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1

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating Organizations 3 Incentive and Objectives FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Objectives: Reduce the risk associated with implementing the FBSR NAS waste form as a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Conduct test with actual tank wastes Use the best science to fill key data gaps Linking previous and new results together 4 Outline FBSR NAS waste form processing scales FBSR NAS waste form data/key assumptions FBSR NAS key data gaps FBSR NAS testing program 5 FBSR NAS Waste Form Processing

2

Microsoft PowerPoint - 9-03 Jantzen FBSR EM TECH EX SLIDES-JANTZEN-PIERCE.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form For Hanford LAW and Secondary Waste C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 17, 2010 Print Close 2 FY10: Participating Organizations Print Close 3 Incentive and Objectives FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW and/or Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) Objectives:

3

Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form ...  

Clay/Coal Superheated Steam (pyrolizes organics and catalyzes mineralization) CO2, N2, H2O CRR HVAC HTF PBF Feed Tank Sand Filter or Stack DISPOSAL ...

4

(NaAlSiO4) – Malinkoite (NaBSiO4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes · Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom

5

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) PRODUCT: MONOLITH FORMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The most important requirement for Hanford's low activity waste (LAW) form for shallow land disposal is the chemical durability of the product. A secondary, but still essential specification, is the compressive strength of the material with regards to the strength of the material under shallow land disposal conditions, e.g. the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations, because the term ''near-surface disposal'' indicates disposal in the uppermost portion, or approximately the top 30 meters, of the earth's surface. The THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) mineral waste form for LAW is granular in nature because it is formed by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). As a granular product it has been shown to be as durable as Hanford's LAW glass during testing with ASTM C-1285-02 known as the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and with the Single Pass Flow Through Test (SPFT). Hanford Envelope A and Envelope C simulants both performed well during PCT and SPFT testing and during subsequent performance assessment modeling. This is partially due to the high aluminosilicate content of the mineral product which provides a natural aluminosilicate buffering mechanism that inhibits leaching and is known to occur in naturally occurring aluminosilicate mineral analogs. In order for the TTT Na-Al-Si (NAS) granular mineral product to meet the compressive strength requirements (ASTM C39) for a Hanford waste form, the granular product needs to be made into a monolith or disposed of in High Integrity Containers (HIC's). Additionally, the Hanford intruder scenario for disposal in the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) trench is mitigated as there is reduced intruder exposure when a waste form is in a monolithic form. During the preliminary testing of a monolith binder for TTT's FBSR mineral product, four parameters were monitored: (1) waste loading (not optimized for each waste form tested); (2) density; (3) compressive strength; and (4) durability must not be compromised--binding agent should not react with the NAS product and binding agent should not create an unfavorable pH environment that may cause accelerated leaching. It is the goal of the present study to survey cementitious waste forms based on Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Ceramicrete, and hydroceramic binders by correlating waste loading, density and compressive strength and then determine if these binders affect the product performance in terms of the PCT response. This will be done by making a one-to-one comparison of the PCT response measured on granular NAS mineral product (mixed bed and fines products) with the PCT response of the monolithed NAS product in the different binders. Future studies may include, refining the above binders, and examining other binders. It is likely that binders formed from kaolin would be most compatible with the chemistry of the THOR{reg_sign} mineral waste form which is made by steam reforming of kaolin and sodium rich wastes. The economics of production on a large scale have yet to be investigated for any of the binders tested.

Jantzen, C

2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating...

7

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) WITH HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES  

SciTech Connect

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

8

Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) With Hanford Low Activity Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750?C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Burket, P. R.; Bannochie, C. J.; Daniel, W. G.; Nash, C. A.; Cozzi, A. D.; Herman, C. C.

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

Single Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) Test Results of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Forms used for LAW Immobilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One such immobilization technology being considered is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) tests at various flow rates have been conducted with the granular products fabricated using these two methods. Results show that the materials exhibit a relatively low forward dissolution rate on the order of 10-3 g/(m2d) with the material made in the laboratory giving slightly higher values.

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Strandquist, Sara C.; Dage, DeNomy C.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

(FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

11

DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) WASTE FORMS  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium aqueous radioactive wastes. The addition of clay and a catalyst as co-reactants converts high sodium aqueous low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford and Idaho DOE sites to a granular ''mineralized'' waste form that may be made into a monolith form if necessary. Simulant Hanford and Idaho high sodium wastes were processed in a pilot scale FBSR at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The durability of the FBSR waste form products was tested in order to compare the measured durability to previous FBSR waste form testing on Hanford Envelope C waste forms that were made by THOR Treatment Technologies (TTT) and to compare the FBSR durability to vitreous LAW waste forms, specifically the Hanford low activity waste (LAW) glass known as the Low-activity Reference Material (LRM). The durability of the FBSR waste form is comparable to that of the LRM glass for the test responses studied.

Jantzen, C

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

12

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer System. Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) More Documents & Publications Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment

13

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWO-SPT-2007-00249 LWO-SPT-2007-00249 Rev. 1 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) For Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) November, 2007 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) LWO-SPT-2007-00249 Rev. 1 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DEA-AC09-96SR18500 and is an account of work performed under that contract. Neither the United States Department of Energy, nor WSRC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, or product or process

14

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING WITH ACUTAL HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES VERIFYING FBSR AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the cleanup mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplementary treatments being considered. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and other secondary wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates/nitrites, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, and/or radio-nuclides like I-129 and Tc-99. Radioactive testing of Savannah River LAW (Tank 50) shimmed to resemble Hanford LAW and actual Hanford LAW (SX-105 and AN-103) have produced a ceramic (mineral) waste form which is the same as the non-radioactive waste simulants tested at the engineering scale. The radioactive testing demonstrated that the FBSR process can retain the volatile radioactive components that cannot be contained at vitrification temperatures. The radioactive and nonradioactive mineral waste forms that were produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process are shown to be as durable as LAW glass.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

The NAS Parallel Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weeratunga, “The NAS Parallel Benchmarks,” Intl. Journal ofD. Simon, “NAS Par- allel Benchmark Results,” Proceedings ofD. Simon, “NAS Par- allel Benchmark Results,” IEEE Parallel

Bailey, David H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48 RADIOACTIVE WASTE SAMPLE USING FBSR TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC DESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

Hammond, C; William Pepper, W

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

17

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS MADE FROM HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE (TANK FARM BLEND) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMATION (FBSR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP’s LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at 6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanford’s blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a “tie back” between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for to

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18/10 18/10 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on November 18th, 2010. High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda Journey to Excellence Goal 2 and Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Fate of Tc99 at WTP and Current Work on Capture Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification Impacts of Feed Composition and Recycle on Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glass Mass Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification Salt Waste Processing Initiatives Recap and Conclusions to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations Tank Closure More Documents & Publications

19

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on November 18th, 2010. High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda Journey to Excellence Goal 2 and Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Fate of Tc99 at WTP and Current Work on Capture Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification Impacts of Feed Composition and Recycle on Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glass Mass Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification Salt Waste Processing Initiatives Recap and Conclusions to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations

20

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS MADE FROM HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE (TANK FARM BLEND) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMATION (FBSR)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP’s LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at <2g/m2 during ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency) durability testing. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product was investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage. Monolithing in an inorganic geopolymer binder, which is amorphous, macro-encapsulates the granules, and the monoliths pass ANSI/ANS 16.1 and ASTM C1308 durability testing with Re achieving a Leach Index (LI) of 9 (the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, IDF, criteria for Tc-99) after a few days and Na achieving an LI of >6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanford’s blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a “tie back” between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for to

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

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21

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS MADE FROM HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE (TANK SX-105, TANK AN-103, AND AZ-101/102) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMATION (FBSR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is a robust technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes. Applications have been tested at the pilot scale for the high sodium, sulfate, halide, organic and nitrate wastes at the Hanford site, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). Due to the moderate processing temperatures, halides, sulfates, and technetium are retained in mineral phases of the feldspathoid family (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite, etc). The feldspathoid minerals bind the contaminants such as Tc-99 in cage (sodalite, nosean) or ring (nepheline) structures to surrounding aluminosilicate tetrahedra in the feldspathoid structures. The granular FBSR mineral waste form that is produced has a comparable durability to LAW glass based on the short term PCT testing in this study, the INL studies, SPFT and PUF testing from previous studies as given in the columns in Table 1-3 that represent the various durability tests. Monolithing of the granular product was shown to be feasible in a separate study. Macro-encapsulating the granular product provides a decrease in leaching compared to the FBSR granular product when the geopolymer is correctly formulated.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Hall, H.; Miller, D.; Missimer, D.; Nash, C.; Williams, F.

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

22

Preparation and initial characterization of fluidized bed steam reforming pure-phase standards  

SciTech Connect

Hanford is investigating the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process for their Low Activity Waste. The FBSR process offers a low-temperature continuous method by which liquid waste can be processed with the addition of clay into a sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form. The NAS waste form is mainly comprised of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}), sodalite (Na{sub 8}[AlSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}Cl{sub 2}), and nosean (Na{sub 8}[AlSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}SO{sub 4}). Anions such as perrhenate (ReO{sub 4}{sup -}), pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}), and iodine (I{sup -}) are expected to replace sulfate in the nosean structure and/or chloride in the sodalite mineral structure (atomically bonded inside the aluminosilicate cages that these mineral structures possess). In the FBSR waste form, each of these phases can exist in a variety of solid solutions that differ from the idealized forms observed in single crystals in nature. The lack of understanding of the durability of these stoichiometric or idealized mineral phases complicates the ability to deconvolute the durability of the mixed phase FBSR product since it is a combination of different NAS phases. To better understand the behavior, fabrication and testing of the individual phases of the FBSR product is required. Analytical Development (AD) of the Science and Technology directorate of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to prepare the series of phase-pure standards, consisting of nepheline, nosean, and Cl, Re, and I sodalite. Once prepared, X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to confirm the products were phase pure. These standards are being used for subsequent characterization studies consisting of the following: single-pass flow-through (SPFT) testing, development of thermodynamic data, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) calibration curves. In addition to the above mentioned phase-pure standards, AD was tasked with fabricating a mixed Tc-Re sodalite.

Missimer, D. M.; Rutherford, R. L.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

24

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO4, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

UESC Success Stories at NAS Pensacola  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 2008 April 2008 NAVFAC Southeast - PWD UESC Success Stories @ NAS Pensacola - Andy Saleh, PE (REM, Sain Engineering Associates) - Alice Oberhausen (Contracting Officer, NAVFAC Pensacola) April 15, 2008 2 UESC (9 Step) Process enabled by BOAs with Gulf Power (electric) and Energy Services of Pensacola (natural gas) Project identified and / or initiated by - Billing Analysis Walkthrough Audit Tenant Request

26

Best Practice Guidelines for Deploying NAS Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report was developed to provide guidelines for a utility to consider when deploying a sodium sulfur (NAS) battery system in a distribution network. Two utilities have completed NAS battery deployments in load peak-shaving applications and several other applications are currently in process.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

27

Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Battery Research in Korea: Part II ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The activities of sodium sulfur (NaS) battery research in Korea ... The presentation was focused on the development of tubular NaS batteries ...

28

Advanced Intermediate-Temperature Na-S Battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we reported an intermediate-temperature (~150°C) sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery. With a reduced operating temperature, this novel battery can potentially reduce the cost and safety issues associated with the conventional high-temperature (300~350°C) Na-S battery. A dense ?"-Al2O3 solid membrane and tetraglyme were utilized as the electrolyte separator and catholyte solvent in this battery. Solubility tests indicated that cathode mixture of Na2S4 and S exhibited extremely high solubility in tetraglyme (e.g., > 4.1 M for Na2S4 + 4 S). CV scans of Na2S4 in tetraglyme revealed two pairs of redox couples with peaks at around 2.22 and 1.75 V, corresponding to the redox reactions of polysulfide species. The discharge/charge profiles of the Na-S battery showed a slope region and a plateau, indicating multiple steps and cell reactions. In-situ Raman measurements during battery operation suggested that polysulfide species were formed in the sequence of Na2S5 + S ? Na2S5 + Na2S4? Na2S4 + Na2S2 during discharge and in a reverse order during charge. This battery showed dramatic improvement in rate capacity and cycling stability over room-temperature Na-S batteries, which makes it attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Kirby, Brent W.; Xu, Wu; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo (Gary)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

NAS Battery Distributed Energy Storage System Best Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility transmission and distribution (T&D) systems require extensive investment for upkeep. In addition, load growth over time increases the possibility of overload conditions, or loss of load, which may require upgrades to guard against these contingency events. In some situations, installation of sodium-sulfur (NAS) energy storage systems may solve a capacity shortfall and defer the need for an upgrade. Such installations can improve system reliability and customer service, while reducing the economic...

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

30

High electron mobility in Ga(In)NAs films grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the highest mobility values above 2000 cm{sup 2}/Vs in Si doped GaNAs film grown by molecular beam epitaxy. To understand the feature of the origin which limits the electron mobility in GaNAs, temperature dependences of mobility were measured for high mobility GaNAs and referential low mobility GaInNAs. Temperature dependent mobility for high mobility GaNAs is similar to the GaAs case, while that for low mobility GaInNAs shows large decrease in lower temperature region. The electron mobility of high quality GaNAs can be explained by intrinsic limiting factor of random alloy scattering and extrinsic factor of ionized impurity scattering.

Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Okada, Yoshitaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Inagaki, Makoto [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8511, Aichi (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masafumi [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8511, Aichi (Japan)

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

NAS Miramar Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell demonstration status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Part of M-C Power`s Technology Development Program, this MCFC power plant is designed to supply 250 kW of electricity to Naval Air Station (NAS) Miramar. It also cogenerates steam for the district heating system. The power plant is a fully integrated unit incorporating an advanced design fuel cell based on years of laboratory tests and a prior field test. This demonstration incorporates many innovative features, one of which is the plate type reformer which processes the natural gas fuel for use in the fuel cell. M-C Power Corp. has completed the design, fabrication, and conditioning of a 250-cell fuel cell stack, which was shipped to the site where it will be installed, tested, and evaluated as a 250 kW Proof-of-Concept MCFC Power Plant. (Originally going to Kaiser Permanente`s Sand Diego Medical Center, it was relocated to Miramar.)

Scroppo, J.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Battery Energy Storage System - 2006 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries have begun to be commercialized in Japan, market development of NaS batteries in the United States has lacked a full-scale commercial demonstration. This report describes one of the first U.S. commercial NaS application efforts and details its technical aspects.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

33

GaInNAs Junctions for Next-Generation Concentrators: Progress and Prospects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We discuss progress in the development of GaInNAs junctions for application in next-generation multijunction concentrator cells. A significant development is the demonstration of near-100% internal quantum efficiencies in junctions grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Testing at high currents validates the compatibility of these devices with concentrator operation. The efficiencies of several next-generation multijunction structures incorporating these state-of-the-art GaInNAs junctions are projected.

Friedman, D. J.; Ptak, A. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Geisz, J. F.; Kiehl, J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" April 29, 2008 - 11:31am Addthis Remarks As Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Tom for that kind introduction. And I want to commend you, Norm Augustine and Chuck Vest for your continued leadership on these issues. You are powerful voices for urgent and sustained action to preserve this nation's technological preeminence - and our economic competitiveness. It's a pleasure to be here with you all, and with my good friends Margaret and Carlos. It strikes me that we are in the fortunate position of

35

Towards using and improving the NAS parallel benchmarks: a parallel patterns approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NAS parallel benchmarks, originally developed by NASA for evaluating performance of their high-performance computers, have been regarded as one of the most widely used benchmark suites for side-by-side comparisons of high-performance machines. However, ...

Vivek Kale

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

1 MW / 7.2 MWh NaS Battery Demonstration and Case Study Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New York Power Authority (NYPA), working together with the Metropolitan Transit Authority Long Island Bus (LIB) Company, has installed an advanced sodium sulfur battery energy storage system (NaS BESS) at the LIB facility located at 700 Commercial Avenue, Garden City, New York. The BESS is capable of providing a nominal 1MW of power to the bus fueling compressor station for 6-8 hours per day, 7 days per week.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

Field Trial of AEP Sodium-Sulfur (NAS) Battery Demonstration Project: Interim Report - Plant Design and Expected Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first stationary power demonstration of sodium-sulfur (NAS) batteries in the United States has been hosted by the American Electric Power Company. The battery system was co-developed by the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and NGK Insulators, Ltd. (NGK). This report defines the NAS technology, as well as the associated power conversion system (PCS) parameters and requirements that were necessary to convert the DC power from the NAS battery modules to AC power for connection to the utility grid sy...

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Improved container electrode coatings for Na/S battery systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current sodium sulfur (Na/S) battery systems utilize the fast ion conducting properties of sodium beta{double_prime}-alumina electrolyte (BASE) to create high energy density sodium-sulfur electrochemical cells which can be used as components of secondary batteries. Since the days when these cells were invented at the Ford Motor Company Scientific Laboratory by J.T. Kummer and N. Weber, problems with container electrode corrosion have troubled the Na/S systems that have been developed in the many laboratories. In an unpublished investigation carried out at the Ford Motor Company laboratory, it was shown that titanium nitride films sputter deposited onto aluminum substrates under the appropriate conditions can exhibit excellent resistance to corrosion by sodium polysulfide melts. In the work carried out here, the corrosion resistant properties of TiN coatings sputter deposited on Al substrates have been investigated. TiN sputter coated aluminum samples were tested under static conditions in sodium sulfide melts and in Na/S cells under the range of electrochemical conditions needed for battery operation. The sputter deposited coatings produced in these experiments exhibited satisfactory corrosion resistance in the static tests but degraded under full cell operation. Tests of TiN coatings deposited by reactive ion-plating (IP), a common commercial process, showed excellent corrosion and electrical performance in both static and complete cell testing. Charge/discharge testing of sulfur core cells with IP coatings for over 350 cycles to 70 % depth of discharge has shown only very minor changes in cell performance and the tests are continuing.

Hunt, T.K. [Environmental Research Institute of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Applications Development Dept.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Characterization of a Dominant Electron Trap in GaNAs Using Deep-Level Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dilute-nitrogen GaNAs epitaxial layers grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition were characterized by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). For all samples, the dominant DLTS signal corresponds to an electron trap having an activation energy of about 0.25 to 0.35 eV. The minority-carrier trap density in the p-type material is quantified based on computer simulation of the devices. The simulations show that only about 2% of the traps in the depleted layer are filled during the transient. The fraction of the traps that are filled depends strongly on the depth of the trap, but only weakly on the doping of the layers and on the conduction-band offset. The simulations provide a pathway to obtain semi-quantitative data for analysis of minority-carrier traps by DLTS.

Johnston, S. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Performance characteristics of hybrid MPI/OpenMP implementations of NAS parallel benchmarks SP and BT on large-scale multicore supercomputers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) are well-known applications with the fixed algorithms for evaluating parallel systems and tools. Multicore supercomputers provide a natural programming paradigm for hybrid programs, whereby OpenMP can be used with the ... Keywords: Hybrid MPI/OpenMP, NAS parallel benchmarks, benchmarks, multicore, performance characteristics, supercomputers

Xingfu Wu; Valerie Taylor

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

My Documents\\Presentations\\IFE\\NAS\\JCF_IFE_NAS_LANL_V4Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Slide 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Slide 1 Prospects for Inertial Fusion\\Presentations\\IFE\\NAS\\JCF_IFE_NAS_LANL_V4Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Slide 3 LANL fully supports

42

The Navy seeks to identify responsible sources and obtain information in regard to purchasing renewable power for Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, located in Fallon, NV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) for Renewable Generation REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) for Renewable Generation Opportunities at NAWS China Lake, NAS Fallon, MCAGCC 29 Palms, and MCAS Yuma The Department of Navy (DoN) intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) in early 2009 for renewable energy generation opportunities at Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake, California; Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada; Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) Twentynine Palms, California, and Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Yuma, Arizona. The DoN will consider opportunities for the purchase of renewable power, developer wholesale generation, distributed generation, and the combination of those opportunities. Specifically, the Navy will provide Government land on these installations for large

43

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1-07 Mason DOE EM Waste Processing Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plants: Studsvik Processing Facility: Ion exchange resins (45" diameter FBSR) DOE Idaho Integrated Waste Treatment Unit: SBW treatment (48" diameter FBSR) DOE...

44

DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER WASTE FORMS FOR SODIUM BEARING WASTE AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) processing of Sodium Bearing Waste simulants was performed in December 2006 by THOR{sup sm} Treatment Technologies LLC (TTT) The testing was performed at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) pilot plant facilities in Golden, CO. FBSR products from these pilot tests on simulated waste representative of the SBW at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) were subsequently transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization and leach testing. Four as-received Denitration and Mineralization Reformer (DMR) granular/powder samples and four High Temperature Filter (HTF) powder samples were received by SRNL. FBSR DMR samples had been taken from the ''active'' bed, while the HTF samples were the fines collected as carryover from the DMR. The process operated at high fluidizing velocities during the mineralization test such that nearly all of the product collected was from the HTF. Active bed samples were collected from the DMR to monitor bed particle size distribution. Characterization of these crystalline powder samples shows that they are primarily Al, Na and Si, with > 1 wt% Ca, Fe and K. The DMR samples contained less than 1 wt% carbon and the HTF samples ranged from 13 to 26 wt% carbon. X-ray diffraction analyses show that the DMR samples contained significant quantities of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} startup bed. The DMR samples became progressively lower in starting bed alumina with major Na/Al/Si crystalline phases (nepheline and sodium aluminosilicate) present as cumulative bed turnover occurred but 100% bed turnover was not achieved. The HTF samples also contained these major crystalline phases. Durability testing of the DMR and HTF samples using the ASTM C1285 Product Consistency Test (PCT) 7-day leach test at 90 C was performed along with several reference glass samples. Comparison of the normalized leach rates for the various DMR and HTF components was made with the reference glasses and the Low Activity Waste (LAW) specification for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Vitrification Plant (WTP). Normalized releases from the DMR and HTF samples were all less than 1 g/m{sup 2}. For comparison, normalized release from the High-Level Waste (HLW) benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass for Si, Li, Na and B ranges from 2 to 8 g/m{sup 2}. The normalized release specification for LAW glass for the Hanford WTP is 2 g/m{sup 2}. The Toxicity Characteristic Leach Test (TCLP) was performed on DMR and HTF as received samples and the tests showed that these products meet the criteria for the EPA RCRA Universal Treatment Standards for all of the constituents contained in the starting simulants such as Cr, Pb and Hg (RCRA characteristically hazardous metals) and Ni and Zn (RCRA metals required for listed wastes).

Crawford, C; Carol Jantzen, C

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

Report for Treating Hanford LAW and WTP SW Simulants: Pilot Plant Mineralizing Flowsheet  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is responsible for managing the disposal of radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site in Washington State. The Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant (WPT) will separate the waste into a small volume of high level waste (HLW), containing most of the radioactive constituents, and a larger volume of low activity waste (LAW), containing most of the non-radioactive chemical and hazardous constituents. The HLW and LAW will be converted into immobilized waste forms for disposal. Currently there is inadequate LAW vitrification capacity planned at the WTP to complete the mission within the required timeframe. Therefore additional LAW capacity is required. One candidate supplemental treatment technology is the fluidized bed steam reformer process (FBSR). This report describes the demonstration testing of the FBSR process using a mineralizing flowsheet for treating simulated Hanford LAW and secondary waste from the WTP (WTP SW). The FBSR testing project produced leach-resistant solid products and environmentally compliant gaseous effluents. The solid products incorporated normally soluble ions into an alkali alumino-silicate (NaS) mineral matrix. Gaseous emissions were found to be within regulatory limits. Cesium and rhenium were captured in the mineralized products with system removal efficiencies of 99.999% and 99.998 respectively. The durability and leach performance of the FBSR granular solid were superior to the low activity reference material (LMR) glass standards. Normalized product consistency test (PCT) release rates for constituents of concern were approximately 2 orders of magnitude less than that of sodium in the Hanford glass [standard].

Arlin Olson

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

Predicting Nepheline Formation with Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... model has been developed to predict nepheline (NaAlSiO4) formation in compositions of interest for waste glasses projected to be formed at the Hanford Site.

47

Sulfate Volatilization in Simulated Nuclear Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes · Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom

48

Utilizing Oxygen Uptake to Predict Lifetimes of Elastomeric O-rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes · Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom

49

Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom Clay after ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes · Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom  ...

50

Epsilon Metal Waste Form Development for Fission Products in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes · Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom  ...

51

Multiscale Modeling for Predicting Long-Term Behavior of Glass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes · Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom  ...

52

Adsorbents of Titanate Nanofibers and Nanotubes for the Removal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes · Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom  ...

53

Electrochemical and Thermal Properties of Rare-Earth Chlorides in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes · Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom  ...

54

EEG Response to NAS WIPP Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas) requirements and protection of public health and the environment? One purpose of HSG measurements is to ensure that the room-based concentration limits CMCLs) of i volatile...

55

Recent Advances in the Capture/Sequestration of Volatile ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... would work collaboratively to solve the technical challenges and develop the ... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes.

56

EM Engineering & Technology Roadmap and Major Technology Demonstration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LLC proprietary FBSR technology (currently under construction for treatment of sodium bearing waste in Idaho) to process early LAW and future WTP recycle streams and to...

57

Impact of Particle Agglomeration on Accumulation Rates in the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

58

Liquidus Temperature Studies for High Level Nuclear Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

59

Burst, Ring and Biaxial Creep of Zircaloy Cladding – Applications to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

60

The Effect of Particle Geometry on the Dissolution Behavior of Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Functionalized Nanoporous Sorbent Materials for Chemical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

62

The Effects of Lithium Nitrate on Highly Active Liquor in the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

63

Viscosity of Multicomponent Glasses as a Function of Temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

64

Determining Thermal Conductivity of Simulated Feed for High Level ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

65

Thermal Degradation and Immobilisation of Spent Ion Exchange ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

66

Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

67

Sodalite-Based Forms for Wastes Containing Actinides and Halides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

68

Technology Development for Nuclear Waste Stabilization II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity ... A total of 8 sludge batches have been processed through the DWPF ...

69

Adsorption of of Radioactive Iodine from Used Nuclear Fuel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

70

Environmental Cracking of Nickel Alloys in Bicarbonate and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

71

Advanced Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilisation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

72

Migration of Iodine Solidified in Ettringite into Compacted Bentonite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

73

REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) Modeling and Process Control in the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

74

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on SRS Low Activity Waste (LAW) modified to simulate Hanford waste....

75

Object-Oriented Implementation for NAS Parallel Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ion deals with the external behavior of an object while encapsulation helps manage the system complexity by hiding the internal details of the object implementation. Thus, the abstraction and encapsulation complement each other in dealing with the complexity. Often, a set of abstractions in real life systems forms a hierarchy. Inheritance organizes the classes in a hierarchical structure, which gives a greater level of abstraction to the problem. Inheritance coupled with dynamic binding results in polymorphism, where one name can be used to denote different items of the classes in a hierarchy. This very organized approach of the object--oriented paradigm helps the developer in conquering the complexity of highly complex scientific applications (Booch 1991). The need for proper abstractions is more crucial for parallel programming than sequential programming (Grimshaw 1993). The higher 47 level abstractions provided by the object--oriented paradigm can make the specific architectural ...

Siva Linga Korlakunta; Siva Linga Korlakunta; Donna S. Reese; Julia E. Hodges; W. Edwin; Ellis Clayborne; D. Taylor; Richard D. Koshel; Major Professor; Dr. Donna; S. Reese

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

NAS/NAE Committee on the Prospects for IFE Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Polar-Drive Ignition on the NIF J. D. Zuegel University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics 0 0 be tested on the NIF with a few modest modifications to the facility · Beam-smoothingimprovements: ­ Multi modifications to the NIF facility ­ Beamsmoothingisonlyrequiredatthebeginningofthelaserpulse, which minimizes

77

Failure Analysis and Manufacturing Process Review of an NAS626 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler Stack Economizer Tube Failure · Case Studies in Environmentally Assisted Failures: Solving Their Problem When You Don't Know the Cause.

78

Kathy Yelick Appointed to NAS Computer Science and Telecommunications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appointed to National Academies Computer Science and Telecommunications Board Kathy Yelick Appointed to National Academies Computer Science and Telecommunications Board September...

79

Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Secondary Battery Research in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2012. Symposium, Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications. Presentation Title ...

80

Os Efeitos da Seca nas Florestas Chuvosas Amazônicas P. Meir...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chuvosas Amaznicas P. Meir, 1 P. M. Brando, 2,3, 4 D. Nepstad, 5 S. Vasconcelos, 6 A. C. L. Costa, 7 E. Davidson, 4 S. Almeida, 8 R. A. Fisher, 9 E. D. Sotta, 10 D. Zarin,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assessment of NGK's Sodium-Sulfur (NAS®) Batteries in the ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

maintained by AWEA, UWIG and NREL * 2007 IEEE Study* provides an excellent distillation of such studies. Findings include: The cost of wind Integration is low (up to...

82

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR THE BENCH STEAM REFORMER TEST  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing. The type, quantity and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluid bed steam reformer (FBSR). A determination of the adequacy of the FBSR process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the FBSR process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used to test the FBSR process. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the testing criteria.

BANNING DL

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

83

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on two caustic Hanford waste streams (SX-105 and An-103). The tests...

84

SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the sample selection, sample preparation, environmental, and regulatory considerations for shipment of Hanford radioactive waste samples for treatability studies of the FBSR process at the Savannah River National Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

ROBBINS RA

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

Support of Activities of the NAS in Relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Academies (NA) provides support for the activities related to the long-term follow up of the health of the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki being conducted by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) laboratories in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The NA serves as scientific and administrative liaison between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and RERF, and performs tasks in the areas of scientific oversight, information/public interface, fiscal oversight, and personnel management. The project includes recruitment and support of approximately 10 NA employees who work at RERF in Japan. Specific activities are performed consistent with the cooperative agreement’s Statement of Work between DOE and NA and consistent with an Annual Work Plan developed by DOE and NA.

Douple, Evan B.

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

NAS battery demonstration at American Electric Power:a study for the DOE energy storage program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first U.S. demonstration of the NGK sodium/sulfur battery technology was launched in August 2002 when a prototype system was installed at a commercial office building in Gahanna, Ohio. American Electric Power served as the host utility that provided the office space and technical support throughout the project. The system was used to both reduce demand peaks (peak-shaving operation) and to mitigate grid power disturbances (power quality operation) at the demonstration site. This report documents the results of the demonstration, provides an economic analysis of a commercial sodium/sulfur battery energy storage system at a typical site, and describes a side-by-side demonstration of the capabilities of the sodium/sulfur battery system, a lead-acid battery system, and a flywheel-based energy storage system in a power quality application.

Newmiller, Jeff (Endecon Engineering, San Ramon, CA); Norris, Benjamin L. (Norris Energy Consulting Company, Martinez, CA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

MPI versus MPI+OpenMP on IBM SP for the NAS benchmarks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hybrid memory model of clusters of multiprocessors raises two issues: programming model and performance. Many parallel programs have been written by using the MPI standard. To evaluate the pertinence of hybrid models for existing MPI codes, we compare ...

Franck Cappello; Daniel Etiemble

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

An Integrated Approach to Evaluating Risk Mitigation Measures for UAV Operational Concepts in the NAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integrated approach is outlined in this paper to evaluate risks posed by operating Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace System. The approach supports the systematic evaluation of potential risk mitigation ...

Weibel, Roland E

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

89

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiative, which included dramatic increases in federal funding for basic research, particularly in the physical sciences. As you know, among other things, the...

90

Efeito da carboximetilcelulose e de outros aditivos enológicos nas características químicas e sensoriais dos vinhos.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Os cristais de tartarato (hidrogeno tartarato de potássio e tartarato neutro de cálcio) formam-se naturalmente no vinho, sendo a principal causa de sedimentos no vinho… (more)

Guise, Raquel Amorim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Thermoelectric and electrical characterization of Si nanowires and GaNAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 3.12: Plot of RTD resistance versus temperature?, µ and n . . . . 3.3.3 RTD Calibration . . . . . . . .the practical range for V g . RTD Calibration In addition to

Pichanusakorn, Paothep

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

94

Program on Technology Innovation: New York Power Authority Advanced Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Battery Energy Storage System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities, energy service companies, and utility customers lack familiarity with distributed electric storage systems. Demonstration projects highlighting the benefits, safety, and effectiveness of such systems will promote their propagation. The benefits derived from the storage of electrical energy are well defined in the EPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage for Transmission and Distribution Applications (Electric Power Research Institute [EPRI] report 1001834). This report documents system des...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

95

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 25870 of 31,917 results. 61 - 25870 of 31,917 results. Download CX-004258: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Spacer Dampers Along the Ostrander-McLaughlin Number 1 500-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/29/2010 Location(s): Clackamas County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004258-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004174: Categorical Exclusion Determination Heavy Water Disposition Offsite, K-Area CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004174-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004176: Categorical Exclusion Determination Making Nepheline (NaAlSiO4), Phase Pure Standards

96

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC12.DeAngelis [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SYNTHESIS SYNTHESIS of SODALITE SYNTHESIS OF SODALITE FROM NEPHELINE FOR CONDITIONING CHLORIDE SALT WASTES G. De Angelis, C. Fedeli, M. Capone ENEA - C.R. Casaccia, Roma, Italy M. Da Ros, F. Giacobbo, E. Macerata, M. Mariani Politecnico di Milano - Milano, Italy IPRC 2012, Fontana, Wisconsin, USA SYNTHESIS of SODALITE Synthesis of LiK.SODALITE through Pressureless Consolidation process SYNTHESIS of SODALITE PC Process at ANL Process flow diagram for Pressureless Consolidation process at ANL SYNTHESIS of SODALITE Pressureless Consolidation Can Assembly (left) and Production-scale CWF furnace (right) PC Process at ANL SYNTHESIS of SODALITE Al 2 Si 2 O 7 . 2H 2 O --- NaOH NaAlSiO 4 LiCl-KCl Melting Freezing Crushing Simulated Waste Salt Nepheline PC process Ar glove-box Air 773 K room temp. Heating Mixing Nepheline Kaolinite Glass frit Mixing SYNTHESIS of SODALITE SYNTHESIS of SODALITE Mixing

97

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 23, 2010 September 23, 2010 CX-004179: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench Scale Testing on the Cesium Nitric Acid Recovery Evaporator (CNP) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office September 23, 2010 CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Bench-Scale Steam Reformer (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office September 23, 2010 CX-004176: Categorical Exclusion Determination Making Nepheline (NaAlSiO4), Phase Pure Standards CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

98

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analytical Development has been requested to make Nepheline (Sodium Aluminum Silicate) to support the Sludge Batch 4 work. The Nepheline will be Analytical Development has been requested to make Nepheline (Sodium Aluminum Silicate) to support the Sludge Batch 4 work. The Nepheline will be used in the x-ray diffraction laboratory as a standard to quantify the amount of nepheline in samples which are received. Rev 1 - Analytical Development has been requested to make Phase Pure Standards, I sodalite, Re sodalite, F sodalite, Cl sodalite, Nepheline, and Nosean, to support the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming project. These standards will be used in the x-ray diffraction laboratory as standards to quantify the amount of these materials in the samples which are received. Making Nepheline (NaAlSiO4), Phase Pure Standards Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC - A - 2006 - 090, Rev.1 Sep 23, 2010

99

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 18180 of 29,416 results. 71 - 18180 of 29,416 results. Download Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Fluidized Bed... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/technology-maturation-plan-tmp-fluidized-bed-steam-reforming-fbsr Download Audit of Shutdown and Transition of the Mound Plant, IG-0408 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-shutdown-and-transition-mound-plant-ig-0408 Download HQFMSP Chapter 11, Incidents of Security Concern 2013 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 11, Incidents of Security Concern Describes DOE Headquarters procedures for reporting, investigating, and

100

Radionuclide and contaminant immobilization in the fluidized bed steam reforming waste products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process and resulting waste form. The first section of the chapter gives an overview of the potential need for FBSR processing in nuclear waste remediation followed by an overview of the engineering involved in the process itself. This is followed by a description of waste form production at a chemical level followed by a section describing different process streams that have undergone the FBSR process. The third section describes the resulting mineral product in terms of phases that are present and the ability of the waste form to encapsulate hazardous and radioactive wastes from several sources. Following this description is a presentation of the physical properties of the granular and monolith waste form product including and contaminant release mechanisms. The last section gives a brief summary of this chapter and includes a section on the strengths associated with this waste form and the needs for additional data and remaining questions yet to be answered. The reader is directed elsewhere for more information on other waste forms such as Cast Stone (Lockrem, 2005), Ceramicrete (Singh et al., 1997, Wagh et al., 1999) and geopolymers (Kyritsis et al., 2009; Russell et al., 2006).

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Brown, Christopher F.; Jantzen, Carol; Pierce, Eric M.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101 & 241AZ-102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-l0-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FBSR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-5.2.1-2010-001, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Estudo dos efeitos de colisões atômicas na dinâmica, nas propriedades estatíticas e no emaranhamento entre átomos aprisionados interagindo com a luz.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Neste trabalho nós consideramos um Condensado de Bose-Einstein em uma armadilha interagindo simultaneamente com o campo quantizado de uma cavidade de alto fator de qualidade… (more)

Vivian Vanessa França

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 13901395 Numerical Simulation of Replacing Oil by Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­1395 Numerical Simulation of Replacing Oil by Water in a Scale-Invariant Porous Medium Ekaterina P. KUROCHKINA with 2563 grid in spatial variables. 1 Introduction The interface of oil displaced by water is unstable a significant influence on the transport of water and oil. The permeability heterogenei- ty is often identified

Popovych, Roman

104

Um rio entre dois mundos : cidade, memória e narrador nas obras Relato de um certo Oriente e Dois Irmãos de Milton Hatoum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tese (doutorado)-Universidade de Brasília, Instituto de Letras, Departamento de Teoria Literária e Literaturas, 2011. Este trabalho consiste no estudo dos romances Relato de um certo… (more)

Maia, Ana Luiza Montalvão

105

Performance Characteristics of Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Implementations of NAS Parallel Benchmarks SP and BT on Large-scale Multicore Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a Description Logic ALCF(D) which provides feature chains and a concrete domain extension for quantitative aggregates can in fact be met by a particular DL called ALCF(D) (for the DL nomenclature see [Baader et al & Hanschke 92] with the language ALCF(D) (i.e., ALC with feature agreements and concrete domains

106

DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of both experimental and modeling studies performed using Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulants and FBSR product from Tank 48 simulant testing in order to develop higher levels of coal-carbon that can be managed by DWPF. Once the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process starts up for treatment of Tank 48 legacy waste, the FBSR product stream will contribute higher levels of coal-carbon in the sludge batch for processing at DWPF. Coal-carbon is added into the FBSR process as a reductant and some of it will be present in the FBSR product as unreacted coal. The FBSR product will be slurried in water, transferred to Tank Farm and will be combined with sludge and washed to produce the sludge batch that DWPF will process. The FBSR product is high in both water soluble sodium carbonate and unreacted coal-carbon. Most of the sodium carbonate is removed during washing but all of the coal-carbon will remain and become part of the DWPF sludge batch. A paper study was performed earlier to assess the impact of FBSR coal-carbon on the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) operation and melter off-gas flammability by combining it with SB10-SB13. The results of the paper study are documented in Ref. 7 and the key findings included that SB10 would be the most difficult batch to process with the FBSR coal present and up to 5,000 mg/kg of coal-carbon could be fed to the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. In the present study, a bench-scale demonstration of the DWPF CPC processing was performed using SB10 simulants spiked with varying amounts of coal, and the resulting seven CPC products were fed to the DWPF melter cold cap and off-gas dynamics models to determine the maximum coal that can be processed through the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. Based on the results of these experimental and modeling studies, the presence of coal-carbon in the sludge feed to DWPF is found to have both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off-gas flammability safety basis limits during the 9X/5X off-gas surge for normal bubbled melter

Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of both experimental and modeling studies performed using Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulants and FBSR product from Tank 48 simulant testing in order to develop higher levels of coal-carbon that can be managed by DWPF. Once the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process starts up for treatment of Tank 48 legacy waste, the FBSR product stream will contribute higher levels of coal-carbon in the sludge batch for processing at DWPF. Coal-carbon is added into the FBSR process as a reductant and some of it will be present in the FBSR product as unreacted coal. The FBSR product will be slurried in water, transferred to Tank Farm and will be combined with sludge and washed to produce the sludge batch that DWPF will process. The FBSR product is high in both water soluble sodium carbonate and unreacted coal-carbon. Most of the sodium carbonate is removed during washing but all of the coal-carbon will remain and become part of the DWPF sludge batch. A paper study was performed earlier to assess the impact of FBSR coal-carbon on the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) operation and melter off-gas flammability by combining it with SB10-SB13. The results of the paper study are documented in Ref. 7 and the key findings included that SB10 would be the most difficult batch to process with the FBSR coal present and up to 5,000 mg/kg of coal-carbon could be fed to the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. In the present study, a bench-scale demonstration of the DWPF CPC processing was performed using SB10 simulants spiked with varying amounts of coal, and the resulting seven CPC products were fed to the DWPF melter cold cap and off-gas dynamics models to determine the maximum coal that can be processed through the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. Based on the results of these experimental and modeling studies, the presence of coal-carbon in the sludge feed to DWPF is found to have both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off-gas flammability safety basis limits during the 9X/5X off-gas surge for normal bubbled melter

Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Process for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic liquid radioactive wastes to solid insoluble products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive wastes to a solid, relatively insoluble, thermally stable form is provided and comprises the steps of reacting powdered aluminum silicate clay, e.g., kaolin, bentonite, dickite, halloysite, pyrophyllite, etc., with the sodium nitrate-containing radioactive wastes which have a caustic concentration of about 3 to 7 M at a temperature of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to thereby entrap the dissolved radioactive salts in the aluminosilicate matrix. In one embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid waste, such as neutralized Purex-type waste, or salts or oxide produced by evaporation or calcination of these liquid wastes (e.g., anhydrous salt cake) is converted at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to the solid mineral form-cancrinite having an approximate chemical formula 2(NaAlSiO.sub.4) .sup.. xSalt.sup.. y H.sub.2 O with x = 0.52 and y = 0.68 when the entrapped salt is NaNO.sub.3. In another embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid is reacted with the powdered aluminum silicate clay at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C, the resulting reaction product is air dried eitheras loose powder or molded shapes (e.g., bricks) and then fired at a temperature of at least 600.degree. C to form the solid mineral form-nepheline which has the approximate chemical formula of NaAlSiO.sub.4. The leach rate of the entrapped radioactive salts with distilled water is reduced essentially to that of the aluminosilicate lattice which is very low, e.g., in the range of 10.sup.-.sup.2 to 10.sup.-.sup.4 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for cancrinite and 10.sup.-.sup.3 to 10.sup.-.sup.5 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for nepheline.

Barney, Gary S. (Richland, WA); Brownell, Lloyd E. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.'

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

111

JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for an assessment of the flow patterns on the tank mixing. Pump design and operating parameters used for the analysis are summarized in Table 1. The baseline pump orientations are chosen by the previous work [Lee et. al, 2008] and the initial engineering judgement for the conservative flow estimate since the modeling results for the other pump orientations are compared with the baseline results. As shown in Table 1, the present study assumes that each slurry pump has 900 gpm flowrate for the tank mixing analysis, although the Standard Operating Procedure for Tank 48 currently limits the actual pump speed and flowrate to a value less than 900 gpm for a 29 inch liquid level. Table 2 shows material properties and weight distributions for the solids to be modeled for the mixing analysis in Tank 48.

Lee, S.

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

112

ZIRCONIUM HIGHLIGHTS  

SciTech Connect

The effect of hot-worked thickness on the corrosion behavior of atmosphere-melted Zircaloy-2 is discussed. Hydrogen pickup upon etching Zircaloy- 2 Zircaloy-3, and properties of vacuum-cast Zircaloy-2 and the fabrication of special Zirccaloy shapes are presented. A hardness converison chart for annealed zirconium and zirconium alloys is included. (J.E.D.) The useful properties of the tungsten wires used in the incandescent lamp and ra dio tubes industry are ensured by adding about 1% of various ingredie (e.g., K, Na, Al, Si compounds) to the tungstic acid and producing metal powder and compressed rods. During the sintering of these rods, the additions are evapo rated to such an extact that finally the concentration of foreign atoms remains only 10/sup 5/. According to the investigations, the warm hardness values of these tungsten pieces is determined by the traces of impurities. In order to investigate the influencce of the various kinds of atoms, an apparatus was built for the determination of half-micro warm hardnesses of various kinds of tungsten metals in the temperature interval 20 to 800 deg C The tungsten wires made with additions containing Si had an average hardness H/sub V/ = 250 at 800 deg C, while the wires without such additions had corresponding values of H/sub V/ = 180. Traces of Si considerably prevent the h have been investigated. (auth)

1958-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Council (NAS/NRC) (2004), The Hydrogen Economy:al, 2000 Spath et al, 2000 NAS/NRC, 2004 A- 7 An Integratedday Small Padro, 2002 NAS/NRC, 2004 PV Electrolysis NAS/NRC,

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on a composite of two caustic Hanford A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on a composite of two caustic Hanford tank waste streams (AZ101 and AZ102). The tests will be performed in SRNL 773-A Shielded Cells, A-block with portions being completed in B-wing and in the Analytical Development labs. Approximately, 1.5 L of each waste stream will be fed to the process over the course of ~15 runs (<100 mL of waste per run). Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Hanford Sample E Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC-A-2011-0004, Rev.0 Feb 10, 2011 Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2011.03.16 14:24:12

115

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 mL of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This project will be conducted under a Hazardous Treatability Study. The process operates at ~ 700 degrees C and at -6 inwc pressure. The process will generate ~ 25 g of solid sodium-alumino-silicate mineralized product per run. This mineral product contains RCRA metals. The process also produces ~ 0.07 moles of gaseous NOx per run. Other constituents of the off-gas stream include CO, CO2, H2, H2O and N2. Approximately 860 mL of steam

116

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 mL of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This project will be conducted under a Hazardous Waste Treatability Study. The process operates at ~ 700 degrees C and at -6 inwc pressure. The process will generate ~ 25 g of solid sodium-alumino-silicate mineralized, granular product per run. This mineral product contains RCRA metals. The process also produces ~ 0.07 moles of gaseous NOx per run. Other constituents of the off-gas stream include CO, CO2, H2, H2O and N2.

117

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 mL of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This project will be conducted under a Hazardous Waste Treatability Study. The process operates at ~ 700 degrees C and at -6 inwc pressure. The process will generate ~ 25 g of solid sodium-alumino-silicate mineralized, granular product per run. This mineral product contains RCRA metals. The process also produces ~ 0.07 moles of gaseous NOx per run. Other constituents of the off-gas stream include CO, CO2, H2, H2O and N2.

118

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 mL of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This project will be conducted under a Hazardous Treatability Study. The process operates at ~ 700 degrees C and at -6 inwc pressure. The process will generate ~ 25 g of solid sodium-alumino-silicate mineralized product per run. This mineral product contains RCRA metals. The process also produces ~ 0.07 moles of gaseous NOx per run. Other constituents of the off-gas stream include CO, CO2, H2, H2O and N2. Approximately 860 mL of steam

119

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT FOR HANFORD'S LOW ACTIVITY WASTE AND SECONDARY WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of I-125/129 and Tc-99 to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Ninety six grams of radioactive product were made for testing. The second campaign commenced using SRS LAW chemically trimmed to look like Hanford's LAW. Six hundred grams of radioactive product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Cozzi, A.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Daniel, G.

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Le'u gsum pa _'phags pa shA ri'i bu dang 'phags pa mo'u 'gal gyi bu gnyis khyim nas khyim med par rab tu byung ba'i lo rgyus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

{ ~ f:! ~ !":1 ~ LI :- [j' , Ll ~ . ~ y- . ~ , ~ ~ :-.... ~ ci19 Ll "to t{ ~ !":1 [( ~ ~ t6' ~ ~ ~ !O f:! ET y- LI 4! to I.ltf fit> iJ ~~ !O LI , Ll • ~ c!fJI ~ Ier- I~ Ll fi1 6~ t6' @ ~? rn . Ll y- ~ ~ ~ @ ~ ~ !f6"- i... Ll ~ !O IF" u:-­fT- P 17""- v-- W v-- LI iJ c~ ~ LI I~ t{ • • [j' 1!":1 ' iJ 4! ~ /:Zl ~ • 1>:'"" .... ~ ~ "-I • 6fT ~ i7~' LI t{ fl W ffii?'~ ~ t{ LI !":1 W {~ t~ ~ ,W- fT iLl 6f:! lr I :-::= (!Ii' rn t'}f ~ ,:.". rn r.::l LI . • II:[) ~ Ll...

Lepcha, Samten Gyatso

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


122

Non-destructive determination of trace-element concentrations. Annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A beam port has been installed at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) reactor by the University of Maryland group in cooperation with the NBS staff in order to initiate studies of a new analytical technique: neutron-capture prompt ..gamma..-ray activation analysis (PGAA). A detection system based on a large, high resolution Ge(Li) detector surrounded by NaI crystal has been developed for measurement of prompt ..gamma.. rays from 80 keV to 11 MeV. With a temporary external beam tube in place, neutron and ..gamma..-ray backgrounds were investigated prior to design and construction of a well-shielded beam tube and massive shielding for the detection system. With the backgrounds suitably low, it has been possible to investigate ..gamma..-ray spectra of a wide range of samples. These spectra are being carefully analyzed to identify species contributing the observed lines. Whenever an element's presence is suspected. Standards of the pure element or simple compounds are irradiated to determine its complete spectrum. This is necessary in order to determine which lines are useful for analytical purposes and which have interferences from other elements. From the results to date, it appears that PGAA will be able to measure the following elements in many types of samples: H, B, C, N, Na, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Cd, Sm, and Gd. Many other elements will be measurable in certain classes of samples. Furthermore, the list of elements is incomplete, as not all lines have yet been identified in the spectra. The quantitative application of the method is being tested using a wide range of NBS Standard Reference Materials whose elemental compositions are well characterized. Measurements are reported for about fourteen elements in several standards. In general, the agreement with previous measurements is quite good.

Gordon, G.E.; Zoller, W.H.; Walters, W.B.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Optical Basicity and Nepheline Crystallization in High Alumina Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to find compositions that increase waste loading of high-alumina wastes beyond what is currently acceptable while avoiding crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) on slow cooling. Nepheline crystallization has been shown to have a large impact on the chemical durability of high-level waste glasses. It was hypothesized that there would be some composition regions where high-alumina would not result in nepheline crystal production, compositions not currently allowed by the nepheline discriminator. Optical basicity (OB) and the nepheline discriminator (ND) are two ways of describing a given complex glass composition. This report presents the theoretical and experimental basis for these models. They are being studied together in a quadrant system as metrics to explore nepheline crystallization and chemical durability as a function of waste glass composition. These metrics were calculated for glasses with existing data and also for theoretical glasses to explore nepheline formation in Quadrant IV (passes OB metric but fails ND metric), where glasses are presumed to have good chemical durability. Several of these compositions were chosen, and glasses were made to fill poorly represented regions in Quadrant IV. To evaluate nepheline formation and chemical durability of these glasses, quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the Product Consistency Test were conducted. A large amount of quantitative XRD data is collected here, both from new glasses and from glasses of previous studies that had not previously performed quantitative XRD on the phase assemblage. Appendix A critically discusses a large dataset to be considered for future quantitative studies on nepheline formation in glass. Appendix B provides a theoretical justification for choice of the oxide coefficients used to compute the OB criterion for nepheline formation.

Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Winschell, Abigail E.

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

124

CX-005511: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

511: Categorical Exclusion Determination 511: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005511: Categorical Exclusion Determination Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Hanford Sample E CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on a composite of two caustic Hanford tank waste streams (AZ101 and AZ102). The tests will be performed in Savannah River National Laboratory 773-A Shielded Cells, A-block with portions being completed in B-wing and in the Analytical Development labs. Approximately, 1.5 liters of each waste stream will be fed to the process over the course of ~15 runs ( DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

125

CX-004173: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004173: Categorical Exclusion Determination Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Savannah River Site Low Activity Waste (LAW) (Module B) CX(s) Applied: B3/6 Date: 09/30/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on Savannah River Site Low Activity Waste (LAW) modified to simulate Hanford waste. The tests will be performed in Savannah River National Laboratory 773-A Shielded Cells, A-block with portions being completed in B-wing, C-wing, and in the Analytical Development laboratories. Approximately 2 liters of sample will be fed to the process.

126

Savannah River Site - Tank 48 Briefing on SRS Tank 48 Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank 48 Tank 48 Independent Technical Review August 2006 2 SRS Tank 48 ITR SRS Tank 48 ITR Key ITR Observation Two distinct problems: Removing tetraphenylborate (TPB) waste and then cleaning the tank sufficiently to support return to service Processing contents to eliminate TPB hazard August 2006 3 SRS Tank 48 ITR SRS Tank 48 ITR Overarching ITR Conclusions 1. TPB Processing is on the right track - DOE/WSRC have selected the most promising candidates - Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is the most technically attractive and mature of the candidate processes August 2006 4 SRS Tank 48 ITR SRS Tank 48 ITR Overarching Conclusions (continued) 2. Heel removal and tank cleanout will be a very challenging task. Compounding issues: - Physical difficulties in cleanout (access, congestion, etc.)

127

CX-003967: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67: Categorical Exclusion Determination 67: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003967: Categorical Exclusion Determination Steam Reforming Treatability Study with Hanford Samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on two caustic Hanford waste streams (SX-105 and An-103). The tests will be performed in Savannah River National Laboratory 773-A Shielded Cells, A-block with portions being completed in B-wing and in the Analytical Development laboratories. Approximately, 1 Liter of each waste stream will be fed to the process over the course of 8 runs (250 milliliter of waste per run). DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

128

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1-06 Subramanian Sams11-12.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WP Technical Exchange WP Technical Exchange Hanford/SRS Tank Waste Path Forward Karthik Subramanian, SRR Terry Sams, WRPS 11/16/2010 SRR-MS-2010-00249 Print Close 2 Overview * Technology Deployment Vision * Tank Waste Strategy and Life-Cycle Benefits - Transformational Technology Scenarios * Hanford - Vitrification Technologies - Salt Processing: LAW Pretreatment and Immobilization * Rotary Microfiltration/Small Column Ion Exchange (RMF/SCIX) * Alternate LLW: Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) - Accelerated SST Retrieval * SRS - Vitrification Technologies - Salt Processing * Rotary Microfiltration/Small Column Ion Exchange (RMF/SCIX) * Next Generation Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Print Close 3 Technology Deployment * Goal-oriented technology deployment process to integrate and manage resources through collaboration

129

CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45: Categorical Exclusion Determination 45: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/25/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in Savannah River National Laboratory High Level Caves (HLC), A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 milliliters (mL) of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs.

130

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

48 Business Decision Criteria 48 Business Decision Criteria Renee H. Spires Technology Development May 21, 2009 5/21/09 2 Tank 48 Business Decision Criteria Technology development for the treatment of Tank 48 was invested in two alternatives - Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) - Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Systems engineering processes were used to identify, define and weigh a set of criteria to perform selection of alternatives - Designed with flexibility so that the criteria can be applied to the Tank 48 technology selection at any time The business decision will result in the design, deployment and operation of the selected alternative for the treatment of Tank 48 5/21/09 3 Agenda Tank 48 Background and Importance Development of Criteria Comparison to Past Evaluations Status

131

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 6150 of 26,764 results. 41 - 6150 of 26,764 results. Photo Gallery LED Lighting on the National Mall http://energy.gov/photos/led-lighting-national-mall Download Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2, Issue 1- January 2013 The Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly is published by the Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Division of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) to... http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/energy-emergency-preparedness-quarterly-vol-2-issue-1-january-2013 Download Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for

132

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 18070 of 28,560 results. 61 - 18070 of 28,560 results. Download Financial and Activity Report- February 19, 2010 http://energy.gov/downloads/financial-and-activity-report-february-19-2010 Download Financial and Activity Report- March 26, 2010 http://energy.gov/downloads/financial-and-activity-report-march-26-2010 Download Financial and Activity Report- April 09, 2010 http://energy.gov/downloads/financial-and-activity-report-april-09-2010 Download Financial and Activity Report- August 20, 2010 http://energy.gov/downloads/financial-and-activity-report-august-20-2010 Download Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for

133

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Bench-Scale Steam Reformer (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in Savannah River National Laboratory High Level Caves, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 milliliters (mL) of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This

135

Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) Documents Available for Download November 1, 2007 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer System. November 1, 2007 Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Wet Air Oxidation.

136

Can we learn from failure? Examining US experiences with nuclear repository siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Research Council (NAS/NRC) moved forward somewhatsite-selection process (see NAS/ NRC, 1996). As noted in theproblems identified by the NAS/NRC committee were three sets

Freudenburg, Wm R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product, which is one of the objectives of this current study, is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. FBSR testing of a Hanford LAW simulant and a WTP-SW simulant at the pilot scale was performed by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC at Hazen Research Inc. in April/May 2008. The Hanford LAW simulant was the Rassat 68 tank blend and the target concentrations for the LAW was increased by a factor of 10 for Sb, As, Ag, Cd, and Tl; 100 for Ba and Re (Tc surrogate); 1,000 for I; and 254,902 for Cs based on discussions with the DOE field office and the environmental regulators and an evaluation of the Hanford Tank Waste Envelopes A, B, and C. It was determined through the evaluation of the actual tank waste metals concentrations that some metal levels were not sufficient to achieve reliable detection in the off-gas sampling. Therefore, the identified metals concentrations were increased in the Rassat simulant processed by TTT at HRI to ensure detection and enable calculation of system removal efficiencies, product retention efficiencies, and mass balance closure without regard to potential results of those determinations or impacts on product durability response such as Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). A WTP-SW simulant based on melter off-gas analyses from Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was also tested at HRI in the 15-inch diameter Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) dual reformer at HRI in 2008. The target concentrations for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were increased by 16X for Se, 29X for Tl, 42X for Ba, 48X for Sb, by 100X for Pb and Ni, 1000X for Ag, and 1297X for Cd to ensure detection by the an

Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

138

Steam Reforming Technology Demonstration for Conversion of DOE Sodium-Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory into a Leach-Resistant Alkali Aluminosilicate Waste Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The patented THOR{sup R} fluidized-bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), currently under construction at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site.1 SBW is an acidic waste created primarily from cleanup of the fuel reprocessing equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL. The SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, and alkali and aluminum nitrates, along with many other inorganic compounds, including substantial levels of radionuclides. As part of the implementation of the THOR{sup R} process at INTEC, an engineering-scale technology demonstration (ESTD) was conducted using a specially designed pilot plant located at Hazen Research, Inc. in Golden Colorado. This ESTD confirmed the efficacy of the THOR{sup R} FBSR process to convert the SBW into a granular carbonate-based waste form suitable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE authorized, as a risk reduction measure, the performance of an additional ESTD to demonstrate the production of an insoluble mineralized product, in the event that an alternate disposition path is required. The additional ESTD was conducted at the Hazen Research facility using the THOR{sup R} process and the same SBW simulant employed previously. An alkali aluminosilicate mineral product was produced that exhibited excellent leach resistance and chemical durability. The demonstration established general system operating parameters for a full-scale facility; provided process off-gas data that confirmed operation within regulatory limits; determined that the mineralized product exhibits superior leach resistance and durability, compared to Environmental Assessment (EA) and Low-activity Reference Material (LRM) glasses, as indicated by the Product Consistency Test (PCT); ascertained that Cs and Re (a surrogate for Tc) were non-volatile and were retained in the mineral product; and showed that heavy metals were converted into mineral forms that were not leachable, as determined by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. (authors)

Ryan, K.; Bradley Mason, J.; Evans, B.; Vora, V. [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC, Aiken, SC (United States); Olson, A. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Rensselaer Catalog Undergraduate, Graduate, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and CEO of Exxon Mobil Corporation. RObERT C. RICHARDSON [NAS] is the F. R. Newman Professor of Physics

Varela, Carlos

140

Developments in Leach Testing  

Characterization of reuse materials •….Recent National Academy of Science (NAS) report on CCR use in mine filling stated that full

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141

Summary - Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S Wet Air Savan contain liquid w contain potent to the option tank w Bed S condu be pur The as Techn Techn as liste * W o o The Ele Site: S roject: S P Report Date: J ited States Savanna Why DOE r Oxidation Proc nnah River Tan ning approxima waste. The wa ns tetraphenylb tially flammable tank head spa s have been id waste: Wet Air O team Reformin cted to aid in d rsued for treatin What th ssessment team ology Element ology Readine ed below: Wet Air Oxidatio Reactor sys Offgas Trea To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Savannah Rive SRS Tank 48H Project July 2007 Departmen ah River E-EM Did This cess k 48H is a 1.3 ately 250, 000 aste is a salt so borate (TPB), w e concentration ce. Two poten dentified for this Oxidation (WAO ng (FBSR). Th deciding which ng the Tank 48

142

Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory for Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect

The patented THOR{sup R} steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) as the technology of choice for treatment of about one million gallons of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). SBW is an acidic waste created primarily from cleanup of the fuel reprocessing equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid and alkali and aluminum nitrates with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium. The steam reforming process will convert the SBW into dry, solid, carbonate and aluminate minerals supporting a preferred path for disposal as remote handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP). The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) will design, build, and operate an Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that will comprise an integrated THOR{sup R} process system that will utilize dual fluidized bed steam reformers (FBSR) for treatment of the SBW. Design of the IWTU is nearing completion. The IWTU will be constructed at INTEC, immediately east of the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF), with planned fabrication and construction to start in early 2007 upon receipt of needed permits and completion of design and engineering. This paper provides a project and process overview of the IWTU and discusses the design and construction status. IWTU equipment and facility designs and bases will be presented. (authors)

Landman, W.; Roesener, S. [CH2M WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mason, B.; Wolf, K.; Amaria, N. [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC, Aiken, SC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—THOR® Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix  

SciTech Connect

Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

144

DEVELOPMENT QUALIFICATION AND DISPOSAL OF AN ALTERNATIVE IMMOBILIZED LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE FORM AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Demonstrating that a waste form produced by a given immobilization process is chemically and physically durable as well as compliant with disposal facility acceptance criteria is critical to the success of a waste treatment program, and must be pursued in conjunction with the maturation of the waste processing technology. Testing of waste forms produced using differing scales of processing units and classes of feeds (simulants versus actual waste) is the crux of the waste form qualification process. Testing is typically focused on leachability of constituents of concern (COCs), as well as chemical and physical durability of the waste form. A principal challenge regarding testing immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) forms is the absence of a standard test suite or set of mandatory parameters against which waste forms may be tested, compared, and qualified for acceptance in existing and proposed nuclear waste disposal sites at Hanford and across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. A coherent and widely applicable compliance strategy to support characterization and disposal of new waste forms is essential to enhance and accelerate the remediation of DOE tank waste. This paper provides a background summary of important entities, regulations, and considerations for nuclear waste form qualification and disposal. Against this backdrop, this paper describes a strategy for meeting and demonstrating compliance with disposal requirements emphasizing the River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site and the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) mineralized low-activity waste (LAW) product stream.

SAMS TL; EDGE JA; SWANBERG DJ; ROBBINS RA

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

145

Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

146

Implementing Network File System Protocol for Highly Available Clustered Applications on Network Attached Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces method for implementing NFS protocol for larger block/network packets transfer over to NAS [Network Attached Storage] from Highly Available clients. NAS storage scalability is habitually inadequate to the volume of the appliance. ... Keywords: NAS, NFS, RPC, RAID

K. J. Latesh Kumar

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Engine Design for LIFE Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/NAE, January 2011NIF-0111-20839s2.ppt 2 #12;The LIFE "chamber" is an unsealed, segmented array sitting within a low pressure gas environment Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011NIF Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011NIF-0111-20839s2.ppt 4 #12;Once moved to the engine bay, cooling

148

Administrator Asst. Admin.(OAR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) > (`00) > NAS BEIR I - The Effects on Populations of Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation (`72) > (`79) > NAS BEIR III - The Effects on Populations of Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation (`80) > Radiation Standards (87) > NAS BEIR IV - Health Risks of Radon and Other Internally Deposited Alpha

149

Influence of liquid structure on diffusive isotope separation in molten silicates and aqueous solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular diffusion in natural volcanic liquids discriminates between isotopes of major ions (e.g., Fe, Mg, Ca, and Li). Although isotope separation by diffusion is expected on theoretical grounds, the dependence on mass is highly variable for different elements and in different media. Silicate liquid diffusion experiments using simple liquid compositions were carried out to further probe the compositional dependence of diffusive isotopic discrimination and its relationship to liquid structure. Two diffusion couples consisting of the mineral constituents anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}; denoted AN), albite (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}; denoted AB), and diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}; denoted DI) were held at 1450°C for 2 h and then quenched to ambient pressure and temperature. Major-element as well as Ca and Mg isotope profiles were measured on the recovered quenched glasses. In both experiments, Ca diffuses rapidly with respect to Si. In the AB–AN experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 20 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Ca is much greater than in natural liquid experiments where D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 1. In the AB–DI experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 6 and the efficiency of isotope separation is between that of the natural liquid experiments and the AB–AN experiment. In the AB–DI experiment, D{sub Mg}/D{sub Si} ~ 1 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Mg is smaller than it is for Ca yet similar to that observed for Mg in natural liquids. The results from the experiments reported here, in combination with results from natural volcanic liquids, show clearly that the efficiency of diffusive separation of Ca isotopes is systematically related to the solvent-normalized diffusivity—the ratio of the diffusivity of the cation (D{sub Ca}) to the diffusivity of silicon (D{sub Si}). The results on Ca isotopes are consistent with available data on Fe, Li, and Mg isotopes in silicate liquids, when considered in terms of the parameter D{sub cation}/D{sub Si}. Cations diffusing in aqueous solutions display a similar relationship between isotopic separation efficiency and D{sub cation} =D{sub H 2 O} , although the efficiencies are smaller than in silicate liquids. Our empirical relationship provides a tool for predicting the magnitude of diffusive isotopic effects in many geologic environments and a basis for a more comprehensive theory of isotope separation in liquid solutions. We present a conceptual model for the relationship between diffusivity and liquid structure that is consistent with available data.

Watkins, J.M.; DePaolo, D.J.; Ryerson, F.J.; Peterson, B.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium-Bearing Tank Wastes at Idaho National Laboratory for Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect

The patented THOR{sup R} steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the technology of choice for treatment of about one million gallons of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site 1. SBW is an acidic waste created primarily from cleanup of the fuel reprocessing equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid and alkali and aluminum nitrates with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium. The steam reforming process will convert the SBW into dry, solid, carbonate and aluminate minerals supporting a preferred path for disposal as remote handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP). The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) will design, build, and operate an Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) that will comprise an integrated THOR{sup R} process system that will utilize dual fluidized bed steam reformers (FBSR) for treatment of the SBW. The IWTU is being constructed at INTEC, immediately east of the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF). Detailed design of the IWTU has been completed and DOE has approved the CD-3 detailed design. The State of Idaho has approved the RCRA and construction air permits. Construction of the IWTU started in April 2007 with civil and foundation work. This paper provides a project and process overview of the IWTU and discusses the design and construction status. IWTU equipment and facility designs and bases will be presented. (authors)

Landman, W.; Roesener, S. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bradley Mason, J.; Bourgeois, T.; Amaria, N. [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC, Aiken, SC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection Data Package—Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site in southeast Washington State has 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes stored in 177 underground tanks (ORP 2010). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), through its contractors, is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to convert the radioactive and hazardous wastes into stable glass waste forms for disposal. Within the WTP, the pretreatment facility will receive the retrieved waste from the tank farms and separate it into two treated process streams. These waste streams will be vitrified, and the resulting waste canisters will be sent to offsite (high-level waste [HLW]) and onsite (immobilized low-activity waste [ILAW]) repositories. As part of the pretreatment and ILAW processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed of in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is developing data packages to support that down-selection. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilizing and solidifying the liquid secondary wastes. At the Hanford Site, the FBSR process is being evaluated as a supplemental technology for treating and immobilizing Hanford LAW radioactive tank waste and for treating secondary wastes from the WTP pretreatment and LAW vitrification processes.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pires, Richard P.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

Program on Technology Innovation: Summary of the National Academy of Sciences Report: "Going the Distance?"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2003, The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) formed a Committee on Transportation of Radioactive Waste (NAS Committee) to examine the transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in the United States. The focus of this study was on the transportation of SNF in the United States. The NAS Committee obtained information needed for this study from a variety of sources, including technical studies on transportation risks, package performance, waste inventories, tran...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

WIPP RCRA Documents menu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Task Force Final Report EEG Response to NAS WIPP Committee Questions for May 19, 2003 Meeting Quality Assurance Program Document Rev. 9...

154

NERSC Training at SC12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of available application proxies including traditional offerings (NAS Parallel Benchmarks, High Performance Linpack, etc.) in order to provide proper context. We then focus...

155

Design, Synthesis and Electrochemical Characterizations of Positive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage and Recovery in a Complex-Shaped Double Pipe Heat Exchanger · Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Battery Research in Korea: ...

156

Organic Materials for Electrodes in Rechargeable Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage and Recovery in a Complex-Shaped Double Pipe Heat Exchanger · Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Battery Research in Korea: ...

157

[en] SUBSTITUTION OF THE OIL DIESEL BY ALTERNATIVE FUELS IN THE GENERATION OF ELECTRICITY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[pt] Este estudo foi realizado visando avaliar o desempenho de um grupo gerador na geração de energia elétrica nas áreas remotas do Brasil utilizando um… (more)

CLOVIS HENRIQUE M FONSECA

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Rational Comedy for an Irrational Planet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... He has given presentations to the ACS, the National Association of Science Writers, various outlets of the NAS, Applied Biosystems, Microsoft ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

Estudo numérico e experimental em amortecedores tipo stockbridge para linhas de transmissão aéreas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Um dos grandes problemas nas linhas de transmissão de energia elétrica aéreas são os danos nos cabos surgidos pela fadiga provocada pela vibração eólica. Este… (more)

Vinícius Pereira Silva

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

at NAS Google collaboration on IB reports April 2007 Science Accelerator launch Internet Archive Collaboration On EPN May 2007 Patent Database launch CrossRef collaboration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Slide17 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

at NAS Google collaboration on IB reports April 2007 Science Accelerator launch Internet Archive Collaboration On EPN May 2007 Patent Database launch CrossRef collaboration...

162

April 8, 2013 VIA MAIL Diane Honeycutt National Institute of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... y y y The MME shall use DIAMETER for retrieval of security data from HSS for UE NAS security (in accordance with 3GPP) y ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Definition: Quad | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Terms British thermal unit, Energy, energy References http:www.eia.govtoolsglossaryindex.cfm?idQ http:needtoknow.nas.eduenergyglossary Retri LikeLike...

164

Hidrelétrica serra do facão no Rio São Marcos: tramas e dramas sobre Davinópolis (GO).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A construção de Aproveitamentos Hidrelétricos nas áreas de Cerrado tem potencializado a exclusão e desapropriação do campesinato, além de gerar uma série de outros efeitos… (more)

Helen Cassia Reinaldo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Relato de um certo oriente ou o delicado território do Alter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Milton Hatoum é considerado um dos mais interessantes autores da Literatura Brasileira contemporânea. Nas suas obras, Hatoum vem criando um universo complexo, onde se expõem… (more)

Braga, Jorge Manuel da Costa Santos Rodrigues

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Análise estratigráfica e estrutural do intervalo carbonoso portador de CBM : eo-permiana da Bacia do Paraná.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O termo Coal Bed Methane (CBM) refere-se ao metano gerado nas camadas de carvão e é um alvo exploratório na indústria do petróleo. Desde os… (more)

Junia Casagrande

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

occupational inhalation exposure to nickel dust (primarily nickel subsulfate) at refineries has resulted in increased incidences of pulmonary and nasal cancer (NAS 1975,...

168

EMC 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Edge Optical Properties of GaInNAsSb Quantum Wells Around 1550nm ... of epitaxial crystal growth and to the physics of electronic structure and devices.

169

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search...

170

ALGORITHMS AND COMPUTER CODES FOR ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR QUANTUM SCATTERING THEORY. VOLUME 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under Contract NAS7-100, sponsored by the National Aeronautics and SpacePropulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under Contract NAS7-100, sponsored by the National Aeronautics a.id Space

Thomas Ed, Lowell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

WEEKLY BULLETIN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16 20 24 -800 -400 0 400 800 1200 1600 Large scale grid NaS-2 NaS-1 SOFC Solar Time [h] SOFC prediction. 0 5 10 15 20 0 5 10 15 20 25 IV- SOFC+NaS+Solar B I-IV (2025 target) [/G] [] Commercial

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

172

Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the operation of Relational Databases with Network Attached Storage (NAS). Management implications and performance expectations for databases using NAS are presented in detail. Additionally, best practice guidelines are provided for deploying Oracle ® using Sun Solaris ™ Operating System platforms and Network Appliance ™ (NetApp) storage with the Network File System (NFS) protocol.

Glenn Colaco; Darrell Suggs

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Testing and evaluation aspects of integration of unmanned air systems into the national air space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current developments show that the integration of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) is a process that will inevitably happen. Arguably, it may be viewed as one of the key milestones in the history of aviation. Whereas ... Keywords: NAS integration, modeling and simulation, test and evaluation, unmanned aerial systems, verification and validation

Mauricio Castillo-Effen; Nikita Visnevski

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 1, Cell and battery safety  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD&D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH&S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

Ohi, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

Ohi, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Recycling and disposal of spent sodium-sulfur (Na/S) batteries are important issues that must be addressed as part of the commercialization process of Na/S battery-powered electric vehicles. The use of Na/S batteries in electric vehicles will result in significant environmental benefits, and the disposal of spent batteries should not detract from those benefits. In the United States, waste disposal is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Understanding these regulations will help in selecting recycling and disposal processes for Na/S batteries that are environmentally acceptable and cost effective. Treatment processes for spent Na/S battery wastes are in the beginning stages of development, so a final evaluation of the impact of RCRA regulations on these treatment processes is not possible. The objectives of tills report on battery recycling and disposal are as follows: Provide an overview of RCRA regulations and requirements as they apply to Na/S battery recycling and disposal so that battery developers can understand what is required of them to comply with these regulations; Analyze existing RCRA regulations for recycling and disposal and anticipated trends in these regulations and perform a preliminary regulatory analysis for potential battery disposal and recycling processes. This report assumes that long-term Na/S battery disposal processes will be capable of handling large quantities of spent batteries. The term disposal includes treatment processes that may incorporate recycling of battery constituents. The environmental regulations analyzed in this report are limited to US regulations. This report gives an overview of RCRA and discusses RCRA regulations governing Na/S battery disposal and a preliminary regulatory analysis for Na/S battery disposal.

Corbus, D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 2, Battery recycling and disposal  

SciTech Connect

Recycling and disposal of spent sodium-sulfur (Na/S) batteries are important issues that must be addressed as part of the commercialization process of Na/S battery-powered electric vehicles. The use of Na/S batteries in electric vehicles will result in significant environmental benefits, and the disposal of spent batteries should not detract from those benefits. In the United States, waste disposal is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Understanding these regulations will help in selecting recycling and disposal processes for Na/S batteries that are environmentally acceptable and cost effective. Treatment processes for spent Na/S battery wastes are in the beginning stages of development, so a final evaluation of the impact of RCRA regulations on these treatment processes is not possible. The objectives of tills report on battery recycling and disposal are as follows: Provide an overview of RCRA regulations and requirements as they apply to Na/S battery recycling and disposal so that battery developers can understand what is required of them to comply with these regulations; Analyze existing RCRA regulations for recycling and disposal and anticipated trends in these regulations and perform a preliminary regulatory analysis for potential battery disposal and recycling processes. This report assumes that long-term Na/S battery disposal processes will be capable of handling large quantities of spent batteries. The term disposal includes treatment processes that may incorporate recycling of battery constituents. The environmental regulations analyzed in this report are limited to US regulations. This report gives an overview of RCRA and discusses RCRA regulations governing Na/S battery disposal and a preliminary regulatory analysis for Na/S battery disposal.

Corbus, D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE I STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of a glass used for immobilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) is generally quantified by its resistance to chemical degradation, or durability. The durability of a HLW glass is dependent on its composition. If crystalline phases form within a glass during cooling, the composition of the residual glass network is altered, therefore affecting the durability of the glass. Crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}) has been shown to adversely impact the durability of HLW glasses since it removes glass forming species (in this case, Al and Si) from the glass network. The propensity for nepheline crystallization in a HLW glass increases with increasing concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O in the glass. Nepheline crystallization is therefore of concern for processing of HLW at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since the sludge waste streams at the Savannah River Site (SRS) can contain high concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O. Currently, a 'nepheline discriminator' is included as a process control constraint at the DWPF. The nepheline discriminator relates the concentrations of SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (as weight percentages in glass) to a critical value of 0.62. The discriminator defines a boundary line on the SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary diagram above which (or toward the SiO{sub 2} corner of the ternary) nepheline is not predicted to crystallize in the glass upon quenching or slow cooling. The current equation uses only the concentrations of the SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} components in the glass in predicting whether or not nepheline is likely to crystallize. However, several other components have been shown to impact the propensity for nepheline crystallization, including B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO among others. Therefore, the potential exists to further refine the nepheline discriminator to include these components. In addition, recently studied HLW glasses with relatively high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions of 25 wt % or greater and nepheline discriminator values well below 0.62 have been shown to be free of nepheline crystallization upon quenching and slow cooling. Thus, the current nepheline discriminator equation also appears to be conservative for some HLW glass compositions. Refining the nepheline discriminator to include other important components and to reduce conservatism may provide access to high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration glass compositions for the DWPF, which could in turn allow access to higher waste loadings, decreased washing and improved waste throughput. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a series of HLW glass compositions based on a projected composition of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), the next sludge batch to be processed in the DWPF. The selected glass compositions all had nepheline discriminator values below the current limit of 0.62. They cover a range of locations on the SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} diagram. They also include varying amounts of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO to support an evaluation of the impact of these components on the propensity for nepheline crystallization. The results described in this report confirm that some conservatism exists in the current nepheline discriminator. Several glass compositions, particularly compositions that target higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations, were shown to be very durable (i.e., PCT responses that were more than an order of magnitude better than that of the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass) while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62. Increased concentrations of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and increased concentrations of CaO were shown to improve durability responses and suppress the formation of nepheline. This provides incentive to revise the nepheline discriminator to reduce some of this conservatism and incorporate the influence of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The revised nepheline discriminator could potentially change from a constant line on

Fox, K; James Newell, J; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

179

REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE I STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The performance of a glass used for immobilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) is generally quantified by its resistance to chemical degradation, or durability. The durability of a HLW glass is dependent on its composition. If crystalline phases form within a glass during cooling, the composition of the residual glass network is altered, therefore affecting the durability of the glass. Crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}) has been shown to adversely impact the durability of HLW glasses since it removes glass forming species (in this case, Al and Si) from the glass network. The propensity for nepheline crystallization in a HLW glass increases with increasing concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O in the glass. Nepheline crystallization is therefore of concern for processing of HLW at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since the sludge waste streams at the Savannah River Site (SRS) can contain high concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O. Currently, a 'nepheline discriminator' is included as a process control constraint at the DWPF. The nepheline discriminator relates the concentrations of SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (as weight percentages in glass) to a critical value of 0.62. The discriminator defines a boundary line on the SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary diagram above which (or toward the SiO{sub 2} corner of the ternary) nepheline is not predicted to crystallize in the glass upon quenching or slow cooling. The current equation uses only the concentrations of the SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} components in the glass in predicting whether or not nepheline is likely to crystallize. However, several other components have been shown to impact the propensity for nepheline crystallization, including B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO among others. Therefore, the potential exists to further refine the nepheline discriminator to include these components. In addition, recently studied HLW glasses with relatively high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions of 25 wt % or greater and nepheline discriminator values well below 0.62 have been shown to be free of nepheline crystallization upon quenching and slow cooling. Thus, the current nepheline discriminator equation also appears to be conservative for some HLW glass compositions. Refining the nepheline discriminator to include other important components and to reduce conservatism may provide access to high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration glass compositions for the DWPF, which could in turn allow access to higher waste loadings, decreased washing and improved waste throughput. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a series of HLW glass compositions based on a projected composition of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), the next sludge batch to be processed in the DWPF. The selected glass compositions all had nepheline discriminator values below the current limit of 0.62. They cover a range of locations on the SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} diagram. They also include varying amounts of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO to support an evaluation of the impact of these components on the propensity for nepheline crystallization. The results described in this report confirm that some conservatism exists in the current nepheline discriminator. Several glass compositions, particularly compositions that target higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations, were shown to be very durable (i.e., PCT responses that were more than an order of magnitude better than that of the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass) while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62. Increased concentrations of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and increased concentrations of CaO were shown to improve durability responses and suppress the formation of nepheline. This provides incentive to revise the nepheline discriminator to reduce some of this conservatism and incorporate the influence of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The revised nepheline discriminator could potentially change from a constant line on

Fox, K; James Newell, J; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

180

Navy Technology Validation (Techval)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Technology Validation (Techval) FUPWG Spring Meeting 2008 April 15, 2008 Destin, FL Paul Kistler, PE CEM NAVFAC Engineering Service Center Port Hueneme CA Navy Techval CURRENT PROJECTS * Cool Roof reflective roof coating  NS Pearl Harbor HI * Thermal Destratifiers  NAS Oceana VA * Boiler Combustion Controls  USNA Annapolis MD * Sand Filters  NAS Lemoore CA * Spectrally Enhanced Lighting  Navy Yard Washington DC * Desuperheater  NS Norfolk VA  NAS North Island CA * HVAC CO2 Controls  NAB Little Creek VA  NAVSUPPACT Mid-South TN  NB Kitsap Bremerton WA *HVAC Occupancy Controls NAS Oceana VA *Electromagnetic Pulse Water Treatment NADEP San Diego CA NSY Puget Sound WA *LED Parking Lot Lighting NBVC Port Hueneme CA Techval

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propulsion Laboratory, operated under contract NAS7-030001 with the National Aeronautics and SpacePropulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space

Wood-Vasey, William Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAS Battery Performance NAS Battery Performance at Charleston, WV October 17, 2005 Ali Nourai American Electric Power November 2, 2006 A Presentation to DOE Peer Review Program 2 Partners American Electric Power * Owner & Operator of DESS * Project Management * Site Work * Permits NGK Insulators * Manufacturer of NAS Battery System S&C Electric Company * PCS * System Integration DOE/Sandia * Partial Sponsor A Collaboration to Launch Distributed Energy Storage System 3 Overview- First MW-Scale NAS Application Outside Japan Nine Months to Deploy the First Unit Went into Contract with NGK and S&C Sept 2005 The Storage Unit Started Operation in June 2006 4 Distributed Energy Storage System (DESS) Project It was Justified Main Function 1.2 MW Peak Shaving Justifications 1) Corporate Strategy 2) Distribution Capital Deferral

183

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CAM DG DOE-2 DWR ESP FEMP FERC GJ HPC KWh MBTU MWh NAS NBVCwhen calculated using the FERC method (giving ½ credit forchiller and CHP system; the FERC efficiency is 56%. The

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

AST Composite Wing Program---Executive Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boeing Company demonstrated the application of stitched/resin infused (S/RFI) composite materials on commercial transport aircraft primary wing structures under the Advanced Subsonic technology (AST) Composite Wing contract, NAS1-20546. This report ...

Karal Michael

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

From design through operations-Results from new construction performance contract and beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Rate Electricity Usage Gas Usage Energy Usage (Total) N/as significant because gas usage was approximately half as2) Utility Bill Year 3 Gas Usage [kBtu/sqft-yr] Electricity

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Wentworth, Scott

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Nano-antennes optiques pour l'inspection des structures photoniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??L'objectif de cette thèse est de concevoir et élaborer des outils innovants, baptisés nano-antennes (NAs), pour sonder le champ électromagnétique optique au voisinage des structures… (more)

Abdoulkader Ibrahim, Idriss

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A stochastic and dynamic model of delay propagation within an airport network for policy analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As demand for air travel increases over the years and many busy airports operate close to their capacity limits, congestion at some airports on any given day can quickly spread throughout the National Aviation System (NAS). ...

Pyrgiotis, Nikolaos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

M6, Enhancement of Hole Transport and Carrier Distribution in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DD1, Enhanced Spin Injection and Spin Lifetimes in Graphene ... FF5, GaInNAsSb Quantum Wells with Strain-Compensating GaAsP Layers for GaAs-

189

Effects of reduced IFR arrival-arrival wake vortex separation minima and improved runaway operations sequencing on flight delay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) 65.6% and 67.0% and the average NAS delay by 24.3% and 24.7% relative to the FIFO and Serve-the-Longest-Queue algorithms respectively.

Bly, Elizabeth, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

News News Technical Progress Technical Progress Ian Fisk Ian...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for user home space Increasing our available tape resources in time for Pre-Challenge Production The Costs CPU Nodes 160,000 Disk Servers 100,000 NAS Systems...

191

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicle’s Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehicle’stires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicle’s Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehicle’stires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a com- munity. NAS-NRC: National Academy of Sciences -Regulatory Guide (NRC) - Safety Analysis Report - UnitedICRU LET LWR MPBB MPC NCRP NRC PAG PWR RBE RG SAR UNSCEAR

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from recent studies (NAS/ NRC, ASHRAE/Battelle), andAtmospheric Administration NRC O 2 O 3 P PAS PdO 2 PM PO 2environmental quality concerns NRC’s monitoring priorities

Gundel, Lara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Performance Evaluation of Fast Ethernet, Giganet, and Myrinet on a Cluster  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the performance of three popular technologies used to interconnect machines on clusters: Fast Ethernet, Myrinet and Giganet. To achieve this purpose, we used the NAS Parallel Benchmarks. Surprisingly, for the LU application, the ...

Marcelo Lobosco; Vítor Santos Costa; Claudio Luis de Amorim

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Forecast-Based Decision Support for San Francisco International Airport: A NextGen Prototype System That Improves Operations during Summer Stratus Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During summer, marine stratus encroaches into the approach to San Francisco International Airport (SFO) bringing low ceilings. Low ceilings restrict landings and result in a high number of arrival delays, thus impacting the National Air Space (NAS). These ...

David W. Reynolds; David A. Clark; F. Wesley Wilson; Lara Cook

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1-05 WP Tec Exch (Schneider) final 11...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EM Tank Waste R&D Plan (2010) EM Tank Waste IPT Report (2010) NAS Report - Advice on the DOE Cleanup Technology Roadmap (2009) EM Engineering & Technology Roadmap (2008) Print...

198

Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistance coef?cient (RRC), which is also a non-dimensionalresistance (NAS 2006). The RRC for typical family cars is inoff-road tires have higher RRC values. While tires with RRC

Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Electric Vehicle Preparedness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

state or reflect those of the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. INLEXT-13-29360 Electric Vehicle Preparedness Task 1: Assessment of Data and Survey Results for NAS...

200

Concept development and evaluation of airborne traffic displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system concept for a cockpit traffic situation display (TSD) was developed and a preliminary evaluation was undertaken to investigate the effect of a TSD on safety, efficiency, and capacity in the 3rd generation NAS/ARTS ...

Imrich, Thomas

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Competition and congestion in the National Aviation System : multi-agent, multi-stakeholder approaches for evaluation and mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The US National Aviation System (NAS) is a complex system with multiple, interacting agents including airlines, passengers, and system operators, each with somewhat different objectives and incentives. These interactions ...

Vaze, Vikrant (Vikrant Suhas)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evaluating passenger delays in the US domestic air transportation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fundamental component of any National Airspace System (NAS) performance evaluation is the cost impact of air traffic delays, and more generally capacity limitations, on the traveling passengers. In previous research it ...

Umang, Nitish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Safety considerations for operation of different classes of unmanned aerial vehicles in the National Airspace System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is currently a broad effort underway in the United States and internationally by several organizations to craft regulations enabling the safe operation of UAVs in the NAS. Current federal regulations governing unmanned ...

Weibel, Roland E. (Roland Everett)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Safety Considerations for Operation of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is currently a broad effort underway in the United States and internationally by several organizations to craft regulations enabling the safe operation of UAVs in the NAS. Current federal regulations governing unmanned ...

Weibel, Roland E

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

205

Complete genome sequence of Capnocytophaga ochracea type strain (VPI 2845T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with type strain genome sequencing projects registered inR= IDA; C=TAS; and I= NAS. Genome sequencing and annotationin Table 2. Table 2. Genome sequencing project information

Mavromatis, Konstantinos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Review and evaluation of national airspace system models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract from Technical Report Documentation Page: This report is intended to serve as a guide to the availability and capability of state-of-the-art analytical and simulation models of the National Airspace System (NAS). ...

Odoni, Amedeo R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Definition: Kilowatt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Known As kW Related Terms Kilowatt-hour, Power, Watt, power References http:www1.eere.energy.govsiteadministrationglossary.htmlK http:needtoknow.nas.eduenergy...

208

THE UNIVERSITY' OF CHICAGO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

were begun. Several elurrie.3 were made up using eimlyred, miorcnied U02 and light water. This latter nas employ for t-m re*eo*e. First, it served ae a good ?eane of...

209

Evaluating the depiction of complex RNAV/RNP procedures and analyzing a potential de-cluttering technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance Based Navigation (PBN) is a key element of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) NextGen Program. In order to increase National Airspace System (NAS) capacity and efficiency, PBN routes and procedures are ...

Butchibabu, Abhizna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management System – Battery Storage Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the modeling approach, methodologies, and results of the sodium sulfur (NaS) battery evaluation study, which was conducted by Battelle for the California Energy Commission (CEC).

Lu, Ning; Weimar, Mark R.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Ma, Jian; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Distributed feedback control for an eulerian model of the national airspace system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes an Eulerian model of traffic flows in the National Airspace System (NAS) and presents a distributed feedback control approach for managing the flows. The main contribution is the development of a model ...

Le Ny, Jerome

212

Nash Equilibria in Random Games Imre B ar any # , Santosh Vempala + and Adrian Vetta #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

serial no NAS-6 24 635 2 doacross no SDS-1 1 25 2 serial no SDS-2 1 32 3 serial no SDS-3 1 25 2 serial

Vempala, Santosh

213

NETL-RUA ENEWS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 2012 VOLUME 2, ISSUE 8 NETL-RUA Members Selected as Ambassadors in Pilot Science Program On Wednesday, May 30, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National...

214

Using tactical flight level resource allocation to alleviate congested en-route airspace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A motivation exists to formulate and implement new tools and methodologies to address the problem of congestion in the National Airspace System (NAS). This thesis presents a novel methodology for allocating aircraft among ...

Abad, Antonio Manuel, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* Ridge Energy Mini-CAES Feasibility Study * DUA NYS Energy Storage Market Analysis * EPRI SolutionsCustomized Energy NYS EES Economics Study * NYPALI Bus 1 MW7 MWhr NaS BESS...

216

Uranium and Aluminosilicate Surface Precipitation Tests  

SciTech Connect

The 2H evaporator at the Savannah River Site has been used to treat an aluminum-rich waste stream from canyon operations and a silicon-rich waste stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The formation of aluminosilicate scale in the evaporator has caused significant operational problems. Because uranium has been found to accumulate in the aluminosilicate solids, the scale deposition has introduced criticality concerns as well. The objective of the tests described in this report is to determine possible causes of the uranium incorporation in the evaporator scale materials. The scope of this task is to perform laboratory experiments with simulant solutions to determine if (1) uranium can be deposited on the surfaces of various sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) forms and (2) aluminosilicates can form on the surfaces of uranium-containing solids. Batch experiments with simulant solutions of three types were conducted: (1) contact of uranium solutions/sols with NAS coatings on stainless steel surfaces, (2) contact of uranium solutions with NAS particles, and (3) contact of precipitated uranium-containing particles with solutions containing aluminum and silicon. The results show that uranium can be incorporated in NAS solids through encapsulation in bulk agglomerated NAS particles of different phases (amorphous, zeolite A, sodalite, and cancrinite) as well as through heterogeneous deposition on the surfaces of NAS coatings (amorphous and cancrinite) grown on stainless steel. The results also indicate that NAS particles can grow on the surfaces of precipitated uranium solids. Particularly notable for evaporator operations is the finding that uranium solids can form on existing NAS scale, including cancrinite solids. If NAS scale is present, and uranium is in sufficient concentration in solution to precipitate, a portion of the uranium can be expected to become associated with the scale. The data obtained to date on uranium-NAS affinity are qualitative. A necessary next step is to quantitatively determine the amounts of uranium that may be incorporated into NAS scale solids under differing conditions e.g., varying silicon/aluminum ratio, uranium concentration, temperature, and deposition time.

Hu, M.Z.

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

217

Technical Considerations for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission/ National Academy of Sciences Proposed Study: Cancer in Populations L iving Near Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), is updating the 1990 U.S. National Institutes of Health - National Cancer Institute (NCI) report, Cancer in Populations Living near Nuclear Facilities. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a committee of scientists and professionals in the fields of epidemiology, radiation biology, nuclear plant effluents, and environmental risk assessment to provide study design considerations to the NAS committe...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

218

Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and Energy at Naval Air Station Oceana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location at NAS Oceana. Location at NAS Oceana. by these changes, including bachelor housing, hangers, the galley, office buildings, the chapel, and maintenance facilities. This ESPC also included installing ground source heat pumps in three buildings, adding digital control systems to increase heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) efficiency, efficient lighting retrofits, and other water conservation measures. These other water conservation measures include over 5,000 water efficient domestic fixtures, includ- ing faucets, showerheads, and toilets

219

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent CO2 Capture Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0013865 Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is continuing the development process for a non-aqueous solvent (NAS)-based CO2 capture process that was originated at laboratory scale under an ARPA-E project. This project will conduct bench-scale testing to show the potential of the technology to reduce the parasitic energy penalty. Key technical and economic challenges and uncertainties to be addressed include solvent makeup cost, scalable regenerator design, development of a complete NAS process arrangement, and improved confidence in the capital cost estimate that will enable the scale up of the process. One major focus is identification of best-candidate NAS formulations. This will entail reducing solvent makeup costs by reducing the formulation cost. In addition, efforts will be made to reduce evaporative and degradation losses while maintaining the desired CO2 absorption chemistry. A second focus area involves advancing the design of the process. This will be done by developing and evaluating the effectiveness of two process units specific to NASs - the NAS Recovery/Wash Section and NAS Regenerator. As the project proceeds, the testing campaign will evaluate thermal regeneration energy requirements [kJt / kg CO2] and develop a detailed understanding of the operation of the process. Preliminary analyses indicate that the NAS process can reduce energy consumption by 30 to 50 percent compared to current state of the art CO2 capture processes.

220

Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and Energy at Naval Air Station Oceana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Location at NAS Oceana. Location at NAS Oceana. by these changes, including bachelor housing, hangers, the galley, office buildings, the chapel, and maintenance facilities. This ESPC also included installing ground source heat pumps in three buildings, adding digital control systems to increase heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) efficiency, efficient lighting retrofits, and other water conservation measures. These other water conservation measures include over 5,000 water efficient domestic fixtures, includ- ing faucets, showerheads, and toilets

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

LIFE Economics and Delivery Pathway Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anklam--NAS/NAE, January 29, 2011 2NIF-0111-20828s2.ppt #12;A minimum electrical gain of 3 to 4 gain may outweigh benefits LIFE Point Design Anklam--NAS/NAE, January 29, 2011NIF-0111-20828s2.ppt 3, 2011NIF-0111-20828s2.ppt 4 #12;Improvements to gain need to be weighed against cost impacts on affected

222

Technical Considerations for NRC/National Academy Proposed Study of Cancer Risks in Populations Living near Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), is updating the 1990 U.S. National Institutes of Health - National Cancer Institute (NCI) report, "Cancer in Populations Living near Nuclear Facilities." The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a committee of scientists and professionals in the fields of epidemiology, radiation biology, nuclear plant effluents, and environmental risk assessment to provide study design considerations to the NAS commit...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Flexible Network Attached Storage using Remote DMA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to make nodes in a cluster double as compute nodes and network attached storage (NAS) nodes. This allows for a flexible and customizable storage system as the NAS control software is handled by regular workstations. The nodes can still be efficient compute nodes if networks with remote DMA capabilities are used, as such networks remove the processor from the data forwarding loop. We demonstrate this through measurements of a prototype implementation.

Jørgen S. Hansen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the last of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues that may affect the commercial-scale use of sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles. The reports are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers the in-vehicle safety issues of electric vehicles powered by Na/S batteries. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, and private industry. It has three major goals: (1) to identify the unique hazards associated with electric vehicle (EV) use; (2) to describe the existing standards, regulations, and guidelines that are or could be applicable to these hazards; and (3) to discuss the adequacy of the existing requirements in addressing the safety concerns of EVs.

Mark, J

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 4, In-vehicle safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the last of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues that may affect the commercial-scale use of sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles. The reports are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers the in-vehicle safety issues of electric vehicles powered by Na/S batteries. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, and private industry. It has three major goals: (1) to identify the unique hazards associated with electric vehicle (EV) use; (2) to describe the existing standards, regulations, and guidelines that are or could be applicable to these hazards; and (3) to discuss the adequacy of the existing requirements in addressing the safety concerns of EVs.

Mark, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48H RADIOACTIVEWASTE SAMPLE USING FLUIDIZED BED STEAMREFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANICDESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

Crawford, C

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract The goal of this study is to map and characterize Quaternary faults in southern Dixie Valley for the Department of the Navy Geothermal Program Office's NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project. We will use this information to better characterize the regional structure and geothermal resource potential of the area,with a focus on determining the structural

228

OpenSHMEM Performance and Potential: A NPB Experimental Study  

SciTech Connect

OpenSHMEM is a recently introduced open stan- dard for all SHMEM libraries. In this paper we discuss the dif- ferent aspects of porting the NAS parallel benchmarks from their MPI 1 implementations to those that use the new OpenSHMEM library API. We compare performance and scalability of these unoptimized OpenSHMEM NAS benchmarks with their MPI 1, and in some cases, MPI 2 counter parts. Through the perfor- mance results of the OpenSHMEM NAS parallel benchmarks on three different platforms that use different OpenSHMEM library implementations we show that even without optimizations these benchmarks have performance comparable to MPI 1 and better than MPI 2 on more mature library implementations. We also do an in-depth analysis of the performance and expect that with hardware support and better implementation of collectives the OpenSHMEM implementations can outperform MPI.

Pophale, Swaroop [University of Houston, Houston; Nanjegowda, Ramachandra [University of Houston, Houston; Curtis, Anthony R [ORNL; Chapman, Barbara [University of Houston, Houston; Jin, Haoqiang [NASA Ames Research Center; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Band engineering in dilute nitride and bismide semiconductor lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly mismatched semiconductor alloys such as GaNAs and GaBiAs have several novel electronic properties, including a rapid reduction in energy gap with increasing x and also, for GaBiAs, a strong increase in spin orbit- splitting energy with increasing Bi composition. We review here the electronic structure of such alloys and their consequences for ideal lasers. We then describe the substantial progress made in the demonstration of actual GaInNAs telecomm lasers. These have characteristics comparable to conventional InP-based devices. This includes a strong Auger contribution to the threshold current. We show, however, that the large spin-orbit-splitting energy in GaBiAs and GaBiNAs could lead to the suppression of the dominant Auger recombination loss mechanism, finally opening the route to e?fficient temperature-stable telecomm and longer wavelength lasers with significantly reduced power consumption.

Christopher A. Broderick; Muhammad Usman; Stephen J. Sweeney; Eoin P. O'Reilly

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Viral genome structures are optimal for capsid assembly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding how virus capsids assemble around their nucleic acid (NA) genomes could promote efforts to block viral propagation or to reengineer capsids for gene therapy applications. We develop a coarse-grained model of capsid proteins and NAs with which we investigate assembly dynamics and thermodynamics. In contrast to recent theoretical models, we find that capsids spontaneously `overcharge'; i.e., the negative charge of the NA exceeds the positive charge on capsid. When applied to specific viruses, the optimal NA lengths closely correspond to the natural genome lengths. Calculations based on linear polyelectrolytes rather than base-paired NAs underpredict the optimal length, demonstrating the importance of NA structure to capsid assembly. These results suggest that electrostatics, excluded volume, and NA tertiary structure are sufficient to predict assembly thermodynamics and that the ability of viruses to selectively encapsidate their genomic NAs can be explained, at least in part, on a thermodynamic basis.

Jason D. Perlmutter; Cong Qiao; Michael F. Hagan

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Development of the prototype pneumatic transfer system for ITER neutron activation system  

SciTech Connect

The neutron activation system (NAS) measures neutron fluence at the first wall and the total neutron flux from the ITER plasma, providing evaluation of the fusion power for all operational phases. The pneumatic transfer system (PTS) is one of the key components of the NAS for the proper operation of the system, playing a role of transferring encapsulated samples between the capsule loading machine, irradiation stations, counting stations, and disposal bin. For the validation and the optimization of the design, a prototype of the PTS was developed and capsule transfer tests were performed with the developed system.

Cheon, M. S.; Seon, C. R.; Pak, S.; Lee, H. G. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Bertalot, L. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

National Park ServiceNational Park Service U.S. Department of the InteriorU.S. Department of the Interior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

learn relevant science in parks E X P E R I E N C E Y O U R A M E R I C AE X P E R I E N C E Y O U R A M E R I C A NPS helps attain NAS science education standards andNPS helps attain NAS scienceTim Watkins S i d Ed ti C di tS i d Ed ti C di tScience and Education CoordinatorScience and Education

Crone, Elizabeth

233

TEPPC Meeting November 2-3, 2011 San Diego, CA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2013 6, 2013 Jim Williams, staff, WIEB, High-Level Radioactive Waste Committee The Proposed BNSF Settlement Agreement: Background & WIEB Comments Outline: Proposed BNSF Settlement Agreement & WIEB Comments 1. Background 2. National interest in dedicated trains * Explicitly stated by NAS in 2006 * Advantages expressed by NAS 3. WIEB concerns & comments (4) * Section of settlement agreement * Basis for WIEB comment * Joint Reply from BNSF / DOE / DOD 4. Overarching points in Joint Reply & WIEB's Response to Joint Reply 5. Status 2 The Proposed BNSF Settlement Agreement: Background 1983: DOE/DOD sue 21 major railroads (see, Union Pacific, Balt & Ohio; Aberdeen & Rockfish) Re: the common carrier obligation to carry SNF/HLW in

234

Ventilation of the Deep Western Boundary Current and Abyssal Western North Atlantic: Estimates from Tritium and 3He Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tritium and excess 3He data from the 1981 TTO/NAS program are used to study the time scales for the ventilation of the deep western basin by recently formed North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). The large-scale distributions of tritium and 3He in ...

Scott C. Doney; William J. Jenkins

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix C: preliminary design data package. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix to the final report on the Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program contans data on Na-S batteries, Ni-Zn batteries; vehicle body design; tire characteristics; and results of computer simulations of vehicle yaw, pitch, and roll under various driving and aerodynamic conditions. (LCL)

Piccolo, R.

1979-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

236

User-assisted ink-bleed correction for handwritten documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a user-assisted framework for correcting ink-bleed in old handwritten documents housed at the National Archives of Singapore (NAS). Our approach departs from traditional correction techniques that strive for full automation. Fully-automated ... Keywords: document processing, ink-bleed, restoration, user-assisted systems

Yi Huang; Michael S. Brown

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

mn header will be provided by the publisher To appear in Math. Nachr., 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Baku, Azerbaijan 2 Universidade do Algarve, Portugal Received(1), (1997), 107-114. Mubariz G. Hajibayov Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics of NAS of Azerbaijan. 9, F.Agayev str., AZ1141, Baku, Azerbaijan. Stefan G. Samko Universidade do Algarve. Faro 8000, Portugal Copyright

Samko, Stefan

238

HMNewsFall09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTENTS CONTENTS Japan's R&D Program ..................1 Hydrate in Nature..........................7 HYFLUX Expedition ......................12 Sub Sampling for GH ................ 16 Gas Production Geomechanical Implications ................................. 18 Announcements ...................... 23 * Database Now Available * Global Assessment * NETL-NAS Fellowship * New Zealand Workshop * EGU 2010 Abstracts

239

Programa Intensivo de Lngua Portuguesa e Cultura Brasileira da UFMG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais, possuindo campi nas cidades de Belo Horizonte (capital de MG) e Montes Carlos, 6627 - Campus Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil. Classes: Faculty of Letters at UFMG ­ Avenida Antonio Carlos, 6627 - Campus Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Público Alvo

Chaimowicz, Luiz

240

COLE DOCTORALE ABB GREGOIRE QUIPE de LA CLINIQUE DE L'ACTIVIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e milhas Antes de dormir Eu nem cochilei Os mais belos montes Escalei Nas noites escuras De frio m'ont aidée avec tant de patience à comprendre un peu de cette langue si difficile. � Antoine m'ont aidée, chacun à sa manière, à comprendre un peu plus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mixing of miscible liquids in gas-segmented serpentine channels Hakan Dogan a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixing of miscible liquids in gas-segmented serpentine channels Hakan Dogan a , Selman Nas b July 2009 Accepted 16 July 2009 Available online 22 July 2009 Keywords: Segmented gas-liquid flow of miscible liquids in gas-segmented serpentine channels is studied computationally in a two

Muradoglu, Metin

242

PROCEEDINGS O F THE IEEE, VOL.56, NO. 1, JANUARY196837 [`I J. J. Wysocki,"Lithium-doped radiation-resistant silicon solar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,"Lithium-doped radiation-resistant silicon solar cells," IEEE Trans. Nuclear Science. vol.NS-13, pp. 168-173, December 1966 damagein semiconductorsXI1: Effects ofhighenergy electrons in silicon and silicon solar cells," Contract NAS 5-3805, May 25, 1966. 14] R. V. Tauke, "Thermal annealing of irradiated n-on-p silicon solar cells

Teich, Malvin C.

243

Water Resource Impacts of Alternative Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Commission also has produced large number of reports on California's water ­ energy relationship. NRDC and other NGOs also have produced reports on similar issues #12;8 Modeling Water Resources within per unit (gallon or mmBtu) of ethanol produced NAS (07), Fingerman (08): Net water changes from

California at Davis, University of

244

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Monthly progress reports, April 1, 1978--June 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a collection of monthly status reports from the AiResearch Manufacturing Company, who is developing eight prototype solar heating and cooling sytems under NASA Contract NAS8-32091. This effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3-, 25-, and 75-ton size units.

Not Available

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Survey of UAS Technologies for Command, Control, and Communication (C3)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integration of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) presents many challenges including airworthiness certification. As an alternative to the time consuming process of modifying the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs), ... Keywords: Certification, Command, control, and communication (C3), Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS)

Richard S. Stansbury; Manan A. Vyas; Timothy A. Wilson

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Preliminary Analysis of Potential ADS-B User Benefits for Hawaiian Helicopter Air Tour Operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADS-B ground infrastructure is currently planned to be installed in Hawaii between 2010 and 2013 as part of the National Airspace System (NAS) wide implementation of ADS-B. Current plans call for ADS-B coverage to be focused ...

Lester, Edward

247

Early Childhood Distance Partnership Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wagner Tribal Affiliation: Blackfeet Hometown: Browning, MT Double Major: Media Arts Future Plans: John-timers who continue with us this year - George Price (NAS 100) and Annabelle Chatsis (Blackfeet Language a freshman seminar for us. He is also holding advanced Blackfeet language seminars on Tuesday afternoons. Dr

Maxwell, Bruce D.

248

Resolution of National Academy of Sciences technical issues at N Reactor; Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document the Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (Westinghouse Hanford) response documenting the scope required to address the 14 issues identified in the NAS/NAE technical recommendations that affect the N Reactor. The closure of the issues related to the N Reactor will provide the appropriate documentation to the DOE for certification of compliance.

Rainey, T.E.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Na-ion Intercalation Electrodes for Na...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAES Pumped Hydro Power Stationary 1 kW 100 kW 10 MW 1 GW 10 kW 1 MW 100 MW Li Ion Battery NaS, Na metal halide Vehicle Energy Density and Cost Lifetime and Capital Cost PHEV...

250

Predicting Price/Performance Trade-offs for Whitney: A Commodity Computing Cluster  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We couple simple performance models with pricing to optimize the design of clusters built from commodity components for scientific computing. We apply this technique using the NAS Parallel Benchmarks as a representative workload. We develop models of ... Keywords: PC clusters, benchmarking, performance modeling, supercomputing

Jeffrey C. Becker; Bill Nitzberg; Rob F. Van Der Wijngaart; Maurice Yarrow

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

272 JOURNAL OF DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 9, NO. 4, APRIL 2013 First-Principle Electronic Properties of Dilute-As  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure, dilute-As GaNAs, First-Principle, lasers, light-emitting diodes. I. INTRODUCTION GROUP III-Nitride compound plays a critical role in the optoelectronic applications such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs for the laser and light emitting diode applications. Due to the technological importance that is potentially

Gilchrist, James F.

252

Joe W. Kwan U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington DC December 5, 2012 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory #12;We presented to NAS diameter spot 0.03 J/cm2 (50 ns window) 5.3 J/cm2 (0.6 ns window) Fluence w/in focal radius & FWHM duration

253

BURNING PLASMA NEXT STEPS: DISCUSSION OF KEY DEVELOPMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BURNING PLASMA NEXT STEPS: DISCUSSION OF KEY DEVELOPMENTS Gerald A. Navratil Columbia University/FESAC Burning Plasma Strategy Dec 2002 NRC/NAS Interim Report on Burning Plasmas Jan 30, 2003 DOE of the physics of burning plasma, advance fusion technology, and contribute to the development of fusion energy

254

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Monthly progress reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a collection of monthly status reports from the AiResearch Manufacturing Company, who is developing eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems under NASA Contract NAS8-32091. This effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3-, 25-, and 75-ton size units.

Not Available

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Electricity from Renewables: Status, Prospects, and Impediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity from Renewables: Status, Prospects, and Impediments America's Energy Future Study Panel on Electricity from Renewables K. John Holmes, National Research Council, Study Director (jholmes@nas.edu) #12, Carnegie Mellon University ·James J. Markowsky***, American Electric Power (Ret.) ·Richard A. Meserve

Kammen, Daniel M.

256

Abstract This paper addresses the following key questions in the discussion on the integration of renewable energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries, pumped hydro energy storage (PH), and demand response (DR). Hybrid, NaS battery, Li-Ion battery, pumped-hydro energy storage, demand response, hybrid energy storage turbines (CT), demand response (DR), and pumped hydro energy storage (PH). This paper addresses several key

257

Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, pumped-hydro energy storage (PH), and demand response (DR). Hybrid concepts that combine 2 or more conventional turbines (CT), sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries, Lithium Ion (Li-ion) batteries, pumped-hydro energy explores the financial feasibility of using pumped hydro systems for energy arbitrage in the BPA region

258

Global Warming: Connecting the Dots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Conservation More Efficient Technology Life Style Changes 2. Renewable & CO2-Free Energy Hydro Solar, Wind) Carbon Tax/Technology Investment, (3) Energy Efficiency Standards, (4) NAS study on ice sheets, (5 for CO2 Emissions and Climate Change #12;Methods to Reduce CO2 Emissions 1. Energy Efficiency

Hansen, James E.

259

Microsoft PowerPoint - 6- 02 final - Next generation melter deploymet at WTP - Nov10.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ron Calmus, WRPS Ron Calmus, WRPS Ron Calmus, WRPS Terry Sams, WRPS Terry Sams, WRPS Deployment Plan Overview for Next Deployment Plan Overview for Next Generation Melter at WTP Generation Melter at WTP November 17, 2010 November 17, 2010 Print Close Tank Operations Contract 2 Presentation Outline  Introduction and Background  Project Goals and Objectives  Key Programmatic Decisions  New Generation Melters (NGM) Development and Deployment Planning (AJHCM & CCIM)  NGM Development and Deployment Activities and Interfaces  Near-Term NGM Development Costs  Summary - Focus Areas Next Generation Melters 2 Print Close Tank Operations Contract 3 Introduction and Background  National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Recommendations - In 2009 the NAS stated in it's report that:

260

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 18920 of 28,560 results. 11 - 18920 of 28,560 results. Download Newsletter (May 2011) SHR.pub http://energy.gov/management/downloads/newsletter-may-2011-shrpub Article NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" Remarks As Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman http://energy.gov/articles/nas-nae-national-convocation-rising-above-gathering-storm-two-years-later-accelerating Download Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc.- EA-2000-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc., related to Work Planning and Control Deficiencies associated with Replacement of Exhaust Ventilation Filters at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DOE Congratulates Under Secretary, National Lab Director and Other National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Congratulates Under Secretary, National Lab Director and Other Congratulates Under Secretary, National Lab Director and Other National Lab Scientists for Receiving Top Scientific Honor DOE Congratulates Under Secretary, National Lab Director and Other National Lab Scientists for Receiving Top Scientific Honor April 29, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Under Secretary for Science Steven E. Koonin, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Director Persis Drell, and other National Lab affiliated scientists and engineers are among the 72 new members elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). NAS is a private, nonprofit, honorific society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to furthering science and technology and to their use for the general welfare.

262

ESS 2012 Peer Review - NYSERDA Energy Storage Projects - Dhruv Bhatnagar, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NYSERDA Energy Storage Projects NYSERDA Energy Storage Projects Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND No. 2011-XXXXP NaS Battery at MTA Long Island Bus Depot Beacon Flywheel Plant at Stephentown, NY 4 Demonstration Project Sites 1) Beacon Flywheel Plant at Stephentown, NY * Ancillary services in NYISO 2) NaS Battery at MTA Long Island Bus Depot * Time of day load shifting to avoid TOU rates 3) Flow Battery at Niagara Falls State Park * Renewables integration/firming &

263

Excess plutonium disposition: The deep borehole option  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the current status of technologies required for the disposition of plutonium in Very Deep Holes (VDH). It is in response to a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report which addressed the management of excess weapons plutonium and recommended three approaches to the ultimate disposition of excess plutonium: (1) fabrication and use as a fuel in existing or modified reactors in a once-through cycle, (2) vitrification with high-level radioactive waste for repository disposition, (3) burial in deep boreholes. As indicated in the NAS report, substantial effort would be required to address the broad range of issues related to deep bore-hole emplacement. Subjects reviewed in this report include geology and hydrology, design and engineering, safety and licensing, policy decisions that can impact the viability of the concept, and applicable international programs. Key technical areas that would require attention should decisions be made to further develop the borehole emplacement option are identified.

Ferguson, K.L.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

Astrophysical and cosmological problems of invisible mass and dark energy in the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Workshop on results of the Project Kosmomikrofizyka-2 (Astroparticle Physics) of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) of Ukraine "Astrophysical and cosmological problems of invisible mass and dark energy in the Universe" was held on November 21-22, 2012 in the Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv, Ukraine (http://lpd.kinr.kiev.ua/kmf12). This Project was carried out during three years (2010-2012) by scientists from various universities and institutes of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine; it was a logical continuation of the previous scientific program of the NAS of Ukraine "Researches of structure and composition of the Universe, hidden mass and dark energy (Kosmomikrofizyka)" in 2007-2009. These programs were devoted to theoretical and experimental investigations in astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, physics of atomic nuclei and particle physics, which are related with the problems of dark matter and dark energy in the Universe.

P. Belli; L. A. Berdina; R. Bernabei; A. Bogdan; R. S. Boiko; A. Yu. Burgazli; F. Cappella; R. Cerulli; D. M. Chernyak; F. A. Danevich; A. d'Angelo; M. V. Eingorn; S. H. Fakhr; E. Fedorova; E. N. Galashov; A. Giuliani; B. I. Hnatyk; A. Incicchitti; G. Ivashchenko; V. V. Kobychev; O. O. Kobzar; H. Kraus; B. N. Kropivyansky; A. V. Kudinova; Yu. A. Kulinich; M. Laubenstein; V. V. Marchenko; S. Marnieros; V. B. Mikhailik; A. A. Minakov; V. M. Mokina; L. L. Nagornaya; A. S. Nikolaiko; C. Nones; B. S. Novosyadlyj; E. Olivieri; V. O. Pelykh; D. V. Poda; R. B. Podviyanuk; O. G. Polischuk; O. N. Sergijenko; V. N. Shlegel; V. M. Shulga; V. M. Sliusar; O. B. Sushchov; Y. V. Taistra; M. Tenconi; O. Torbaniuk; V. I. Tretyak; V. S. Tsvetkova; V. G. Vakulik; Ya. V. Vasiliev; A. Vasylenko; O. Vasylenko; V. I. Zhdanov; A. I. Zhuk

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

265

Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries: Status and Challenges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sodium-beta alumina batteries, have been extensively developed for a few decades and encouraging progress has been achieved so far. The anode is typically molten sodium while the cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). The electrolyte typically used is a ?"-Al2O3 solid membrane. The issues prohibiting broad commercialization of this type of technology are dependent on the materials used, but can be broadly described as relatively high cost, safety (particularly for the Na-S couple), and low power. This paper offers a review on materials and designs for the batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

266

Security Topic Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group Group Security and TEC * Tension exists between open forum concept of TEC and the ability of STG members to discuss security topics. - DOE will maintain the open forum - it will not form a subgroup of cleared members NAS Study * Some members want STG to formally recommend a fully independent review of security issues - DOE is reviewing the NAS study and has not formulated a position Security Topic Group (Continued) Classification Guide & Information Sharing Protocol * Guide is finished and undergoing internal concurrence - Slated for late September release * Protocol will be completed once the guide is issued Security-Related Lessons Learned * Lessons learned document was distributed and comments requested by the end of March Security Topic Group (Continued) SRG/CVSA Survey

267

CMVRTC: PBBT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

performance based Brake tester (PBBt) performance based Brake tester (PBBt) PBBT The ORNL's Center for Transportation Analysis, in collaboration with the FMCSA and the Tennessee Highway Patrol (THP) Commercial Vehicle Enforcement (CVE), conducted a Performance-Based Brake Tester (PBBT) Valuation Study. The purpose of the study was to determine the PBBT's ability to increase the number of contacts with commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) and explore how the PBBT affects the CMV out-of-service (OOS) rate. The PBBT is a roller dynamometer which measures the vehicle's established brake force and calculates brake efficiency to indicate the effectiveness of the vehicle's brakes. Several test scenarios were employed using North American Standard (NAS) Level-1, 2, and 3 CMV inspection criteria. The first three scenarios employed both an NAS inspection (Level-1, 2, or 3)

268

Deux noms tangoutes dans une legende tibetaine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I ème siècle, et donc antérieure d’au moins quatre cent ans aux textes tibétains eux-mêmes. Deuxièmement, le nom d’une montagne est mentionné, accompagné lui aussi d’une glose en tibétain : de nas rgyal-rabs drug na Mi-nyag Rgyal-rgod byung / de... ’i dus su / si no‘i zhwa / Bod-skad du bsgyur na / sems nag-po’i ri zhes pa la skyes pa’i mis rgyal- po’i blon-po byas nas rgyal-po gsod par ‘gyur zhes pa Six générations après lui, Rgyal-rgod du Mi-nyag apparut. A cette époque, on disait qu’un homme...

Jacques, Guillaume

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Buddhist princess and the woolly turban: non-Buddhist others in a 15th century biography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rnams la ‘di ni bdag gis kun tu mi bzod kyis/ rdo ba dang ‘phongs la rab tu bskrod cig ces bsgoo/’khor rnams kyis kyang le lo ma yin par de bzhin du bgyis pa las/ bya gag gi phreng pa zhig pa bzhin du gyur nas rnga dang bshang la sogs pa rnams ni gzhi... dbus su ci nang bgyid par zhus nas/ de dang de’i las la ‘jug pa na rgyal ba’i dbang mos rang gi lha’i de nyid dran par byes te blta stangs kyi gzir bas gshen rabs kyi rgyal mtshan ‘chang ba yon mchod ‘khor dang bcas pa thams cad la shing tu mi zad pa...

Diemberger, Hildegard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Analise Matematica III 1 o semestre de 2002/2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Â?atica da semana de 18/11/2002) 1. Num reactor nuclear a temperatura t da Â?agua de refrigeraÂ?cÂ?ao, a pressÂ?ao p nas paredes do reactor, e a quantidade de urÂ?anio u no interior do reactor, satisfazem as seguintes relaÂ?cÂ?oes # # # t 2 + 8ue p = 5, ut 3 + p 8u = -1. No estado actual do reactor estas vari

Godinho, Leonor

271

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Monthly progress reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a combination of monthly progress reports submitted by AiResearch Manufacturing Company. It contains a summary of activities and progress made from November 1, 1978, to February 28, 1979. AiResearch Manufacturing Company is developing prototype solar heating/cooling systems under NASA Contract NAS8-32091. This effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

Not Available

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Going the Distance? NRC's Response to the National Academy of Science's Transportation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In February 2006, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) published the results of a 3 1/2-year study, titled Going the Distance, that examined the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) in the United States. NAS initiated this study to address what it perceived to be a national need for an independent, objective, and authoritative analysis of SNF and HLW transport in the United States. The study was co-sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. This paper addresses some of the recommendations made in the NAS study related to the performance of SNF transportation casks in long duration fires, the use of full-scale package testing, and the need for an independent review of transportation security prior to the commencement of large scale shipping campaigns to an interim storage site or geologic repository. In conclusion: The NRC believes that the current regulations in 10 CFR Part 71 for the design of SNF and HLW transportation packages provide a very high level of protection to the public for very severe accidents and credible threat scenarios. As recommended by the NAS study, additional studies of accidents involving severe fires have been completed. These studies have confirmed that spent fuel casks would be expected to withstand very severe fires without the release of any fission products from the spent fuel. Additionally, changes in rail operating procedures such as the use of dedicated trains and prohibition on the co-location of SNF and flammable liquids in rail tunnels can further reduce the already low probability of severe rail accident fires involving SNF and HLW. (authors)

Easton, E.P.; Bajwa, C.S. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test. Final report, September 30, 1992--March 31, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed for manufacturing and demonstrating the performance of its 250-kW molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) stack in an integrated system at the Naval Air Station Miramar (NAS Miramar) located in San Diego, California. The stack constructed for the demonstration test at the NAS Miramar consisted of 250 cells. It was manufactured using M-C Power`s patented Internally Manifolded Heat Exchanger (IMHEX{reg_sign}) stack design. The demonstration test at NAS Miramar was designed to operate the 250-kW MCFC stack in a cogeneration mode. This test represented the first attempt to thermally integrate an MCFC stack in a cogeneration system. The test was started on January 10, 1997, and voluntarily terminated on May 12, 1997, after 2,350 hours of operation at temperatures above 1,100 F and at a pressure of three atmospheres. It produced 160 MWh of d.c. power and 346,000 lbs of 110 psig steam for export during 1,566 hours of on-load operations. The test demonstrated a d.c. power output of 206 kW. Most of the balance of the plant (BOP) equipment operated satisfactorily. However, the off-the-shelf automotive turbocharger used for supplying air to the plant failed on numerous occasions and the hot gas blower developed seal leakage problems which impacted continuous plant operations. Overall the demonstration test at NAS Miramar was successful in demonstrating many critical features of the IMHEX technology. Lessons learned from this test will be very useful for improving designs and operations for future MCFC power plants.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Understanding the Potential and Limitations of Dilute Nitride Alloys for Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dilute nitride alloys provide a powerful tool for engineering the band gap and lattice constant of III-V alloys. However, nitrogen degrades the performance of GaAs solar cells. This project seeks to understand and demonstrate the limits of performance of GaInNAs alloys by (a) correlating deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) data with device performance and (b) using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to reduce background impurity concentrations.

Kurtz, S.; Ptak, A.; Johnston, S.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Friedman, D.; Geisz, J.; McMahon, W.; Kibbler, A.; Olson, J.; Crandall, R.; Branz, H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Development and testing of the Solar Control Corporation modular Controller and Solarstat Subsystem. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the final results of contract NAS8-32258 Solar Control Corporation, for the additional development work on their existing Controller and Solarstat Subsystem for use with solar heating and cooling systems. It discusses the intended use of the final report, describes the deliverable end items, lists program objectives, and relates how they were accomplished. The report shows that the products developed are marketable and suitable for public use.

Hankins, J.D.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Comparison of Storage Technologies for Distributed Resource Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes six electricity storage technologies by describing operating principles, technical characteristics, field experience, and capital and operating costs: o sodium sulfur (NaS) battery o polysulfide-bromine (PSB) battery ("Regensys") o vanadium redox battery (VRB) o compressed air energy storage (CAES) o flywheels electrochemical capacitors In addition, the data is used to compare storage technologies in four applications: (1) peak shaving on the customer side of the meter; (2) peak sh...

2003-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

High Energy Density Na-S/NiCl2 Hybrid Battery  

SciTech Connect

High temperature (250-350°C) sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) are attractive energy storage devices for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications. Currently, two technologies are commercially available in NBBs, e.g., sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries. In this study, we investigated the combination of these two chemistries with a mixed cathode. In particular, the cathode of the cell consisted of molten NaAlCl4 as a catholyte and a mixture of Ni, NaCl and Na2S as active materials. During cycling, two reversible plateaus were observed in cell voltage profiles, which matched electrochemical reactions for Na-S and Na-NiCl2 redox couples. An irreversible reaction between sulfur species and Ni was identified during initial charge at 280°C, which caused a decrease in cell capacity. The final products on discharge included Na2Sn with 1< n < 3, which differed from Na2S3 found in traditional Na-S battery. Reduction of sulfur in the mixed cathode led to an increase in overall energy density over ZEBRA batteries. Despite of the initial drop in cell capacity, the mixed cathode demonstrated relatively stable cycling with more than 95% of capacity retained over 60 cycles under 10mA/cm2. Optimization of the cathode may lead to further improvements in battery performance.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Lemmon, John P.; Kim, Jin Yong; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo (Gary) [Gary

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 30, Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park natural areas and reference areas--Oak Ridge Reservation environmentally sensitive sites containing special plants, animals, and communities  

SciTech Connect

Areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) that contain rare plant or animal species or are special habitats are protected through National Environmental Research Park Natural Area (NA) or Reference Area (RA) designations. The US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park program is responsible for identifying species of vascular plants that are endangered, threatened, or rare and, as much as possible, for conserving those areas in which such species grow. This report includes a listing of Research Park NAs and RAs with general habitat descriptions and a computer-generated map with the areas identified. These are the locations of rare plant or animal species or special habitats that are known at this time. As the Reservation continues to be surveyed, it is expected that additional sites will be designated as Research Park NAs or RAs. This document is a component of a larger effort to identify environmentally sensitive areas on ORR. This report identifies the currently known locations of rare plant species, rare animal species, and special biological communities. Floodplains, wetlands (except those in RAs or NAs), and cultural resources are not included in this report.

Pounds, L.R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US); Parr, P.D.; Ryon, M.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

New Materials for Future Generations of III-V Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three- and four-junction III-V devices are proposed for ultrahigh-efficiency solar cells using a new 1-eV material lattice-matched to GaAs, namely, GaInNAs. We demonstrate working prototypes of a GaInNAs-based solar cell lattice-matched to GaAs with photoresponse down to 1 eV. Under the AM1.5 direct spectrum with all the light higher in energy than the GaAs band gap filtered out, the prototypes grown with base doping of about 10{sup 17} cm-3 have open-circuit voltages ranging from 0.35 to 0.44 V, short-circuit current densities of 1.8 mA/cm2, and fill factors from 61% to 66%. To improve on the current record-efficiency tandem GaInP/GaAs solar cell by adding a GaInNAs junction, the short-circuit current density of this 1-eV cell must be significantly increased. Because these low short-circuit current densities are due to short diffusion lengths, we have demonstrated a depletion-width-enhanced variation of one of the prototype devices that trades off decreased voltage for increased photocurrent, with a short-circuit current density of 7.4 mA/cm2 and an open-circuit voltage of 0.28 V.

Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Olson, J. M.; Kramer, C.; Kibbler, A.; Kurtz, S. R.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Biodegradation of Triclosan by Aerobic Microorganisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Triclosan, a synthetic antimicrobial agent, is an emerging environmental contaminant. Due to incomplete removal of triclosan by wastewater treatment plants, treated wastewater is one major source of environmental triclosan. Biodegradation of triclosan has been observed in activated sludge and the environment, suggesting that it is possible to develop a cost-effective biotreatment strategy for triclosan removal from wastewater. However, current knowledge on triclosan biodegradation is scarce and limited. To bridge this knowledge gap, this dissertation characterized cultivable triclosan-degrading microorganisms, identified uncultivable triclosan-utilizing bacteria, and elucidated triclosan biodegradation pathways. Furthermore, two treatment strategies were examined to enhance triclosan biodegradation in nitrifying activated sludge (NAS). A wastewater bacterial isolate, Sphingopyxis strain KCY1 (hereafter referred as strain KCY1), can completely degrade triclosan with a stoichiometric release of chloride. This strain can retain its degradation ability toward triclosan when after grown in complex nutrient medium containing triclosan as low as 5 micrograms/L. Based on five identified metabolites, a meta-cleavage pathway was proposed for triclosan biodegradation by strain KCY1. By using [13C12]-triclosan stable isotope probing, eleven uncultured triclosan-utilizing bacteria in a triclosan-degrading microbial consortium were identified. These clones are distributed among alpha-, beta-, or gamma-Proteobacteria, suggesting that triclosan-utilizing bacteria are phylogenetically diverse. None of these clone sequences were similar to known triclosan degraders. Growth substrates affected the triclosan degradation potential of four selected oxygenase-expressing bacteria. Biphenyl-grown Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 and propane-grown Rhodococcus ruber ENV425 cannot degrade triclosan. On the other hand, propane- and 2-propanol-grown Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 can degrade triclosan completely. Due to product toxicity, finite transformation capacities for triclosan were observed for Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 grown on biphenyl, propane, and LB medium with dicyclopropylketone (alkane monooxygenase inducer). Four chlorinated metabolites were detected during triclosan degradation by biphenyl-grown RHA1 and a meta-cleavage pathway was proposed. Complete triclosan (5 mg/L) degradation was observed within 96 hrs in NAS receiving ammonia amendment (0 to 75 mg/L of NH4-N). The fastest triclosan degradation was observed in the NAS exhibiting the highest amount of ammonia. When ammonia oxidation was active in NAS, the amendment of strain KCY1 did not further enhance triclosan removal. Overall, the results suggested that triclosan biodegradation can be enhanced by increasing the activity of ammonia oxidation in NAS.

Lee, Do Gyun

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

284

W:\Wpgraphs\CCT\CCToday Newsletter\04-spring\ToPrinter\04_Spring-CHANGES-4-13-04.pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New ZET Initiative New ZET Initiative ........................ 1 News Bytes ................................. 1 Mercury Control Program .............. 3 Carbon Sequestration ................... 6 International Initiatives ................. 8 NAS Hydrogen Report ................ 10 Materials Development ............... 11 MFIX Computer Code ................. 12 Upcoming Events ....................... 13 Status Report .............................. 14 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOE/FE-0468 * ISSUE NO. 57, SPRING 2004 See "News Bytes" on page 13... The U.S. Department of Energy has named Mark Maddox as Act- ing Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, replacing Carl Michael Smith who recently resigned after

285

Related Links | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration The National Nuclear Security Administration Related Links Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs > Related Links Related Links NNSA Lab Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Lab Directed Research and Development Collaborations DOE Adanced Scientific Computing Research DTRA (Defense Threat Reduction Agency) NAS (National Academy of Sciences) NSF (National Science Foundation) DOD (Department of Defense) NASA Exascale Activities NNSA Exascale Environment Planning Workshop ASCR Co-Design Centers Supercomputing Top 500 List ASC at Supercomputing Conference Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Facebook

286

01_fall_rev1.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Meeting on Fossil R&D China Meeting on Fossil R&D ..... 1 News Bytes ................................... 1 DOE CCT Conference ................... 2 Sequestration Conference ............ 3 APFBC Repowering ...................... 4 R&D Milestones ........................... 6 Thermal Barrier Coatings .............. 7 Mined Land a Carbon Sink ........... 8 Upcoming Events .......................... 8 UCR Advances Coal Science ....... 9 NAS Validates FE R&D .............. 10 Lasers to Enhance Gasifiers ....... 11 International Initiatives ............... 12 Status of CCT Projects ................ 14 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOE/FE-0215P-46 ISSUE NO. 46, FALL 2001 See "News Bytes" on page 5 ...

287

Qualification test and analysis report: solar collectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Test results show that the Owens-Illinois Sunpak/sup TM/ Model SEC 601 air-cooled collector meets the national standards and codes as defined in the Subsystem Performance Specification and Verification Plan of NASA/MSFC Contract NAS8-32259, dated October 28, 1976. The architectural and engineering firm of Smith, Hinchman and Grylls, Detroit, Michigan, acted in the capacity of the independent certification agency. The program calls for the development, fabrication, qualification and delivery of an air-liquid solar collector for solar heating, combined heating and cooling, and/or hot water systems.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A feasibility assessment of magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling space power converters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) under NASA Contract NAS3-26061, {open_quotes}A Feasibility Assessment of Magnetic Bearings for Free-Piston Stirling Space Engines.{close_quotes} The work was performed over the period from July 1990 through August 1991. The objective of the effort was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery of the type currently being evaluated for possible use in future long-term space missions.

Curwen, P.W.; Rao, D.K.; Wilson, D.S. [Mechanical Technology Inc., Latham, NY (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

N reactor safety upgrades final status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the requirements, objectives, work completed, and issues resolved for all safety upgrades recommended by the various expert panels (e.g., Roddis), National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and Westinghouse Independent Safety Appraisal (WISA) team. This report reflects the status of the recommendations at the time of publication, while the reactor is being placed in cold standby. Each recommendation required a resolution, a closure process if closed, and a punchlist reference if open and required for restart. These recommendations are maintained on databases that were updated periodically as work was completed or punchlisted. The databases and files are to be retained with the N Reactor Standby files.

Foreman, S.K.; Rainey, T.E.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Microsoft Word - NYSERDA_DOE_Select[1].doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Funding under the for Funding under the Joint NYSERDA / DOE Energy Storage Initiative, Project Title Company Type NAS Battery Demonstration Project New York Power Authority White Plains, NY Demonstration Grid Frequency Regulation by Recycling Electrical Energy in Flywheels Beacon Power Corporation Wilmington, MA Demonstration Demonstration of Commercial Energy Storage Device in Edge of Grid Application Gaia Power Technologies New York, NY Demonstration Rotor Development for Advanced Flywheel Power Systems AFS Trinity Power Corporation Livermore, CA Development New York Storage Market Analysis Distributed Utility Associates Livermore, CA Analysis Market Analysis Studies EPRI PEAC Corporation Knoxville, TN Analysis Mini-CAES for Transmission Congestion Relief Ridge Energy Storage & Grid Services

291

Revue d’Etudes Tibétaines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- yang gtan la mi pheb pas / ‘jal byed mtha’ drug tshul bzhi’i sgo nas rtogs par bya ste / : “ Ainsi, les tantra non communs [qui doivent être l’]objet d’une compréhension exacte (gzhal bya), les ågama, les préceptes et les tantra secrets [dont l... : “objet épistémologique” (tshad mas rtogs par bya ba) (v. Krang dbyi sun, et alii (1985) : Bod rgya tshig mdzod chen mo , Mi rigs dpe skrun khang, DZA-AH, p. 2416) ; on pourrait com- prendre aussi, ”objet d’une réalisation véritable”. 17 V. supra, n. 16...

Achard, Jean-Luc

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A propos de l'usage des termes nyin et srib dans le mDo smad chos 'byung  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

à l'édition mDo smad chos 'byung, Lanzhou, Kan su'u mi rigs dpe skrun khang, 1982. 2 J'en ai déjà traité, pour un autre point ("A propos de notations géographiques dans l'A mdo chos 'byung", Tibet, Past and Present, Tibetan Studies I, Leiden... 63 : " sPu rang nas shar smad kyi phyogs su mi ring bar Klo bo sMan thang zer ba'i yul yod pa…": "Not far in a direction down eastward from Spu-rangs is the region called Klo-bo sman-thang"), elle ne l'est pas pour une région moins connue ou des...

Chayet, Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Going Beyond 10,000 Years at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On July 9, 2004, the U.S. Court of Appeals (1) issued a ruling that denied all challenges, except one, in a set of lawsuits against the federal government’s Yucca Mountain (YM) nuclear waste repository project. The successful challenge, brought by the State of Nevada, argued that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had deviated from recommendations of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (2) by limiting the regulatory compliance time to 10,000 years. Subsequently, the EPA has announced that it will not appeal and instead will revise the standard (3). Here we address several major questions that must be considered in formulating this revised standard. In 1992 Congress passed the Energy Policy Act, directing the EPA to promulgate sitespecific standards for YM “based upon and consistent with the findings and recommendations ” of a NAS review. This review (4) generated recommendations generally consistent with the standard that EPA subsequently established (5). However, important differences remained in the recommendations and justification for the compliance period. EPA chose a 15 mrem per year dose limit with the same 10,000-yearperiod for compliance assessment (6) as used previously for the Waste Isolation Pilot

P. F. Peterson; W. E. Kastenberg; M. Corradini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linde, LLC Linde, LLC SCC/Capture Division FY14-15/ 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2015 Steve Mascaro Murray Hill, NJ Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Continue the advancement of the Recipient's NAS CO2 Capture Process, both in solvent formulation and in process equipment. This work will involve modeling, techno-economic analysis, and risk assessment. Steven A. Mascaro Digitally signed by Steven A. Mascaro DN: cn=Steven A. Mascaro, email=Steven.Mascaro@netl.doe.gov, o=U.S. Dept. Of Energy, NETL, l=Morgantown, WV Reason: I attest to the accuracy and integrity of this document Date: 2013.09.23 16:10:00 -04'00' 09 23 2013 John Ganz Digitally signed by John Ganz DN: cn=John Ganz, o=NETL, ou=ECD, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US

295

Aluminosilicate Precipitation Impact on Uranium  

SciTech Connect

Experiments have been conducted to examine the fate of uranium during the formation of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) when wastes containing high aluminate concentrations are mixed with wastes of high silicate concentration. Testing was conducted at varying degrees of uranium saturation. Testing examined typical tank conditions, e.g., stagnant, slightly elevated temperature (50 C). The results showed that under sub-saturated conditions uranium is not removed from solution to any large extent in both simulant testing and actual tank waste testing. This aspect was not thoroughly understood prior to this work and was necessary to avoid criticality issues when actual tank wastes were aggregated. There are data supporting a small removal due to sorption of uranium on sites in the NAS. Above the solubility limit the data are clear that a reduction in uranium concentration occurs concomitant with the formation of aluminosilicate. This uranium precipitation is fairly rapid and ceases when uranium reaches its solubility limit. At the solubility limit, it appears that uranium is not affected, but further testing might be warranted.

WILMARTH, WILLIAM

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fate of Uranium during Sodium Aluminosilicate Formation under Waste Tank Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Experiments have been conducted to examine the fate of uranium during the formation of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) when wastes containing high aluminate concentrations are mixed with wastes of high silicate concentration. Testing was conducted at varying degrees of uranium saturation. Testing examined typical tank conditions, e.g., stagnant, slightly elevated temperature (50 C). The results showed that under sub-saturated conditions uranium is not removed from solution to any large extent in both simulant testing and actual tank waste testing. There are data supporting a small removal due to sorption of uranium on sites in the NAS. Above the solubility limit the data are clear that a reduction in uranium concentration occurs with the formation of aluminosilicate. This uranium precipitation is fairly rapid and ceases when uranium reaches its solubility limit. At the solubility limit, it appears that uranium is not affected, but further testing might be warranted. Lastly, analysis of the uranium speciation in a Tank 49H set of samples showed the uranium to be soluble. Analysis of the solution composition and subsequent use of the Hobb's uranium solubility model indicated a uranium solubility limit of 32 mg/L. The measured value of uranium in the Tank 49H matched the model prediction.

Wilmarth, B

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

Assessment of Aerosol Radiative Impact over Oceanic Regions Adjacent to Indian Subcontinent using Multi-Satellite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Using data from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, we have retrieved regional distribution of aerosol column single scattering albedo (parameter indicative of the relative dominance of aerosol absorption and scattering effects), a most important, but least understood aerosol property in assessing its climate impact. Consequently we provide improved assessment of short wave aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) (on both regional and seasonal scales) estimates over this region. Large gradients in north-south ARF were observed as a consequence of gradients in single scattering albedo as well as aerosol optical depth. The highest ARF (-37 W m-2 at the surface) was observed over the northern Arabian Sea during June to August period (JJA). In general, ARF was higher over northern Bay of Bengal (NBoB) during winter and pre-monsoon period, whereas the ARF was higher over northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during the monsoon and post- monsoon period. The largest forcing observed over NAS during JJA is the consequence of large amounts of desert dust transported from the west Asian dust sources. High as well as seasonally invariant aerosol single scattering albedos (~0.98) were observed over the southern Indian Ocean region far from continents. The ARF estimates based on direct measurements made at a remote island location, Minicoy (8.3°N, 73°E) in the southern Arabian Sea are in good agreement with the estimates made following multisatellite analysis.

Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Krishnamoorthy, K.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Comparison of Vehicle Efficiency Technology Attributes and Synergy Estimates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyzing the future fuel economy of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) requires detailed knowledge of the vehicle technologies available to improve LDV fuel economy. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been relying on technology data from a 2001 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study (NAS 2001) on corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, but the technology parameters were updated in the new proposed rulemaking (EPA and NHTSA 2009) to set CAFE and greenhouse gas standards for the 2011 to 2016 period. The update is based largely on an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of technology attributes augmented by NHTSA data and contractor staff assessments. These technology cost and performance data were documented in the Draft Joint Technical Support Document (TSD) issued by EPA and NHTSA in September 2009 (EPA/NHTSA 2009). For these tasks, the Energy and Environmental Analysis (EEA) division of ICF International (ICF) examined each technology and technology package in the Draft TSD and assessed their costs and performance potential based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program assessments. ICF also assessed the technologies? other relevant attributes based on data from actual production vehicles and from recently published technical articles in engineering journals. ICF examined technology synergy issues through an ICF in-house model that uses a discrete parameter approach.

Duleep, G.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ford/DOE sodium-sulfur battery electric vehicle development and demonstration. Phase I-1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of Phase I-A analyses and design studies are presented. The objective of the Phase I-A effort was to evaluate the sodium-sulfur battery, in an existing conventional production automobile, as a potential power source for an electric vehicle. The Phase I-A work was divided into five (5) major sub-tasks as follows: vehicle specification sub-task; NaS battery packaging study sub-task; vehicle packaging layout sub-task; electrical system study sub-task; and system study sub-tasks covering performance and economy projections, powertrain and vehicle safety issues and thermal studies. The major results of the sodium-sulfur battery powered electric vehicle study program are: the Fiesta was chosen to be the production vehicle which would be modified into a 2-passenger, electric test bed vehicle powered by a NaS battery; the vehicle mission was defined to be a 2-passenger urban/suburban commuter vehicle capable of at least 100 miles range over the CVS driving cycle and a wide open throttle capability of 0 to 50 mph in 14 seconds, or less; powertrain component specifications were defined; powertrain control strategy has been selected; and a suitable test bed vehicle package scheme has been developed.

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Understanding and Mitigating Multicore Performance Issues on theAMD Opteron Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 15 years, microprocessor performance hasdoubled approximately every 18 months through increased clock rates andprocessing efficiency. In the past few years, clock frequency growth hasstalled, and microprocessor manufacturers such as AMD have moved towardsdoubling the number of cores every 18 months in order to maintainhistorical growth rates in chip performance. This document investigatesthe ramifications of multicore processor technology on the new Cray XT4?systems based on AMD processor technology. We begin by walking throughthe AMD single-core and dual-core and upcoming quad-core processorarchitectures. This is followed by a discussion of methods for collectingperformance counter data to understand code performance on the Cray XT3?and XT4? systems. We then use the performance counter data to analyze theimpact of multicore processors on the performance of microbenchmarks suchas STREAM, application kernels such as the NAS Parallel Benchmarks, andfull application codes that comprise the NERSC-5 SSP benchmark suite. Weexplore compiler options and software optimization techniques that canmitigate the memory bandwidth contention that can reduce computingefficiency on multicore processors. The last section provides a casestudy of applying the dual-core optimizations to the NAS ParallelBenchmarks to dramatically improve their performance.

Levesque, John; Larkin, Jeff; Foster, Martyn; Glenski, Joe; Geissler, Garry; Whalen, Stephen; Waldecker, Brian; Carter, Jonathan; Skinner, David; He, Helen; Wasserman, Harvey; Shalf, John; Shan,Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Evaluation of tuff as a medium for a nuclear waste repository: interim status report on the properties of tuff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second in a series of summary briefings to the National Academy of Science`s (NAS) Committee on Radioactive Waste Management dealing with feasibility of disposal of heat-producing radioactive waste in silicic tuff. The interim status of studies of tuff properties determined on samples obtained from Yucca Mountain and Rainier Mesa (G-tunnel) located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are discussed. In particular, progress is described on resolving issues identified during the first briefing to the NAS which include behavior of water in tuff when heated, the effect of the presence or absence of water and joints on the thermal/physical properties of tuff and the detailed/complex sorptive properties of highly altered and unaltered tuff. Initial correlations of thermal/physical and sorptive properties with the highly variable porosity and mineralogy are described. Three in-situ, at-depth field experiments, one nearly completed and two just getting underway are described. In particular, the current status of mineralogy and petrology, geochemistry, thermal and mechanical, radiation effects and water behavior studies are described. The goals and initial results of a Mine Design Working Group are discussed. Regional factors such as seismicity, volcanism and hydrology are not discussed.

Johnstone, J.K.; Wolfsberg, K. (eds.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

ABCC/RERF: Commemorating the First 50 Years and Looking to the Future [Symposium program  

SciTech Connect

In 1946, President Harry Truman, in a document currently on display at the entrance to this auditorium, approved a directive to the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council (NAS-NRC) to initiate a long-term investigation of the health effects associated with exposure to radiation from the atomic bombs. With funding provided by the Atomic Energy Commission, now the Department of Energy, NAS-NRC established the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) in March 1947. The government of Japan through the Japanese National Institute of Health, became a partner in that endeavor in 1948. In 1975, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) was established and assumed the responsibilities of ABCC. This symposium commemorates 50 years of ABCC/RERF. It is dedicated to the many survivors and their families without whose cooperation we would not have learned as much as we have about the effects of radiation. It is also dedicated to the thousands of employees of RERF and scientists around the world who have contributed through the years to the analysis and interpretation of the information emerging from this unique study.

NONE

1997-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

Inertial confinement fusion. ICF quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993, Volume 4, Number 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1990 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report of its review of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, it was recommended that a high priority be placed on completing the Precision Nova Project and its associated experimental campaign. Since fiscal year 1990, the lab has therefore campaigned vigorously on Nova and in its supporting laboratories to develop the Precision Nova capabilities needed to perform the stressful target experiments recommended in the 1990 NAS report. The activities to enable these experiments have been directed at improvements in three areas - the Nova laser, target fabrication capabilities, and target diagnostics. As summarized in the five articles in this report, the Precision Nova improvements have been successfully completed. These improvements have had a positive impact on target performance and on the ability to diagnose the results, as evidenced by the HEP-1 experimental results. The five articles generally concentrate on improvements to the capabilities rather than on the associated target physics experiments. Separate abstracts are included for each paper.

Powell, H.T.; Schleich, D.P.; Murphy, P.W. [eds.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Direct conversion of surplus fissile materials, spent nuclear fuel, and other materials to high-level-waste glass  

SciTech Connect

With the end of the cold war the United States, Russia, and other countries have excess plutonium and other materials from the reductions in inventories of nuclear weapons. The United States Academy of Sciences (NAS) has recommended that these surplus fissile materials (SFMs) be processed so they are no more accessible than plutonium in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This spent fuel standard, if adopted worldwide, would prevent rapid recovery of SFMs for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. The NAS recommended investigation of three sets of options for disposition of SFMs while meeting the spent fuel standard: (1) incorporate SFMs with highly radioactive materials and dispose of as waste, (2) partly burn the SFMs in reactors with conversion of the SFMs to SNF for disposal, and (3) dispose of the SFMs in deep boreholes. The US Government is investigating these options for SFM disposition. A new method for the disposition of SFMs is described herein: the simultaneous conversion of SFMs, SNF, and other highly radioactive materials into high-level-waste (HLW) glass. The SFMs include plutonium, neptinium, americium, and {sup 233}U. The primary SFM is plutonium. The preferred SNF is degraded SNF, which may require processing before it can be accepted by a geological repository for disposal.

Forsberg, C.W.; Elam, K.R.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Preparation and Characterization of Chemical Plugs Based on Selected Hanford Waste Simulants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of preparation and characterization of chemical plugs based on selected Hanford Site waste simulants. Included are the results of chemical plug bench testing conducted in support of the M1/M6 Flow Loop Chemical Plugging/Unplugging Test (TP-RPP-WTP-495 Rev A). These results support the proposed plug simulants for the chemical plugging/ unplugging tests. Based on the available simulant data, a set of simulants was identified that would likely result in chemical plugs. The three types of chemical plugs that were generated and tested in this task consisted of: 1. Aluminum hydroxide (NAH), 2. Sodium aluminosilicate (NAS), and 3. Sodium aluminum phosphate (NAP). While both solvents, namely 2 molar (2 M) nitric acid (HNO3) and 2 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 60°C, used in these tests were effective in dissolving the chemical plugs, the 2 M nitric acid was significantly more effective in dissolving the NAH and NAS plugs. The caustic was only slightly more effecting at dissolving the NAP plug. In the bench-scale dissolution tests, hot (60°C) 2 M nitric acid was the most effective solvent in that it completely dissolved both NAH and NAS chemical plugs much faster (1.5 – 2 x) than 2 M sodium hydroxide. So unless there are operational benefits for the use of caustic verses nitric acid, 2 M nitric acid heated to 60°C C should be the solvent of choice for dissolving these chemical plugs. Flow-loop testing was planned to identify a combination of parameters such as pressure, flush solution, composition, and temperature that would effectively dissolve and flush each type of chemical plug from preformed chemical plugs in 3-inch-diameter and 4-feet-long pipe sections. However, based on a review of the results of the bench-top tests and technical discussions, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Research and Technology (R&T), Engineering and Mechanical Systems (EMS), and Operations concluded that flow-loop testing of the chemically plugged pipe sections would not provide any additional information or useful data. The decision was communicated through a Sub Contract Change Notice (SCN-070) that included a revised scope as follows: • Photographing the chemical plugs in the pipes before extrusion to compare the morphology of aged gels with that of fresh gels. • Setting up an extrusion apparatus and extruding the chemical plugs. • Documenting the qualitative observations on the efforts to remove the chemical plug materials from the pipe sections. • Performing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of extruded gel samples to detect any crystallization of gel during storage. • Disposing of the extruded gel as a waste. • Documenting the analytical results in a test report. There were no significant morphological differences between the fresh and aged plugs except for an overgrowth of small transparent crystals on the surface of the aged NAS gel plug. An initial pressure of 15 KPa for the NAS plug and from ~2 to 6 KPa for the NAH plug. Following extrusion, the NAP plug sections were thixotropic. The bulk of all the aged gel plugs consisted of amorphous material with nitratine constituting the crystalline phase. A separate question about the whether the current in-tank waste conditions will bound the future multi-tank blended feed conditions for the Waste Treatment Plant is outside the scope of this study.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Gunderson, Katie M.; Baum, Steven R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Poloski, Adam P.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Advisory Committees | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisory Committees Advisory Committees High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees HEPAP AAAC External link NAS External link News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Advisory Committees Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Jointly chartered since October 2000 by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Science Foundation (NSF), HEPAP reports both to DOE's Office of High Energy Physics and the NSF's Mathematical & Physical Sciences

308

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Islanding: Improving Electric Islanding: Improving Electric Service Reliability with Energy Storage Emeka Okafor American Electric Power Nov 2 nd , 2010 Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories 2 Project Description * Outages on distribution system can last several hours. * Energy Storage Systems can be leveraged to reduce impact of outages. * Project demonstrates ability of Energy Storage to mitigate outage impact. * Three 2-MW systems commissioned in 2009. * Demonstrated ability to provide backup power. 2006 - Battery in a Substation for Capital Deferral Installed 1MW, 7.2 MWh of NAS battery on a feeder to defer building a new substation Daily Peak Shaving Tyler Mountain Feeder 12 kV bus North Charleston Feeder

309

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aqueous Rechargeable Lithium Batteries (ARLBs) Aqueous Rechargeable Lithium Batteries (ARLBs) of High Energy Density Prof. Dr. Yuping Wu New Energy and Materials Laboratory (NEML), Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 Tel/Fax: +86-21-5566 4223 Email: wuyp@fudan.edu.cn @ 6th US-China Electric Vehicles and Battery Technology Workshop, Boston 23-24 August, 2012 Motto of NEML Electrochemical technologies 4E + E Energy problem Environmental pollution Enjoy life Solve Reduce To cultivate Elites for the society. 1. Chemical Power Sources * Supercapacitors * Polysulfide bromide battery (PSB) * Zn/Br battery * Vanadium redox couples (VRC) * Sodium sulfur battery (Na/S) * Lead acid battery * Metal-air battery * Ni-MH * Lithium ion battery * Safety * Rate capability

310

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Performance Impacts from and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades Yun (Helen) He National Energy Research Supercomputing Center Cray User Group Meeting May 4-7, 2009 1 Outline * Franklin Introduction * Benchmarks * Quad Core Upgrade * CLE 2.1 Upgrade * IO Upgrade * Summary 2 Franklin's Role at NERSC * NERSC is the US DOE's keystone high performance computing center. * Franklin is the "flagship" system at NERSC serving ~3,100 scientific users in different application disciplines. * Serves the needs for most NERSC users from modest to extreme concurrencies. * Expects significant percentage of time to be used for capability jobs on Franklin. 3 Kernel Benchmarks * Processor: NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) - Serial: NPB 2.3 Class B * best understood code base - Parallel: NPB 2.4 Class D at 64 and 256 ways

311

Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Fallon Naval Air Station Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes As was mentioned previously, the Navy signed a development contract with Ormat in 2005 to produce power from a potential resource on the SE corner of the main side portion of NAS Fallon. Additionally the GPO began additional exploration activities on the Bombing Range 16 in collaboration with the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy. The introduction of $9.1M of Recovery Act funds in early 2009 led to a broadening as well as an

312

Definition: Watt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Watt Watt Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Watt A unit of measure for power, which measures the rate of energy conversion; equal to one joule per second (or 1/746 horsepower); equivalent to one ampere under a pressure of one volt.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The watt' is a derived unit of power in the International System of Units (SI), named after the Scottish engineer James Watt (1736-1819). The unit, defined as one joule per second, measures the rate of energy conversion or transfer. Also Known As W Related Terms Electricity, Power, Kilowatt References ↑ http://www.eia.gov/tools/glossary/index.cfm?id=W#watt ↑ http://needtoknow.nas.edu/energy/glossary/ Retri LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. eved from

313

Statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on the National Academy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on the National Statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on the National Academy of Sciences Report: Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on the National Academy of Sciences Report: Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership August 3, 2005 - 2:35pm Addthis Washington, DC - Late yesterday the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) National Research Council issued a report titled: Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership. Following is a statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman in response to the report: "I am pleased that the National Academy of Sciences agrees that we are on the right path with our research and development. We agree that this effort

314

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Induced Seismic Events Induced Seismic Events (Earthquakes) Key Points: * Induced seismic events are earthquakes attributable to human activity. The possibility of induced seismic activity related to energy development projects, including shale gas, has drawn some public attention. * Although hydraulic fracturing releases energy deep beneath the surface to break rock, studies thus far indicate the energy released is generally not large enough to trigger a seismic event that could be felt on the surface. 1 * However, waste fluid disposal through underground injection can "pose some risk for induced seismicity." 2 * According to the National Academies of Sciences (NAS), accurately predicting seismic event magnitude or occurrence is not possible, in part because of a lack of comprehensive data on

315

Performance and scalability evaluation of "Big Memory" on Blue Gene Linux.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address memory performance issues observed in Blue Gene Linux and discuss the design and implementation of 'Big Memory' - an alternative, transparent memory space introduced to eliminate the memory performance issues. We evaluate the performance of Big Memory using custom memory benchmarks, NAS Parallel Benchmarks, and the Parallel Ocean Program, at a scale of up to 4,096 nodes. We find that Big Memory successfully resolves the performance issues normally encountered in Blue Gene Linux. For the ocean simulation program, we even find that Linux with Big Memory provides better scalability than does the lightweight compute node kernel designed solely for high-performance applications. Originally intended exclusively for compute node tasks, our new memory subsystem dramatically improves the performance of certain I/O node applications as well. We demonstrate this performance using the central processor of the LOw Frequency ARray radio telescope as an example.

Yoshii, K.; Iskra, K.; Naik, H.; Beckman, P.; Broekema, P. C. (LCF); ( MCS); (Netherlands Inst. for Radio Astronomy)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Microsoft PowerPoint - Kosinski  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Research Projects Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) Shane Kosinski Research Opportunities with the DOE for HBCUs July 9, 2009 2 Background on ARPA-E Rising Above the Gathering Storm, 2006 (National Academies) * Establish an Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) * "Creative, out-of-the-box, transformational" energy research * Spinoff Benefit - Help educate next generation of researchers * Secretary Chu (then Director of Berkeley National lab) on committee America COMPETES Act, 2007 * Authorizes the establishment of ARPA-E American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) * $400M provided for ARPA-E * President Obama launches ARPA-E in a speech at NAS on April 27, 2009 3 Background on ARPA-E Mission * To "enhance the economic and energy security of the US"

317

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Technology Radar V-V NaNiCl2 Li-ion ZnCl2 Pb-A NiCad H2Br2 ZnBr2 NiMH NaS Fe2Cr3 trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble trouble Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! Opportunity ! 2  Bridge the gap to the practical application of a mature and high-performance electrochemistry for grid storage.  Provide the required application definition with utility and other customer input to optimize benefits to the community  Facilitate technology and system development in 2010 - 2011  Field demonstration at PG&E Modular Generation Substation early 2012  Field deployment at Modesto Irrigation District late 2012 Proof of Principle Technology

318

FY2002 ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS PEER REVIEW AGENDA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM ANNUAL PEER REVIEW November 2-3, 2006 Washington Marriott Hotel, Washington, DC (USA) AGENDA Thursday, November 2, 2004 7:45 AM Continental Breakfast 8:30 Welcome and Overview - Dr. Imre Gyuk, DOE 8:40 DOE Perspective - DOE 9:00 ESS Program Overview - John Boyes, Sandia National Laboratories 9:20 NAS Battery Performance at Charleston, WV - Ali Nourai, AEP Corp. (Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE/ESS) through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). 9:40 Evaluation of the Kauai Island Utility Co-operative System for Energy storage Potential - Abbas Akhil, Sandia National Laboratories (Funded by the Kauai Island Utility Co-0p). 10:00 Iowa Stored Energy Plant - Bob Haug, Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency

319

Microsoft PowerPoint - Goodwin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology TRansfer (STTR) Dave Goodwin DOE SBIR/STTR Office Physical Scientist HBCU Meeting July 9, 2009 DOE Mission Support 1. Advancing the Nation's Economic and Energy Security. 2. Promoting Scientific and Technological Innovation. 3. Ensuring the Environmental Clean-Up of the National Nuclear Weapons Complex. 2 Overview (1 of 3) $1.7 billion invested by DOE (since 1992), in over 7,000 grants, generated over 15,000 person-years of jobs. $2.4 billion in sales from 60% of Phase II companies, in addition to DOE Mission Needs; e.g., from FY05 thru FY07, the Phase II 172 companies generated 17,933 total jobs. National Conference, Nov 2-5, Reno, www.unr.edu/sbir- sttr2009/index.html. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) University Industry

320

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EESAT 2009 EESAT 2009 October 4-7 Seattle Ali Nourai American Electric Power Chairman, Electricity Storage Association Energy Storage Projects in AEP - A Migratory Trend - 2 * 5.2 Million customers * 11 States * 39,000 MW Generation * 38,953 miles Transmission * 212,781 miles Distribution * $45.2 billion Assets (2008) * $14.4 billion revenue (2008) * 20,861 Employees AEP Overview 3 Migratory Path of Utility Energy Storage - in AEP Large Central Units Storage at Grid Edge Substation Batteries Graphics adapted from an EPRI Presentation by Joe Hughes This Migration Trend is Driven by Popularity of Customer-Owned Distributed Generation and Customers' demand for higher service quality 4 AEP's View of Energy Storage Value 120/240 V 69 kV 4 to 34 kV 480 V 138 kV 345 kV 765 kV CES (Community) NAS (Substation)

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321

Benchmarks used  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benchmarks used Benchmarks used Benchmarks used Using a set of benchmarks described below, different optimization options for the different compilers on Edison. The compilers are also compared against one another on the benchmarks. NERSC6 Benchmarks We used these benchmarks from the NERSC6 procurement: NERSC 6 PROCUREMENT MPI BENCHMARKS Benchmark Science Area Algorithm Concurrency Languages GTC Fusion PIC, finite difference 2048 f90 IMPACT-T Accelerator Physics PIC, FFT 1024 f90 MILC Materials Science Conjugate gradient, sparse matrix, FFT 1024 c, assembly NPB 3.3.1 MPI Parallel Benchmarks The following NPB 3.3 MPI Benchmarks were run, all at a concurrency of 1024 processes. They are all written in Fortran. NAS PARALLEL MPI BENCHMARKS - VERSION 3.3.1 Benchmark Full Name Description Level

322

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 Existing Regulations A11: Technical advice and assistance to organizations Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010909: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 24, 2013 CX-010914: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Testing of a Highly Efficient Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System (SUMMARY Categorical Exclusion (CX)) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6

323

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: North Carolina | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carolina Carolina Categorical Exclusion Determinations: North Carolina Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in North Carolina. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010908: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 17, 2013 CX-010939: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/17/2013 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2, 2013 CX-010812: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scoping Studies of Advanced Gasification Technologies for Hydrogen

324

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Risks Speaker(s): Richard Sextro Date: October 27, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Although most of the exposures to radon and its radioactive decay products arise from indoor airborne radon originating in the soil adjacent to buildings, some contact with radon can occur due to its presence in drinking water. The exposures and health risks associated with radon dissolved in drinking water are typically much smaller, although the magnitude of the exposures and risks have been uncertain and the subject of some controversy. The 1996 Amendments to the (U.S.) Safe Drinking Water Act required the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to contract with the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to re-evaluate the risks associated with

325

Analyzing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Effect of Different Programming Models Upon Performance and Memory Usage on Cray XT5 Platforms Hongzhang Shan Future Technology Group, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Haoqiang Jin NAS Division, NASA Arms Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 Karl Fuerlinger University of California at Berkeley, EECS Department, Computer Science Division Berkeley, CA 94720 Alice Koniges, Nicholas J. Wright NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract-Harnessing the power of multicore platforms is chal- lenging due to the additional levels of parallelism present. In this paper, we examine the effect of the choice of programming model upon performance and overall memory usage on the Cray XT5. We use detailed time breakdowns to measure the contributions to the total runtime from computation,

326

Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Register Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 19 / Friday, January 28, 2011 / Notices No decision will be made to implement any alternative until the U.S. Navy F-35C West Coast Homebasing EIS process is completed and a Record of Decision is signed by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Energy, Installations and Environment) or designee. Resource areas to be addressed in the U.S. Navy F-35C West Coast Homebasing EIS will include, but not be limited to: Air quality, noise environment, land use, socioeconomics, infrastructure and community services, natural resources, biological resources, cultural resources, safety and environmental hazards. The analysis will evaluate direct and indirect impacts, and will account for cumulative impacts from other relevant activities in the area of NAS Lemoore

327

Management Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Plan Transportation Plan (and Planning) Development National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 15, 2013 Buffalo, New York Considerations in Transportation Plan Development  Reaffirms the involvement of key stakeholders in both planning and carrying out transportation activities  Takes into account comments on the 2007 and 2009 plans, the WIPP Transportation Plan, the DOE Strategy in response to the BRC and NAS findings, the DOE Transportation Practices Manual (DOE Manual 460.2-1A) and commercial best practices  Outlines the planning process, involved parties, and schedules for activities that need to be completed prior to developing site-specific campaign plans  Reaches back to address issues (both resolved and unresolved) from

328

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: New Jersey | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jersey Jersey Categorical Exclusion Determinations: New Jersey Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in New Jersey. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2013 CX-010909: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 26, 2013 CX-011114: Categorical Exclusion Determination Municipal Complex Solar Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/26/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): Golden Field Office August 1, 2013 CX-010816: Categorical Exclusion Determination Effects of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Turbulent Combustion and

329

EIS-0259 Final Environmental Impact Statement On The Disposal Of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, And Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-. -. 1. PURPOSE AND NEED U.S. Navy nuclear ships are decommissioned and defieled at the end of their usefi Metime, when the cost of continued operation is not justified by their fitary capabfity, or when the ship is no longer needed. The Navy needs to disposition the reactor compartments born defieled and decommissioned ctisers, and OHIO Class and LOS ANGELES Class submarines. The number of reactor compartments under consideration by this Environmental Impact Statement is about 100. These reactor compartments are in addition to the pre-LOS ANGELES Class submarines tieady being disposed of under the Na&s 1984 Find Environmental hpact Statement (USN, 1984a). Newer types of U.S. Navy nuclear-powered stips that are not expected to be decommissioned in the next 20 years (e.g., aircraft carriers, SEAWOLF Class submarines) are not included in this fid Enviromentd Impact Statement.

330

Benchmarks used  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benchmarks used Benchmarks used Benchmarks used Using a set of benchmarks described below, different optimization options for the different compilers on Edison. The compilers are also compared against one another on the benchmarks. NERSC6 Benchmarks We used these benchmarks from the NERSC6 procurement: NERSC 6 PROCUREMENT MPI BENCHMARKS Benchmark Science Area Algorithm Concurrency Languages GTC Fusion PIC, finite difference 2048 f90 IMPACT-T Accelerator Physics PIC, FFT 1024 f90 MILC Materials Science Conjugate gradient, sparse matrix, FFT 1024 c, assembly NPB 3.3.1 MPI Parallel Benchmarks The following NPB 3.3 MPI Benchmarks were run, all at a concurrency of 1024 processes. They are all written in Fortran. NAS PARALLEL MPI BENCHMARKS - VERSION 3.3.1 Benchmark Full Name Description Level

331

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Research Projects Agency - Energy Department of Energy's Business Opportunity Session September 24, 2009 Name: Antony DiGiovanni Title: Budget Director Office: ARPA-E E-Mail: ARPA-E@hq.doe.gov Website: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/ Rising Above the Gathering Storm, 2006 (National Academies) * Establish an Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) * "Creative, out-of-the-box, transformational" energy research * Spinoff Benefit - Help educate next generation of researchers * Secretary Chu (then Director of Berkeley National lab) on committee America COMPETES Act, 2007 * Authorizes the establishment of ARPA-E American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) * $400M provided for ARPA-E * President Obama launches ARPA-E in a speech at NAS

332

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Islanding Islanding Dynamic Islanding For Improving Electric Service Reliability with Energy Storage Ali Nourai American Electric Power Presentation to DOE Peer Review Meeting 2008 Funded in Part by the Power Electronics Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE/PE) through Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Outline Outline 1. Existing AEP storage projects - performance data 2. New AEP storage projects - exploring new storage values DOE/Sandia has been sponsoring the innovative components of energy storage projects in AEP 3 AEP NaS Application #1

333

Title (right click and Remove Content ControlŽ if any hard returns, soft returns, hard spaces, or hard dashes are used)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2145 2145 Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report Workshop Committee December 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 iii Executive Summary This report is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Sciences (NAS) have repeatedly described the need for advanced instruments that "predict, control, and design the components of energetic processes and environmental balance," most notably in biological, chemical, environmental,

334

Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors Title Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2004 Authors Gundel, Lara A., Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan Keywords carbon monoxide, ozone Abstract Identification of aircraft cabin environmental quality concerns for which sensors may be useful The highest priority environmental indicators identified are ozone and cabin air pressure, followed by carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with moderate priority, and then relative humidity, airborne particles, and organic contaminants, including engine oil byproducts and pesticides. This list is based on the Congressional requirements and recent scientific literature, starting with information from recent studies (NAS/NRC, ASHRAE/Battelle), and continuing by seeking input from a variety of stakeholders.

335

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Federal Register 2 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 35 / Thursday, February 21, 2013 / Notices governments and other eligible entities for public benefit purposes. Notices of interest from representatives of the homeless, and other interested parties located in the vicinity of any listed surplus property should be submitted to the recognized Local Redevelopment Authority (LRA). Surplus Property Description. The additional property that is surplus to the needs of the Federal Government consists of approximately 10 acres of land and facilities at the former NAS Brunswick. The land and facilities were formerly requested by the Federal Aviation Administration, and it had subsequently withdrawn its interest in this property. The surplus property is comprised of the following three non-

336

Paul Dickman's Presentation to NERAC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Program Update Presented to: Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Presented by: Paul Dickman Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management May 18, 2004 Washington, DC 2 Congress Created a Legal Obligation Congress Created a Legal Obligation to Dispose of Nuclear Waste to Dispose of Nuclear Waste * Current Schedule 1957 NAS supported deep geologic disposal 1987 Congress limited characterization to Yucca Mountain 1992 Energy Policy Act set EPA standard process 2002 President recommended, Congress approved Yucca Mountain 1982 Congress passed Nuclear Waste Policy Act 2010* Begin receipt of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste 2004* Submit License Application to NRC * 1982 - Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) established

337

Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review - Day 1 morning presentations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 morning 1 morning presentations Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review - Day 1 morning presentations The 2006 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program was held in Washington DC on November 2-3, 2006. Current and completed program projects were presented and reviewed by a group of industry professionals. Presentations from the Day 1 morning session are below. ESS 2006 Peer Review - NAS Battery Performance at Charleston, WV - Ali Nourai, AEP.pdf ESS 2006 Peer Review - Evaluation of the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative System for Energy Storage Potential - Abbas Akhil, SNL.pdf ESS 2006 Peer Review - Iowa Stored Energy Plant - Bob Haug, ISEPA.pdf ESS 2006 Peer Review - Superconducting Flywheel Development - Phil Johnson, Boeing.pdf ESS 2006 Peer Review - Bipolar NiMH Battery Development and Testing - James

338

Energy Storage Systems 2009 Peer Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Peer Review 09 Peer Review Energy Storage Systems 2009 Peer Review The DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted an annual peer review in Seattle, WA on October 8, 2009. The 1-day conference included welcoming remarks from OE's Imre Gyuk as well as a program overview from John Boyes of Sandia National Laboratories and 11 presentations on individual projects. The agenda, program overview, and project presentations are available below. ESS 2009 Peer Review - Agenda.pdf ESS 2009 Peer Review - DOE-ESS Overview - John Boyes, SNL.pdf ESS 2009 Peer Review - Long Island Bus NaS Battery Energy Storage Project - Steve Eckroad, EPRI.pdf ESS 2009 Peer Review - Development of an Integrated Power Controller Based on HT SOI and SiC - Joseph Henfling, SNL.pdf ESS 2009 Peer Review - Large Format Carbon Enhanced VRLA Battery Test

339

RDMD Transition Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR LARGE SCALE ENERGY EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR LARGE SCALE ENERGY STORAGE - TOWARDS LOW TEMPERATURE SODIUM BATTERIES JUN LIU PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND, WA 99252 PNNL: Zhenguo Yang, Yuliang Cao, Xiaolin Li, Lifeng Xiao Sandia: Bruce C. Bunker Supported by PNNL's transformational Materials Science Initiative Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Pacific Northwest National Laboratories Significant challenges for meeting the long term low cost and reliability requirement for stationary energy storage. Distributed storage Central storage End user storage Capital cost ($/kWh) CAES Pumped Hydro Power Stationary 1 kW 100 kW 10 MW 1 GW 10 kW 1 MW 100 MW Li Ion Battery NaS, Na metal halide Vehicle Energy Density and Cost Lifetime and Capital Cost

340

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bus Bus NaS Battery Energy Storage Project U.S. DOE Peer Review Seattle, WA October 8, 2009 Steve Eckroad Electric Power Research Institute Seckroad@epri.com (704) 595-2717 2 © 2009 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. Acknowledgements This project is part of the joint energy storage initiative between the New York State Energy Research and Development Agency (NYSERDA) and the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/ESS) and managed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC84-94AL85000. * US DOE and NYSERDA - Imre Gyuk and Joe Sayer

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341

Slide 0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

arpa-e.energy.gov arpa-e.energy.gov GRIDSCALE RAMPABLE INTERMITTENT DISPATCHABLE STORAGE (GRIDS) PROGRAM MARK JOHNSON PROGRAM DIRECTOR DOE Annual Storage R&D Review Meeting ARPA-E and OE November 2010 www.arpa-e.energy.gov Overview of ARPA-E as an Agency Overview of GRIDS Storage Program Technical Progress in Energy Storage ARPA-E: Applying The ARPA Model To Energy 2006 Rising Above the Gathering Storm (National Academies) 2007 America COMPETES Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) $400M appropriated for ARPA-E President Obama launches ARPA-E in a speech at NAS on April 27, 2009 ARPA-E's Distinct Culture * Excellence * Openness * Integrity * Speed * Metrics Driven * Flat and Nimble Fulfilling ARPA-E's Mission To enhance the economic and energy security of the

342

The MicroGrid: a Scientific Tool for Modeling Computational Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complexity and dynamic nature of the Internet (and the emerging Computational Grid) demand that middleware and applications adapt to the changes in configuration and availability of resources. However, to the best of our knowledge there are no simulation tools which support systematic exploration of dynamic Grid software (or Grid resource) behavior. We describe our vision and initial efforts to build tools to meet these needs. Our MicroGrid simulation tools enable Globus applications to be run in arbitrary virtual grid resource environments, enabling broad experimentation. We describe the design of these tools, and their validation on microbench marks, the NAS parallel benchmarks, and an entire Grid application. These validation experiments show that the MicroGrid can match actual experiments within a few percent (2% to 4%).

H. J. Song; X. Liu; D. Jakobsen; R. Bhagwan; X. Zhang; K. Taura; A. Chien

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 5  

SciTech Connect

Contents include articles entitled: USGS report supports previous conclusions re tritium migration at Beatty; Ohio selects new contractor for screening; Maine Yankee`s future uncertain; Southeast Compact limits funds for North Carolina project; California, Energy, and Interior exchange correspondence on Ward Valley testing; TCC meets in Salt Lake City, Utah; Garner named executive director and forum participant for Northwest Compact; Seventh Circuit upholds Energy Secretary`s determination re distribution of surcharge rebates; US Ecology sues Nebraska re wetlands mitigation; US Supreme Court hears line-item veto challenge; Court rules NAS must provide public access; WCS sues Envirocare of Texas; DOE and Envirocare sign consent agreement; NRC issues performance assessment guidance; NRC to publish final decommissioning rule; House subcommittee passes Texas Consent Act; Environmental justice bill introduced in the House; and International nuclear safety body established.

Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory`s & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R & D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R & D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory's Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ellipsoidal and parabolic glass capillaries as condensers for x-ray microscopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single-bounce ellipsoidal and paraboloidal glass capillary focusing optics have been fabricated for use as condenser lenses for both synchrotron and tabletop x-ray microscopes in the x-ray energy range of 2.5-18 keV. The condenser numerical apertures (NAs) of these devices are designed to match the NA of x-ray zone plate objectives, which gives them a great advantage over zone plate condensers in laboratory microscopes. The fabricated condensers have slope errors as low as 20 {mu}rad rms. These capillaries provide a uniform hollow-cone illumination with almost full focusing efficiency, which is much higher than what is available with zone plate condensers. Sub-50 nm resolution at 8 keV x-ray energy was achieved by utilizing this high-efficiency condenser in a laboratory microscope based on a rotating anode generator.

Zeng Xianghui; Duewer, Fred; Feser, Michael; Huang, Carson; Lyon, Alan; Tkachuk, Andrei; Yun Wenbing

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

System installation package for the new Hampshire Vocational Technical College, Manchester, N. H  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary Systems, Incorporated of Jaffrey, New Hampshire, under NASA/MSFC Contract NAS8-32243 has taken its Series V Solar Heating System and developed it to a degree acceptable by local codes and regulatory agencies. The system is composed of the Series V warm air collector, the LCU-110 logic control unit and the USU-A universal switching and transport unit. The collector was originally conceived and designed as an integrated roof/wall system and provides a dual function in the structure. This document describes the above system which has been installed in the residential solar laboratory located at the New Hampshire Vocational Technical College in Manchester, N.H. In addition, it provides general guidelines which may be utilized in development of detailed installation plans and specifications, as well as instructions on operation and maintenance.

Not Available

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Sodium/sulfur battery engineering for stationary energy storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of modular systems to distribute power using batteries to store off-peak energy and a state of the art power inverter is envisioned to offer important national benefits. A 4-year, cost- shared contract was performed to design and develop a modular, 300kVA/300-kWh system for utility and customer applications. Called Nas-P{sub AC}, this system uses advanced sodium/sulfur batteries and requires only about 20% of the space of a lead-acid-based system with a smaller energy content. Ten, 300-VDC, 40-kWh sodium/sulfur battery packs are accommodated behind a power conversion system envelope with integrated digital control. The resulting design facilities transportation, site selection, and deployment because the system is quiet and non-polluting, and can be located in proximity to the load. This report contains a detailed description of the design and supporting hardware development performed under this contract.

Koenig, A.; Rasmussen, J. [Silent Power, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Installation of the first Distributed Energy Storage System (DESS) at American Electric Power (AEP).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

AEP studied the direct and indirect benefits, strengths, and weaknesses of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) and chose to transform its entire utility grid into a system that achieves optimal integration of both central and distributed energy assets. To that end, AEP installed the first NAS battery-based, energy storage system in North America. After one year of operation and testing, AEP has concluded that, although the initial costs of DESS are greater than conventional power solutions, the net benefits justify the AEP decision to create a grid of DESS with intelligent monitoring, communications, and control, in order to enable the utility grid of the future. This report details the site selection, construction, benefits and lessons learned of the first installation, at Chemical Station in North Charleston, WV.

Nourai, Ali (American Electric Power Company, Columbus, OH)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 16320 of 26,764 results. 11 - 16320 of 26,764 results. Article Statement from Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on the National Academy of Sciences Report: Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Washington, DC - Late yesterday the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) National Research Council issued a report titled: Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership.... http://energy.gov/articles/statement-secretary-energy-samuel-w-bodman-national-academy-sciences-report-review-research Article Celebrating Achievement and Potential at the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers Thirteen winners were recently announced - 11 supported by the Energy Department's Office of Science and two supported by the Department's

353

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration FAA Air Traffic Organization Presented to: Department of Energy Presented by: Mark DeNicuolo, Manager, Performance & Analyses, FAA ATO Safety and Technical Training Date: September 20, 2012 Safety Management 2 * Approximately 50,000 flights per day * En Route centers handle 40.5 million aircraft per year * FAA/contract towers handle: - 51.2 million airport operations - 39 million instrument operations * 732 million passenger enplanements * Over 5,000 civil, public-use airports * Approximately 33,300 ATO employees - More than 15,000 air traffic controllers - More than 7,000 technicians and engineers * 21 ARTCCs, 513 ATCTs, 17 FSSs, 3 AFSSs National Airspace System (NAS) 3 Discipline Domains En Route Terminal FSS Support NDP Totals

354

Feature - Fuel Economy for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Report Looks at Fuel Economy for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles New Report Looks at Fuel Economy for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles heavy duty trucks Argonne researcher Aymeric Rousseau was part of a National Academy of Science (NAS) committee established to make recommendations on improving and regulating fuel consumption for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. On March 31, the committee issued a report that evaluates various technologies and methods that could improve the fuel economy of these vehicles. As a system analysis engineer at Argonne's Center for Transportation Research, Rousseau contributed his expertise on vehicle modeling and simulation to the committee, which was comprised of 19 members from industry, research organizations and academia. Rousseau, who leads the development of Argonne's PSAT and Autonomie software tools, helped the committee determine how modeling and simulation tools can be used to:

355

Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory's Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

NONE

1994-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energy’s Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.?

Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hydrogen Scenario Analysis Summary Report: Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements  

SciTech Connect

Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and retailers, consumers, and governments. The interaction of these agents in the marketplace will determine the real costs and benefits of early market transformation policies, and ultimately the success of the transition itself. The transition to hydrogen-powered transportation faces imposing economic barriers. The challenges include developing and refining a new and different power-train technology, building a supporting fuel infrastructure, creating a market for new and unfamiliar vehicles, and achieving economies of scale in vehicle production while providing an attractive selection of vehicle makes and models for car-buyers. The upfront costs will be high and could persist for a decade or more, delaying profitability until an adequate number of vehicles can be produced and moved into consumer markets. However, the potential rewards to the economy, environment, and national security are immense. Such a profound market transformation will require careful planning and strong, consistent policy incentives. Section 811 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005, Public Law 109-59 (U.S. House, 2005), calls for a report from the Secretary of Energy on measures to support the transition to a hydrogen economy. The report was to specifically address production and deployment of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure needed to support those vehicles. In addition, the 2004 report of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 2004), The Hydrogen Economy, contained two recommendations for analyses to be conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to strengthen hydrogen energy transition and infrastructure planning for the hydrogen economy. In response to the EPACT requirement and NAS recommendations, DOE's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT) has supported a series of analyses to evaluate alternative scenarios for deployment of millions of hydrogen fueled vehicles and supporting infrastructure. To ensure that these alternative market penetration scenarios took into consideration the thinking of the automobile manufacturers, energy companies, industrial hydrogen suppliers, and others from the private sector, DOE held several stakeholder meetings to explain the analyses, describe the models, and solicit comments about the methods, assumptions, and preliminary results (U.S. DOE, 2006a). The first stakeholder meeting was held on January 26, 2006, to solicit guidance during the initial phases of the analysis; this was followed by a second meeting on August 9-10, 2006, to review the preliminary results. A third and final meeting was held on January 31, 2007, to discuss the final analysis results. More than 60 hydrogen energy experts from industry, government, national laboratories, and universities attended these meetings and provided their comments to help guide DOE's analysis. The final scenarios attempt to reflect the collective judgment of the participants in these meetings. However, they should not be interpreted as having been explicitly endorsed by DOE or any of the stakeholders participating. The DOE analysis examined three vehicle penetration scenarios: Scenario 1--Production of thousands of vehicles per year by 2015 and hundreds of thousands per year by 2019. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 2.0 million fuel cell vehicles (FCV) by 2025. Scenario 2--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013 and hundreds of thousands by 2018. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 5.0 million FCVs by 2025. Scenario 3--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013, hundreds of thousands by 2018, and millions by 2021 such that market penetration is 10 million by 2025. Scenario 3 was formulated to comply with the NAS recommendation: 'DOE should map out and evaluate a transition plan consistent with developing the infrastructure a

Greene, David L [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; James, Brian [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Perez, Julie [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Melendez, Margo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Unnasch, Stefan [Life Cycle Associates; Rutherford, Daniel [TIAX, LLC; Hooks, Matthew [TIAX, LLC

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Hydrogen Scenario Analysis Summary Report: Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and retailers, consumers, and governments. The interaction of these agents in the marketplace will determine the real costs and benefits of early market transformation policies, and ultimately the success of the transition itself. The transition to hydrogen-powered transportation faces imposing economic barriers. The challenges include developing and refining a new and different power-train technology, building a supporting fuel infrastructure, creating a market for new and unfamiliar vehicles, and achieving economies of scale in vehicle production while providing an attractive selection of vehicle makes and models for car-buyers. The upfront costs will be high and could persist for a decade or more, delaying profitability until an adequate number of vehicles can be produced and moved into consumer markets. However, the potential rewards to the economy, environment, and national security are immense. Such a profound market transformation will require careful planning and strong, consistent policy incentives. Section 811 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005, Public Law 109-59 (U.S. House, 2005), calls for a report from the Secretary of Energy on measures to support the transition to a hydrogen economy. The report was to specifically address production and deployment of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure needed to support those vehicles. In addition, the 2004 report of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 2004), The Hydrogen Economy, contained two recommendations for analyses to be conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to strengthen hydrogen energy transition and infrastructure planning for the hydrogen economy. In response to the EPACT requirement and NAS recommendations, DOE's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT) has supported a series of analyses to evaluate alternative scenarios for deployment of millions of hydrogen fueled vehicles and supporting infrastructure. To ensure that these alternative market penetration scenarios took into consideration the thinking of the automobile manufacturers, energy companies, industrial hydrogen suppliers, and others from the private sector, DOE held several stakeholder meetings to explain the analyses, describe the models, and solicit comments about the methods, assumptions, and preliminary results (U.S. DOE, 2006a). The first stakeholder meeting was held on January 26, 2006, to solicit guidance during the initial phases of the analysis; this was followed by a second meeting on August 9-10, 2006, to review the preliminary results. A third and final meeting was held on January 31, 2007, to discuss the final analysis results. More than 60 hydrogen energy experts from industry, government, national laboratories, and universities attended these meetings and provided their comments to help guide DOE's analysis. The final scenarios attempt to reflect the collective judgment of the participants in these meetings. However, they should not be interpreted as having been explicitly endorsed by DOE or any of the stakeholders participating. The DOE analysis examined three vehicle penetration scenarios: Scenario 1--Production of thousands of vehicles per year by 2015 and hundreds of thousands per year by 2019. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 2.0 million fuel cell vehicles (FCV) by 2025. Scenario 2--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013 and hundreds of thousands by 2018. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 5.0 million FCVs by 2025. Scenario 3--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013, hundreds of thousands by 2018, and millions by 2021 such that market penetration is 10 million by 2025. Scenario 3 was formulated to comply with the NAS recommendation: 'DOE should map out and evaluate a transition plan consistent with developing the infrastructure and hydrogen res

Greene, David L [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; James, Brian [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Perez, Julie [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Melendez, Margo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Unnasch, Stefan [Life Cycle Associates; Rutherford, Daniel [TIAX, LLC; Hooks, Matthew [TIAX, LLC

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Destin, FL | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Destin, FL Destin, FL FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Destin, FL October 7, 2013 - 2:56pm Addthis Going coastal for energy efficiency. FUPWG. April 15-16, 2008, Destin, Florida Gulf Power: A Southern Company FEMP logo April 15-16, 2008 Hosted by Gulf Power Monday, April 14, 2008 6:30 pm Steering Committee Meeting & Networking Dinner Ocean Club 8955 US Highway 98 W Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Tuesday, April 15, 2008 7:45 - 8:30 am Registration and Continental Breakfast 8:30 - 8:45 am Gulf Power Welcome P. Bernard Jacob, Customer Operations Vice President 8:45 - 9:15 am FEMP Welcome David McAndrew, FEMP 9:15 - 10:00 am Washington Update David McAndrew, FEMP 10:00 - 10:30 am Technology Update Paul Kistler 10:30 - 11:00 am Networking Break & New Member Mentor Introductions 11:00 - 11:30 am Gulf Power Success Story - NAS Chiller Replacement

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361

M S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

% % "s .J' /:, * & 1 $&; i e' 3 ' M S , 4- Monthly Report / hw4~ 3. SuhumaP @&gstlo~ (5. S&umxr, C. Smnson) 3ik&wd.on of xllymaloy rod3 Qnd berylll~ ahapes ma conductf3d at Rew3x3 Brass and Copper co. 0.. i7-Lm .3 6, 194.6. One pure bwylUm L&" billet m m &r&d into a 1 l/8' * rod and one pure beryllium #' billet n-as extrLlc-!c?c into 1,53om disn. PC& Ro5ults V"mv3 good. Two pm0 bcrylliwn cp billets andc

362

LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contents include articles entitled: Chem-Nuclear documents new plan for Barnwell; Nebraska releases technical analysis of LLRW facility; Southeast Compact suspends funding for NC facility development; NC governor and Southeast Compact differ on proposed MOU; Midwest Compact to return export fees; State legislators` group revises radioactive waste policy; Internal documents discuss administration`s policy on Ward Valley; BLM issues EA for Ward Valley testing; California DHS, NRC criticize DOI`s testing protocols; Army removes training mines from Ward Valley site; The 1997 gubernatorial elections and a look ahead to 1998; Court throws out case challenging Pennsylvania`s siting law; DOE files notice of appeal in WCS suit; Central Compact moves to dismiss ``Veto`` authority suit; Congress exempts NAS from FACA; Judge sets schedule for Ward Valley case; Court won`t order DOE to accept spent fuel by deadline; NRC chairman expresses concern re CERCLA reauthorization; Senators question EPA`s guidance on remediation; EPA issues guidance, criticizes NRC decommissioning rule; Members of Congress clarify FUSRAP transfer; HLW legislation passes House by wide margin; Takings legislation passes House; Energy and water bill signed into law; and Senate confirms 5 of 6 DOE appointees.

Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Environmental requirements at hydroelectric power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydroelectric power is the most mature and widely implemented of the renewable energy technologies. The energy of flowing water has been used to perform work directly since ancient times, and the use of hydropower turbines to generate electricity traces back to the 19th century. Two commonly used turbine types, the Francis and Kaplan turbines, are essentially refinements of the simple reaction turbine of Hero of Alexandria, dating from about 100 B.C. (NAS 1976). Hydroelectric power production provides over 10% of the net electrical generation in the US, more than petroleum or natural gas and far more than the other renewable energy technologies combined. On a regional basis, hydroelectric power represents 14% of the net electrical power generation in the Rocky Mountain states and nearly 63% along the Pacific Coast. Those states that have the largest percentages of their electricity generated by hydropower (e.g., Idaho, Oregon, Montana, and Washington) also tend to have the lowest average cost of electricity per kilowatt-hour.

Cada, G.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Francfort, J.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory's Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy's. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1993-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

365

Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory`s Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy`s. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1993-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

366

Navy Techval Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACTIVITY NAME ACTIVITY NAME Navy Techval Program Technology Deployment Working Group May 23, 2012 Paul Kistler, PE CEM NAVFAC Engineering Service Center Port Hueneme CA Navy Techval Magnetic Bearing Chiller Compressor What is it, how does it work? Data from projects Where does it work best? 3 Navy Techval Drawing courtesy of Danfoss Turbocor Compressors, Inc. The Magnetic Bearing Chiller Compressor at a Glance 4 2 ea. 60 ton chiller compressors with magnetic bearings NAS Jacksonville FL Navy Techval 5 Navy Techval 6 Navy Techval Compressor Efficacy Plant Efficacy Average Load Average Compressor Power Cooling Tower Power Plant Power New .57 kW/ton .61 kW/ton 75.4 ton 45.9kW 2.44kW 48.3 kW Existing 1.02 kW/ton 1.04 kW/ton 76.7 ton 78.5kW 1.55kW 80.1 kW

367

J. Lloyd,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

63 a 484. 63 a 484. 1 Ecofisiologia de Floresta e Vegetação de Savana J. Lloyd, 1 M. L. Goulden, 2 J.P. Ometto, 3 S. Patiño, 4 N.M. Fyllas, 1 e C.A. Quesada 5 As características ecofisiológicas da vegetação de floresta e savana são comparadas na tentativa de entender como as diferenças fisiológicas próprias de cada bioma e entre esses tipos de vegetação se relacionam com suas distribuições geográficas. Uma simples ordenação mostra, primeiramente, que embora a precipitação exerça um efeito chave nas distribuições da vegetação amazônica, as características do solo são também importantes. Em particular, descobriu-se que, em regimes similares de precipitação, as florestas decíduas tendem a ocorrer em solos mais férteis do que os tipos de vegetação de savana. Um subsolo de alto

368

Oliver L. Phillips,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

73 a 387. 73 a 387. 1 Mudanças na Biomassa, Dinâmica e Composição da Floresta Amazônica, 1980 - 2002 Oliver L. Phillips, 1 Niro Higuchi, 2 Simone Vieira, 3 Timothy R. Baker, 1 Kuo-Jung Chao, 1 e Simon L. Lewis 1 O monitoramento de longo prazo de parcelas florestais distribuídas ao longo da Amazônia fornece uma poderosa forma de se quantificar os estoques e fluxos de biomassa e biodiversidade. Neste capítulo, examinamos as evidências de mudanças associadas à estrutura, dinâmica e composição funcional de florestas amazônicas maduras nas últimas décadas. As florestas maduras têm, como um todo, adquirido biomassa e apresentado dinâmica e crescimento acelerados, mas as questões sobre a persistência dessas mudanças de longo prazo permanecem. Em razão de o crescimento

369

Yadvinder Malhi,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

55 a 371. 55 a 371. 1 Produção, Estoques e Fluxo de Carbono nas Florestas Amazônicas Yadvinder Malhi, 1 Sassan Saatchi, 2 Cecile Girardin, 1 Luiz E. O. C. Aragão 1 Os estoques de carbono e a dinâmica de florestas tropicais são assunto de interesse de importantes políticas científicas internacionais. A pesquisa associada ao Experimento de Grande Escala da Biosfera-Atmosfera na Amazônia (LBA) gerou avanços substanciais para o entendimento da ciclagem de carbono em sítios selecionados de florestas da Amazônia brasileira e produziu novos resultados sobre o modo como esses processos podem variar através da vasta região amazônica. Relatamos aqui aspectos desse novo entendimento. Apresentamos, em particular, uma síntese abrangente do ciclo do carbono em três sítios focais do LBA (Manaus, Tapajós e

370

Regeneração de Floresta Secundária Eric A. Davidson Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

299 a 309. 299 a 309. 1 Limitações de Nutrientes para a Regeneração de Floresta Secundária Eric A. Davidson Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA Luiz A. Martinelli CENA, Universidade de São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brasil Os solos antigos, altamente intemperizados, de florestas de planície na Bacia Amazônica em geral mostram ciclos conservativos de P e ciclos "frouxos" de N. Essa generalização se aplica às florestas maduras, mas a aceleração da mudança no uso da terra está alterando as paisagens da Amazônia. Aproximadamente 16% da área original de floresta foram desmatados e cerca de 160.000 km 2 são cobertos por vegetação secundária. As florestas secundárias são comuns nas regiões agrícolas, mas poucas permanecem por muito mais de

371

A Distribuição Espacial e Variabilidade Interanual do Fogo na Amazônia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 a 60. 3 a 60. 1 A Distribuição Espacial e Variabilidade Interanual do Fogo na Amazônia Wilfrid Schroeder, 1 Ane Alencar, 2 Eugênio Arima, 3 e Alberto Setzer 4 Evidências a partir de observações de carvão sugerem baixa frequência de eventos de fogo causadores de alteração das florestas amazônicas no período anterior ao século vinte. Entretanto, a distribuição espacial e temporal do fogo mudou drasticamente nas últimas décadas. O fogo tornou-se uma das forças motrizes do uso da terra e da mudança da cobertura vegetal na Amazônia. A crescente intervenção humana na região, juntamente com anomalias climáticas, expuseram as florestas tropicais a um número sem precedentes de fogos em vegetação com consequências importantes para o funcionamento do complexo sistema

372

Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Supply and Emerging Resources Future Supply and Emerging Resources The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program - Graduate Fellowship Program Methane Hydrate Graduate Fellowship Program Jeffrey James Marlow, a graduate student in Geobiology at the California Institute of Technology, was recently selected as the 2012 recipient of the NETL-National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Methane Hydrate Research Fellowship. Please see page 15 of the March 2013 issue (Vol. 13, Issue 1) of Fire in the Ice for more information on the recipient. The Department of Energy has a long history of building synergistic relationships with research universities. Funding academic research is a "win-win-win" situation. The U.S. government is able to tap into some of the best minds available for solving national energy problems, the universities get the support they need to maintain cutting edge faculty and laboratories, and the students involved are provided with opportunities that help them along their chosen path of study, strengthening the national pool of scientists and engineers. According to Samuel Bodman, speaking about graduate research in methane hydrates, "Students are the foundation of our energy future, bringing new ideas and fresh perspectives to the energy industry. What better way to assure technology innovation than to encourage students working on the development of a resource that has the potential to tip our energy balance toward clean-burning, domestic fuels."

373

Navy Techval Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ACTIVITY NAME ACTIVITY NAME Navy Techval Program Technology Deployment Working Group May 23, 2012 Paul Kistler, PE CEM NAVFAC Engineering Service Center Port Hueneme CA Navy Techval Magnetic Bearing Chiller Compressor What is it, how does it work? Data from projects Where does it work best? 3 Navy Techval Drawing courtesy of Danfoss Turbocor Compressors, Inc. The Magnetic Bearing Chiller Compressor at a Glance 4 2 ea. 60 ton chiller compressors with magnetic bearings NAS Jacksonville FL Navy Techval 5 Navy Techval 6 Navy Techval Compressor Efficacy Plant Efficacy Average Load Average Compressor Power Cooling Tower Power Plant Power New .57 kW/ton .61 kW/ton 75.4 ton 45.9kW 2.44kW 48.3 kW Existing 1.02 kW/ton 1.04 kW/ton 76.7 ton 78.5kW 1.55kW 80.1 kW

374

Development and evaluation of probability density functions for a set of human exposure factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe efforts carried out during 1998 and 1999 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to assist the U.S. EPA in developing and ranking the robustness of a set of default probability distributions for exposure assessment factors. Among the current needs of the exposure-assessment community is the need to provide data for linking exposure, dose, and health information in ways that improve environmental surveillance, improve predictive models, and enhance risk assessment and risk management (NAS, 1994). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) plays a lead role in developing national guidance and planning future activities that support the EPA Superfund Program. OERR is in the process of updating its 1989 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS) as part of the EPA Superfund reform activities. Volume III of RAGS, when completed in 1999 will provide guidance for conducting probabilistic risk assessments. This revised document will contain technical information including probability density functions (PDFs) and methods used to develop and evaluate these PDFs. The PDFs provided in this EPA document are limited to those relating to exposure factors.

Maddalena, R.L.; McKone, T.E.; Bodnar, A.; Jacobson, J.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Final Technical Summary: Center for Fundamental and Applied Research in Nanostructured and Lightweight Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The core projects for this DOE-sponsored Center at Michigan Tech have focused on several of the materials problems identified by the NAS. These include: new electrode materials, enhanced PEM materials, lighter and more effective bipolar plates, and improvement of the carbon used as a current carrier. This project involved fundamental and applied research in the development and testing of lightweight and nanostructured materials to be used in fuel cell applications and for chemical synthesis. The advent of new classes of materials engineered at the nanometer level can produce materials that are lightweight and have unique physical and chemical properties. The grant was used to obtain and improve the equipment infrastructure to support this research and also served to fund seven research projects. These included: 1. Development of lightweight, thermally conductive bipolar plates for improved thermal management in fuel cells; 2. Exploration of pseudomorphic nanoscale overlayer bimetallic catalysts for fuel cells; 3. Development of hybrid inorganic/organic polymer nanocomposites with improved ionic and electronic properties; 4. Development of oriented polymeric materials for membrane applications; 5. Preparation of a graphitic carbon foam current collectors; 6. The development of lightweight carbon electrodes using graphitic carbon foams for battery and fuel cell applications; and 7. Movement of water in fuel cell electrodes.

Michael Mullins, Tony Rogers, Julia King, Jason Keith, Bahne Cornilsen, Jeffrey Allen, Ryan Gilbert, Joseph Holles.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Activities of the National Academy of Sciences in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activities of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), has a long history and the specific time period supported by this contract is but a small piece of the long-term continuing program. As a background, in August 1945, atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima (6 August) and Nagasaki (9 August). Shortly after the bombings, US medical teams joined forces with their Japanese counterparts to form a Joint Commission for the Investigation of the Effects of the Atomic Bombs. As a result of the Joint Commission's investigations, it was determined that consideration should be given to the establishment of a long-term study of the potential late health effects of exposure of the survivors to radiation from the bombs. The results obtained from RERF studies contribute the vast majority of information that provides a better understanding of radiation effects on humans. This information has been used extensively by national organizations and international committees for estimating risks associated with radiation exposures. The estimated risks developed by these independent organizations are used by government agencies around the world to establish standards for protection of individuals exposed in the occupational, medical, and general environment. Some of these results are described briefly in this report.

Edington, C.W.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part 1, Introduction, integration, and summary: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ``other``. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk.

Evans, J.S. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Abrahmson, S. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Bender, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilbert, E.S. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Green Prison: Santa Rita Jail Creeps Towards Zero Net Energy (ZNE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large project is underway at Alameda County's twenty-year old 45 ha 4,000-inmate Santa Rita Jail, about 70 km east of San Francisco. Often described as a green prison, it has a considerable installed base of distributed energy resources including a seven-year old 1.2 MW PV array, a four-year old 1 MW fuel cell with heat recovery, and efficiency investments. A current US$14 M expansion will add approximately 2 MW of NaS batteries, and undetermined wind capacity and a concentrating solar thermal system. This ongoing effort by a progressive local government with considerable Federal and State support provides some excellent lessons for the struggle to lower building carbon footprint. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) finds true optimal combinations of equipment and operating schedules for microgrids that minimize energy bills and/or carbon emissions without 2 of 12 significant searching or rules-of-thumb prioritization, such as"efficiency first then on-site generation." The results often recommend complex systems, and sensitivities show how policy changes will affect choices. This paper reports an analysis of the historic performance of the PV system and fuel cell, describes the complex optimization applied to the battery scheduling, and shows how results will affect the jail's operational costs, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. DER-CAM is used to assess the existing and proposed DER equipment in its ability to reduce tariff charges.

Marnay, Chris; DeForest, Nicholas; Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jon; Dierckxsens, Carlos; Mendes, Goncalo; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo Ferreira

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

379

Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 4, July 1994  

SciTech Connect

This issue includes the following articles: Federal Facility Compliance Act Task Force forms mixed waste workgroup; Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety considers construction of centralized storage facility; Midwest Commission agrees on capacity limit, advisory committee; EPA responds to California site developer`s queries regarding application of air pollutant standards; county-level disqualification site screening of Pennsylvania complete; Texas Compact legislation introduced in US Senate; Generators ask court to rule in their favor on surcharge rebates lawsuit; Vermont authority and Battelle settle wetlands dispute; Eighth Circuit affirms decision in Nebraska community consent lawsuit; Nebraska court dismisses action filed by Boyd County local monitoring committee; NC authority, Chem-Nuclear, and Stowe exonerated; Senator Johnson introduces legislation to transfer Ward Valley site; Representative Dingell writes to Clinton regarding disposal of low-level radioactive waste; NAS committee on California site convenes; NRC to improve public petition process; NRC releases draft proposed rule on criteria for decontamination and closure of NRC-licensed facilities; and EPA names first environmental justice federal advisory council.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Realizacao domestica e escolar de foto e video 3D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

English: Industry does not give attention to the small domestic or professional market of digital technologies for 3D images. What was done on the XX century by using photographic film is not know available to the common people, though the facilities are even better. Some technique developed in Brasil twenty years ago and the use of conventional domestic photo or video cameras allows fot making pictures and films at home by using digital conversions for editing, and two-color goggles. The anaglyphic technique, the same NASA employs to show Mars images to the public, is not employed in Brazil yet. We must analize the reasons for that. Portugues: A industria nao tem dado atencao ao mercado domestico ou profissional de pequena escala nas novas tecnologias digitais para imagem 3D. O que foi feito ao longo do seculo XX usando filme fotografico nao esta hoje ao alcance das pessoas, sendo que a facilidade de uso e muito maior. Tecnicas desenvolvidas no Brasil ha mais de vinte anos, e o uso de simples cameras convencionais de fotografia e video permitem realizar fotos e filmes caseiros por meio de conversoes digitais na edicao e o uso de oculos bicolor. A tecnica anagifica, a mesma que a NASA usa para mostrar ao publico as imagens de Marte, por exemplo, nao teve espaco no Brasil ainda. Devemos analisar os motivos que podem estar influenciando e os caminhos para mudar isso.

Jose J. Lunazzi

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advanced Materials for Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries: Status, Challenges and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect

The increasing penetration of renewable energy and the trend toward clean, efficient transportation have spurred growing interests in sodium-beta alumina batteries that store electrical energy via sodium ion transport across a ?"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte at elevated temperatures (typically 300~350°C). Currently, the negative electrode or anode is metallic sodium in molten state during battery operation; the positive electrode or cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). Since the groundbreaking works in the sodium-beta alumina batteries a few decades ago, encouraging progress has been achieved in improving battery performance, along with cost reduction. However there remain issues that hinder broad applications and market penetration of the technologies. To better the Na-beta alumina technologies require further advancement in materials along with component and system design and engineering. This paper offers a comprehensive review on materials of electrodes and electrolytes for the Na-beta alumina batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Xia, Guanguang; Lemmon, John P.; Yang, Zhenguo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 3: A new reactor concept without uranium or thorium for burning weapons-grade plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) requested that the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) examine concepts that focus only on the destruction of 50,000 kg of weapons-grade plutonium. A concept has been developed by the INEL for a low-temperature, low-pressure, low-power density, low-coolant-flow-rate light water reactor that destroys plutonium quickly without using uranium or thorium. This concept is very safe and could be designed, constructed, and operated in a reasonable time frame. This concept does not produce electricity. Not considering other missions frees the design from the paradigms and constraints used by proponents of other dispositioning concepts. The plutonium destruction design goal is most easily achievable with a large, moderate power reactor that operates at a significantly lower thermal power density than is appropriate for reactors with multiple design goals. This volume presents the assumptions and requirements, a reactor concept overview, and a list of recommendations. The appendices contain detailed discussions on plutonium dispositioning, self-protection, fuel types, neutronics, thermal hydraulics, off-site radiation releases, and economics.

Ryskamp, J.M.; Schnitzler, B.G.; Fletcher, C.D. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Results of advanced batter technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during FY 1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies [Na/S, Li/FeS, Ni/Metal-Hydride, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and lie evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most promising R D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory. Electric and hybrid propulsion systems, No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during FY 1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies [Na/S, Li/FeS, Ni/Metal-Hydride, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and lie evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Electric and Magnetic Fields Research and Public Information Dissemination Program annual report for fiscal year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) Research and Public Information Dissemination (RAPID) Program was authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 as a near-term effort to expand and accelerate the research needed to address the EMF issue. As required by this legislation, the EMF Interagency Committee, the National EMF Advisory Committee (NEMFAC), and the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) are providing valued input and advice for the direction of this program. With this input and advice, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) have developed and are implementing five-year program plans. Multi-year health effects research projects and related EMF measurement and exposure assessment projects are underway using funds appropriated in fiscal years 1994, 1995, and 1996 together with voluntary non-Federal contributions. The results of these research projects, along with the results of other EMF research, will be used as input to the hazard evaluation effort, which is the focus of the EMF RAPID Program. A coordinated interagency program is underway to communicate needed information on the EMF issue in a clear manner to the public and other decision makers.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Optimizing performance of superscalar codes for a single Cray X1MSP processor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growing gap between sustained and peak performance for full-scale complex scientific applications on conventional supercomputers is a major concern in high performance computing. The recently-released vector-based Cray X1 offers to bridge this gap for many demanding scientific applications. However, this unique architecture contains both data caches and multi-streaming processing units, and the optimal programming methodology is still under investigation. In this paper we investigate Cray X1 code optimization for a suite of computational kernels originally designed for superscalar processors. For our study, we select four applications from the SPLASH2 application suite (1-D FFT,Radix, Ocean, and Nbody), two kernels from the NAS benchmark suite (3-DFFT and CG), and a matrix-matrix multiplication kernel. Results show that for many cases, the addition of vectorization compiler directives results faster runtimes. However, to achieve a significant performance improvement via increased vector length, it is often necessary to restructure the program at the source level sometimes leading to algorithmic level transformations. Additionally, memory bank conflicts may result in substantial performance losses. These conflicts can often be exacerbated when optimizing code for increased vector lengths, and must be explicitly minimized. Finally, we investigate the relationship of the X1 data caches on overall performance.

Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Oliker, Leonid

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

Results of advanced battery technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies [Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Development of the sodium/sulfur battery technology for utility applications  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of battery energy storage systems for electric utilities. An important part of this DOE program is the engineering of the battery subsystem. Because lower costs are possible and less space is required compared with conventional battery technologies, two advanced battery systems are being developed: sodium/sulfur and zinc/bromine. A brief description of the development approach being followed along with the current status of the sodium/sulfur technology is described in this paper. Of immediate relevance, a factory integrated modular sodium/sulfur system has been designed that incorporates many of the advantages of this technology. Each module (designated as NAS-P{sub AC}) combines a 600-kWh sodium/sulfur battery, a 300 kW power converter and a control system. In addition to the potential for low life-cycle cost, other specific benefits include excellent portability and an installed system-level footprint that is about 20% of an equivalent system using lead-acid batteries. The sodium/sulfur battery is designed to deliver its rated energy for 1500 cycles or 5 years of maintenance-free operation.

Braithwaite, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, A.A. [Silent Power, Inc., Wayne, PA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Report of the Ad Hoc Panel on heavy ion facilities  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the USAEC, the President of the National Academy of Sciences appointed an Ad Hoc Panel under the NAS-NRC Committee on Nuclear Science to make an intensive study of various aspects of the science and technology involved in heavy ion research in light of the needs of the national program in this field. In particular, the panel was asked to formulate and evaluate various options for the development of heavy ion facilities that would include an appropriate accelerator complex capable of producing heavy ion beams and the ancillary apparatus required for experimental exploitation. Also, the Panel was asked to evaluate the current status and potentialities of the Super HILAC and Bevalac accelerators of the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley. Results of the study are presented. Topics include heavy ions in nuclear physics and chemistry, atomic physics, heavy ions and astro and space physics, materials science and solid state, and biomedicine. The state of the technology related to the choice of a heavy ion accelerator system is reviewed, and the various possible choices are reviewed including the large tandem accelerator, tandem- cyclotron systems, and linear accelerators. The upgrading of existing facilities (Super HILAC, Bevalac, and PPA) is discussed. Cost estimates for various heavy ion facilities are briefly discussed. (WHK)

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Utilization of Surplus Weapons Plutonium As Mixed Oxide Fuel Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) endorses the rapid application of mixed uraniumplutonium oxide (MOX) fuel technology to accomplish the timely disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. The end of the Cold War has led to universal recognition that both the United States and Russia possess stockpiles of weapons-grade plutonium that far exceed their defense requirements. In 1994 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) stated the following: “The existence of this material [surplus weapons-usable plutonium and highly enriched uranium] constitutes a clear and present danger to national and international security. 1 ” Russia and the United States have held extensive discussions on plutonium disposition, culminating in a September 2000 agreement 2 to dispose of 34 metric tons of surplus weaponsgrade plutonium in each country. The U.S. Department of Energy has completed two major Environmental Impact Statements on surplus plutonium disposition. 3,4 Implementation of the associated Records of Decision 5,6 has resulted in an ongoing program to dispose of surplus U.S. weapons-grade plutonium by fabricating the material into MOX fuel and using the fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. As with the blend-down of highly enriched uranium, a

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Consortia Focused on Photovoltaic R&D, Manufacturing, and Testing: A Review of Existing Models and Structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program prepares to initiate a new cost-shared research and development (R&D) effort on photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing, it is useful to review the experience to date with consortia focused on PV R&D, manufacturing, and testing. Information was gathered for this report by conducting interviews and accessing Web sites of 14 U.S. consortia and four European consortia, each with either a primary focus on or an emerging interest in PV technology R&D, manufacturing, or testing. Additional input was collected from several workshops held by the DOE and National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 2009, which examined the practical steps -- including public-private partnerships and policy support -- necessary to enhance the United States' capacity to competitively manufacture photovoltaics. This report categorizes the 18 consortia into three groups: university-led consortia, industry-led consortia, and manufacturing and testing facilities consortia. The first section summarizes the organizations within the different categories, with a particular focus on the key benefits and challenges for each grouping. The second section provides a more detailed overview of each consortium, including the origins, goals, organization, membership, funding sources, and key contacts. This survey is a useful resource for stakeholders interested in PV manufacturing R&D, but should not imply endorsement of any of these groups.

Coggeshall, C.; Margolis, R. M.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Experiences with Co-Array Fortran on Hardware Shared Memory Platforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Source-to-source translation is an important code generation strategy commonly used by parallelizing compilers and compilers for parallel languages. In this paper, we investigate the performance impact of using different Fortran 90 representations for local and remote accesses on scalable shared-memory multiprocessors when generating SPMD code for Co-array Fortran. Our aim is to deliver the full power of the hardware platform to the application when operating on local data and when accessing remote data using either coarse-grain or fine-grain communication. We explored the performance impact of several different representations for shared data and several different ways of implementing communication. Using CAF variants of the STREAM, Random Access, and NAS MG & SP benchmarks, we compared the performance of library-based implementations of one-sided communication with fine-grain communication that uses pointers to access remote data using load and store operations. Our experiments showed that using pointer-based fine-grain communication improved performance as much as a factor of 24 on an SGI Altix and as much as a factor of five on an SGI Origin, when pointer initialization is hoisted out of a loop performing data accesses. 1

Yuri Dotsenko; Cristian Coarfa; John Mellor-crummey; Daniel Chavarría-mir

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Analysis of the GaInP/GaAs/1-eV/Ge Cell and Related Structures for Terrestrial Concentrator Application: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the analysis of the potential of GaInP/GaAs/1-eV/Ge four-junction solar cell to improve on the efficiency of the state-of-the-art GaInP/GaAs/Ge benchmark. We emphasize three factors: (1) The newly proposed terrestrial concentrator spectrum has a lower ratio of red to blue light than does the old AM1.5 direct standard spectrum. (2) Standard two-layer antireflection coatings do not provide near-zero reflectance over the full spectral range of interest for these devices. (3) GaInNAs junctions used to date for the 1-eV junction have quantum efficiencies less than {approx}75%. These factors all limit the device current, adversely affecting the four-junction efficiency. We discuss strategies for ameliorating this problem, including going to alternate structures such as a GaInP/GaAs/0.9-eV three-junction device.

Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Geisz, J. F.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Plutonium disposition study phase 1b final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of the Westinghouse activities performed as part of the Plutonium Disposition Study Phase 1b. These activities, which took place from May 16, 1993 to September 15, 1993, build upon the work completed in Phase 1a, which concluded on May 15, 1993. In Phase 1a, three Plutonium Disposal Reactor (PDR) options were developed for the disposal of excess weapons grade plutonium from returned and dismantled nuclear weapons. This report documents the results of several tasks that were performed to further knowledge in specific areas leading up to Phase 2 of the PDR Study. The Westinghouse activities for Phase 1b are summarized as follows: (1) resolved technical issues concerning reactor physics including equilibrium cycle calculations, use of gadolinium, moderator temperature coefficient, and others as documented in Section 2.0; (2) analyzed large Westinghouse commercial plants for plutonium disposal; (3) reactor safety issues including the steam line break were resolved, and are included in Section 2.0; (4) several tasks related to the PDR Fuel Cycle were examined; (5) cost and deployment options were examined to determine optimal configuration for both plutonium disposal and tritium production; (6) response to questions from DOE and National Academy of Scientists (NAS) reviewers concerning the PDR Phase 1a report are included in Appendix A.

NONE

1993-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory's Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy's. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1993-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

397

Energy Storage for Variable Renewable Energy Resource Integration - A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the following key questions in the discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid: a) what will be the future balancing requirement to accommodate a simulated expansion of wind energy resources from 3.3 GW in 2008 to 14.4 GW in 2019 in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP), and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting the balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP). A life-cycle analysis was performed to assess the least-cost technology option for meeting the new balancing requirement. The technologies considered in this study include conventional turbines (CT), sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries, lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries, pumped hydro energy storage (PH), and demand response (DR). Hybrid concepts that combine 2 or more of the technologies above are also evaluated. This analysis was performed with collaboration by the Bonneville Power Administration and funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Guo, Xinxin; Nguyen, Tony B.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Commercialization of New Lattice-Matched Multi-Junction Solar Cells Based on Dilute Nitrides: July 8, 2010 - March 7, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Final Technical Progress Report for PV Incubator subcontract NAT-0-99013-03. The overall objective of this Incubator subcontract was to complete the work necessary to make commercial ready solar cells using the dilute nitride technology. The specific objectives of this program were aimed at completing the development of a triple-junction solar cell that incorporates a GaInNAs {approx}1eV subcell to the point of commercial readiness, and determining the cell reliability and, if necessary, identifying and eliminating process or material related issues that lead to early-life cell failures. There were three major objectives for Phase 1, each of which focuses on a key element of the solar cell that determines its performance in a commercial CPV system. One objective was to optimize the quality and performance of the key individual components making up the solar cell structure and then to optimize the integration of these components into a complete triple-junction cell. A second objective was to design and test anti-reflective coating that maximizes the light coupled into a 3J cell with a {approx}1 eV bottom cell bandgap. The third objective was to develop Highly Accelerated Life Tests (HALT) protocols and tools for identifying and correcting potential reliability problems. The Phase 2 objectives were a continuation of the work begun in Phase 1 but aimed at optimizing cell performance for commercial requirements. Phase 2 had four primary objectives: (1) develop a glass-matched anti-reflective coating (ARC) and optimize the cell/ARC to give good performance at 60C operating temperature, (2) optimize the cell for good operation at 60C and high concentration, and (3) complete the light biased HALT system and use it to determine what, if any, failures are observed, and (4) determine the reliability limits of the optimized cell.

Herb, J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Optimization of Trona/Limestone Injection for SO2 Control in Coal-Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Mobotec USA develops and markets air pollution control systems for utility boilers and other combustion systems. They have a particular interest in technologies that can reduce NOx, SOx, and mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers, and have been investigating the injection of sorbents such as limestone and trona into a boiler to reduce SOx and Hg emissions. WRI proposed to use the Combustion Test Facility (CTF) to enable Mobotec to conduct a thorough evaluation of limestone and trona injection for SO{sub 2} control. The overall goal of the project was to characterize the SO{sub 2} reductions resulting from the injection of limestone and trona into the CTF when fired with a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal used in one of Mobotec's Midwest installations. Results revealed that when limestone was injected at Ca:S molar ratios of 1.5 to 3.0, the resulting SO{sub 2} reductions were 35-55%. It is believed that further reductions can be attained with improved mixing of the sorbent with the combustion gases. When limestone was added to the coal, at Ca:S molar ratios of 0.5 to 1.5, the SO{sub 2} reductions were 13-21%. The lower reductions were attributed to dead-burning of the sorbent in the high temperature flame zone. In cases where limestone was both injected into the furnace and added to the coal, the total SO{sub 2} reductions for a given Ca:S molar ratio were similar to the reductions for furnace injection only. The injection of trona into the mid-furnace zone, for Na:S molar ratios of 1.4 to 2.4, resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 29-43%. Limestone injection did not produce any slag deposits on an ash deposition probe while trona injection resulted in noticeable slag deposition.

None

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Bandgap Engineering in High-Efficiency Multijunction Concentrator Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses semiconductor device research paths under investigation with the aim of reaching the milestone efficiency of 40%. A cost analysis shows that achieving very high cell efficiencies is crucial for the realization of cost-effective photovoltaics, because of the strongly leveraging effect of efficiency on module packaging and balance-of systems costs. Lattice-matched (LM) GaInP/ GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cells have achieved the highest independently confirmed efficiency at 175 suns, 25?C, of 37.3% under the standard AM1.5D, low-AOD terrestrial spectrum. Lattice-mismatched, or metamorphic (MM), materials offer still higher potential efficiencies, if the crystal quality can be maintained. Theoretical efficiencies well over 50% are possible for a MM GaInP/ 1.17-eV GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cell limited by radiative recombination at 500 suns. The bandgap - open circuit voltage offset, (Eg/q) - Voc, is used as a valuable theoretical and experimental tool to characterize multijunction cells with subcell bandgaps ranging from 0.7 to 2.1 eV. Experimental results are presented for prototype 6-junction cells employing an active {approx}1.1-eV dilute nitride GaInNAs subcell, with active-area efficiency greater than 23% and over 5.3 V open-circuit voltage under the 1-sun AM0 space spectrum. Such cell designs have theoretical efficiencies under the terrestrial spectrum at 500 suns concentration exceeding 55% efficiency, even for lattice-matched designs.

King, R. R.; Sherif, R. A.; Kinsey, G. S.; Kurtz, S.; Fetzer, C. M.; Edmondson, K. M.; Law, D. C.; Cotal, H. L.; Krut, D. D.; Ermer, J. H.; Karam, N. H.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 4. Plutonium dispositioning in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect

This study is in response to a request by the Reactor Panel Subcommittee of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) to evaluate the feasibility of using plutonium fuels (without uranium) for disposal in existing conventional or advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs and in low temperature/pressure LWR designs that might be developed for plutonium disposal. Three plutonium-based fuel forms (oxides, aluminum metallics, and carbides) are evaluated for neutronic performance, fabrication technology, and material and compatibility issues. For the carbides, only the fabrication technologies are addressed. Viable plutonium oxide fuels for conventional or advanced LWRs include plutonium-zirconium-calcium oxide (PuO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}-CaO) with the addition of thorium oxide (ThO{sub 2}) or a burnable poison such as erbium oxide (Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}) or europium oxide (Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to achieve acceptable neutronic performance. Thorium will breed fissile uranium that may be unacceptable from a proliferation standpoint. Fabrication of uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuels is well established; however, fabrication of plutonium-based oxide fuels will require further development. Viable aluminum-plutonium metallic fuels for a low temperature/pressure LWR include plutonium aluminide in an aluminum matrix (PuAl{sub 4}-Al) with the addition of a burnable poison such as erbium (Er) or europium (Eu). Fabrication of low-enriched plutonium in aluminum-plutonium metallic fuel rods was initially established 30 years ago and will require development to recapture and adapt the technology to meet current environmental and safety regulations. Fabrication of high-enriched uranium plate fuel by the picture-frame process is a well established process, but the use of plutonium would require the process to be upgraded in the United States to conform with current regulations and minimize the waste streams.

Sterbentz, J.W.; Olsen, C.S.; Sinha, U.P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A High Temperature Electrochemical Energy Storage System Based on Sodium Beta-Alumina Solid Electrolyte (Base)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done during the period September 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008. Work was conducted in the following areas: (1) Fabrication of sodium beta{double_prime} alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) using a vapor phase process. (2) Mechanistic studies on the conversion of {alpha}-alumina + zirconia into beta{double_prime}-alumina + zirconia by the vapor phase process. (3) Characterization of BASE by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and conductivity measurements. (4) Design, construction and electrochemical testing of a symmetric cell containing BASE as the electrolyte and NaCl + ZnCl{sub 2} as the electrodes. (5) Design, construction, and electrochemical evaluation of Na/BASE/ZnCl{sub 2} electrochemical cells. (6) Stability studies in ZnCl{sub 2}, SnCl{sub 2}, and SnI{sub 4} (7) Design, assembly and testing of planar stacks. (8) Investigation of the effect of porous surface layers on BASE on cell resistance. The conventional process for the fabrication of sodium ion conducting beta{double_prime}-alumina involves calcination of {alpha}-alumina + Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} + LiNO{sub 3} at 1250 C, followed by sintering powder compacts in sealed containers (platinum or MgO) at {approx}1600 C. The novel vapor phase process involves first sintering a mixture of {alpha}-alumina + yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) into a dense ceramic followed by exposure to soda vapor at {approx}1450 C to convert {alpha}-alumina into beta{double_prime}-alumina. The vapor phase process leads to a high strength BASE, which is also resistant to moisture attack, unlike BASE made by the conventional process. The PI is the lead inventor of the process. Discs and tubes of BASE were fabricated in the present work. In the conventional process, sintering of BASE is accomplished by a transient liquid phase mechanism wherein the liquid phase contains NaAlO{sub 2}. Some NaAlO{sub 2} continues to remain at grain boundaries; and is the root cause of its water sensitivity. In the vapor phase process, NaAlO{sub 2} is never formed. Conversion occurs by a coupled transport of Na{sup +} through BASE formed and of O{sup 2-} through YSZ to the reaction front. Transport to the reaction front is described in terms of a chemical diffusion coefficient of Na{sub 2}O. The conversion kinetics as a function of microstructure is under investigation. The mechanism of conversion is described in this report. A number of discs and tubes of BASE have been fabricated by the vapor phase process. The material was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), before and after conversion. Conductivity (which is almost exclusively due to sodium ion transport at the temperatures of interest) was measured. Conductivity was measured using sodium-sodium tests as well as by impedance spectroscopy. Various types of both planar and tubular electrochemical cells were assembled and tested. In some cases the objective was to determine if there was any interaction between the salt and BASE. The interaction of interest was mainly ion exchange (possible replacement of sodium ion by the salt cation). It was noted that Zn{sup 2+} did not replace Na+ over the conditions of interest. For this reason much of the work was conducted with ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode salt. In the case of Sn-based, Sn{sup 2+} did ion exchange, but Sn{sup 4+} did not. This suggests that Sn{sup 4+} salts are viable candidates. These results and implications are discussed in the report. Cells made with Na as the anode and ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode were successfully charged/discharged numerous times. The key advantages of the batteries under investigation here over the Na-S batteries are: (1) Steel wool can be used in the cathode compartment unlike Na-S batteries which require expensive graphite. (2) Planar cells can be constructed in addition to tubular, allowing for greater design flexibility and integration with other devices such as planar SOFC. (3) Comparable or higher open circuit voltage (OCV) than the Na-S battery. (4) Wider operating temperature range and higher temper

Anil Virkar

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Preliminary Assessment of Overweight Mainline Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration requested information regarding overweight and oversized vehicle traffic entering inspection stations (ISs) in order to develop strategies for future research efforts and possibly help guide regulatory issues involving overweight commercial motor vehicles (CMVs). For a period of one month, inspection stations in Knox County and Greene County, Tennessee, recorded overweight and oversized vehicles that entered these ISs. During this period, 435 CMVs were recorded using an electronic form filled out by enforcement personnel at the IS. Of the 435 CMVs recorded, 381 had weight information documented with them. The majority (52.2%) of the vehicles recorded were five-axle combination vehicles, and 50.6% of all the vehicles were permitted to operate above the legal weight limit in Tennessee, which is 80,000 lb for vehicles with five or more axles. Only 16.8% of the CMVs recorded were overweight gross (11.5% of permitted vehicles) and 54.1% were overweight on an axle group. The low percentage of overweight gross CMVs was because only 45 of the vehicles over 80,000 lb. were not permitted. On average, axles that were overweight were 2,000 lb. over the legal limit for an axle or group of axles. Of the vehicles recorded, 172 vehicles were given a North American Standard (NAS) inspection during the assessment. Of those, 69% of the inspections were driver-only inspections (Level III) and only 25% of the inspections had a vehicle component (such as a Level I or Level II). The remaining 6% of inspections did not have valid Aspen numbers; the type of was inspection unknown. Data collected on the types of trailers of each vehicle showed that about half of the recorded CMVs could realistically be given a Level I (full vehicle and driver) inspection; this estimate was solely based on trailer type. Enforcement personnel at ISs without an inspection pit have difficulty fully inspecting certain vehicles due to low clearance below the trailer. Because of this, overweight and oversized vehicles were normally only given a Level III (driver) inspection; thus, little is known about the safety of these vehicles. The out-of-service (OOS) rate of all the inspected vehicles (driver and vehicle inspections) was 18.6%, while the OOS rate for vehicle inspections (Level I and II) was 52.4%. Future work will focus on performing Level I inspections on five-axle combination tractor-trailers and the types of violations that overweight vehicles may have. This research will be conducted in Tennessee and possibly in other states as well.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Cost Effective Surfactant Formulations for Improved Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work during the 30 month time period of this project. This was planned originally for 3-years duration, but due to its financial limitations, DOE halted funding after 2 years. The California Institute of Technology continued working on this project for an additional 6 months based on a no-cost extension granted by DOE. The objective of this project is to improve the performance of aqueous phase formulations that are designed to increase oil recovery from fractured, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. This process works by increasing the rate and extent of aqueous phase imbibition into the matrix blocks in the reservoir and thereby displacing crude oil normally not recovered in a conventional waterflood operation. The project had three major components: (1) developing methods for the rapid screening of surfactant formulations towards identifying candidates suitable for more detailed evaluation, (2) more fundamental studies to relate the chemical structure of acid components of an oil and surfactants in aqueous solution as relates to their tendency to wet a carbonate surface by oil or water, and (3) a more applied study where aqueous solutions of different commercial surfactants are examined for their ability to recover a West Texas crude oil from a limestone core via an imbibition process. The first item, regarding rapid screening methods for suitable surfactants has been summarized as a Topical Report. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the surface of these chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite power is pre-treated to make the surface oil-wet. The next step is to add the pre-treated powder to a test tube and add a candidate aqueous surfactant formulation; the greater the percentage of the calcite that now sinks to the bottom rather than floats, the more effective the surfactant is in changing the solids to become now preferentially water-wet. Results from the screening test generally are consistent with surfactant oil recovery performance reported in the literature. The second effort is a more fundamental study. It considers the effect of chemical structures of different naphthenic acids (NA) dissolved in decane as model oils that render calcite surfaces oil-wet to a different degree. NAs are common to crude oil and are at least partially responsible for the frequent observation that carbonate reservoirs are oil-wet. Because pure NA compounds are used, trends in wetting behavior can be related to NA molecular structure as measured by solid adsorption, contact angle and our novel, simple flotation test with calcite. Experiments with different surfactants and NA-treated calcite powder provide information about mechanisms responsible for sought after reversal to a water-wet state. Key findings include: (1) more hydrophobic NA's are more prone to induce oil-wetting, and (2) recovery of the model oil from limestone core was better with cationic surfactants, but one nonionic surfactant, Igepal CO-530, also had favorable results. This portion of the project included theoretical calculations to investigate key basic properties of several NAs such as their acidic strength and their relative water/oil solubility, and relate this to their chemical structure. The third category of this project focused on the recovery of a light crude oil from West Texas (McElroy Field) from a carbonate rock (limestone outcrop). For this effort, the first item was to establish a suite of surfactants that would be compatible with the McElroy Field brine. Those were examined further for their ability to recover oil by imbibition. Results demonstrate several types of promising candida

William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Yongfu Wu

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the maximum score possible. A highly ranked ANA or ARA is one that is large in size compared to other areas, includes a greater proportion of the watershed within Reservation boundaries, contains a number of status taxa at high densities, exhibits a high overall biodiversity, has very good or excellent habitat and water quality, is well protected and isolated from disturbances, and shows several other characteristics that contribute to natural area value. In this report, the term 'natural area' is loosely defined as a terrestrial or aquatic system that exhibits, or is thought to exhibit, high natural integrity and other significant natural values. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate and rank the currently recognized Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for their natural area value. A previous study (Baranski 2009) analyzed, evaluated, and ranked terrestrial areas (Natural Areas [NAs], Reference Areas [RAs], and Cooperative Management Areas [CMAs]) on the ORR for natural area value, and a precise methodology for natural area evaluation was developed. The present study is intended to be a complement and companion to the terrestrial area study and attempts to employ a similar methodology for aquatic areas so that aquatic and terrestrial areas can be compared on a similar scale. This study specifically develops criteria for assessing the ecological, biodiversity, and natural area importance and significance of aquatic systems on the Reservation in a relevant and consistent manner. The information can be integrated into the Tennessee Natural Heritage Program (http://tn.gov/environment/na/nhp.shtml) system and applied to potential new aquatic areas. Further, the information will be useful in planning, management, and protection efforts on the ORR.

Baranski, Dr. Michael J. [Catawba College

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:02:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIP_R10-NTN_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"

408

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:03:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIP_R10-NMR_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"