAsP GaInAsSb · Intra-cavity power up to ~100W Pump Pump optics Mirror and intraVECSEL and intra--cavity sensingcavity sensing · Intra-Cavity Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (ICLAS

Strathclyde, University of

284

MAC5711 AN ALISE DE ALGORITMOS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/10 (tentativo) e 2/12 (4as. feiras). Critâ??erio de avaliaâ?ºcâ?ao: Vocâ??e terâ??a de atingir mâ??edia pelo menos 5.0 tanto nas provas (MP) como nos exercâ??�cios (ME). A mâ??edia final no semestre serâ??a uma mâ??edia ponderada

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

285

CCM118 COMPUTAC ~AO I INFORMAC ~OES GERAIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

semestre. Crit´erio de avalia¸c~ao: Voc^e ter´a de atingir m´edia pelo menos 5.0 tanto nas provas (MP) como nos exerc´icios (ME). A m´edia final no semestre ser´a uma m´edia ponderada de MP e ME, com pesos

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

286

Instituto Superior Tecnico Departamento de Matematica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exames A nota dos testes ou exames1 ´e, consoante a op¸c~ao de cada aluno: ­ ou a m´edia das notas dos notas nas fichas de exerc´icios. A nota com avalia¸c~ao cont´inua ´e a m´edia da nota dos testes ou

Cannas da Silva, Ana

287

CCM118 COMPUTAC ~AO I INFORMAC ~OES GERAIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atingir m´edia pelo menos 5.0 tanto nas provas (MP) como nos exerc´icios (ME). A m´edia final no semestre ser´a uma m´edia ponderada de MP e ME, com pesos a serem definidos durante o semestre. P´agina da

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

288

Inaugurao do Reator IEA -USP Marcelo Damy de Souza Santos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inauguração do Reator IEA - USP Marcelo Damy de Souza Santos Jucelino Kubitschek Janio Quadros 1958. Maris, Quasi-free scattering and nuclear structure. Reviews of Modern Physics, 38:121, 1966) Tornou-se o Review, 132:2325, 1963 Iniciou mais uma área, que passou logo a ser amplamente representada nas

dos Santos, C.A.

289

PROCEEDINGS O F THE IEEE, VOL.56, NO. 1, JANUARY196837 [`I J. J. Wysocki,"Lithium-doped radiation-resistant silicon solar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,"Lithium-doped radiation-resistant silicon solar cells," IEEE Trans. Nuclear Science. vol.NS-13, pp. 168-173, December 1966 damagein semiconductorsXI1: Effects ofhighenergy electrons in silicon and silicon solar cells," Contract NAS 5-3805, May 25, 1966. 14] R. V. Tauke, "Thermal annealing of irradiated n-on-p silicon solar cells

Teich, Malvin C.

290

Dan Martin Watson Department of Physics and Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

panel. 2008, 2011, 2013 NASA: Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Science: Origins of Solar Postoctoral Fellowship Program review panel. 2012 NSF: Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research review panel 2009-2011 National Academy of Sciences (NAS)/National Research Council (NRC) 2010 Decadal

291

Authenticating Aviation Augmentation System Sherman C. Lo, Stanford University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the national airspace (NAS). Assessing and developing security for these #12;systems can provide useful. INTRODUCTION An important function of augmentation systems for Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS systems is a useful first case study for developing and implementing enhanced information security

Stanford University

292

Preliminary Assessment of Alternative Navigation Means for Civil Aviation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Homeland Security Presidential Directive 7 (HSPD-7) and National Security Presidential Directive 39 (NSPD Administration (FAA) is looking to develop alternative navigation means to global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) and GPS. While the national airspace (NAS) includes many navigation systems such as distance

Stanford University

293

Produced by the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office he University of Elec-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for astrophysics, nuclear fusion, and ultrashort wavelength lithography. Notably, ILS research- The Institute lasers and gravitational wave anten- nas; and quantum solids. Findings from research conducted at ILS stability lasers that are being used for the construction of Japan's Kamioka Gravitational Wave Detector

Yanai, Keiji

294

National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS) and Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC to the Director for Forensic Science Vice-Chair, National Commission on Forensic Science 25th International Symposium on Human Identification Phoenix, AZ October 1, 2014 #12;Forensic Science Realignment · NAS report

295

National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS) and Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC on Forensic Science #12;Forensic Science Realignment · NAS report ­ Feb 2009 · White House Subcommittee on Forensic Science (SoFS) ­ July 2009 to Dec 2012 · DOJ/NIST Partnership ­ NCFS (National Commission

296

Microsoft PowerPoint - 6- 02 final - Next generation melter deploymet at WTP - Nov10.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ron Calmus, WRPS Ron Calmus, WRPS Ron Calmus, WRPS Terry Sams, WRPS Terry Sams, WRPS Deployment Plan Overview for Next Deployment Plan Overview for Next Generation Melter at WTP Generation Melter at WTP November 17, 2010 November 17, 2010 Print Close Tank Operations Contract 2 Presentation Outline  Introduction and Background  Project Goals and Objectives  Key Programmatic Decisions  New Generation Melters (NGM) Development and Deployment Planning (AJHCM & CCIM)  NGM Development and Deployment Activities and Interfaces  Near-Term NGM Development Costs  Summary - Focus Areas Next Generation Melters 2 Print Close Tank Operations Contract 3 Introduction and Background  National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Recommendations - In 2009 the NAS stated in it's report that:

297

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 18920 of 28,560 results. 11 - 18920 of 28,560 results. Download Newsletter (May 2011) SHR.pub http://energy.gov/management/downloads/newsletter-may-2011-shrpub Article NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" Remarks As Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman http://energy.gov/articles/nas-nae-national-convocation-rising-above-gathering-storm-two-years-later-accelerating Download Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc.- EA-2000-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc., related to Work Planning and Control Deficiencies associated with Replacement of Exhaust Ventilation Filters at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental

298

DOE Congratulates Under Secretary, National Lab Director and Other National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Congratulates Under Secretary, National Lab Director and Other Congratulates Under Secretary, National Lab Director and Other National Lab Scientists for Receiving Top Scientific Honor DOE Congratulates Under Secretary, National Lab Director and Other National Lab Scientists for Receiving Top Scientific Honor April 29, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Under Secretary for Science Steven E. Koonin, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Director Persis Drell, and other National Lab affiliated scientists and engineers are among the 72 new members elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). NAS is a private, nonprofit, honorific society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to furthering science and technology and to their use for the general welfare.

299

ESS 2012 Peer Review - NYSERDA Energy Storage Projects - Dhruv Bhatnagar, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NYSERDA Energy Storage Projects NYSERDA Energy Storage Projects Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND No. 2011-XXXXP NaS Battery at MTA Long Island Bus Depot Beacon Flywheel Plant at Stephentown, NY 4 Demonstration Project Sites 1) Beacon Flywheel Plant at Stephentown, NY * Ancillary services in NYISO 2) NaS Battery at MTA Long Island Bus Depot * Time of day load shifting to avoid TOU rates 3) Flow Battery at Niagara Falls State Park * Renewables integration/firming &

300

Astrophysical and cosmological problems of invisible mass and dark energy in the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Workshop on results of the Project Kosmomikrofizyka-2 (Astroparticle Physics) of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) of Ukraine "Astrophysical and cosmological problems of invisible mass and dark energy in the Universe" was held on November 21-22, 2012 in the Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv, Ukraine (http://lpd.kinr.kiev.ua/kmf12). This Project was carried out during three years (2010-2012) by scientists from various universities and institutes of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine; it was a logical continuation of the previous scientific program of the NAS of Ukraine "Researches of structure and composition of the Universe, hidden mass and dark energy (Kosmomikrofizyka)" in 2007-2009. These programs were devoted to theoretical and experimental investigations in astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, physics of atomic nuclei and particle physics, which are related with the problems of dark matter and dark energy in the Universe.

P. Belli; L. A. Berdina; R. Bernabei; A. Bogdan; R. S. Boiko; A. Yu. Burgazli; F. Cappella; R. Cerulli; D. M. Chernyak; F. A. Danevich; A. d'Angelo; M. V. Eingorn; S. H. Fakhr; E. Fedorova; E. N. Galashov; A. Giuliani; B. I. Hnatyk; A. Incicchitti; G. Ivashchenko; V. V. Kobychev; O. O. Kobzar; H. Kraus; B. N. Kropivyansky; A. V. Kudinova; Yu. A. Kulinich; M. Laubenstein; V. V. Marchenko; S. Marnieros; V. B. Mikhailik; A. A. Minakov; V. M. Mokina; L. L. Nagornaya; A. S. Nikolaiko; C. Nones; B. S. Novosyadlyj; E. Olivieri; V. O. Pelykh; D. V. Poda; R. B. Podviyanuk; O. G. Polischuk; O. N. Sergijenko; V. N. Shlegel; V. M. Shulga; V. M. Sliusar; O. B. Sushchov; Y. V. Taistra; M. Tenconi; O. Torbaniuk; V. I. Tretyak; V. S. Tsvetkova; V. G. Vakulik; Ya. V. Vasiliev; A. Vasylenko; O. Vasylenko; V. I. Zhdanov; A. I. Zhuk

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Astrophysical and cosmological problems of invisible mass and dark energy in the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Workshop on results of the Project Kosmomikrofizyka-2 (Astroparticle Physics) of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) of Ukraine "Astrophysical and cosmological problems of invisible mass and dark energy in the Universe" was held on November 21-22, 2012 in the Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv, Ukraine (http://lpd.kinr.kiev.ua/kmf12). This Project was carried out during three years (2010-2012) by scientists from various universities and institutes of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine; it was a logical continuation of the previous scientific program of the NAS of Ukraine "Researches of structure and composition of the Universe, hidden mass and dark energy (Kosmomikrofizyka)" in 2007-2009. These programs were devoted to theoretical and experimental investigations in astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, physics of atomic nuclei and particle physics, which are related with the problems of dark matter and dark energy in the Universe.

Belli, P; Bernabei, R; Bogdan, A; Boiko, R S; Burgazli, A Yu; Cappella, F; Cerulli, R; Chernyak, D M; Danevich, F A; d'Angelo, A; Eingorn, M V; Fakhr, S H; Fedorova, E; Galashov, E N; Giuliani, A; Hnatyk, B I; Incicchitti, A; Ivashchenko, G; Kobychev, V V; Kobzar, O O; Kraus, H; Kropivyansky, B N; Kudinova, A V; Kulinich, Yu A; Laubenstein, M; Marchenko, V V; Marnieros, S; Mikhailik, V B; Minakov, A A; Mokina, V M; Nagornaya, L L; Nikolaiko, A S; Nones, C; Novosyadlyj, B S; Olivieri, E; Pelykh, V O; Poda, D V; Podviyanuk, R B; Polischuk, O G; Sergijenko, O N; Shlegel, V N; Shulga, V M; Sliusar, V M; Sushchov, O B; Taistra, Y V; Tenconi, M; Torbaniuk, O; Tretyak, V I; Tsvetkova, V S; Vakulik, V G; Vasiliev, Ya V; Vasylenko, A; Vasylenko, O; Zhdanov, V I; Zhuk, A I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Security Topic Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group Group Security and TEC * Tension exists between open forum concept of TEC and the ability of STG members to discuss security topics. - DOE will maintain the open forum - it will not form a subgroup of cleared members NAS Study * Some members want STG to formally recommend a fully independent review of security issues - DOE is reviewing the NAS study and has not formulated a position Security Topic Group (Continued) Classification Guide & Information Sharing Protocol * Guide is finished and undergoing internal concurrence - Slated for late September release * Protocol will be completed once the guide is issued Security-Related Lessons Learned * Lessons learned document was distributed and comments requested by the end of March Security Topic Group (Continued) SRG/CVSA Survey

303

CMVRTC: PBBT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

performance based Brake tester (PBBt) performance based Brake tester (PBBt) PBBT The ORNL's Center for Transportation Analysis, in collaboration with the FMCSA and the Tennessee Highway Patrol (THP) Commercial Vehicle Enforcement (CVE), conducted a Performance-Based Brake Tester (PBBT) Valuation Study. The purpose of the study was to determine the PBBT's ability to increase the number of contacts with commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) and explore how the PBBT affects the CMV out-of-service (OOS) rate. The PBBT is a roller dynamometer which measures the vehicle's established brake force and calculates brake efficiency to indicate the effectiveness of the vehicle's brakes. Several test scenarios were employed using North American Standard (NAS) Level-1, 2, and 3 CMV inspection criteria. The first three scenarios employed both an NAS inspection (Level-1, 2, or 3)

304

Freeze-drying bovine spermatozoa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~- ssopiosl ~cion, bae in x690 ie esca kxt~n P ) +ho originaesd ehs so~ 9n usa ends''~ 999s sorh nas in ehs 89. sld o9! syeoloIXp, His proosdsrs osa eo iwss"s senXX piness o9 eisans and eo hasp ehm eve s&~2mle aoQI'sndsr va~ ae -20C oneil elm emesrisX mes...

Faris, Harvey Lee

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Notice Type: Presolicitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a requirement for 1 each EMC VNX 5300 - NAS - 18 TB - Rack-Mountable - Serial Attached SCSI 2 - HD 3 TB X 6 - Rack-Mountable - 15 X Total Bay - 15 X 3.5" P/N: V31-DAE-N- 15, 1 each EMC VNX Second Control Station - Control Processor - 1U- Rack-Mountable P/N: VNX5300CS2M, 1 each EMC VNX Control Station - Control

306

DoD Fuel Cell Demonstration Program: Energy Savings and Emissions Reductions to Date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

while two others have made provisions to use this mode in the future. Of the five utilizing this mode, two (NAS Fallon and Naval Hospital, MCAGCC Twentynine Palms) are providing emergency backup power for galleys, two (Pine Bluff Arsenal... to preheat boiler makeup water and/or condensate return. In some cases thennal storage tanks have been installed to utilize hot water produced during times of low thennal demand. Seven PAFCs (23%) are installed at hospitals, providing hot water to heat...

Holcomb, F. H.; Binder, M. J.; Taylor, W. R.

307

Going the Distance? NRC's Response to the National Academy of Science's Transportation Study  

SciTech Connect

In February 2006, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) published the results of a 3 1/2-year study, titled Going the Distance, that examined the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) in the United States. NAS initiated this study to address what it perceived to be a national need for an independent, objective, and authoritative analysis of SNF and HLW transport in the United States. The study was co-sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. This paper addresses some of the recommendations made in the NAS study related to the performance of SNF transportation casks in long duration fires, the use of full-scale package testing, and the need for an independent review of transportation security prior to the commencement of large scale shipping campaigns to an interim storage site or geologic repository. In conclusion: The NRC believes that the current regulations in 10 CFR Part 71 for the design of SNF and HLW transportation packages provide a very high level of protection to the public for very severe accidents and credible threat scenarios. As recommended by the NAS study, additional studies of accidents involving severe fires have been completed. These studies have confirmed that spent fuel casks would be expected to withstand very severe fires without the release of any fission products from the spent fuel. Additionally, changes in rail operating procedures such as the use of dedicated trains and prohibition on the co-location of SNF and flammable liquids in rail tunnels can further reduce the already low probability of severe rail accident fires involving SNF and HLW. (authors)

Easton, E.P.; Bajwa, C.S. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

The F-path approach for pattern generation in microprocessor testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X CONCLUSIONS 99 REFERENCES 101 APPENDICES A MC68000 ASSEMBLER LANGUAGE DESCRIPTION. . . . . . . B INSTRUCTION SET FOR MINIMUM CONTROL TESTING 104 107 VITA 110 vnt LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5...THE F-PATH APPROACH FOR PATTERN GENERATION IN MICROPROCESSOR TESTING A Thesis by JOSE SAL1NAS Approved as to style and content by: Fabrizio Lombardi (Chair of Committee) Donald Friesen (Member) Richard Vo (Head of Department) Karan...

Salinas, Jose?

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

310

consumo total en cada un dos casos. Os niveis de iluminacin obtivronse por  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ácida. Á súa vez, a sustentabilidade econó- mica é consecuencia da posíbel diminu- ción de potencia (cambio de lámpadas) polas condicións arqui- tectónicas das aulas nas que se actuou. A sustentabilidade renovación dunha instalación interior de alumeado debe ter en conta obxectivos de sustentabilidade ambiental

Fraguela, Basilio B.

311

Economics of design and operation of overhead electric distribution systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

failures where bare conductors have been used, than on lines under the same operating conditions built of weather-proof conductor. k9 The area of the conductor exoosed to viind and ice, loading nas been re- duced by, omitting the insulation without... ? dead end, galvanized, zith cotter key. This clevis must, fit both $506 and O. B. X. H. strain insulators under 10, 000 pound tension. 19. Connectors ? 3 ? bolt, solderless, bronze clamp. 20. Connectors ? aluminum, 2" clamp. 21. Ground rods...

Cox, Carl Clarence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

Amores de Abat-jour: A cena teatral brasileira e a escrita de mulheres nos anos vinte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FALL 2001 75 Amores de Abat-jour: a cena teatral brasileira e a escrita de mulheres nos anos vinte Kátia da Costa Bezerra Nas últimas décadas, muitos pesquisadores têm se dedicado a um verdadeiro trabalho de escavação arqueológica na busca por... vozes silenciadas. Para tanto, eles têm procurado desencavar de arquivos e acervos empoeirados nomes e obras esquecidos pela historiografía oficial. Um projeto de resgate queja começa a surtir efeito dado o número crescente de antologias e ensaios...

Costa Bezerra, Ká tia da

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Study to define demographics, economics, and environmental awareness of charter anglers in Galveston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach? (President, 1993). Fisheries management during recent decades must consider ecological, political, economic, and sociocultural factors to meet their charge of conservation and optimum use (NAS, 2006). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS... of jobs in businesses and industries that support wildlife-related recreation; and they generated funds through licenses and taxes that pay for many of the country?s ______________ This thesis follows the style of the journal Human Dimensions...

Cummins, Rhonda D.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Comparison of Different Methods of Harvesting Cotton.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- - TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, Director College Station. Texas BULLETIN NO. 683 OCTOBER, 1946 COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT METHODS OF HARVESTING COTTON Division of Agricultural Engineering . and Division of Agronomy... on the rougher methods of harvesting cotton, such as hand-snapping and machine harvesting both with the picker type and the stripper type mechanical harvesters. This n-as largely because the lint from the roughly harvested cottons contained more foreign...

Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

CCM128 COMPUTAC ~AO II INFORMAC ~OES GERAIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ao definidos em breve. Crit´erio de avalia¸c~ao: Voc^e ter´a de atingir m´edia pelo menos 5.0 tanto nas provas (MP) como nos exerc´icios (ME). A m´edia final no semestre ser´a uma m´edia ponderada de MP e ME, com

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

316

MAC5711 AN ALISE DE ALGORITMOS INFORMAC ~OES GERAIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as seguintes datas tentativas: 29/9 e 24/11 (5as. feiras). Crit´erio de avalia¸c~ao: Voc^e ter´a de atingir m´edia pelo menos 5.0 tanto nas provas (MP) como nos exerc´icios (ME). A m´edia final no semestre ser´a uma m´edia

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

317

CCM128 COMPUTAC ~AO II INFORMAC ~OES GERAIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´erio de avalia¸c~ao: Voc^e ter´a de atingir m´edia pelo menos 5.0 tanto nas provas (MP) como nos exerc´icios (ME). A m´edia final no semestre ser´a uma m´edia ponderada de MP e ME, com pesos a serem definidos

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

318

MAC320 INTRODUC ~AO `A TEORIA DOS GRAFOS INFORMAC ~OES GERAIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´erio de avalia¸c~ao: Voc^e ter´a de atingir m´edia pelo menos 5,0 tanto nas pro- vas (MP) como nos exerc´a considerada na atribui¸c~ao da nota final. Sua nota final ser´a uma m´edia ponderada de MP, ME, e PA, com

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

319

MAC5711 AN ALISE DE ALGORITMOS INFORMAC ~OES GERAIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/10 (tentativo) e 2/12 (4as. feiras). Crit´erio de avalia¸c~ao: Voc^e ter´a de atingir m´edia pelo menos 5.0 tanto nas provas (MP) como nos exerc´icios (ME). A m´edia final no semestre ser´a uma m´edia ponderada

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

320

The 4000-3400A S02 vibration spectrum with long absorbing paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ Of the eyeetrngreyh ~rating n oae a+noted te refloat light fxoo tho loxp ~ tbe?ido open slit 8 onto plane sdxror tL?~ N~ nas xn11ostsd to oonter the r?floated bono ca R x and pries Rapzssaed te ebs nearest eea4iaeteri LL ~ prh pg 4 p1~tL Q1wcLnste ths socaen...

Russell, Ralph Keith

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High Energy Density Na-S/NiCl2 Hybrid Battery  

SciTech Connect

High temperature (250-350°C) sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) are attractive energy storage devices for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications. Currently, two technologies are commercially available in NBBs, e.g., sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries. In this study, we investigated the combination of these two chemistries with a mixed cathode. In particular, the cathode of the cell consisted of molten NaAlCl4 as a catholyte and a mixture of Ni, NaCl and Na2S as active materials. During cycling, two reversible plateaus were observed in cell voltage profiles, which matched electrochemical reactions for Na-S and Na-NiCl2 redox couples. An irreversible reaction between sulfur species and Ni was identified during initial charge at 280°C, which caused a decrease in cell capacity. The final products on discharge included Na2Sn with 1< n < 3, which differed from Na2S3 found in traditional Na-S battery. Reduction of sulfur in the mixed cathode led to an increase in overall energy density over ZEBRA batteries. Despite of the initial drop in cell capacity, the mixed cathode demonstrated relatively stable cycling with more than 95% of capacity retained over 60 cycles under 10mA/cm2. Optimization of the cathode may lead to further improvements in battery performance.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Lemmon, John P.; Kim, Jin Yong; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo (Gary) [Gary

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Preparation and Characterization of Chemical Plugs Based on Selected Hanford Waste Simulants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of preparation and characterization of chemical plugs based on selected Hanford Site waste simulants. Included are the results of chemical plug bench testing conducted in support of the M1/M6 Flow Loop Chemical Plugging/Unplugging Test (TP-RPP-WTP-495 Rev A). These results support the proposed plug simulants for the chemical plugging/ unplugging tests. Based on the available simulant data, a set of simulants was identified that would likely result in chemical plugs. The three types of chemical plugs that were generated and tested in this task consisted of: 1. Aluminum hydroxide (NAH), 2. Sodium aluminosilicate (NAS), and 3. Sodium aluminum phosphate (NAP). While both solvents, namely 2 molar (2 M) nitric acid (HNO3) and 2 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 60°C, used in these tests were effective in dissolving the chemical plugs, the 2 M nitric acid was significantly more effective in dissolving the NAH and NAS plugs. The caustic was only slightly more effecting at dissolving the NAP plug. In the bench-scale dissolution tests, hot (60°C) 2 M nitric acid was the most effective solvent in that it completely dissolved both NAH and NAS chemical plugs much faster (1.5 – 2 x) than 2 M sodium hydroxide. So unless there are operational benefits for the use of caustic verses nitric acid, 2 M nitric acid heated to 60°C C should be the solvent of choice for dissolving these chemical plugs. Flow-loop testing was planned to identify a combination of parameters such as pressure, flush solution, composition, and temperature that would effectively dissolve and flush each type of chemical plug from preformed chemical plugs in 3-inch-diameter and 4-feet-long pipe sections. However, based on a review of the results of the bench-top tests and technical discussions, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Research and Technology (R&T), Engineering and Mechanical Systems (EMS), and Operations concluded that flow-loop testing of the chemically plugged pipe sections would not provide any additional information or useful data. The decision was communicated through a Sub Contract Change Notice (SCN-070) that included a revised scope as follows: • Photographing the chemical plugs in the pipes before extrusion to compare the morphology of aged gels with that of fresh gels. • Setting up an extrusion apparatus and extruding the chemical plugs. • Documenting the qualitative observations on the efforts to remove the chemical plug materials from the pipe sections. • Performing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of extruded gel samples to detect any crystallization of gel during storage. • Disposing of the extruded gel as a waste. • Documenting the analytical results in a test report. There were no significant morphological differences between the fresh and aged plugs except for an overgrowth of small transparent crystals on the surface of the aged NAS gel plug. An initial pressure of <150 psi was required to start extruding the aged NAS and NAP plugs, whereas the NAH plug began to extrude with the application of minimal pressure. The shear strength of extruded samples ranged from ~9 to >15 KPa for the NAS plug and from ~2 to 6 KPa for the NAH plug. Following extrusion, the NAP plug sections were thixotropic. The bulk of all the aged gel plugs consisted of amorphous material with nitratine constituting the crystalline phase. A separate question about the whether the current in-tank waste conditions will bound the future multi-tank blended feed conditions for the Waste Treatment Plant is outside the scope of this study.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Gunderson, Katie M.; Baum, Steven R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Poloski, Adam P.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Calculations supporting evaluation of potential environmental standards for Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992, Section 801 (US Congress, 1992) provides for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to contract the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to conduct a study and provide findings and recommendations on reasonable standards for the disposal of high-level wastes at the Yucca Mountain site. The NAS study is to provide findings and recommendations which include, among other things, whether a health-based standard based on dose to individual members of the public from releases to the accessible environment will provide a reasonable standard for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The EPA, based upon and consistent with the findings and recommendations of the NAS, is required to promulgate standards for protection of the public from releases from radioactive materials stored or disposed of in a repository at the Yucca Mountain site. This document presents a number of different ``simple`` analyses of undisturbed repository performance that are intended to provide input to those responsible for setting appropriate environmental standards for a potential repository at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. Each of the processes included in the analyses has been simplified to capture the primary significance of that process in containing or isolating the waste from the biosphere. In these simplified analyses, the complex waste package interactions were approximated by a simple waste package ``failure`` distribution which is defined by the initiation and rate of waste package ``failures``. Similarly, releases from the waste package and the engineered barrier system are controlled by the very near field environment and the presence and rate of advective and diffusive release processes. Release was approximated by either a simple alteration-controlled release for the high solubility radionuclides and either a diffusive or advective-controlled release for the solubility-limited radionuclides.

Duguid, J.O.; Andrews, R.W.; Brandstetter, E.; Dale, T.F.; Reeves, M. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

01_fall_rev1.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Meeting on Fossil R&D China Meeting on Fossil R&D ..... 1 News Bytes ................................... 1 DOE CCT Conference ................... 2 Sequestration Conference ............ 3 APFBC Repowering ...................... 4 R&D Milestones ........................... 6 Thermal Barrier Coatings .............. 7 Mined Land a Carbon Sink ........... 8 Upcoming Events .......................... 8 UCR Advances Coal Science ....... 9 NAS Validates FE R&D .............. 10 Lasers to Enhance Gasifiers ....... 11 International Initiatives ............... 12 Status of CCT Projects ................ 14 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOE/FE-0215P-46 ISSUE NO. 46, FALL 2001 See "News Bytes" on page 5 ...

325

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

326

W:\Wpgraphs\CCT\CCToday Newsletter\04-spring\ToPrinter\04_Spring-CHANGES-4-13-04.pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New ZET Initiative New ZET Initiative ........................ 1 News Bytes ................................. 1 Mercury Control Program .............. 3 Carbon Sequestration ................... 6 International Initiatives ................. 8 NAS Hydrogen Report ................ 10 Materials Development ............... 11 MFIX Computer Code ................. 12 Upcoming Events ....................... 13 Status Report .............................. 14 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOE/FE-0468 * ISSUE NO. 57, SPRING 2004 See "News Bytes" on page 13... The U.S. Department of Energy has named Mark Maddox as Act- ing Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, replacing Carl Michael Smith who recently resigned after

327

Related Links | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration The National Nuclear Security Administration Related Links Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Related Links Related Links NNSA Lab Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Lab Directed Research and Development Collaborations DOE Adanced Scientific Computing Research DTRA (Defense Threat Reduction Agency) NAS (National Academy of Sciences) NSF (National Science Foundation) DOD (Department of Defense) NASA Exascale Activities NNSA Exascale Environment Planning Workshop ASCR Co-Design Centers Supercomputing Top 500 List ASC at Supercomputing Conference Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Facebook

328

A feasibility assessment of magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling space power converters  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work performed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) under NASA Contract NAS3-26061, {open_quotes}A Feasibility Assessment of Magnetic Bearings for Free-Piston Stirling Space Engines.{close_quotes} The work was performed over the period from July 1990 through August 1991. The objective of the effort was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery of the type currently being evaluated for possible use in future long-term space missions.

Curwen, P.W.; Rao, D.K.; Wilson, D.S. [Mechanical Technology Inc., Latham, NY (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Cooking with Canned Beef Stew (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E-80S 12/08 Platillos con estofado de carne de res en lata El estofado de res en lata viene cocido y listo para comer. Cada lata de 24 onzas equivale a tres porciones de 1 taza cada una. El guisado de res constituye una buena fuente de vitamina A..., prote?nas y hierro. S?rvalo sobre arroz o fideos como una sabrosa comida, acompa?ado, por ejemplo, de una guarnici?n de ejotes. Almacenamiento Almacene las latas cerradas de guisado de carne a temperatura ambiente. Para conservar su sabor, cons...

Anding, Jenna

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

330

Cooking with Walnuts (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recetas con Nueces de Castilla (walnuts) Las nueces de Castilla son una excelente fuente de prote?nas y minerales. Una onza de nueces de Castilla (el equivalente a 14 mitades de nuez, aproximadamente) contiene m?s o menos 180 calor?as, sobre todo... por su alto contenido de grasa. Las nueces de castilla a?aden sabor a las ensaladas, panes, platillos principales y postres. Almacenamiento Las nueces de Castilla se conservar?n fresca en su bolsa sellada durante aproximadamente 6 meses. Una vez...

Anding, Jenna

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

331

Efficient Path Delay Test Generation with Boolean Satisfiability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assignments (NAs) of the paths are compacted to improve the compaction ratio. However, dynamic compaction takes significantly more CPU time than static compaction. 1.5 Pseudo Functional Test The voltage level of the power grid in the circuit can... significantly affect the accuracy of delay test. [32][33] The launching of the delay test causes a surge in the current drawn from the power grid. Because of the inductance on the power grid, this current surge will cause a large drop in power supply voltage...

Bian, Kun

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Investigations into the Chemistry of Laudering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the solution 1711-1666 Same as above, but completely immersed 1634, 1634 Boiled in 2.5 N a 2 C 0 3 , for 3.5 hrs. half im­ mersed 1648 Same as one above but completely immersed... 1636 Boiled in 5 per cent NasCOa for 3.5 hrs., im­ mersed completely 1625... D OF CLOTH solution used Original muslin JVJJ Muslin, bleached medium (Muslin A ) v/!;; Muslin, bleached strongly (Muslin B) A/ 1 0 _ Muslin B N 7 1 0 rinsed 3 times with distilled wat( Original muslin A V J O Muslin A A7J0 Muslin B AV 0...

Faragher, W.F.

1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Estimation of interstitial water in porous medium by capillary pressure measurements at various temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was prepared and its density determined with a Christian Beckers specific gravity balance. To saturate' the core samples with brine, they were first evacuated in a sleeve-top descicator for two hours, brine Nas then introduced into the core container.... After soaking the samples for two hours, the cores were removed, wiped with a paper towel to remove surface brine, and weighed again. The increase in weight was equal to the weight of the brine that now occupied the pores of each core. This increase...

Gupta, Mahesh Chander

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

334

Decompression characteristics of standard swine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Contract NAS 2-5481, Ocean Systems Inc. 1970. Elliott, D. H. The pathological processes of decompression lk . 1: tb ~yb 11 AMdi ~DPtt ~td Ai* 8 *k, dtt d by P. B. 8 tt M D. 8. Wilt tt. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1969, p. 414-436. 26 12. Ferris, E.... edited by P. B. Benuett and D. H. Elliott. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1969, p. 451-463. 15. Hawkins, J. A. , Shilling, C. W. , and Hansen, R. A. A suggested change in change in calculating decompression tables for diving. Nav. Med. Bull. 33: 327...

Roby, John Worth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

335

The dynamics of subadult flocks of whooping cranes wintering in Texas, 1978-79 through 1982-83  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table ~Pa e Number of banded whooping cranes by hatch year wintering at ANWR and environs for 1978-79 through 1982-83 seasons 13 Banded subadult whooping cranes wintering at ANWR, and environs, 1980-81 through 1982-83 winter seasons . . . . 14... Location of banded whooping crane chicks at ANWR and environs for 1978-79 through 1982-83 seasons 38 Average subadult whooping crane flock size by month from ANWR and TPWD aerial surveys and NAS boat observations for 1978-79 season 41 Average subadult...

Bishop, Mary Anne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

Ultrasonic absorption in liquid mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, It is obvious that much moxe experimental dates both absorption snd thermalv is needed before this theory can be substantiated Purpose of the Investigation Ths present research was undertaken to investigate thoroughly ths absorption in mixtuxws of ethanol... Agricultural and lheohaaioal College of %nas ia partial fulfi&went of tbs aequtreaante for the daggse of ~t %53 ~or Sub)eot Pllgedss Table of Contents Ii Beokgxeund snd Theory Absorption in Pure Liqu1ds 8, Absorpt1on in Idquid Bixtures XI Purpose...

Davis, James Madison

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

The rate of carbonic acid decomposition in sea water and its oceanographic significance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed Air Purging . . . . . . . . , . . 58 15 L6 Carbon-14 Uptake by ~la ~nas sp. in a Closed System, under 4f Carbon Dioxide Gas Purging and under N Gas Purging using Low pH Sea Water . C b -V, Uptk by~Mt ~~lt ik Cl System and under N2 Gas... and under Nitrogen Gas Purging and 4$ Carbon Dioxide Purging, using low pH Sea Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , 63 12 Carbon-14 Uptake by Nitzuhia closterium in a Closed System and under Nitrogen Gas Purging . 1v PREFATORY' NOTE The author...

Park, Kilho

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

MAC 115 Introduc~ao `a Computac~ao Instituto de Fisica Segundo Semestre de 2002 -Noturno  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

^ametros uma matriz real A com m linhas e n colunas e uma posi¸c~ao (i, j) da matriz, e devolve a m´edia aritm´etica dos vizinhos de A[i][j]. (Em geral, essa m´edia ´e a m´edia aritm´etica dos n´umeros A[i - 1][j], A[i + 1][j], A[i][j - 1], A[i][j + 1]. Nas bordas da matriz, essa m´edia ´e uma m´edia de menos de quatro

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

339

MAC323 ESTRUTURAS DE DADOS INFORMAC~OES GERAIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

no dia 25/6 (3a. feira). Crit´erio de avalia¸c~ao: Voc^e ter´a de atingir m´edia pelo menos 5.0 nas provas (MP) e pelo menos 6.0 nos EPs (MEP). A m´edia final no semestre ser´a uma m´edia ponderada de MP e MEP, com pesos a serem definidos durante o semestre. Da mesma forma, os pesos para o c´alculo das m´edias

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

340

MAC 115 -Introdu,c"ao `a Computa,c"ao Instituto de F'isica -Segundo Semestre de 2002 -Noturno  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,c"ao (i, j) da matriz, e devolve a m'edia aritm'etica dos vizinhos de A[i][j]. (Em ger* *al, essa m'edia 'e a m'edia aritm'etica dos n'umeros A[i - 1][j], A[i + 1][j], A[i][j - 1], A[i][j + 1* *]. Nas bordas da matriz, essa m'edia 'e uma m'edia de menos de quatro n'umeros; por exemplo, no caso em

Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Bol. Soc. Paran. Mat. (3s.) v. 21 1/2 (2003): 120.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curvatura m´edia igual a 1. Tal rela¸c~ao segue do teorema fundamental da Geometria, calcado nas equa´icies de curvatura m´edia 1 em IH3 , o que sob um ponto de vista filos´ofico ´e de se esperar. Este ´e o 5 3 O espa¸co hiperb´olico IH3 8 4 Superf´icies de curvatura m´edia pr´e-determinada em IR3 11 5

Sa Earp, Ricardo

342

Microsoft Word - NYSERDA_DOE_Select[1].doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Funding under the for Funding under the Joint NYSERDA / DOE Energy Storage Initiative, Project Title Company Type NAS Battery Demonstration Project New York Power Authority White Plains, NY Demonstration Grid Frequency Regulation by Recycling Electrical Energy in Flywheels Beacon Power Corporation Wilmington, MA Demonstration Demonstration of Commercial Energy Storage Device in Edge of Grid Application Gaia Power Technologies New York, NY Demonstration Rotor Development for Advanced Flywheel Power Systems AFS Trinity Power Corporation Livermore, CA Development New York Storage Market Analysis Distributed Utility Associates Livermore, CA Analysis Market Analysis Studies EPRI PEAC Corporation Knoxville, TN Analysis Mini-CAES for Transmission Congestion Relief Ridge Energy Storage & Grid Services

343

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linde, LLC Linde, LLC SCC/Capture Division FY14-15/ 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2015 Steve Mascaro Murray Hill, NJ Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Continue the advancement of the Recipient's NAS CO2 Capture Process, both in solvent formulation and in process equipment. This work will involve modeling, techno-economic analysis, and risk assessment. Steven A. Mascaro Digitally signed by Steven A. Mascaro DN: cn=Steven A. Mascaro, email=Steven.Mascaro@netl.doe.gov, o=U.S. Dept. Of Energy, NETL, l=Morgantown, WV Reason: I attest to the accuracy and integrity of this document Date: 2013.09.23 16:10:00 -04'00' 09 23 2013 John Ganz Digitally signed by John Ganz DN: cn=John Ganz, o=NETL, ou=ECD, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US

344

Cationic Lipid-Nucleic Acid Complexes for Gene Delivery And Silencing: Pathways And Mechanisms for Plasmid Dna And Sirna  

SciTech Connect

Motivated by the promises of gene therapy, there is great interest in developing non-viral lipid-based vectors for therapeutic applications due to their low immunogenicity, low toxicity, ease of production, and the potential of transferring large pieces of DNA into cells. In fact, cationic liposome (CL) based vectors are among the prevalent synthetic carriers of nucleic acids (NAs) currently used in gene therapy clinical trials worldwide. These vectors are studied both for gene delivery with CL-DNA complexes and gene silencing with CL-siRNA (short interfering RNA) complexes. However, their transfection efficiencies and silencing efficiencies remain low compared to those of engineered viral vectors. This reflects the currently poor understanding of transfection-related mechanisms at the molecular and self-assembled levels, including a lack of knowledge about interactions between membranes and double stranded NAs and between CL-NA complexes and cellular components. In this review we describe our recent efforts to improve the mechanistic understanding of transfection by CL-NA complexes, which will help to design optimal lipid-based carriers of DNA and siRNA for therapeutic gene delivery and gene silencing.

Ewert, K.K.; Zidovska, A.; Ahmad, A.; Bouxsein, N.F.; Evans, H.M.; McAllister, C.S.; Samuel, C.E.; Safinya, C.R.; /SLAC

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

345

Direct conversion of surplus fissile materials, spent nuclear fuel, and other materials to high-level-waste glass  

SciTech Connect

With the end of the cold war the United States, Russia, and other countries have excess plutonium and other materials from the reductions in inventories of nuclear weapons. The United States Academy of Sciences (NAS) has recommended that these surplus fissile materials (SFMs) be processed so they are no more accessible than plutonium in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This spent fuel standard, if adopted worldwide, would prevent rapid recovery of SFMs for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. The NAS recommended investigation of three sets of options for disposition of SFMs while meeting the spent fuel standard: (1) incorporate SFMs with highly radioactive materials and dispose of as waste, (2) partly burn the SFMs in reactors with conversion of the SFMs to SNF for disposal, and (3) dispose of the SFMs in deep boreholes. The US Government is investigating these options for SFM disposition. A new method for the disposition of SFMs is described herein: the simultaneous conversion of SFMs, SNF, and other highly radioactive materials into high-level-waste (HLW) glass. The SFMs include plutonium, neptinium, americium, and {sup 233}U. The primary SFM is plutonium. The preferred SNF is degraded SNF, which may require processing before it can be accepted by a geological repository for disposal.

Forsberg, C.W.; Elam, K.R.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Factors that affect the degradation of naphthenic acids in oil sands wastewater by indigenous microbial communities  

SciTech Connect

The acute toxicity of wastewater generated during the extraction of bitumen from oil sands is believed to be due to naphthenic acids (NAs). To determine the factors that affect the rate of degradation of representative NAs in microcosms containing wastewater and the acute toxicity of treated and untreated wastewater, the effects of temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, and phosphate addition on the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release form two representative naphthenic acid substrates, (linear) U-{sup 14}C-palmitic acid (PA) and (bicyclic) decahydro-2-naphthoic acid-8-{sup 14}C (DHNA), were monitored. Tailings pond water (TPW) contained microorganisms well adapted to mineralizing both PA and DHNA:PA was degraded more quickly (10--15% in 4 weeks) compared to DHNA (2--4% in 8 weeks). On addition of phosphate, the rate of NA degradation increased up to twofold in the first 4 weeks, with a concurrent increase in the rate of oxygen consumption by oil sands TPW. The degradation rate then declined to levels equivalent to those measured in flasks without phosphate. The observed plateau was not due to phosphate limitation. Decreases in either the dissolved oxygen concentration or the temperature reduced the rate. Phosphate addition also significantly decreased the acute toxicity of TPW to fathead minnows. In contrast, Microtox{reg_sign} analyses showed no reduction in the toxicity of treated or untreated TPW after incubation for up to 8 weeks at 15 C.

Lai, J.W.S.; Pinto, L.J.; Kiehlmann, E.; Bendell-Young, L.I.; Moore, M.M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Assessment of Aerosol Radiative Impact over Oceanic Regions Adjacent to Indian Subcontinent using Multi-Satellite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Using data from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, we have retrieved regional distribution of aerosol column single scattering albedo (parameter indicative of the relative dominance of aerosol absorption and scattering effects), a most important, but least understood aerosol property in assessing its climate impact. Consequently we provide improved assessment of short wave aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) (on both regional and seasonal scales) estimates over this region. Large gradients in north-south ARF were observed as a consequence of gradients in single scattering albedo as well as aerosol optical depth. The highest ARF (-37 W m-2 at the surface) was observed over the northern Arabian Sea during June to August period (JJA). In general, ARF was higher over northern Bay of Bengal (NBoB) during winter and pre-monsoon period, whereas the ARF was higher over northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during the monsoon and post- monsoon period. The largest forcing observed over NAS during JJA is the consequence of large amounts of desert dust transported from the west Asian dust sources. High as well as seasonally invariant aerosol single scattering albedos (~0.98) were observed over the southern Indian Ocean region far from continents. The ARF estimates based on direct measurements made at a remote island location, Minicoy (8.3°N, 73°E) in the southern Arabian Sea are in good agreement with the estimates made following multisatellite analysis.

Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Krishnamoorthy, K.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Microsoft PowerPoint - Kosinski  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Research Projects Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) Shane Kosinski Research Opportunities with the DOE for HBCUs July 9, 2009 2 Background on ARPA-E Rising Above the Gathering Storm, 2006 (National Academies) * Establish an Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) * "Creative, out-of-the-box, transformational" energy research * Spinoff Benefit - Help educate next generation of researchers * Secretary Chu (then Director of Berkeley National lab) on committee America COMPETES Act, 2007 * Authorizes the establishment of ARPA-E American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) * $400M provided for ARPA-E * President Obama launches ARPA-E in a speech at NAS on April 27, 2009 3 Background on ARPA-E Mission * To "enhance the economic and energy security of the US"

350

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Technology Radar V-V NaNiCl2 Li-ion ZnCl2 Pb-A NiCad H2Br2 ZnBr2 NiMH NaS Fe2Cr3 trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! 2  Bridge the gap to the practical application of a mature and high-performance electrochemistry for grid storage.  Provide the required application definition with utility and other customer input to optimize benefits to the community  Facilitate technology and system development in 2010 - 2011  Field demonstration at PG&E Modular Generation Substation early 2012  Field deployment at Modesto Irrigation District late 2012 Proof of Principle Technology

351

FY2002 ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS PEER REVIEW AGENDA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM ANNUAL PEER REVIEW November 2-3, 2006 Washington Marriott Hotel, Washington, DC (USA) AGENDA Thursday, November 2, 2004 7:45 AM Continental Breakfast 8:30 Welcome and Overview - Dr. Imre Gyuk, DOE 8:40 DOE Perspective - DOE 9:00 ESS Program Overview - John Boyes, Sandia National Laboratories 9:20 NAS Battery Performance at Charleston, WV - Ali Nourai, AEP Corp. (Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE/ESS) through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). 9:40 Evaluation of the Kauai Island Utility Co-operative System for Energy storage Potential - Abbas Akhil, Sandia National Laboratories (Funded by the Kauai Island Utility Co-0p). 10:00 Iowa Stored Energy Plant - Bob Haug, Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency

352

Microsoft PowerPoint - Goodwin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology TRansfer (STTR) Dave Goodwin DOE SBIR/STTR Office Physical Scientist HBCU Meeting July 9, 2009 DOE Mission Support 1. Advancing the Nation's Economic and Energy Security. 2. Promoting Scientific and Technological Innovation. 3. Ensuring the Environmental Clean-Up of the National Nuclear Weapons Complex. 2 Overview (1 of 3) $1.7 billion invested by DOE (since 1992), in over 7,000 grants, generated over 15,000 person-years of jobs. $2.4 billion in sales from 60% of Phase II companies, in addition to DOE Mission Needs; e.g., from FY05 thru FY07, the Phase II 172 companies generated 17,933 total jobs. National Conference, Nov 2-5, Reno, www.unr.edu/sbir- sttr2009/index.html. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) University Industry

353

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EESAT 2009 EESAT 2009 October 4-7 Seattle Ali Nourai American Electric Power Chairman, Electricity Storage Association Energy Storage Projects in AEP - A Migratory Trend - 2 * 5.2 Million customers * 11 States * 39,000 MW Generation * 38,953 miles Transmission * 212,781 miles Distribution * $45.2 billion Assets (2008) * $14.4 billion revenue (2008) * 20,861 Employees AEP Overview 3 Migratory Path of Utility Energy Storage - in AEP Large Central Units Storage at Grid Edge Substation Batteries Graphics adapted from an EPRI Presentation by Joe Hughes This Migration Trend is Driven by Popularity of Customer-Owned Distributed Generation and Customers' demand for higher service quality 4 AEP's View of Energy Storage Value 120/240 V 69 kV 4 to 34 kV 480 V 138 kV 345 kV 765 kV CES (Community) NAS (Substation)

354

Benchmarks used  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benchmarks used Benchmarks used Benchmarks used Using a set of benchmarks described below, different optimization options for the different compilers on Edison. The compilers are also compared against one another on the benchmarks. NERSC6 Benchmarks We used these benchmarks from the NERSC6 procurement: NERSC 6 PROCUREMENT MPI BENCHMARKS Benchmark Science Area Algorithm Concurrency Languages GTC Fusion PIC, finite difference 2048 f90 IMPACT-T Accelerator Physics PIC, FFT 1024 f90 MILC Materials Science Conjugate gradient, sparse matrix, FFT 1024 c, assembly NPB 3.3.1 MPI Parallel Benchmarks The following NPB 3.3 MPI Benchmarks were run, all at a concurrency of 1024 processes. They are all written in Fortran. NAS PARALLEL MPI BENCHMARKS - VERSION 3.3.1 Benchmark Full Name Description Level

355

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 Existing Regulations A11: Technical advice and assistance to organizations Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010909: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 24, 2013 CX-010914: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing of a Highly Efficient Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System (SUMMARY Categorical Exclusion (CX)) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6

356

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: North Carolina | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carolina Carolina Categorical Exclusion Determinations: North Carolina Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in North Carolina. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010908: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 17, 2013 CX-010939: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/17/2013 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2, 2013 CX-010812: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scoping Studies of Advanced Gasification Technologies for Hydrogen

357

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Risks Speaker(s): Richard Sextro Date: October 27, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Although most of the exposures to radon and its radioactive decay products arise from indoor airborne radon originating in the soil adjacent to buildings, some contact with radon can occur due to its presence in drinking water. The exposures and health risks associated with radon dissolved in drinking water are typically much smaller, although the magnitude of the exposures and risks have been uncertain and the subject of some controversy. The 1996 Amendments to the (U.S.) Safe Drinking Water Act required the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to contract with the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to re-evaluate the risks associated with

358

Analyzing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Effect of Different Programming Models Upon Performance and Memory Usage on Cray XT5 Platforms Hongzhang Shan Future Technology Group, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Haoqiang Jin NAS Division, NASA Arms Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 Karl Fuerlinger University of California at Berkeley, EECS Department, Computer Science Division Berkeley, CA 94720 Alice Koniges, Nicholas J. Wright NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract-Harnessing the power of multicore platforms is chal- lenging due to the additional levels of parallelism present. In this paper, we examine the effect of the choice of programming model upon performance and overall memory usage on the Cray XT5. We use detailed time breakdowns to measure the contributions to the total runtime from computation,

359

Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Register Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 19 / Friday, January 28, 2011 / Notices No decision will be made to implement any alternative until the U.S. Navy F-35C West Coast Homebasing EIS process is completed and a Record of Decision is signed by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Energy, Installations and Environment) or designee. Resource areas to be addressed in the U.S. Navy F-35C West Coast Homebasing EIS will include, but not be limited to: Air quality, noise environment, land use, socioeconomics, infrastructure and community services, natural resources, biological resources, cultural resources, safety and environmental hazards. The analysis will evaluate direct and indirect impacts, and will account for cumulative impacts from other relevant activities in the area of NAS Lemoore

360

Management Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Plan Transportation Plan (and Planning) Development National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 15, 2013 Buffalo, New York Considerations in Transportation Plan Development  Reaffirms the involvement of key stakeholders in both planning and carrying out transportation activities  Takes into account comments on the 2007 and 2009 plans, the WIPP Transportation Plan, the DOE Strategy in response to the BRC and NAS findings, the DOE Transportation Practices Manual (DOE Manual 460.2-1A) and commercial best practices  Outlines the planning process, involved parties, and schedules for activities that need to be completed prior to developing site-specific campaign plans  Reaches back to address issues (both resolved and unresolved) from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: New Jersey | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jersey Jersey Categorical Exclusion Determinations: New Jersey Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in New Jersey. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010909: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 26, 2013 CX-011114: Categorical Exclusion Determination Municipal Complex Solar Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/26/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): Golden Field Office August 1, 2013 CX-010816: Categorical Exclusion Determination Effects of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Turbulent Combustion and

362

EIS-0259 Final Environmental Impact Statement On The Disposal Of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, And Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-. -. 1. PURPOSE AND NEED U.S. Navy nuclear ships are decommissioned and defieled at the end of their usefi Metime, when the cost of continued operation is not justified by their fitary capabfity, or when the ship is no longer needed. The Navy needs to disposition the reactor compartments born defieled and decommissioned ctisers, and OHIO Class and LOS ANGELES Class submarines. The number of reactor compartments under consideration by this Environmental Impact Statement is about 100. These reactor compartments are in addition to the pre-LOS ANGELES Class submarines tieady being disposed of under the Na&s 1984 Find Environmental hpact Statement (USN, 1984a). Newer types of U.S. Navy nuclear-powered stips that are not expected to be decommissioned in the next 20 years (e.g., aircraft carriers, SEAWOLF Class submarines) are not included in this fid Enviromentd Impact Statement.

363

Benchmarks used  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benchmarks used Benchmarks used Benchmarks used Using a set of benchmarks described below, different optimization options for the different compilers on Edison. The compilers are also compared against one another on the benchmarks. NERSC6 Benchmarks We used these benchmarks from the NERSC6 procurement: NERSC 6 PROCUREMENT MPI BENCHMARKS Benchmark Science Area Algorithm Concurrency Languages GTC Fusion PIC, finite difference 2048 f90 IMPACT-T Accelerator Physics PIC, FFT 1024 f90 MILC Materials Science Conjugate gradient, sparse matrix, FFT 1024 c, assembly NPB 3.3.1 MPI Parallel Benchmarks The following NPB 3.3 MPI Benchmarks were run, all at a concurrency of 1024 processes. They are all written in Fortran. NAS PARALLEL MPI BENCHMARKS - VERSION 3.3.1 Benchmark Full Name Description Level

364

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Research Projects Agency - Energy Department of Energy's Business Opportunity Session September 24, 2009 Name: Antony DiGiovanni Title: Budget Director Office: ARPA-E E-Mail: ARPA-E@hq.doe.gov Website: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/ Rising Above the Gathering Storm, 2006 (National Academies) * Establish an Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) * "Creative, out-of-the-box, transformational" energy research * Spinoff Benefit - Help educate next generation of researchers * Secretary Chu (then Director of Berkeley National lab) on committee America COMPETES Act, 2007 * Authorizes the establishment of ARPA-E American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) * $400M provided for ARPA-E * President Obama launches ARPA-E in a speech at NAS

365

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Islanding Islanding Dynamic Islanding For Improving Electric Service Reliability with Energy Storage Ali Nourai American Electric Power Presentation to DOE Peer Review Meeting 2008 Funded in Part by the Power Electronics Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE/PE) through Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Outline Outline 1. Existing AEP storage projects - performance data 2. New AEP storage projects - exploring new storage values DOE/Sandia has been sponsoring the innovative components of energy storage projects in AEP 3 AEP NaS Application #1

366

Title (right click and Remove Content ControlŽ if any hard returns, soft returns, hard spaces, or hard dashes are used)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2145 2145 Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report Workshop Committee December 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 iii Executive Summary This report is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Sciences (NAS) have repeatedly described the need for advanced instruments that "predict, control, and design the components of energetic processes and environmental balance," most notably in biological, chemical, environmental,

367

Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors Title Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2004 Authors Gundel, Lara A., Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan Keywords carbon monoxide, ozone Abstract Identification of aircraft cabin environmental quality concerns for which sensors may be useful The highest priority environmental indicators identified are ozone and cabin air pressure, followed by carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with moderate priority, and then relative humidity, airborne particles, and organic contaminants, including engine oil byproducts and pesticides. This list is based on the Congressional requirements and recent scientific literature, starting with information from recent studies (NAS/NRC, ASHRAE/Battelle), and continuing by seeking input from a variety of stakeholders.

368

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Federal Register 2 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 35 / Thursday, February 21, 2013 / Notices governments and other eligible entities for public benefit purposes. Notices of interest from representatives of the homeless, and other interested parties located in the vicinity of any listed surplus property should be submitted to the recognized Local Redevelopment Authority (LRA). Surplus Property Description. The additional property that is surplus to the needs of the Federal Government consists of approximately 10 acres of land and facilities at the former NAS Brunswick. The land and facilities were formerly requested by the Federal Aviation Administration, and it had subsequently withdrawn its interest in this property. The surplus property is comprised of the following three non-

369

Paul Dickman's Presentation to NERAC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Program Update Presented to: Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Presented by: Paul Dickman Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management May 18, 2004 Washington, DC 2 Congress Created a Legal Obligation Congress Created a Legal Obligation to Dispose of Nuclear Waste to Dispose of Nuclear Waste * Current Schedule 1957 NAS supported deep geologic disposal 1987 Congress limited characterization to Yucca Mountain 1992 Energy Policy Act set EPA standard process 2002 President recommended, Congress approved Yucca Mountain 1982 Congress passed Nuclear Waste Policy Act 2010* Begin receipt of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste 2004* Submit License Application to NRC * 1982 - Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) established

370

Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review - Day 1 morning presentations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 morning 1 morning presentations Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review - Day 1 morning presentations The 2006 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program was held in Washington DC on November 2-3, 2006. Current and completed program projects were presented and reviewed by a group of industry professionals. Presentations from the Day 1 morning session are below. ESS 2006 Peer Review - NAS Battery Performance at Charleston, WV - Ali Nourai, AEP.pdf ESS 2006 Peer Review - Evaluation of the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative System for Energy Storage Potential - Abbas Akhil, SNL.pdf ESS 2006 Peer Review - Iowa Stored Energy Plant - Bob Haug, ISEPA.pdf ESS 2006 Peer Review - Superconducting Flywheel Development - Phil Johnson, Boeing.pdf ESS 2006 Peer Review - Bipolar NiMH Battery Development and Testing - James

371

Energy Storage Systems 2009 Peer Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Peer Review 09 Peer Review Energy Storage Systems 2009 Peer Review The DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted an annual peer review in Seattle, WA on October 8, 2009. The 1-day conference included welcoming remarks from OE's Imre Gyuk as well as a program overview from John Boyes of Sandia National Laboratories and 11 presentations on individual projects. The agenda, program overview, and project presentations are available below. ESS 2009 Peer Review - Agenda.pdf ESS 2009 Peer Review - DOE-ESS Overview - John Boyes, SNL.pdf ESS 2009 Peer Review - Long Island Bus NaS Battery Energy Storage Project - Steve Eckroad, EPRI.pdf ESS 2009 Peer Review - Development of an Integrated Power Controller Based on HT SOI and SiC - Joseph Henfling, SNL.pdf ESS 2009 Peer Review - Large Format Carbon Enhanced VRLA Battery Test

372

RDMD Transition Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR LARGE SCALE ENERGY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR LARGE SCALE ENERGY STORAGE - TOWARDS LOW TEMPERATURE SODIUM BATTERIES JUN LIU PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND, WA 99252 PNNL: Zhenguo Yang, Yuliang Cao, Xiaolin Li, Lifeng Xiao Sandia: Bruce C. Bunker Supported by PNNL's transformational Materials Science Initiative Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Pacific Northwest National Laboratories Significant challenges for meeting the long term low cost and reliability requirement for stationary energy storage. Distributed storage Central storage End user storage Capital cost ($/kWh) CAES Pumped Hydro Power Stationary 1 kW 100 kW 10 MW 1 GW 10 kW 1 MW 100 MW Li Ion Battery NaS, Na metal halide Vehicle Energy Density and Cost Lifetime and Capital Cost

373

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bus Bus NaS Battery Energy Storage Project U.S. DOE Peer Review Seattle, WA October 8, 2009 Steve Eckroad Electric Power Research Institute Seckroad@epri.com (704) 595-2717 2 © 2009 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. Acknowledgements This project is part of the joint energy storage initiative between the New York State Energy Research and Development Agency (NYSERDA) and the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/ESS) and managed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC84-94AL85000. * US DOE and NYSERDA - Imre Gyuk and Joe Sayer

374

Slide 0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

arpa-e.energy.gov arpa-e.energy.gov GRIDSCALE RAMPABLE INTERMITTENT DISPATCHABLE STORAGE (GRIDS) PROGRAM MARK JOHNSON PROGRAM DIRECTOR DOE Annual Storage R&D Review Meeting ARPA-E and OE November 2010 www.arpa-e.energy.gov Overview of ARPA-E as an Agency Overview of GRIDS Storage Program Technical Progress in Energy Storage ARPA-E: Applying The ARPA Model To Energy 2006 Rising Above the Gathering Storm (National Academies) 2007 America COMPETES Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) $400M appropriated for ARPA-E President Obama launches ARPA-E in a speech at NAS on April 27, 2009 ARPA-E's Distinct Culture * Excellence * Openness * Integrity * Speed * Metrics Driven * Flat and Nimble Fulfilling ARPA-E's Mission To enhance the economic and energy security of the

375

Advisory Committees | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisory Committees Advisory Committees High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees HEPAP AAAC External link NAS External link News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Advisory Committees Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Jointly chartered since October 2000 by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Science Foundation (NSF), HEPAP reports both to DOE's Office of High Energy Physics and the NSF's Mathematical & Physical Sciences

376

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Islanding: Improving Electric Islanding: Improving Electric Service Reliability with Energy Storage Emeka Okafor American Electric Power Nov 2 nd , 2010 Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories 2 Project Description * Outages on distribution system can last several hours. * Energy Storage Systems can be leveraged to reduce impact of outages. * Project demonstrates ability of Energy Storage to mitigate outage impact. * Three 2-MW systems commissioned in 2009. * Demonstrated ability to provide backup power. 2006 - Battery in a Substation for Capital Deferral Installed 1MW, 7.2 MWh of NAS battery on a feeder to defer building a new substation Daily Peak Shaving Tyler Mountain Feeder 12 kV bus North Charleston Feeder

377

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aqueous Rechargeable Lithium Batteries (ARLBs) Aqueous Rechargeable Lithium Batteries (ARLBs) of High Energy Density Prof. Dr. Yuping Wu New Energy and Materials Laboratory (NEML), Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 Tel/Fax: +86-21-5566 4223 Email: wuyp@fudan.edu.cn @ 6th US-China Electric Vehicles and Battery Technology Workshop, Boston 23-24 August, 2012 Motto of NEML Electrochemical technologies 4E + E Energy problem Environmental pollution Enjoy life Solve Reduce To cultivate Elites for the society. 1. Chemical Power Sources * Supercapacitors * Polysulfide bromide battery (PSB) * Zn/Br battery * Vanadium redox couples (VRC) * Sodium sulfur battery (Na/S) * Lead acid battery * Metal-air battery * Ni-MH * Lithium ion battery * Safety * Rate capability

378

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Performance Impacts from and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades Yun (Helen) He National Energy Research Supercomputing Center Cray User Group Meeting May 4-7, 2009 1 Outline * Franklin Introduction * Benchmarks * Quad Core Upgrade * CLE 2.1 Upgrade * IO Upgrade * Summary 2 Franklin's Role at NERSC * NERSC is the US DOE's keystone high performance computing center. * Franklin is the "flagship" system at NERSC serving ~3,100 scientific users in different application disciplines. * Serves the needs for most NERSC users from modest to extreme concurrencies. * Expects significant percentage of time to be used for capability jobs on Franklin. 3 Kernel Benchmarks * Processor: NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) - Serial: NPB 2.3 Class B * best understood code base - Parallel: NPB 2.4 Class D at 64 and 256 ways

379

Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Fallon Naval Air Station Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes As was mentioned previously, the Navy signed a development contract with Ormat in 2005 to produce power from a potential resource on the SE corner of the main side portion of NAS Fallon. Additionally the GPO began additional exploration activities on the Bombing Range 16 in collaboration with the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy. The introduction of $9.1M of Recovery Act funds in early 2009 led to a broadening as well as an

380

Definition: Watt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Watt Watt Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Watt A unit of measure for power, which measures the rate of energy conversion; equal to one joule per second (or 1/746 horsepower); equivalent to one ampere under a pressure of one volt.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The watt' is a derived unit of power in the International System of Units (SI), named after the Scottish engineer James Watt (1736-1819). The unit, defined as one joule per second, measures the rate of energy conversion or transfer. Also Known As W Related Terms Electricity, Power, Kilowatt References ↑ http://www.eia.gov/tools/glossary/index.cfm?id=W#watt ↑ http://needtoknow.nas.edu/energy/glossary/ Retri LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. eved from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on the National Academy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on the National Statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on the National Academy of Sciences Report: Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on the National Academy of Sciences Report: Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership August 3, 2005 - 2:35pm Addthis Washington, DC - Late yesterday the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) National Research Council issued a report titled: Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership. Following is a statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman in response to the report: "I am pleased that the National Academy of Sciences agrees that we are on the right path with our research and development. We agree that this effort

382

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Induced Seismic Events Induced Seismic Events (Earthquakes) Key Points: * Induced seismic events are earthquakes attributable to human activity. The possibility of induced seismic activity related to energy development projects, including shale gas, has drawn some public attention. * Although hydraulic fracturing releases energy deep beneath the surface to break rock, studies thus far indicate the energy released is generally not large enough to trigger a seismic event that could be felt on the surface. 1 * However, waste fluid disposal through underground injection can "pose some risk for induced seismicity." 2 * According to the National Academies of Sciences (NAS), accurately predicting seismic event magnitude or occurrence is not possible, in part because of a lack of comprehensive data on

383

Serologic titers in the bovine with relation to the demonstration of anaplasma organisms under the light microscope and the infectivity of the animals' blood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

%, LCD ~ '. a, to" s', . 's'. . w. :y it', 'i':: s, t e *, 'o "e ':j;s, '4. ' S. -. = t ', '::~elj NCCCCa CkeC Ae ' . ea, '+?-. o. . o. ' . , lS XX@ CCC ~~ a e e e e e a ~ a o s ~ ~ a 4 ~ B. ~&~ Of Che ~~ of Amp~ ku. ChN ~~as LC~~X ~ 8. ' ~CAVD...Comisog ~, SMcp~ cease ob~ kn Chio ~Xcs srpbh~ snip one cims sncL onXp XX of Chs e~yCes cNMS LnfsesscL afi: Cbis cies. ~ ~X4S C. P. CLCsr CangecL fton s, Xss of 4Iil aC Xcg Co a ~ of 44 ac Lcd seems cLLXnCkon ~ Cha ssnCLP. SsimsX ~ 3SX nas a nonsp~CesksacL ~X...

Huff, John Wesley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

384

LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 5  

SciTech Connect

Contents include articles entitled: USGS report supports previous conclusions re tritium migration at Beatty; Ohio selects new contractor for screening; Maine Yankee`s future uncertain; Southeast Compact limits funds for North Carolina project; California, Energy, and Interior exchange correspondence on Ward Valley testing; TCC meets in Salt Lake City, Utah; Garner named executive director and forum participant for Northwest Compact; Seventh Circuit upholds Energy Secretary`s determination re distribution of surcharge rebates; US Ecology sues Nebraska re wetlands mitigation; US Supreme Court hears line-item veto challenge; Court rules NAS must provide public access; WCS sues Envirocare of Texas; DOE and Envirocare sign consent agreement; NRC issues performance assessment guidance; NRC to publish final decommissioning rule; House subcommittee passes Texas Consent Act; Environmental justice bill introduced in the House; and International nuclear safety body established.

Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Historic contamination along Oakland Inner Harbor  

SciTech Connect

As part of the ongoing remedial investigations (RI) at the Navy`s fleet and Industrial Supply Center, Oakland (FISCO)-Alameda Facility/Alameda Annex (the facility), FISC Oakland, and NAS Alameda, the presence of widespread historic chemical contaminants along the interface between the fill material and the former marshland deposits has been discovered. The historic contaminants are believed to have accumulated within the marshland areas prior to the filling activities along the Oakland Inner Harbor. The historic contaminants consist of heavy petroleum hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), apparently generated by the former industries in the area. Three solid waste management units (SWMUs) and eight areas of concern ( AOCs) were identified at the facility. Three SWMUs and 1 AOC were recommended for site investigations as high-priority.

Bird, J.C. [Versar, Inc. Alameda, CA (United States); Shafer, D.L. [PRC Environmental Management, Inc,. Rancho Cordova, CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Potassium-Rankine power conversion subsystem modeling for nuclear electric propulsion  

SciTech Connect

A potassium-Rankine power conversion system model was developed under Contract No. NAS3-25808 for the NASA-LeRC. This model predicts potassium-Rankine performance for turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) from 1200 - 1600 K, TIT to condenser temperature ratios from 1.25-1.6, power levels from 100 to 10,000 kWe, and lifetimes from 2-10 years. The model is for a Rankine cycle with reheat for turbine stage moisture control. The model assumes heat is supplied from a lithium heat transport loop. The model does not include a heat source or a condenser/heat rejection system model. These must be supplied by the user.

Johnson, G.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process  

SciTech Connect

A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

An efficient parallel algorithm for matrix-vector multiplication  

SciTech Connect

The multiplication of a vector by a matrix is the kernel computation of many algorithms in scientific computation. A fast parallel algorithm for this calculation is therefore necessary if one is to make full use of the new generation of parallel supercomputers. This paper presents a high performance, parallel matrix-vector multiplication algorithm that is particularly well suited to hypercube multiprocessors. For an n x n matrix on p processors, the communication cost of this algorithm is O(n/[radical]p + log(p)), independent of the matrix sparsity pattern. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by employing it as the kernel in the well-known NAS conjugate gradient benchmark, where a run time of 6.09 seconds was observed. This is the best published performance on this benchmark achieved to date using a massively parallel supercomputer.

Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.; Plimpton, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Land use and macroclimate in Presidio County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 'igg0 "rom cire 13ex, r District arid; =-. formally or ger:ised. In 1875. 'I'hc?o(ee is derived !rem P -esidio dc-. . l N rte, as it r!as c;el I ed 'cy the Spani=h cxplorers, meaning gateuey on. Rio Craiide. 'I'hc county is loc:i, i. cl in the Trar... completion o. two major higtways. Cne of these routes, FN 170 or El Carnino del Rio, nas been completed. from Presidio to the Big Bend National Park. Money has beer acorcpriated to complete thi- road to El Paso, thereby pzoviding a. I'ighway from t'?e west...

Ellermeier, Duane Carl

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 16320 of 26,764 results. 11 - 16320 of 26,764 results. Article Statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on the National Academy of Sciences Report: Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Washington, DC - Late yesterday the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) National Research Council issued a report titled: Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership.... http://energy.gov/articles/statement-secretary-energy-samuel-w-bodman-national-academy-sciences-report-review-research Article Celebrating Achievement and Potential at the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers Thirteen winners were recently announced - 11 supported by the Energy Department's Office of Science and two supported by the Department's

392

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration FAA Air Traffic Organization Presented to: Department of Energy Presented by: Mark DeNicuolo, Manager, Performance & Analyses, FAA ATO Safety and Technical Training Date: September 20, 2012 Safety Management 2 * Approximately 50,000 flights per day * En Route centers handle 40.5 million aircraft per year * FAA/contract towers handle: - 51.2 million airport operations - 39 million instrument operations * 732 million passenger enplanements * Over 5,000 civil, public-use airports * Approximately 33,300 ATO employees - More than 15,000 air traffic controllers - More than 7,000 technicians and engineers * 21 ARTCCs, 513 ATCTs, 17 FSSs, 3 AFSSs National Airspace System (NAS) 3 Discipline Domains En Route Terminal FSS Support NDP Totals

393

Feature - Fuel Economy for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Report Looks at Fuel Economy for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles New Report Looks at Fuel Economy for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles heavy duty trucks Argonne researcher Aymeric Rousseau was part of a National Academy of Science (NAS) committee established to make recommendations on improving and regulating fuel consumption for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. On March 31, the committee issued a report that evaluates various technologies and methods that could improve the fuel economy of these vehicles. As a system analysis engineer at Argonne's Center for Transportation Research, Rousseau contributed his expertise on vehicle modeling and simulation to the committee, which was comprised of 19 members from industry, research organizations and academia. Rousseau, who leads the development of Argonne's PSAT and Autonomie software tools, helped the committee determine how modeling and simulation tools can be used to:

394

Factors controlling naphthenic acid corrosion  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory study was conducted to elucidate the influence of chemical and physical parameters on corrosion of type 1018 carbon steel (CS, UNS G10180) and 5% Cr-0.5% Mo steel in oils containing naphthenic acids (NAs) for application to crude oil refinery systems. Effects of test duration, temperature, and acid concentration were assessed for a range of single acids of varying carbon numbers and for NA mixtures in mineral oil (MO) and in heavy vacuum gas oil (HGVO). In addition, a limited study of the effect of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) addition to the acid-oil mixture was conducted. Use of the total acid number (TAN) as a measure of corrosiveness of a crude oil was discredited further. For the same TAN value, molecular size and structure of the acid were shown to have an important influence. Tests conducted in HGVO showed lower corrosion rates than in MO, suggesting inhibition caused by S species in the oil or the steric hindrance of naphtheno-aromatic acids. In oil containing the mixture of NAs, the corrosion rate of type 1018 CS was lower than that for 5% Cr-0.5% Mo steel. The 0.1% H{sub 2}S that passed through the acid-oil mixtures had an inhibiting effect on corrosion. Predicting corrosiveness of a crude oil from the measurement of TAN, distribution of NA composition, and S content and form was particularly challenging. The simple tests used were informative, but further work will be required to establish a standard test method that can provide an adequate ranking of crudes.

Turnbull, A. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom); Slavcheva, E. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Shone, B. [Ty Isa, Nr Mold (United Kingdom)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energy’s Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.?

Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

SOLIDS PRECIPITATION EVENT IN MCU CAUSAL ANALYSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM SOLIDS RECOVERY TEAM  

SciTech Connect

A process upset occurred in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility on April 6th, 2014. During recovery efforts, a significant amount of solids were found in the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Salt Solution Receipt Tanks (SSRTs), two extraction contactors, and scrub contactors. The solids were identified by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as primarily sodium oxalate and sodium alumina silicate (NAS) with the presence of some aluminum hydroxide. NAS solids have been present in the SSFT since simulant runs during cold chemical startup of MCU in 2007, and have not hindered operations since that time. During the process upset in April 2014, the oxalate solids partially blocked the aqueous outlet of the extraction contactors, causing salt solution to exit through the contactor organic outlet to the scrub contactors with the organic phase. This salt solution overwhelmed the scrub contactors and passed with the organic phase to the strip section of MCU. The partially reversed flow of salt solution resulted in a Strip Effluent (SE) stream that was high in Isopar™ L, pH and sodium. The primary cause of the excessive solids accumulation in the SSRTs and SSFT at MCU is attributed to an increase in the frequency of oxalic acid cleaning of the 512-S primary filter. Agitation in the SSRTs at MCU in response to cold weather likely provided the primary mechanism to transfer the solids to the contactors. Sources of the sodium oxalate solids are attributed to the oxalic acid cleaning solution used to clean the primary filter at the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) filtration at 512-S, as well as precipitation from the salt batch feed, which is at or near oxalate saturation. The Solids Recovery Team was formed to determine the cause of the solids formation and develop recommendations to prevent or mitigate this event in the future. A total of 53 recommendations were generated. These recommendations were organized into 4 focus areas: • Improve understanding of oxalate equilibrium and kinetics in salt solutions • Reduction/elimination of oxalic acid cleaning in 512-S • Flowsheet optimization • Improving diagnostic capability The recommendations implemented prior to resumption of MCU operations provide a risk mitigation or detection function through additional sampling and observation. The longer term recommendations provide a framework to increase the basic process knowledge of both oxalate chemistry and filtration behavior and then facilitate decisions that improve the salt flowsheet as a system.

Garrison, A.; Aponte, C.

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Navy Techval Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACTIVITY NAME ACTIVITY NAME Navy Techval Program Technology Deployment Working Group May 23, 2012 Paul Kistler, PE CEM NAVFAC Engineering Service Center Port Hueneme CA Navy Techval Magnetic Bearing Chiller Compressor What is it, how does it work? Data from projects Where does it work best? 3 Navy Techval Drawing courtesy of Danfoss Turbocor Compressors, Inc. The Magnetic Bearing Chiller Compressor at a Glance 4 2 ea. 60 ton chiller compressors with magnetic bearings NAS Jacksonville FL Navy Techval 5 Navy Techval 6 Navy Techval Compressor Efficacy Plant Efficacy Average Load Average Compressor Power Cooling Tower Power Plant Power New .57 kW/ton .61 kW/ton 75.4 ton 45.9kW 2.44kW 48.3 kW Existing 1.02 kW/ton 1.04 kW/ton 76.7 ton 78.5kW 1.55kW 80.1 kW

398

J. Lloyd,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

63 a 484. 63 a 484. 1 Ecofisiologia de Floresta e Vegetação de Savana J. Lloyd, 1 M. L. Goulden, 2 J.P. Ometto, 3 S. Patiño, 4 N.M. Fyllas, 1 e C.A. Quesada 5 As características ecofisiológicas da vegetação de floresta e savana são comparadas na tentativa de entender como as diferenças fisiológicas próprias de cada bioma e entre esses tipos de vegetação se relacionam com suas distribuições geográficas. Uma simples ordenação mostra, primeiramente, que embora a precipitação exerça um efeito chave nas distribuições da vegetação amazônica, as características do solo são também importantes. Em particular, descobriu-se que, em regimes similares de precipitação, as florestas decíduas tendem a ocorrer em solos mais férteis do que os tipos de vegetação de savana. Um subsolo de alto

399

Oliver L. Phillips,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

73 a 387. 73 a 387. 1 Mudanças na Biomassa, Dinâmica e Composição da Floresta Amazônica, 1980 - 2002 Oliver L. Phillips, 1 Niro Higuchi, 2 Simone Vieira, 3 Timothy R. Baker, 1 Kuo-Jung Chao, 1 e Simon L. Lewis 1 O monitoramento de longo prazo de parcelas florestais distribuídas ao longo da Amazônia fornece uma poderosa forma de se quantificar os estoques e fluxos de biomassa e biodiversidade. Neste capítulo, examinamos as evidências de mudanças associadas à estrutura, dinâmica e composição funcional de florestas amazônicas maduras nas últimas décadas. As florestas maduras têm, como um todo, adquirido biomassa e apresentado dinâmica e crescimento acelerados, mas as questões sobre a persistência dessas mudanças de longo prazo permanecem. Em razão de o crescimento

400

Yadvinder Malhi,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

55 a 371. 55 a 371. 1 Produção, Estoques e Fluxo de Carbono nas Florestas Amazônicas Yadvinder Malhi, 1 Sassan Saatchi, 2 Cecile Girardin, 1 Luiz E. O. C. Aragão 1 Os estoques de carbono e a dinâmica de florestas tropicais são assunto de interesse de importantes políticas científicas internacionais. A pesquisa associada ao Experimento de Grande Escala da Biosfera-Atmosfera na Amazônia (LBA) gerou avanços substanciais para o entendimento da ciclagem de carbono em sítios selecionados de florestas da Amazônia brasileira e produziu novos resultados sobre o modo como esses processos podem variar através da vasta região amazônica. Relatamos aqui aspectos desse novo entendimento. Apresentamos, em particular, uma síntese abrangente do ciclo do carbono em três sítios focais do LBA (Manaus, Tapajós e

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401

Regeneração de Floresta Secundária Eric A. Davidson Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

299 a 309. 299 a 309. 1 Limitações de Nutrientes para a Regeneração de Floresta Secundária Eric A. Davidson Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA Luiz A. Martinelli CENA, Universidade de São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brasil Os solos antigos, altamente intemperizados, de florestas de planície na Bacia Amazônica em geral mostram ciclos conservativos de P e ciclos "frouxos" de N. Essa generalização se aplica às florestas maduras, mas a aceleração da mudança no uso da terra está alterando as paisagens da Amazônia. Aproximadamente 16% da área original de floresta foram desmatados e cerca de 160.000 km 2 são cobertos por vegetação secundária. As florestas secundárias são comuns nas regiões agrícolas, mas poucas permanecem por muito mais de

402

A Distribuição Espacial e Variabilidade Interanual do Fogo na Amazônia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 a 60. 3 a 60. 1 A Distribuição Espacial e Variabilidade Interanual do Fogo na Amazônia Wilfrid Schroeder, 1 Ane Alencar, 2 Eugênio Arima, 3 e Alberto Setzer 4 Evidências a partir de observações de carvão sugerem baixa frequência de eventos de fogo causadores de alteração das florestas amazônicas no período anterior ao século vinte. Entretanto, a distribuição espacial e temporal do fogo mudou drasticamente nas últimas décadas. O fogo tornou-se uma das forças motrizes do uso da terra e da mudança da cobertura vegetal na Amazônia. A crescente intervenção humana na região, juntamente com anomalias climáticas, expuseram as florestas tropicais a um número sem precedentes de fogos em vegetação com consequências importantes para o funcionamento do complexo sistema

403

Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Supply and Emerging Resources Future Supply and Emerging Resources The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program - Graduate Fellowship Program Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship Program Jeffrey James Marlow, a graduate student in Geobiology at the California Institute of Technology, was recently selected as the 2012 recipient of the NETL-National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Methane Hydrate Research Fellowship. Please see page 15 of the March 2013 issue (Vol. 13, Issue 1) of Fire in the Ice for more information on the recipient. The Department of Energy has a long history of building synergistic relationships with research universities. Funding academic research is a "win-win-win" situation. The U.S. government is able to tap into some of the best minds available for solving national energy problems, the universities get the support they need to maintain cutting edge faculty and laboratories, and the students involved are provided with opportunities that help them along their chosen path of study, strengthening the national pool of scientists and engineers. According to Samuel Bodman, speaking about graduate research in methane hydrates, "Students are the foundation of our energy future, bringing new ideas and fresh perspectives to the energy industry. What better way to assure technology innovation than to encourage students working on the development of a resource that has the potential to tip our energy balance toward clean-burning, domestic fuels."

404

Navy Techval Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ACTIVITY NAME ACTIVITY NAME Navy Techval Program Technology Deployment Working Group May 23, 2012 Paul Kistler, PE CEM NAVFAC Engineering Service Center Port Hueneme CA Navy Techval Magnetic Bearing Chiller Compressor What is it, how does it work? Data from projects Where does it work best? 3 Navy Techval Drawing courtesy of Danfoss Turbocor Compressors, Inc. The Magnetic Bearing Chiller Compressor at a Glance 4 2 ea. 60 ton chiller compressors with magnetic bearings NAS Jacksonville FL Navy Techval 5 Navy Techval 6 Navy Techval Compressor Efficacy Plant Efficacy Average Load Average Compressor Power Cooling Tower Power Plant Power New .57 kW/ton .61 kW/ton 75.4 ton 45.9kW 2.44kW 48.3 kW Existing 1.02 kW/ton 1.04 kW/ton 76.7 ton 78.5kW 1.55kW 80.1 kW

405

FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Destin, FL | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Destin, FL Destin, FL FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Destin, FL October 7, 2013 - 2:56pm Addthis Going coastal for energy efficiency. FUPWG. April 15-16, 2008, Destin, Florida Gulf Power: A Southern Company FEMP logo April 15-16, 2008 Hosted by Gulf Power Monday, April 14, 2008 6:30 pm Steering Committee Meeting & Networking Dinner Ocean Club 8955 US Highway 98 W Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Tuesday, April 15, 2008 7:45 - 8:30 am Registration and Continental Breakfast 8:30 - 8:45 am Gulf Power Welcome P. Bernard Jacob, Customer Operations Vice President 8:45 - 9:15 am FEMP Welcome David McAndrew, FEMP 9:15 - 10:00 am Washington Update David McAndrew, FEMP 10:00 - 10:30 am Technology Update Paul Kistler 10:30 - 11:00 am Networking Break & New Member Mentor Introductions 11:00 - 11:30 am Gulf Power Success Story - NAS Chiller Replacement

406

M S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

% % "s .J' /:, * & 1 $&; i e' 3 ' M S , 4- Monthly Report / hw4~ 3. SuhumaP @&gstlo~ (5. S&umxr, C. Smnson) 3ik&wd.on of xllymaloy rod3 Qnd berylll~ ahapes ma conductf3d at Rew3x3 Brass and Copper co. 0.. i7-Lm .3 6, 194.6. One pure bwylUm L&" billet m m &r&d into a 1 l/8' * rod and one pure beryllium #' billet n-as extrLlc-!c?c into 1,53om disn. PC& Ro5ults V"mv3 good. Two pm0 bcrylliwn cp billets andc

407

LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 8  

SciTech Connect

Contents include articles entitled: Chem-Nuclear documents new plan for Barnwell; Nebraska releases technical analysis of LLRW facility; Southeast Compact suspends funding for NC facility development; NC governor and Southeast Compact differ on proposed MOU; Midwest Compact to return export fees; State legislators` group revises radioactive waste policy; Internal documents discuss administration`s policy on Ward Valley; BLM issues EA for Ward Valley testing; California DHS, NRC criticize DOI`s testing protocols; Army removes training mines from Ward Valley site; The 1997 gubernatorial elections and a look ahead to 1998; Court throws out case challenging Pennsylvania`s siting law; DOE files notice of appeal in WCS suit; Central Compact moves to dismiss ``Veto`` authority suit; Congress exempts NAS from FACA; Judge sets schedule for Ward Valley case; Court won`t order DOE to accept spent fuel by deadline; NRC chairman expresses concern re CERCLA reauthorization; Senators question EPA`s guidance on remediation; EPA issues guidance, criticizes NRC decommissioning rule; Members of Congress clarify FUSRAP transfer; HLW legislation passes House by wide margin; Takings legislation passes House; Energy and water bill signed into law; and Senate confirms 5 of 6 DOE appointees.

Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Electrical energy storage systems: A comparative life cycle cost analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Large-scale deployment of intermittent renewable energy (namely wind energy and solar PV) may entail new challenges in power systems and more volatility in power prices in liberalized electricity markets. Energy storage can diminish this imbalance, relieving the grid congestion, and promoting distributed generation. The economic implications of grid-scale electrical energy storage technologies are however obscure for the experts, power grid operators, regulators, and power producers. A meticulous techno-economic or cost-benefit analysis of electricity storage systems requires consistent, updated cost data and a holistic cost analysis framework. To this end, this study critically examines the existing literature in the analysis of life cycle costs of utility-scale electricity storage systems, providing an updated database for the cost elements (capital costs, operational and maintenance costs, and replacement costs). Moreover, life cycle costs and levelized cost of electricity delivered by electrical energy storage is analyzed, employing Monte Carlo method to consider uncertainties. The examined energy storage technologies include pumped hydropower storage, compressed air energy storage (CAES), flywheel, electrochemical batteries (e.g. lead–acid, NaS, Li-ion, and Ni–Cd), flow batteries (e.g. vanadium-redox), superconducting magnetic energy storage, supercapacitors, and hydrogen energy storage (power to gas technologies). The results illustrate the economy of different storage systems for three main applications: bulk energy storage, T&D support services, and frequency regulation.

Behnam Zakeri; Sanna Syri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Progress toward high-gain laser fusion  

SciTech Connect

A 1985-1986 Review of the US inertial confinement fusion program by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that five more years might be required to obtain enough data to determine the future course of the program. Since then, data from the Nova laser and from the Halite/Centurion program have resolved most of the outstanding problems identified by the NAS review. In particular, we now believe that we can produce a sufficiently uniform target; that we can keep the energy content in hot electrons and high-energy photons low enough (/approximately/1--10% of drive energy, depending on target design) and achieve enough pulse-shaping accuracy (/approximately/10%, with a dynamic range of 100:1) to keep the fuel on a near-Fermi-degenerate adiabat; that we can produce an /approximately/100-Mbar pressure pulse of sufficient uniformity (/approximately/1%), and can we control hydrodynamic instabilities so that the mix of the pusher into the hot spot is low enough to permit marginal ignition. These results are sufficiently encouraging that the US Department of Energy is planning to complete a 10-MJ laboratory microfusion facility to demonstrate high-gain ICF in the laboratory within a decade. 22 refs., 1 fig.

Storm, E.

1988-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

410

Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 4, July 1994  

SciTech Connect

This issue includes the following articles: Federal Facility Compliance Act Task Force forms mixed waste workgroup; Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety considers construction of centralized storage facility; Midwest Commission agrees on capacity limit, advisory committee; EPA responds to California site developer`s queries regarding application of air pollutant standards; county-level disqualification site screening of Pennsylvania complete; Texas Compact legislation introduced in US Senate; Generators ask court to rule in their favor on surcharge rebates lawsuit; Vermont authority and Battelle settle wetlands dispute; Eighth Circuit affirms decision in Nebraska community consent lawsuit; Nebraska court dismisses action filed by Boyd County local monitoring committee; NC authority, Chem-Nuclear, and Stowe exonerated; Senator Johnson introduces legislation to transfer Ward Valley site; Representative Dingell writes to Clinton regarding disposal of low-level radioactive waste; NAS committee on California site convenes; NRC to improve public petition process; NRC releases draft proposed rule on criteria for decontamination and closure of NRC-licensed facilities; and EPA names first environmental justice federal advisory council.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Liquid-Metal Electrode to Enable Ultra-Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

Metal electrodes have a high capacity for energy storage but have found limited applications in batteries because of dendrite formation and other problems. In this paper, we report a new alloying strategy that can significantly reduce the melting temperature and improve wetting with the electrolyte to allow the use of liquid metal as anode in sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) at much lower temperatures (e.g., 95 to 175°C). Commercial NBBs such as sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries typically operate at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 300-350°C) due to poor wettability of sodium on the surface of ?"-Al2O3. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that Na-Cs alloy can replace pure sodium as the anode material, which provides a significant improvement in wettability, particularly at lower temperatures (i.e., <200°C). Single cells with the Na-Cs alloy anode exhibit excellent cycling life over those with pure sodium anode at 175 and 150°C. The cells can even operate at 95°C, which is below the melting temperature of pure sodium. These results demonstrate that NBB can be operated at ultra lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a new strategy to use liquid metal as the electrode materials for advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation on the anode.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Electric and Magnetic Fields Research and Public Information Dissemination Program annual report for fiscal year 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) Research and Public Information Dissemination (RAPID) Program was authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 as a near-term effort to expand and accelerate the research needed to address the EMF issue. As required by this legislation, the EMF Interagency Committee, the National EMF Advisory Committee (NEMFAC), and the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) are providing valued input and advice for the direction of this program. With this input and advice, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) have developed and are implementing five-year program plans. Multi-year health effects research projects and related EMF measurement and exposure assessment projects are underway using funds appropriated in fiscal years 1994, 1995, and 1996 together with voluntary non-Federal contributions. The results of these research projects, along with the results of other EMF research, will be used as input to the hazard evaluation effort, which is the focus of the EMF RAPID Program. A coordinated interagency program is underway to communicate needed information on the EMF issue in a clear manner to the public and other decision makers.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Summary of scientific investigations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The scientific issues concerning disposal of radioactive wastes in salt formations have received 40 years of attention since the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) first addressed this issue in the mid-50s. For the last 21 years, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have directed site specific studies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This paper will focus primarily on the WIPP scientific studies now in their concluding stages, the major scientific controversies regarding the site, and some of the surprises encountered during the course of these scientific investigations. The WIPP project`s present understanding of the scientific processes involved continues to support the site as a satisfactory, safe location for the disposal of defense-related transuranic waste and one which will be shown to be in compliance with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. Compliance will be evaluated by incorporating data from these experiments into Performance Assessment (PA) models developed to describe the physical and chemical processes that could occur at the WIPP during the next 10,000 years under a variety of scenarios. The resulting compliance document is scheduled to be presented to the EPA in October 1996 and all relevant information from scientific studies will be included in this application and the supporting analyses. Studies supporting this compliance application conclude the major period of scientific investigation for the WIPP. Further studies will be of a ``confirmatory`` and monitoring nature.

Weart, W.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energy Storage for Variable Renewable Energy Resource Integration - A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the following key questions in the discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid: a) what will be the future balancing requirement to accommodate a simulated expansion of wind energy resources from 3.3 GW in 2008 to 14.4 GW in 2019 in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP), and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting the balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP). A life-cycle analysis was performed to assess the least-cost technology option for meeting the new balancing requirement. The technologies considered in this study include conventional turbines (CT), sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries, lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries, pumped hydro energy storage (PH), and demand response (DR). Hybrid concepts that combine 2 or more of the technologies above are also evaluated. This analysis was performed with collaboration by the Bonneville Power Administration and funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Guo, Xinxin; Nguyen, Tony B.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

415

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Jeff Tappen; M.A. Wasiolek; D.W. Wu; J.F. Schmitt

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

416

Biosphere Modeling and Analyses in Support of Total System Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established the obligations of and the relationship between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the management and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. In 1985, the EPA promulgated regulations that included a definition of performance assessment that did not consider potential dose to a member of the general public. This definition would influence the scope of activities conducted by DOE in support of the total system performance assessment program until 1995. The release of a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the technical basis for a Yucca Mountain-specific standard provided the impetus for the DOE to initiate activities that would consider the attributes of the biosphere, i.e. that portion of the earth where living things, including man, exist and interact with the environment around them. The evolution of NRC and EPA Yucca Mountain-specific regulations, originally proposed in 1999, was critical to the development and integration of biosphere modeling and analyses into the total system performance assessment program. These proposed regulations initially differed in the conceptual representation of the receptor of interest to be considered in assessing performance. The publication in 2001 of final regulations in which the NRC adopted standard will permit the continued improvement and refinement of biosphere modeling and analyses activities in support of assessment activities.

Tappen, J. J.; Wasiolek, M. A.; Wu, D. W.; Schmitt, J. F.; Smith, A. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

Advanced Materials for Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries: Status, Challenges and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect

The increasing penetration of renewable energy and the trend toward clean, efficient transportation have spurred growing interests in sodium-beta alumina batteries that store electrical energy via sodium ion transport across a ?"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte at elevated temperatures (typically 300~350°C). Currently, the negative electrode or anode is metallic sodium in molten state during battery operation; the positive electrode or cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). Since the groundbreaking works in the sodium-beta alumina batteries a few decades ago, encouraging progress has been achieved in improving battery performance, along with cost reduction. However there remain issues that hinder broad applications and market penetration of the technologies. To better the Na-beta alumina technologies require further advancement in materials along with component and system design and engineering. This paper offers a comprehensive review on materials of electrodes and electrolytes for the Na-beta alumina batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Xia, Guanguang; Lemmon, John P.; Yang, Zhenguo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Hyperactivated Motility of Stallion Spermatozoa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s t s of chan ges t o t he s perm pl as m a m em brane, c yt os ol and a xonem al s t ruct ures , i ncl u di ng i ncreas ed p rot ei n t yros i ne phos phor yl at i on (P Y, [ 9 ] ), i ncre as ed i nt ra cel l ul ar pH [ 10 - 13 ] , i ncreas ed i nt racel l... ] . B i carbonat e s t i m ul at es t he prot ei n ki nas e A pat hw a y vi a s t i m ul at i on of t he s perm s ol ubl e aden yl at e c yc l as e and product i on o f cAM P [ 27 ] and a l s o fac i l i t at es an i ncreas e i n m e di um pH, whi ch...

Loux, Shavahn C

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

419

Realizacao domestica e escolar de foto e video 3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

English: Industry does not give attention to the small domestic or professional market of digital technologies for 3D images. What was done on the XX century by using photographic film is not know available to the common people, though the facilities are even better. Some technique developed in Brasil twenty years ago and the use of conventional domestic photo or video cameras allows fot making pictures and films at home by using digital conversions for editing, and two-color goggles. The anaglyphic technique, the same NASA employs to show Mars images to the public, is not employed in Brazil yet. We must analize the reasons for that. Portugues: A industria nao tem dado atencao ao mercado domestico ou profissional de pequena escala nas novas tecnologias digitais para imagem 3D. O que foi feito ao longo do seculo XX usando filme fotografico nao esta hoje ao alcance das pessoas, sendo que a facilidade de uso e muito maior. Tecnicas desenvolvidas no Brasil ha mais de vinte anos, e o uso de simples cameras convencionais de fotografia e video permitem realizar fotos e filmes caseiros por meio de conversoes digitais na edicao e o uso de oculos bicolor. A tecnica anagifica, a mesma que a NASA usa para mostrar ao publico as imagens de Marte, por exemplo, nao teve espaco no Brasil ainda. Devemos analisar os motivos que podem estar influenciando e os caminhos para mudar isso.

Jose J. Lunazzi

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

420

Development and evaluation of probability density functions for a set of human exposure factors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to describe efforts carried out during 1998 and 1999 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to assist the U.S. EPA in developing and ranking the robustness of a set of default probability distributions for exposure assessment factors. Among the current needs of the exposure-assessment community is the need to provide data for linking exposure, dose, and health information in ways that improve environmental surveillance, improve predictive models, and enhance risk assessment and risk management (NAS, 1994). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) plays a lead role in developing national guidance and planning future activities that support the EPA Superfund Program. OERR is in the process of updating its 1989 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS) as part of the EPA Superfund reform activities. Volume III of RAGS, when completed in 1999 will provide guidance for conducting probabilistic risk assessments. This revised document will contain technical information including probability density functions (PDFs) and methods used to develop and evaluate these PDFs. The PDFs provided in this EPA document are limited to those relating to exposure factors.

Maddalena, R.L.; McKone, T.E.; Bodnar, A.; Jacobson, J.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Hp-41CV flight performance advisory system (FPAS) for the E-2c, E-2B, and C-2A aircraft. Final technical report Apr-Jun 82  

SciTech Connect

This report describes follow-on work performed under the auspices of AE 4900, Directed Studies in Aeronautical Engineering at the Naval Postgraduate School, to complement the original design of a Flight Performance Advisory System (FPAS) for the E-2C aircraft. The original design fulfilled the requirements of AE 3001, Aircraft Energy Conservation. AE 3001, offered in the Fall Quarter 1981, and conducted by Professor Allen E. Fuhs, was sponsored in part by the Naval Air Development Center (NADC). NADC desired to obtain the input of several fleet experienced aviators in order to design program code for the HP-41CV handheld, programmable calculator that would benefit pilots by providing them with fuel efficiency parameters in flight. Calculators were made available to the participants with the proviso that a completed and operable code for each aircraft be submitted by the end of the academic quarter, September 1981. Upon completion of the E-2C program, attempts were made to use the calculator in flight. One test was conducted informally in an E-2C at RVAW-110, NAS Miramar. Unfortunately, the voltage field induced in the cockpit by the main lobe of the radar passing over the cockpit caused the calculator to cease functioning. The need to devise shielding for the calculator, plus the desire to simplify and improve the existing code lead to this effort.

Ferrell, D.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Power management of hybrid micro-grid system by a generic centralized supervisory control scheme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a generic centralized supervisory control scheme for the power management of multiple power converters based hybrid micro-grid system. The system consists of wind generators, photovoltaic system, multiple parallel connected power converters, utility grid, ac and dc loads. Power management of the micro-grid is performed under two cases: grid mode and local mode. Central supervisory unit (CSU) generates command signal to ensure the power management during the two modes. In local mode, the dc loads in the ac–dc hybrid system can be controlled. In the case of grid mode operation, power flow between the utility grid and micro-grid is controlled. A novel feature of this paper is the incorporation of the multiple power converters. The generated command signal from the CSU can also control the operation of the multiple power converters in both grid and local modes. An additional feature is the incorporation of sodium sulfur battery energy storage system (NAS BESS) which is used to smooth the output power fluctuation of the wind farm. The effectiveness of the control scheme is also verified using real time load pattern. The simulation is performed in PSCAD/EMTDC.

Mir Nahidul Ambia; Ahmed Al-Durra; Cedric Caruana; S.M. Muyeen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Job Pause Service under LAM/MPI+BLCR for Transparent Fault Tolerance  

SciTech Connect

Checkpoint/restart (C/R) has become a requirement for long-running jobs in large-scale clusters due to a meantime- to-failure (MTTF) in the order of hours. After a failure, C/R mechanisms generally require a complete restart of an MPI job from the last checkpoint. A complete restart, however, is unnecessary since all but one node are typically still alive. Furthermore, a restart may result in lengthy job requeuing even though the original job had not exceeded its time quantum. In this paper, we overcome these shortcomings. Instead of job restart, we have developed a transparent mechanism for job pause within LAM/MPI+BLCR. This mechanism allows live nodes to remain active and roll back to the last checkpoint while failed nodes are dynamically replaced by spares before resuming from the last checkpoint. Our methodology includes LAM/MPI enhancements in support of scalable group communicationwith fluctuating number of nodes, reuse of network connections, transparent coordinated checkpoint scheduling and a BLCR enhancement for job pause. Experiments in a cluster with the NAS Parallel Benchmark suite show that our overhead for job pause is comparable to that of a complete job restart. A minimal overhead of 5.6% is only incurred in case migration takes place while the regular checkpoint overhead remains unchanged. Yet, our approach alleviates the need to reboot the LAM run-time environment, which accounts for considerable overhead resulting in net savings of our scheme in the experiments. Our solution further provides full transparency and automation with the additional benefit of reusing existing resources. Executing continues after failures within the scheduled job, i.e., the application staging overhead is not incurred again in contrast to a restart. Our scheme offers additional potential for savings through incremental checkpointing and proactive diskless live migration, which we are currently working on.

Wang, Chao [North Carolina State University; Mueller, Frank [North Carolina State University; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Steven L [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Bandgap Engineering in High-Efficiency Multijunction Concentrator Cells  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses semiconductor device research paths under investigation with the aim of reaching the milestone efficiency of 40%. A cost analysis shows that achieving very high cell efficiencies is crucial for the realization of cost-effective photovoltaics, because of the strongly leveraging effect of efficiency on module packaging and balance-of systems costs. Lattice-matched (LM) GaInP/ GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cells have achieved the highest independently confirmed efficiency at 175 suns, 25?C, of 37.3% under the standard AM1.5D, low-AOD terrestrial spectrum. Lattice-mismatched, or metamorphic (MM), materials offer still higher potential efficiencies, if the crystal quality can be maintained. Theoretical efficiencies well over 50% are possible for a MM GaInP/ 1.17-eV GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cell limited by radiative recombination at 500 suns. The bandgap - open circuit voltage offset, (Eg/q) - Voc, is used as a valuable theoretical and experimental tool to characterize multijunction cells with subcell bandgaps ranging from 0.7 to 2.1 eV. Experimental results are presented for prototype 6-junction cells employing an active {approx}1.1-eV dilute nitride GaInNAs subcell, with active-area efficiency greater than 23% and over 5.3 V open-circuit voltage under the 1-sun AM0 space spectrum. Such cell designs have theoretical efficiencies under the terrestrial spectrum at 500 suns concentration exceeding 55% efficiency, even for lattice-matched designs.

King, R. R.; Sherif, R. A.; Kinsey, G. S.; Kurtz, S.; Fetzer, C. M.; Edmondson, K. M.; Law, D. C.; Cotal, H. L.; Krut, D. D.; Ermer, J. H.; Karam, N. H.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Commercialization of New Lattice-Matched Multi-Junction Solar Cells Based on Dilute Nitrides: July 8, 2010 - March 7, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Final Technical Progress Report for PV Incubator subcontract NAT-0-99013-03. The overall objective of this Incubator subcontract was to complete the work necessary to make commercial ready solar cells using the dilute nitride technology. The specific objectives of this program were aimed at completing the development of a triple-junction solar cell that incorporates a GaInNAs {approx}1eV subcell to the point of commercial readiness, and determining the cell reliability and, if necessary, identifying and eliminating process or material related issues that lead to early-life cell failures. There were three major objectives for Phase 1, each of which focuses on a key element of the solar cell that determines its performance in a commercial CPV system. One objective was to optimize the quality and performance of the key individual components making up the solar cell structure and then to optimize the integration of these components into a complete triple-junction cell. A second objective was to design and test anti-reflective coating that maximizes the light coupled into a 3J cell with a {approx}1 eV bottom cell bandgap. The third objective was to develop Highly Accelerated Life Tests (HALT) protocols and tools for identifying and correcting potential reliability problems. The Phase 2 objectives were a continuation of the work begun in Phase 1 but aimed at optimizing cell performance for commercial requirements. Phase 2 had four primary objectives: (1) develop a glass-matched anti-reflective coating (ARC) and optimize the cell/ARC to give good performance at 60C operating temperature, (2) optimize the cell for good operation at 60C and high concentration, and (3) complete the light biased HALT system and use it to determine what, if any, failures are observed, and (4) determine the reliability limits of the optimized cell.

Herb, J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Report by a special panel of the American Nuclear Society: Protection and management of plutonium  

SciTech Connect

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) established an independent and prestigious panel several months ago to take the matter up where the US National Academy of Science (NAS) left off. The challenge was to look at the broader issue of what to do with civil plutonium, as well as excess weapons material. In terms of approach, the report focused on several short- and long-term issues. The short-term focus was on the disposition of excess weapons plutonium, while the longer-range issue concerned the disposition of the plutonium being produced in the civil nuclear fuel cycle. For the short term, the ANS panel strongly endorsed the concept that all plutonium scheduled for release from the US and Russian weapons stocks should be converted to a form that is intensively radioactive in order to protect the plutonium from theft of seizure (the spent fuel standard). However, since the conversion will at best take several years to complete, the panel has concluded that immediate emphasis should be placed on the assurance that all unconverted materials are protected as securely as when they were part of the active weapon stockpiles. More importantly, the panel also recommended prompt implementation of the so-called reactor option for disposing of surplus US and Russian weapons plutonium. The longer-term issues covered by the panel were those posed by the growing stocks of both separated plutonium and spent fuel generated in the world`s civil nuclear power programs. These issues included what fuel cycle policies should be prudently pursued in light of proliferation risks and likely future energy needs, what steps should be taken in regard to the increase in the demand for nuclear power in the future, and how civil plutonium in its various forms should be protected and managed to minimize proliferation. Overall, the panel concluded that plutonium is an energy resource that should be used and not a waste material to be disposed of.

Bengelsdorf, H. [Bengelsdorf (Harold), Bethesda, MD (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

A High Temperature Electrochemical Energy Storage System Based on Sodium Beta-Alumina Solid Electrolyte (Base)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work done during the period September 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008. Work was conducted in the following areas: (1) Fabrication of sodium beta{double_prime} alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) using a vapor phase process. (2) Mechanistic studies on the conversion of {alpha}-alumina + zirconia into beta{double_prime}-alumina + zirconia by the vapor phase process. (3) Characterization of BASE by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and conductivity measurements. (4) Design, construction and electrochemical testing of a symmetric cell containing BASE as the electrolyte and NaCl + ZnCl{sub 2} as the electrodes. (5) Design, construction, and electrochemical evaluation of Na/BASE/ZnCl{sub 2} electrochemical cells. (6) Stability studies in ZnCl{sub 2}, SnCl{sub 2}, and SnI{sub 4} (7) Design, assembly and testing of planar stacks. (8) Investigation of the effect of porous surface layers on BASE on cell resistance. The conventional process for the fabrication of sodium ion conducting beta{double_prime}-alumina involves calcination of {alpha}-alumina + Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} + LiNO{sub 3} at 1250 C, followed by sintering powder compacts in sealed containers (platinum or MgO) at {approx}1600 C. The novel vapor phase process involves first sintering a mixture of {alpha}-alumina + yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) into a dense ceramic followed by exposure to soda vapor at {approx}1450 C to convert {alpha}-alumina into beta{double_prime}-alumina. The vapor phase process leads to a high strength BASE, which is also resistant to moisture attack, unlike BASE made by the conventional process. The PI is the lead inventor of the process. Discs and tubes of BASE were fabricated in the present work. In the conventional process, sintering of BASE is accomplished by a transient liquid phase mechanism wherein the liquid phase contains NaAlO{sub 2}. Some NaAlO{sub 2} continues to remain at grain boundaries; and is the root cause of its water sensitivity. In the vapor phase process, NaAlO{sub 2} is never formed. Conversion occurs by a coupled transport of Na{sup +} through BASE formed and of O{sup 2-} through YSZ to the reaction front. Transport to the reaction front is described in terms of a chemical diffusion coefficient of Na{sub 2}O. The conversion kinetics as a function of microstructure is under investigation. The mechanism of conversion is described in this report. A number of discs and tubes of BASE have been fabricated by the vapor phase process. The material was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), before and after conversion. Conductivity (which is almost exclusively due to sodium ion transport at the temperatures of interest) was measured. Conductivity was measured using sodium-sodium tests as well as by impedance spectroscopy. Various types of both planar and tubular electrochemical cells were assembled and tested. In some cases the objective was to determine if there was any interaction between the salt and BASE. The interaction of interest was mainly ion exchange (possible replacement of sodium ion by the salt cation). It was noted that Zn{sup 2+} did not replace Na+ over the conditions of interest. For this reason much of the work was conducted with ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode salt. In the case of Sn-based, Sn{sup 2+} did ion exchange, but Sn{sup 4+} did not. This suggests that Sn{sup 4+} salts are viable candidates. These results and implications are discussed in the report. Cells made with Na as the anode and ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode were successfully charged/discharged numerous times. The key advantages of the batteries under investigation here over the Na-S batteries are: (1) Steel wool can be used in the cathode compartment unlike Na-S batteries which require expensive graphite. (2) Planar cells can be constructed in addition to tubular, allowing for greater design flexibility and integration with other devices such as planar SOFC. (3) Comparable or higher open circuit voltage (OCV) than the Na-S battery. (4) Wider operating temperature range and higher temper

Anil Virkar

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

TWRS vadose zone contamination issue expert panel report  

SciTech Connect

When members were first canvassed for participation in the Vadose Zone Expert Panel the stated purpose for convening the Panel was to review a controversial draft report, the SX Tank Farm Report. This report was produced by a DOE Grand Junction Project Office (GJPO) contractor, RUST Geotech, now MACTEC-ERS, for the DOE Richland Office (DOERL). Three meetings were planned for June, July and August, 1995 to review the draft report and to complete a Panel report by mid-September. The Expert Panel has found its efforts confounded by various non-technical issues. The Expert Panel has chosen to address some of the non-technical issues in this Preface rather than to dilute the technical discussion that follows in the body of this independent expert panel status report (Panel Report). Rather than performing a straightforward manuscript review, the Panel was asked to resolve conflicting interpretations of gamma-ray logging measurements performed in vadose zone boreholes (drywells) surrounding the high-level radioactive wastes of the SX tank farm. There are numerous and complex technical issues that must be evaluated before the vertical and radial extent of contaminant migration at the SX tank farm can be accurately assessed. When the Panel first met in early June, 1996, it quickly became apparent that the scientific and technical issues were obscured by policy and institutional affairs which have polarized discussion among various segments of the Hanford organization. This situation reflects the kinds of institutional problems described separately in reports by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS/NRC), The Hanford Tanks Environmental Impacts and Policy Choices and BmTiers to Science: Technical Management of the Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Program. The Vadose Zone Characterization Program, appears to be caught between conflicting pressures and organizational mandates, some imposed from outside DOE-RL and some self-imposed. The institutional problems they encountered include having both Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), the parent organization of the Vadose Zone Characterization Program and Environmental Restoration (ER), each under different regulatory controls and different organizational units, seeking to defend the status quo and discount many of the Panel`s conclusions and recommendations. The results presented in the SX Tank Farm Report, especially the visualizations, have created concern in the public sector, both on a local, personal level and on a national political level.

Shafer, D.S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Influência da flexibilidade e sexo na postura de escolares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ResumoObjetivo Verificar se a flexibilidade e o sexo exercem influência sobre a postura de escolares. Método Foram avaliados 60 escolares de ambos os sexos, com idade entre 5 e 14 anos, divididos em dois grupos: flexibilidade normal (n=21) e flexibilidade reduzida (n=39). A flexibilidade e a postura foram avaliadas, respectivamente, por meio da fotogrametria e do teste de elevação dos membros inferiores em extensão, considerando o ângulo da perna e a avaliação postural. Para o tratamento de dados, foi feita a estatística descritiva (média e desvio padrão). A análise de variância univariada (ANOVA) foi utilizada para verificar a influência conjunta dos fatores flexibilidade e sexo nas variáveis dependentes posturais. Após verificar efeito interativo entre esses dois fatores, procederam-se as comparações múltiplas, utilizando o teste t. Resultados A variável flexibilidade exerceu efeito sobre o ângulo de simetria do joelho (psexo não apresentou influência sobre os ângulos posturais (p>0,05). Houve interação entre as variáveis flexibilidade e sexo no ângulo de simetria do joelho (psexo masculino e flexibilidade reduzida apresentaram maior assimetria de joelho, comparados aos outros subgrupos. Conclusão A postura sofreu efeito isolado da variável flexibilidade e efeito interativo entre o sexo e a flexibilidade. AbstractObjective To evaluate whether flexibility and gender influence students’ posture. Method Evaluation of 60 female and male students, aged 5 to 14 years, divided into two groups: normal flexibility (n=21) and reduced flexibility (n=39). Flexibility and posture were assessed by photogrammetry and by the elevation of the lower limbs in extension, considering the leg angle and the postural evaluation. Descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation) were used for data analysis. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to assess the joint influence of flexibility and gender on the posture-dependent variables. After verifying an interactive effect between the variables of gender and flexibility, multiple comparisons using the t test were applied. Results Flexibility influenced the symmetry angle of the knee (p0.05). There was an interactive effect between the variables of gender and flexibility on the knee symmetry angle (p<0.02). Male students with reduced flexibility had greater asymmetry of the knee when compared to the other subgroups. Conclusion Posture was influenced by an isolated effect of the variable of flexibility and by an interactive effect between gender and flexibility.

Jerusa Jordão Coelho; Maylli Daiani Graciosa; Daiane Lazzeri de Medeiros; Sheila Cristina da Silva Pacheco; Leticia Miranda Resende da Costa; Lilian Gerdi Kittel Ries

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:03:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIP_R10-NMR_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"

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Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:02:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIP_R10-NTN_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"