National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fbsr na-al-si nas

  1. Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) With Hanford Low Activity Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Burket, P. R.; Bannochie, C. J.; Daniel, W. G.; Nash, C. A.; Cozzi, A. D.; Herman, C. C.

    2012-10-22

    Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750?C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

  2. Characterization and Leaching Tests of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Form for LAW Immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-10-01

    Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) have been evaluated. One such immobilization technology is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was involved in an extensive characterization campaign. This goal of this campaign was study the durability of the FBSR mineral product and the mineral product encapsulated in a monolith to meet compressive strength requirements. This paper gives an overview of results obtained using the ASTM C 1285 Product Consistency Test (PCT), the EPA Test Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the ASTMC 1662 Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) test. Along with these durability tests an overview of the characteristics of the waste form has been collected using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), microwave digestions for chemical composition, and surface area from Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) theory.

  3. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING WITH ACUTAL HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES VERIFYING FBSR AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

    2012-01-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the cleanup mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplementary treatments being considered. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and other secondary wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates/nitrites, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, and/or radio-nuclides like I-129 and Tc-99. Radioactive testing of Savannah River LAW (Tank 50) shimmed to resemble Hanford LAW and actual Hanford LAW (SX-105 and AN-103) have produced a ceramic (mineral) waste form which is the same as the non-radioactive waste simulants tested at the engineering scale. The radioactive testing demonstrated that the FBSR process can retain the volatile radioactive components that cannot be contained at vitrification temperatures. The radioactive and nonradioactive mineral waste forms that were produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process are shown to be as durable as LAW glass.

  4. MINERALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR): COMPARISONS TO VITREOUS WASTE FORMS, AND PERTINENT DURABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C

    2008-12-26

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to generate a document for the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cover the following topics: (1) A description of the mineral structures produced by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) of Hanford type Low Activity Waste (LAW including LAWR which is LAW melter recycle waste) waste, especially the cage structured minerals and how they are formed. (2) How the cage structured minerals contain some contaminants, while others become part of the mineral structure (Note that all contaminants become part of the mineral structure and this will be described in the subsequent sections of this report). (3) Possible contaminant release mechanisms from the mineral structures. (4) Appropriate analyses to evaluate these release mechanisms. (5) Why the appropriate analyses are comparable to the existing Hanford glass dataset. In order to discuss the mineral structures and how they bond contaminants a brief description of the structures of both mineral (ceramic) and vitreous waste forms will be given to show their similarities. By demonstrating the similarities of mineral and vitreous waste forms on atomic level, the contaminant release mechanisms of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous (glass) waste forms can be compared. This will then logically lead to the discussion of why many of the analyses used to evaluate vitreous waste forms and glass-ceramics (also known as glass composite materials) are appropriate for determining the release mechanisms of LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms and how the durability data on LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms relate to the durability data for LAW/LAWR glasses. The text will discuss the LAW mineral waste form made by FBSR. The nanoscale mechanism by which the minerals form will be also be described in the text. The appropriate analyses to evaluate contaminant release mechanisms will be discussed, as will the FBSR test results to date and how they compare to testing performed on LAW glasses. Other details about vitreous waste form durability and impacts of REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) on durability are given in Appendix A. Details about the FBSR process, various pilot scale demonstrations, and applications are given in Appendix B. Details describing all the different leach tests that need to be used jointly to determine the leaching mechanisms of a waste form are given in Appendix C. Cautions regarding the way in which the waste form surface area is measured and in the choice of leachant buffers (if used) are given in Appendix D.

  5. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Mineralization for High Organic and Nitrate Waste Streams for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

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    Jantzen, C.M.; Williams, M.R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NOx in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 deg. C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 deg. C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {>=}1000 deg. C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NOx. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O. (authors)

  6. Durability Testing of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JANTZEN, CAROL M.; PAREIZS, JOHN M.; LORIER, TROY H.; MARRA, JAMES C.

    2005-07-01

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes but especially aqueous high sodium wastes at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The FBSR technology converts organic compounds to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, converts nitrate/nitrite species to N{sub 2}, and produces a solid residue through reactions with superheated steam, the fluidizing media. If clay is added during processing a ''mineralized'' granular waste form can be produced. The mineral components of the waste form are primarily Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The cage and ring structured minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc{sup 99} and Cs{sup 137} and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals appear to stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Durability testing of the FBSR products was performed using ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The FBSR mineral products (bed and fines) evaluated in this study were found to be two orders of magnitude more durable than the Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass requirement of 2 g/m{sup 2} release of Na{sup +}. The PCT responses for the FBSR samples tested were consistent with results from previous FBSR Hanford LAW product testing. Differences in the response can be explained by the minerals formed and their effects on PCT leachate chemistry.

  7. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

    2013-08-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP’s LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at <2g/m2 during ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency) durability testing. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product was investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage. Monolithing in an inorganic geopolymer binder, which is amorphous, macro-encapsulates the granules, and the monoliths pass ANSI/ANS 16.1 and ASTM C1308 durability testing with Re achieving a Leach Index (LI) of 9 (the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, IDF, criteria for Tc-99) after a few days and Na achieving an LI of >6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanford’s blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a “tie back” between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for to

  8. Experimental determination of the speciation, partitioning, and release of perrhenate as a chemical surrogate for pertechnetate from a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Fitts, Jeff. P.; Jantzen, Carol. M.; Tang, G.

    2013-12-01

    A key component to closing the nuclear fuel cycle is the storage and disposition of nuclear waste in geologic systems. Multiphase ceramic waste forms have been studied extensively as a potential host matrix for nuclear waste. Understanding the speciation, partitioning, and release behavior of radionuclides immobilized in multiphase ceramic waste forms is a critical aspect of developing the scientific and technical basis for nuclear waste management. In this study, we evaluated a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form (i.e., fluidized-bed steam reform sodium aluminosilicate [FBSR NAS] product) as a potential host matrix for long-lived radionuclides, such as technetium (99Tc). The FBSR NAS material consists primarily of nepheline (ideally NaAlSiO4), anion-bearing sodalites (ideally M8[Al6Si6O24]X2, where M refers to alkali and alkaline earth cations and X refers to monovalent anions), and nosean (ideally Na8[AlSiO4]6SO4). Bulk X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the multiphase ceramic waste form, suggest rhenium (Re) is in the Re(VII) oxidation state and has partitioned to a Re-bearing sodalite phase (most likely a perrhenate sodalite Na8[Al6Si6O24](ReO4)2). Rhenium was added as a chemical surrogate for 99Tc during the FBSR NAS synthesis process. The weathering behavior of the FBSR NAS material was evaluated under hydraulically unsaturated conditions with deionized water at 90 ?C. The steady-state Al, Na, and Si concentrations suggests the weathering mechanisms are consistent with what has been observed for other aluminosilicate minerals and include a combination of ion exchange, network hydrolysis, and the formation of an enriched-silica surface layer or phase. The steady-state S and Re concentrations are within an order of magnitude of the nosean and perrhenate sodalite solubility, respectively. The order of magnitude difference between the observed and predicted concentration for Re and S may be associated with the fact that the anion-bearing sodalites contained in the multiphase ceramic matrix are present as mixed-anion sodalite phases. These results suggest the multiphase FBSR NAS material may be a viable host matrix for long-lived, highly mobilie radionuclides which is a critical aspect in the management of nuclear waste.

  9. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105, Tank AN-103, And AZ-101/102) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

    2013-09-18

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is a robust technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes. Applications have been tested at the pilot scale for the high sodium, sulfate, halide, organic and nitrate wastes at the Hanford site, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). Due to the moderate processing temperatures, halides, sulfates, and technetium are retained in mineral phases of the feldspathoid family (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite, etc). The feldspathoid minerals bind the contaminants such as Tc-99 in cage (sodalite, nosean) or ring (nepheline) structures to surrounding aluminosilicate tetrahedra in the feldspathoid structures. The granular FBSR mineral waste form that is produced has a comparable durability to LAW glass based on the short term PCT testing in this study, the INL studies, SPFT and PUF testing from previous studies as given in the columns in Table 1-3 that represent the various durability tests. Monolithing of the granular product was shown to be feasible in a separate study. Macro-encapsulating the granular product provides a decrease in leaching compared to the FBSR granular product when the geopolymer is correctly formulated.

  10. TISSINTITE, (Ca,Na,)AlSi2O6: A SHOCK-INDUCED CLINOPYROXENE IN THE TISSINT METEORITE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossman. George R.

    of silica. In general, the rarity of vacancy-rich cpx in high-pressure terrestrial rocks likely reflects], the kinetics of nucleation and growth of tissintite are slower for more sodic plag, so tissintite is most

  11. Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS Dploiement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collette. Sébastien

    CH8 Divers 2 Agenda · Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS · Déploiement · VLAN ­ 802.1Q · Gestion d · Sécurisation de Windows · Sécurisation de UNIX · Qu'est-ce que... ­ Firewall, VPN, IDS/IPS, PKI Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN #12;3 Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN · Direct Attached Storage · Network Attached Storage · Storage

  12. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE (WTP-SW) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2014-08-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford’s WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular products (both simulant and radioactive) were tested and a subset of the granular material (both simulant and radioactive) were stabilized in a geopolymer matrix. Extensive testing and characterization of the granular and monolith material were made including the following: ? ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) testing of granular and monolith; ? ASTM C1308 accelerated leach testing of the radioactive monolith; ? ASTM C192 compression testing of monoliths; and ? EPA Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The significant findings of the testing completed on simulant and radioactive WTP-SW are given below: ? Data indicates {sup 99}Tc, Re, Cs, and I

  13. Corte nas bolsas de doutoramento

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    compararmos este valor com os números de 2012, quando foram atri- buídas 1198 bolsas de doutoramento, há uma-doutoramento, esse valor foi de 10,1%, enquanto no das bolsas de doutoramento foi de 8,7% (para chegar a 10%, teriamCorte nas bolsas de doutoramento da FCT foi brutal A Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia deu 298

  14. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

    2006-12-06

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

  15. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

    2007-03-31

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO4, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

  16. SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB

    2010-08-19

    This paper describes the sample selection, sample preparation, environmental, and regulatory considerations for shipment of Hanford radioactive waste samples for treatability studies of the FBSR process at the Savannah River National Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford tank farms contain approximately 57 million gallons of wastes, most of which originated during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel to produce plutonium for defense purposes. DOE intends to pre-treat the tank waste to separate the waste into a high level fraction, that will be vitrified and disposed of in a national repository as high-level waste (HLW), and a low-activity waste (LAW) fraction that will be immobilized for on-site disposal at Hanford. The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the focal point for the treatment of Hanford tank waste. However, the WTP lacks the capacity to process all of the LAW within the regulatory required timeframe. Consequently, a supplemental LAW immobilization process will be required to immobilize the remainder of the LAW. One promising supplemental technology is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) to produce a sodium-alumino-silicate (NAS) waste form. The NAS waste form is primarily composed of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}), sodalite (Nas[AlSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}Cl{sub 2}), and nosean (Na{sub 8}[AlSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}SO{sub 4}). Semivolatile anions such as pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) and volatiles such as iodine as iodide (I{sup -}) are expected to be entrapped within the mineral structures, thereby immobilizing them (Janzen 2008). Results from preliminary performance tests using surrogates, suggests that the release of semivolatile radionuclides {sup 99}Tc and volatile {sup 129}I from granular NAS waste form is limited by Nosean solubility. The predicted release of {sup 99}Tc from the NAS waste form at a 100 meters down gradient well from the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) was found to be comparable to immobilized low-activity waste glass waste form in the initial supplemental LAW treatment technology risk assessment (Mann 2003). To confirm this hypothesis, DOE is funding a treatability study where three actual Hanford tank waste samples (containing both {sup 99}Tc and {sup 125}I) will be processed in Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) to form the mineral product, similar to the granular NAS waste form, that will then be subject to a number of waste form qualification tests. In previous tests, SRNL have demonstrated that the BSR product is chemically and physically equivalent to the FBSR product (Janzen 2005). The objective of this paper is to describe the sample selection, sample preparation, and environmental and regulatory considerations for treatability studies of the FBSR process using Hanford tank waste samples at the SNRL. The SNRL will process samples in its BSR. These samples will be decontaminated in the 222-S Laboratory to remove undissolved solids and selected radioisotopes to comply with Department of Transportation (DOT) shipping regulations and to ensure worker safety by limiting radiation exposure to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). These decontamination levels will also meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) definition of low activity waste (LAW). After the SNRL has processed the tank samples to a granular mineral form, SRNL and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will conduct waste form testing on both the granular material and monoliths prepared from the granular material. The tests being performed are outlined in Appendix A.

  17. Communication Characteristics in the NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communication Characteristics in the NAS Parallel Benchmarks Ahmad Faraj Xin Yuan Department-- In this paper, we investigate the communication characteris- tics of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) implementation of the NAS parallel benchmarks and study the effectiveness of com- piled communication for MPI

  18. GaInNAs laser gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOW,WENG W.; JONES,ERIC D.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-05-23

    The optical gain spectra for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of the lasing threshold current density of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

  19. Experimental studies on atmospheric Stirling engine NAS-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, Hiroichi; Isshiki, Naotsugu; Ohtomo, Michihiro

    1996-12-31

    Atmospheric hot air Stirling engine NAS-1 and 2 have a simple flat rubber sheet diaphragm as their power piston, and they have been experimentally studied at Nihon University for several years continuously, with the target of to get more than 100 watts shaft power by atmospheric air with simple construction and cheap material. The first NAS-1 was intended to be a solar heated engine using television glass and wood for cheap cost, but it failed by thermal break of glass, so the improved NAS-2 is changed to be heated by gas burner, using metallic materials in all parts except rubber power piston. Other than this rubber sheet diaphragm, NAS-2 has many features as using James Watt crank mechanism, high finny copper tube for conventional commercial heat exchanger, and two kinds of hot gas heaters, etc. About the rubber sheet for the power piston, the thickness of the sheet was changed from 2 mm to 6 mm gradually to known what thickness is best, and it is found that about 5 mm is best for this engine. After trying many improvements on this engine, NAS-2 has produced about 130 watt shaft power with indicated power of 350 watt at 1994. In this paper detail of many features, history, results and experiments of these NAS engines are reported.

  20. Job Management Requirements for NAS Parallel Systems and Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    that are becoming increasingly important in the high performance computing industry. Newer job management systems in high perfor- mance computing for NASA. This paper focuses on job management require- ments for two1 Job Management Requirements for NAS Parallel Systems and Clusters William Saphir1, Leigh Ann

  1. Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaics »Tankless WaterEnergyJanuary28-982 DOE Hydrogen

  2. NAS/NRC Report:NAS/NRC Report: Health Risks from Dioxin and RelatedHealth Risks from Dioxin and Related

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    NAS/NRC Report:NAS/NRC Report: Health Risks from Dioxin and RelatedHealth Risks from Dioxin Provost for Research University of WashingtonUniversity of Washington #12;Dioxins, Dibenzofurans and PCBs · Chlorinated Dioxins represent a class of compounds, of which 7 are included in EPA regulations (Contaminants

  3. NAS Miramar Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell demonstration status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scroppo, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Part of M-C Power`s Technology Development Program, this MCFC power plant is designed to supply 250 kW of electricity to Naval Air Station (NAS) Miramar. It also cogenerates steam for the district heating system. The power plant is a fully integrated unit incorporating an advanced design fuel cell based on years of laboratory tests and a prior field test. This demonstration incorporates many innovative features, one of which is the plate type reformer which processes the natural gas fuel for use in the fuel cell. M-C Power Corp. has completed the design, fabrication, and conditioning of a 250-cell fuel cell stack, which was shipped to the site where it will be installed, tested, and evaluated as a 250 kW Proof-of-Concept MCFC Power Plant. (Originally going to Kaiser Permanente`s Sand Diego Medical Center, it was relocated to Miramar.)

  4. PERFORMANCE OF SODIUM-BETA ALUMINA SOLID ELECTROLYTE IN Na/S CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2014-01-01

    SODIUM-BETA ALUMINA SOLID ELECTROLYTE IN Na/S CELLS Lutgardium-be ta alumina type solid electrolytes i s limit ed by

  5. A Programming Model Performance Study Using the NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shan, Hongzhang; Blagojevi?, Filip; Min, Seung-Jai; Hargrove, Paul; Jin, Haoqiang; Fuerlinger, Karl; Koniges, Alice; Wright, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Harnessing the power of multicore platforms is challenging due to the additional levels of parallelism present. In this paper we use the NAS Parallel Benchmarks to study three programming models, MPI, OpenMP and PGAS to understand their performance and memory usage characteristics on current multicore architectures. To understand these characteristics we use the Integrated Performance Monitoring tool and other ways to measure communication versus computation time, as well as the fraction of the run time spent in OpenMP. The benchmarks are run on two different Cray XT5 systems and an Infiniband cluster. Our results show that in general the threemore »programming models exhibit very similar performance characteristics. In a few cases, OpenMP is significantly faster because it explicitly avoids communication. For these particular cases, we were able to re-write the UPC versions and achieve equal performance to OpenMP. Using OpenMP was also the most advantageous in terms of memory usage. Also we compare performance differences between the two Cray systems, which have quad-core and hex-core processors. We show that at scale the performance is almost always slower on the hex-core system because of increased contention for network resources.« less

  6. 1.15?Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Chingakham R.; Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2014-04-01

    , binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported...

  7. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 4759. Symmetries of Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikitin, Anatoly

    Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 47­59. Symmetries of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: nikitin

  8. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 497507 Extended SUSY with Central Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikitin, Anatoly

    Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 497­507 Extended-mail: niederle@fzu.cz Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine E

  9. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 184193 Differential Invariants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 1, 184 Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., Kyiv 4, Ukraine E-mail: rop

  10. GaInNAs Junctions for Next-Generation Concentrators: Progress and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Ptak, A. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Geisz, J. F.; Kiehl, J.

    2005-08-01

    We discuss progress in the development of GaInNAs junctions for application in next-generation multijunction concentrator cells. A significant development is the demonstration of near-100% internal quantum efficiencies in junctions grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Testing at high currents validates the compatibility of these devices with concentrator operation. The efficiencies of several next-generation multijunction structures incorporating these state-of-the-art GaInNAs junctions are projected.

  11. Effects of Bismuth on Wide-Depletion-Width GaInNAs Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ptak, A. J.; France, R.; Jiang, C.-S.; Reedy, R. C.

    2008-05-01

    GaInNAs solar cells could be useful in next-generation multijunction solar cells if issues surrounding low photocurrents and photovoltages are surmounted. Wide-depletion-width devices generate significant photocurrent using a p-i-n structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy, but these depletion widths are only realized in a region of parameter space that leads to rough surface morphologies. Here, bismuth is explored as a surfactant for the growth of GaInNAs solar cells. Very low fluxes of Bi are effective at maintaining smooth surfaces, even at high growth temperatures and In contents. However, Bi also increases the net donor concentration in these materials, manifested in our n-on-p device structures as a pn-junction that moves deeper into the base layer with increasing Bi fluxes. Quantum efficiency modeling and scanning kelvin probe microscopy measurements confirm the type conversion of the base layer from p type to n type. Bi incorporation in GaAsBi samples shows signs of surface segregation, leading to a finite buildup time, and this effect may lead to slow changes in the electrical properties of the GaInNAs(Bi) devices. Bi also appears to create a defect level, although this defect level is not deleterious enough to increase the dark current in the devices.

  12. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 184189. Equivalence of Q-Conditional Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 184 of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: rop

  13. Effect of antimony on the deep-level traps in GaInNAsSb thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, Muhammad Monirul Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro

    2014-09-15

    Admittance spectroscopy has been performed to investigate the effect of antimony (Sb) on GaInNAs material in relation to the deep-level defects in this material. Two electron traps, E1 and E2 at an energy level 0.12 and 0.41?eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}), respectively, were found in undoped GaInNAs. Bias-voltage dependent admittance confirmed that E1 is an interface-type defect being spatially localized at the GaInNAs/GaAs interface, while E2 is a bulk-type defect located around mid-gap of GaInNAs layer. Introduction of Sb improved the material quality which was evident from the reduction of both the interface and bulk-type defects.

  14. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 2, 569573 Symmetries and Supersymmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikitin, Anatoly

    Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 2, 569­573 Symmetries of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: nikitin@imath.kiev.ua The implementation

  15. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 219223 Lie Symmetries of (1+1)-Dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 219­223 Lie. IVANOVA and Homayoon ESHRAGHI Institute of Mathematics of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: rop@imath.kiev.ua, ivanova@imath.kiev.ua Institute for Studies in Theor

  16. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 466468 Realizations of Real 4-Dimensional Solvable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 466 Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., Kyiv 4, Ukraine E-mail: rop@imath.kiev.ua Poltava State Pedagogical University, 2 Ostrogradskoho Str., Poltava, Ukraine E-mail: lutfullin@beep.ru We

  17. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 3439 Solitary Wave Solutions for Heat Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikitin, Anatoly

    Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 34­39 Solitary Pedagogical University, 2 Ostrogradsky Str., 36003 Poltava, Ukraine E-mail: slpoltva@e-mail.pl.ua Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: nikitin

  18. Laser Gain and Threshold Properties in Compressive-Strained and Lattice-Matched GaInNAs/GaAs Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, W.W.; Jones, E.D.; Modine, N.A.; Allerman, A.A.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1999-08-04

    The optical gain spectra for compressive-strained and lattice-matched GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of lasing threshold current density for different GAInNAs/GaAs laser structures.

  19. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 493497 The Connection of the DegasperisProcesi Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkes, John

    Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 493 PARKES Institute for Geophysics, 32 Palladin Ave., 03680 Kyiv, Ukraine E-mail: vakhnenko

  20. Origin of radiative recombination and manifestations of localization effects in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S. L.; Filippov, S.; Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A.; Ishikawa, Fumitaro

    2014-12-22

    Radiative carrier recombination processes in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si substrate are systematically investigated by employing micro-photoluminescence (?-PL) and ?-PL excitation (?-PLE) measurements complemented by time-resolved PL spectroscopy. At low temperatures, alloy disorder is found to cause localization of photo-excited carriers leading to predominance of optical transitions from localized excitons (LE). Some of the local fluctuations in N composition are suggested to lead to strongly localized three-dimensional confining potential equivalent to that for quantum dots, based on the observation of sharp and discrete PL lines within the LE contour. The localization effects are found to have minor influence on PL spectra at room temperature due to thermal activation of the localized excitons to extended states. Under these conditions, photo-excited carrier lifetime is found to be governed by non-radiative recombination via surface states which is somewhat suppressed upon N incorporation.

  1. Study of nitrogen incorporation into GaInNAs: The role of growth temperature in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korpijaervi, V.-M.; Aho, A.; Tukiainen, A.; Laakso, A.; Guina, M.; Laukkanen, P.; Tuominen, M.

    2012-07-15

    GaInNAs has an important impact on developing GaAs-based optoelectronics and multijunction solar cells, but the complex nature of the nitrogen incorporation into GaInAs is still not fully understood. By combining x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we show that nitrogen incorporation is enhanced with increasing growth temperature in the range of 300-450 Degree-Sign C. We study the growth front and show that the surface reconstruction is (1 Multiplication-Sign 3) regardless of growth temperature in this range. The enhanced nitrogen incorporation can be modeled as a thermally activated process with activation energy of about 0.1 eV.

  2. Issued 02/03/2011 BOARD ON PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY Tel 202-334-3520 Fax 202-334-3575 E-mail bpa@nas.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems Background In the development of the 1999 FESAC Committee on Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems requests the community's input@nas.edu Request for Information on Topical Areas in Inertial Fusion Energy Issued by the Committee

  3. FNMI (NAS) ! Teaching Materials!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    . !! INFUSION OF FNMI CONTENT ACROSS THE CURRICULUM !Alberta Education also supports the integration of FNMI content into all subjects: "Aboriginal content can be infused into the regular Kindergarten to Grade 12 programs of study. Infusion of Aboriginal content is not an add-on or a special event--it is an integral

  4. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaNAs alloys with high As content for potential photoanode applications in hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novikov, S. V.; Staddon, C. R.; Foxon, C. T.; Yu, K. M.; Broesler, R.; Hawkridge, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Walukiewicz, W.; Denlinger, J.; Demchenko, I.

    2009-10-06

    The authors have succeeded in growing GaN1?xAsx alloys over a large composition range (0 < x < 0.8) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The enhanced incorporation of As was achieved by growing the films with high As{sub 2} flux at low (as low as 100 C) growth temperatures, which is much below the normal GaN growth temperature range. Using x-ray and transmission electron microscopy, they found that the GaNAs alloys with high As content x > 0.17 are amorphous. Optical absorption measurements together with x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy results reveal a continuous gradual decrease in band gap from -3.4 to < 1 eV with increasing As content. The energy gap reaches its minimum of -0.8 eV at x - 0.8. The composition dependence of the band gap of the crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys follows the prediction of the band anticrossing model (BAC). However, our measured band gap of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} with 0.3 < x < 0.8 are larger than that predicted by BAC. The results seem to indicate that for this composition range the amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys have short-range ordering that resembles random crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys. They have demonstrated the possibility of the growth of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} layers with variable As content on glass substrates

  5. GaInNAs Structures Grown by MBE for High-Efficiency Solar Cells: Final Report; 25 June 1999--24 August 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, C. W.

    2003-08-01

    The focus of this work is to improve the quality of GaInNAs by advanced thin-film growth techniques, such as digital-alloy growth techniques and migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE). The other focus is to further investigate the properties of such materials, which are potentially beneficial for high-efficiency, multijunction solar cells. 400-nm-thick strain-compensated Ga0.92In0.08As/GaN0.03As0.97 short-period superlattices (SPSLs) are grown lattice-matched to GaAs substrates. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of digital alloys is 3 times higher than that of random alloys at room temperature, and the improvement is even greater at low temperature, by a factor of about 12. The room-temperature PL intensity of the GaInNAs quantum well grown by the strained InAs/GaN0.023As SPSL growth mode is higher by a factor 5 as compare to the continuous growth mode. The SPSL growth method allows for independent adjustment of the In-to-Ga ratio without group III competition. MEE reduces the low-energy tail of PL, and PL peaks become more intense and sharper. The twin peaks photoluminescence of GaNAs grown on GaAs was observed at room temperature. The peaks splitting increase with increase in nitrogen alloy content. The strain-induced splitting of light-hole and heavy-hole bands of tensile-strained GaNAs is proposed as an explanation of such behavior.

  6. Identification of nitrogen- and host-related deep-level traps in n-type GaNAs and their evolution upon annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelczuk, ?.; Henini, M.

    2014-07-07

    Deep level traps in as-grown and annealed n-GaNAs layers (doped with Si) of various nitrogen concentrations (N=0.2%, 0.4%, 0.8%, and 1.2%) were investigated by deep level transient spectroscopy. In addition, optical properties of GaNAs layers were studied by photoluminescence and contactless electroreflectance. The identification of N- and host-related traps has been performed on the basis of band gap diagram [Kudrawiec, Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 082109 (2012)], which assumes that the activation energy of electron traps of the same microscopic nature decreases with the rise of nitrogen concentration in accordance with the N-related shift of the conduction band towards trap levels. The application of this diagram has allowed to investigate the evolution of donor traps in GaNAs upon annealing. In general, it was observed that the concentration of N- and host-related traps decreases after annealing and PL improves very significantly. However, it was also observed that some traps are generated due to annealing. It explains why the annealing conditions have to be carefully optimized for this material system.

  7. Improved Performance of GaInNAs Solar Cells Grown by Molecular-Beam Epitaxy Using Increased Growth Rate Instead of Surfactants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ptak, A. J.; France, R.; Jiang, C. S.; Romero, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    GaInNAs is potentially useful for increasing the conversion efficiency of multijunction solar cells if low photocurrents and photovoltages can be increased. Wide-depletion width devices generate significant photocurrents using an n-i-p structure grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, but these wide depletion widths are only realized in a region of parameter space that leads to rough surface morphologies. Surfactants are effective at reducing the surface roughness, but lead to increased defect densities and changes in the net acceptor or donor concentration. Here, we show that increasing the growth rate of GaInNAs solar cells leads to smooth surfaces without the use of a surfactant, even at high In compositions and substrate temperatures. No degradation in material quality is observed when increasing the growth rate from 1.5 to 3.0 {micro}m/h, but a shunt resistance does appear for the high-growth-rate samples. This shunt is attributed to increased spitting of the Ga cell, leading to an increase in the oval defect density, at the higher effusion cell temperatures used to achieve high growth rates. As with the case of Bi in GaInNAs, increased growth rates also appear to increase the net donor concentration, but it is not clear if these effects have the same cause.

  8. Report for Treating Hanford LAW and WTP SW Simulants: Pilot Plant Mineralizing Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arlin Olson

    2012-02-28

    The US Department of Energy is responsible for managing the disposal of radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site in Washington State. The Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant (WPT) will separate the waste into a small volume of high level waste (HLW), containing most of the radioactive constituents, and a larger volume of low activity waste (LAW), containing most of the non-radioactive chemical and hazardous constituents. The HLW and LAW will be converted into immobilized waste forms for disposal. Currently there is inadequate LAW vitrification capacity planned at the WTP to complete the mission within the required timeframe. Therefore additional LAW capacity is required. One candidate supplemental treatment technology is the fluidized bed steam reformer process (FBSR). This report describes the demonstration testing of the FBSR process using a mineralizing flowsheet for treating simulated Hanford LAW and secondary waste from the WTP (WTP SW). The FBSR testing project produced leach-resistant solid products and environmentally compliant gaseous effluents. The solid products incorporated normally soluble ions into an alkali alumino-silicate (NaS) mineral matrix. Gaseous emissions were found to be within regulatory limits. Cesium and rhenium were captured in the mineralized products with system removal efficiencies of 99.999% and 99.998 respectively. The durability and leach performance of the FBSR granular solid were superior to the low activity reference material (LMR) glass standards. Normalized product consistency test (PCT) release rates for constituents of concern were approximately 2 orders of magnitude less than that of sodium in the Hanford glass [standard].

  9. IOV&T OTM MrOYtXt^CLl Nas universidades portuguesas nasceram ou esto a surgir tecnologias capazes de conquistar o interesse de todo o mundo. Das criaes que salvam vidas,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    ÍÍIOV&T OTM MrOYtXt^CLl Nas universidades portuguesas nasceram ou estão a surgir tecnologias capazes de conquistar o interesse de todo o mundo. Das criações que salvam vidas, como tecnologias de Crohn. Entretanto, Pedro Andrade desenvolveu uma nova tecnologia para a empresa, a Cordsafe, que

  10. nas82d5.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th AnnualHistoryMIII: TheJointCoupling,II: Early Government

  11. Response to Questions on Presentation to NAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R

    2011-03-17

    Response to questions on the presentation 'Overview to Chamber and Power Plant Designs for IFE' made at the 1/29-31 meeting of the National Academies Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems.

  12. EEG Response to NAS WIPP Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |SectorforOXFORD ICP-DRIE SystemCareers >EEG

  13. Journey to Excellence Goal 2 and Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    upgrading Effluent Treatment Facility FBSR as supplemental treatment vs 2 nd LAW Facility HLW improved vitrification capacity (1.5 - 2 X) starting in 2025 using...

  14. HPC Symposium, NAS 2008R. L. Winslow Raimond L. Winslow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winslow, Raimond

    -scale) Cell (Meso-scale) Integrative Modeling of the Heart: The Challenge Molecular Biology Cell Biology

  15. Comparison of leading parallel NAS file systems on commodity hardware

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedges, R; Fitzgerald, K; Gary, M; Stearman, D M

    2010-11-08

    High performance computing has experienced tremendous gains in system performance over the past 20 years. Unfortunately other system capabilities, such as file I/O, have not grown commensurately. In this activity, we present the results of our tests of two leading file systems (GPFS and Lustre) on the same physical hardware. This hardware is the standard commodity storage solution in use at LLNL and, while much smaller in size, is intended to enable us to learn about differences between the two systems in terms of performance, ease of use and resilience. This work represents the first hardware consistent study of the two leading file systems that the authors are aware of.

  16. LADEE Update NAsA spacecraft Embarks On Historic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    . This LOI burn is one of the most critical phases of the mission, because without it working we do not get ­ 12 On the cover: A still camera on a sound trigger captured this photo of an airborne frog as LADEE lifts off from Pad 0B at Wallops Flight Facil- ity. The photo team confirms the frog is real

  17. Architectural Requirements and Scalability of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ]. With the recent convergence of paral­ lel machines and the introduction of a standard programming model (MPI machines: The SGI Origin 2000, (left), a cluster of Sun Ultra­1 workstations (center) and the IBM SP2 architecture. Improvements in computational efficiency due to the paral­ lel machines' increasing global cache

  18. NAS/NAE Committee on the Prospects for IFE Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Polar-Drive Ignition on the NIF J. D. Zuegel University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics 0 0 be tested on the NIF with a few modest modifications to the facility · Beam-smoothingimprovements: ­ Multi modifications to the NIF facility ­ Beamsmoothingisonlyrequiredatthebeginningofthelaserpulse, which minimizes

  19. ALSEP TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION Contract NAS 9-5829

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Safety 3. 1. 2. 7.3 Hazard Proofing 3.1.2.7.4 Nuclear Safety Criteria 3. 1.2. 7. 5 Fail Safe 3. 2 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont.) 3. 1. 2. 7 Safety 3. 1. 2. 7. 1 Personnel Safety 3.1. 2. 7. 2 Equipment

  20. SEAB Memorandum on NAS Report, Aligning the Governance Structure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Security, entitled Aligning the Governance Structure of the NNSA Laboratories to Meet 21st Century National Security Challenges. That committee, chaired by Richard A. Meserve,...

  1. NAS Report and Microsite Trace SSL Evolution and Future Promise |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -Department of EnergyNEW YORK STATE

  2. SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROBBINS RA

    2011-02-11

    This paper describes the sample selection, sample preparation, environmental, and regulatory considerations for shipment of Hanford radioactive waste samples for treatability studies of the FBSR process at the Savannah River National Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  3. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105 And AN-103) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, Carol; Herman, Connie; Crawford, Charles; Bannochie, Christopher; Burket, Paul; Daniel, Gene; Cozzi, Alex; Nash, Charles; Miller, Donald; Missimer, David

    2014-01-10

    One of the immobilization technologies under consideration as a Supplemental Treatment for Hanford’s Low Activity Waste (LAW) is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). The FBSR technology forms a mineral waste form at moderate processing temperatures thus retaining and atomically bonding the halides, sulfates, and technetium in the mineral phases (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite). Additions of kaolin clay are used instead of glass formers and the minerals formed by the FBSR technology offers (1) atomic bonding of the radionuclides and constituents of concern (COC) comparable to glass, (2) short and long term durability comparable to glass, (3) disposal volumes comparable to glass, and (4) higher Na2O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings than glass. The higher FBSR Na{sub 2}O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings contribute to the low disposal volumes but also provide for more rapid processing of the LAW. Recent FBSR processing and testing of Hanford radioactive LAW (Tank SX-105 and AN-103) waste is reported and compared to previous radioactive and non-radioactive LAW processing and testing.

  4. Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

    2002-08-01

    Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

  5. Two-Meter Temperature Surveys for Geothermal Exploration Project at NAS

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: Energy ResourcesLake,Fallon | Open Energy

  6. Estudos apresentam novas hipteses para explicar diferenas nas trajetrias de homens e mulheres na cincia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    Ural a escala de 3,2 a 5,2 representa o grau de crença no talento inato. as disciplinas com valores mais altosMatemática FísicaEconomia Economia Física ciênciasdacomputação neurociência Educação Educaçãoneurociência Biologia

  7. Materials Data on NaS2 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. An Integrated Approach to Evaluating Risk Mitigation Measures for UAV Operational Concepts in the NAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weibel, Roland E

    2005-09-26

    An integrated approach is outlined in this paper to evaluate risks posed by operating Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace System. The approach supports the systematic evaluation of potential risk mitigation ...

  9. Thermoelectric and electrical characterization of Si nanowires and GaNAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pichanusakorn, Paothep

    2012-01-01

    resources of the Nano3 cleanroom, and the helpful staffs:usually taken out of the cleanroom for initial measurement

  10. Thermoelectric and electrical characterization of Si nanowires and GaNAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pichanusakorn, Paothep

    2012-01-01

    1.1.2 Peltier and Thompson effects . . . . . . . . . . 1.2and (b) Peltier cooler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .leading to larger |S|. Peltier and Thompson effects The

  11. Today's National Airspace System (NAS) consists of a complex collection of facilities, systems, equipment,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dengfeng

    , field maintenance, certification, systems acquisi- tions, and a variety of other services are air carrier, 27 percent air taxi, 33 percent general aviation, and 4 percent military. · Approximately 49,409,000 instrument operations logged by FAA towers annually. America's aviation industry

  12. Thermoelectric and electrical characterization of Si nanowires and GaNAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pichanusakorn, Paothep

    2012-01-01

    of semiconductors:physics and materials properties.material for the semiconductor industry. Among its most advantageous property

  13. Curso Tcnico em Petrleo e Gs recebe prmios nas Olimpadas de Qumica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paraná, Universidade Federal do

    a Petrobras anunciou que em 2014 a empresa alcançará novamente a autossuficiência volumétrica na produção de

  14. NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    I don't have to remind you of the challenges we face: rapidly growing global demand for energy, along with rising prices. And these demand pressures will only increase with time....

  15. Multi-agent Simulation of NAS Infrastructure Utilization in the Presence of Airline Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the point in which all the aircraft enter the route (see Figure 1). The number of slots from the entry fix that is exponentially distributed. Each route has its own entry queue (or wait) associated. The queues are also divided into slots, time slots. The entry queue is virtually located before the so-called virtual entry fix which

  16. Thermoelectric and electrical characterization of Si nanowires and GaNAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pichanusakorn, Paothep

    2012-01-01

    1 Introduction to Thermoelectric phenomena and theory . . .1.1 Thermoelectric139 5.1.1 Thermoelectric application for highly-mismatch

  17. NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing SwimmingMicrosoft Word1Sustainability inDeputyNAICSLater:

  18. Memorandum on NAS Report, Aligning the Governance Structure of the NNSA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 |Department ofMay 2013 Monthly News Blast|

  19. BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

    2008-09-25

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

  20. DWPF COAL CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

    2010-06-21

    A paper study was completed to assess the impact on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)'s Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) acid addition and melter off-gas flammability control strategy in processing Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) to SB13 with an added Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) stream and two Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) products (Strip Effluent and Actinide Removal Stream). In all of the cases that were modeled, an acid mix using formic acid and nitric acid could be achieved that would produce a predicted Reducing/Oxidizing (REDOX) Ratio of 0.20 Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe. There was sufficient formic acid in these combinations to reduce both the manganese and mercury present. Reduction of manganese and mercury are both necessary during Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing, however, other reducing agents such as coal and oxalate are not effective in this reduction. The next phase in this study will be experimental testing with SB10, FBSR, and both SWPF simulants to validate the assumptions in this paper study and determine whether there are any issues in processing these streams simultaneously. The paper study also evaluated a series of abnormal processing conditions to determine whether potential abnormal conditions in FBSR, SWPF or DWPF would produce melter feed that was too oxidizing or too reducing. In most of the cases that were modeled with one parameter at its extreme, an acid mix using formic acid and nitric acid could be achieved that would produce a predicted REDOX of 0.09-0.30 (target 0.20). However, when a run was completed with both high coal and oxalate, with minimum formic acid to reduce mercury and manganese, the final REDOX was predicted to be 0.49 with sludge and FBSR product and 0.47 with sludge, FBSR product and both SWPF products which exceeds the upper REDOX limit.

  1. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 774776 "Leonard Pairs" in Classical Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    ]). Terwilliger showed [5, 10] that a Leonard pair X, Y satisfies a certain algebraic relations with respect to commutators. In turn, the Terwilliger relations follow from to the so-called relations of the AW

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaNAs alloys with high As content for potential photoanode applications in hydrogen production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novikov, S. V.

    2011-01-01

    ͑2 ␮ m͒, including low cost solar cell applications. Thematerial basis for low cost solar cells. There- fore, welow cost substrates such as glass can be used for solar cell

  3. MEMRIA DA AUDINCIA PBLICA REALIZADA NO DIA 10.07.2013, NAS DEPENDNCIAS DO AUDITRIO DO CSE-UFSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanazaki, Natalia

    dois semestres de bolsa, além do tempo regular de integralização do curso. 2)Valor da Bolsa: Alguns estudantes voltaram a insistir que o valor da bolsa da UFSC deveria ser de um salário mínimo mais 10%, sendo temas mais polêmicos. Neste caso, destacamos: 1)Tempo de duração da bolsa: Apenas alguns estudantes

  4. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 540547 Quantum Algebras, Particle Phenomenology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    -Mann­Okubo (GMO) one, that is, mN +m = 3 2 m + 1 2m. On the contrary, the spectrum generating (or dynamical between isomultilplets (breaking of SU(3) to SU(2)), instead of the standard GMO mass relation

  5. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 2, 759766 Quantum Groups and Cabibbo Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    -Mann­Okubo (GMO) mass relation for the SU(3) octet baryons 1 2 + derived in a particular version [5] of `diquark. The alternative improved version of GMO for octet baryons is the extremely precise mass sum rule (MSR) obtained-analog (1) yields the familiar [7] Gell-Mann­Okubo (GMO) mass relation MN +M = 3 2M + 1 2M in the `classical

  6. Radionuclide and contaminant immobilization in the fluidized bed steam reforming waste products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Brown, Christopher F.; Jantzen, Carol; Pierce, Eric M.

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process and resulting waste form. The first section of the chapter gives an overview of the potential need for FBSR processing in nuclear waste remediation followed by an overview of the engineering involved in the process itself. This is followed by a description of waste form production at a chemical level followed by a section describing different process streams that have undergone the FBSR process. The third section describes the resulting mineral product in terms of phases that are present and the ability of the waste form to encapsulate hazardous and radioactive wastes from several sources. Following this description is a presentation of the physical properties of the granular and monolith waste form product including and contaminant release mechanisms. The last section gives a brief summary of this chapter and includes a section on the strengths associated with this waste form and the needs for additional data and remaining questions yet to be answered. The reader is directed elsewhere for more information on other waste forms such as Cast Stone (Lockrem, 2005), Ceramicrete (Singh et al., 1997, Wagh et al., 1999) and geopolymers (Kyritsis et al., 2009; Russell et al., 2006).

  7. CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101 & 241AZ-102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

    2011-04-21

    This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-l0-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FBSR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-5.2.1-2010-001, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.

  8. DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

    2010-10-15

    This report summarizes the results of both experimental and modeling studies performed using Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulants and FBSR product from Tank 48 simulant testing in order to develop higher levels of coal-carbon that can be managed by DWPF. Once the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process starts up for treatment of Tank 48 legacy waste, the FBSR product stream will contribute higher levels of coal-carbon in the sludge batch for processing at DWPF. Coal-carbon is added into the FBSR process as a reductant and some of it will be present in the FBSR product as unreacted coal. The FBSR product will be slurried in water, transferred to Tank Farm and will be combined with sludge and washed to produce the sludge batch that DWPF will process. The FBSR product is high in both water soluble sodium carbonate and unreacted coal-carbon. Most of the sodium carbonate is removed during washing but all of the coal-carbon will remain and become part of the DWPF sludge batch. A paper study was performed earlier to assess the impact of FBSR coal-carbon on the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) operation and melter off-gas flammability by combining it with SB10-SB13. The results of the paper study are documented in Ref. 7 and the key findings included that SB10 would be the most difficult batch to process with the FBSR coal present and up to 5,000 mg/kg of coal-carbon could be fed to the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. In the present study, a bench-scale demonstration of the DWPF CPC processing was performed using SB10 simulants spiked with varying amounts of coal, and the resulting seven CPC products were fed to the DWPF melter cold cap and off-gas dynamics models to determine the maximum coal that can be processed through the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. Based on the results of these experimental and modeling studies, the presence of coal-carbon in the sludge feed to DWPF is found to have both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off-gas flammability safety basis limits during the 9X/5X off-gas surge for normal bubbled melter

  9. 2009 PILOT SCALE FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING TESTING USING THE THOR (THERMAL ORGANIC REDUCTION) PROCESS: ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR TANK 48H ORGANIC DESTRUCTION - 10408

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.; Jantzen, C.; Burket, P.; Crawford, C.; Daniel, G.; Aponte, C.; Johnson, C.

    2009-12-28

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) must empty the contents of Tank 48H, a 1.3 million gallon Type IIIA HLW storage tank, to return this tank to service. The tank contains organic compounds, mainly potassium tetraphenylborate that cannot be processed downstream until the organic components are destroyed. The THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) technology, herein after referred to as steam reforming, has been demonstrated to be a viable process to remove greater than 99.9% of the organics from Tank 48H during various bench scale and pilot scale tests. These demonstrations were supported by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and the Department of Energy (DOE) has concurred with the SRR recommendation to proceed with the deployment of the FBSR technology to treat the contents of Tank 48H. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed and proved the concept with non-radioactive simulants for SRR beginning in 2003. By 2008, several pilot scale campaigns had been completed and extensive crucible testing and bench scale testing were performed in the SRNL Shielded Cells using Tank 48H radioactive sample. SRNL developed a Tank 48H non-radioactive simulant complete with organic compounds, salt, and metals characteristic of those measured in a sample of the radioactive contents of Tank 48H. FBSR Pilot Scaled Testing with the Tank 48H simulant has demonstrated the ability to remove greater than 98% of the nitrites and greater than 99.5% of the nitrates from the Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily alkali carbonate. The alkali carbonate is soluble and, thus, amenable to pumping as a liquid to downstream facilities for processing. The FBSR technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) pilot scale steam reformer at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. Additional ESTD tests were completed in 2008 and in 2009 that further demonstrated the TTT steam reforming process ability to destroy organics in the Tank 48 simulant and produce a soluble carbonate waste form. The ESTD was operated at varying feed rates and Denitration and Mineralization Reformer (DMR) temperatures, and at a constant Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) temperature of 950 C. The process produced a dissolvable carbonate product suitable for processing downstream. ESTD testing was performed in 2009 at the Hazen facility to demonstrate the long term operability of an integrated FBSR processing system with carbonate product and carbonate slurry handling capability. The final testing demonstrated the integrated TTT FBSR capability to process the Tank 48 simulant from a slurry feed into a greater than 99.9% organic free and primarily dissolved carbonate FBSR product slurry. This paper will discuss the SRNL analytical results of samples analyzed from the 2008 and 2009 THOR{reg_sign} steam reforming ESTD performed with Tank 48H simulant at HRI in Golden, Colorado. The final analytical results will be compared to prior analytical results from samples in terms of organic, nitrite, and nitrate destruction.

  10. Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, H.D.; Young, J.K.; Berkowitz, J.B.; DeVine, Jr.J.C.; Sutter, H.G.

    2008-07-01

    One of U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F and H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents - approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes - are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRC's ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates - WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the Department of Defense (DoD), Technology Readiness Assessment Desk-book. The TRA consists of three parts: - Determination of the Critical Technology Elements (CTEs) for each of the candidate processes. - Evaluation of the Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) of each CTE for each process. - Defining of the technology testing or engineering work necessary to bring immature technologies to the appropriate maturity levels. The TRA methodology assigns a TRL to a technology based on the lowest TRL assigned to any CTE of that technology. Based on the assessment, the overall TRL for WAO was 2 and the TRL for FBSR was 3. WAO was limited by the current lack of definition for the off-gas treatment system (TRL of 2). The FBSR Product Handling had little or no test work and therefore received the lowest score (TRL of 3) for the FBSR CTEs. In summary, both FBSR and WAO appear to be viable technologies for treatment of Tank 48H legacy waste. FBSR has a higher degree of maturity than WAO, but additional technology development will be required for both technologies. However, the Assessment Team believes that sufficient information is available for DOE to select the preferred or primary technology. Limited testing of the backup technology should be conducted as a risk mitigation strategy. (authors)

  11. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.; Young, Joan K.; Berkowitz, Joan B.; Devine, John C.; Sutter, Herbert G.

    2008-10-25

    ABSTRACT One of U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F&H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents – approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes – are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRC’s ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates – WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the Department of Defense (DoD), Technology Readiness Assessment Deskbook. The TRA consists of three parts: • Determination of the Critical Technology Elements (CTEs) for each of the candidate processes. • Evaluation of the Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) of each CTE for each process. • Defining of the technology testing or engineering work necessary to bring immature technologies to the appropriate maturity levels. The TRA methodology assigns a TRL to a technology based on the lowest TRL assigned to any CTE of that technology. Based on the assessment, the overall TRL for WAO was 2 and the TRL for FBSR was 3. WAO was limited by the current lack of definition for the off-gas treatment system (TRL of 2). The FBSR Product Handling had little or no test work and therefore received the lowest score (TRL of 3) for the FBSR CTEs. In summary, both FBSR and WAO appear to be viable technologies for treatment of Tank 48H legacy waste. FBSR has a higher degree of maturity than WAO, but additional technology development will be required for both technologies. However, the Assessment Team believes that sufficient information is available for DOE to select the preferred or primary technology. Limited testing of the backup technology should be conducted as a risk mitigation strategy.

  12. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.; Young, Joan K.; Berkowitz, Joan B.; Devine, John C.; Sutter, Herbert G.

    2008-03-18

    One of U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F&H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents - approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes - are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRC's ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates - WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the Department of Defense (DoD), Technology Readiness Assessment Deskbook. The TRA consists of three parts: (1) Determination of the Critical Technology Elements (CTEs) for each of the candidate processes. (2) Evaluation of the Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) of each CTE for each process. (3) Defining of the technology testing or engineering work necessary to bring immature technologies to the appropriate maturity levels. The TRA methodology assigns a TRL to a technology based on the lowest TRL assigned to any CTE of that technology. Based on the assessment, the overall TRL for WAO was 2 and the TRL for FBSR was 3. WAO was limited by the current lack of definition for the off-gas treatment system (TRL of 2). The FBSR Product Handling had little or no test work and therefore received the lowest score (TRL of 3) for the FBSR CTEs. In summary, both FBSR and WAO appear to be viable technologies for treatment of Tank 48H legacy waste. FBSR has a higher degree of maturity than WAO, but additional technology development will be required for both technologies. However, the Assessment Team believes that sufficient information is available for DOE to select the preferred or primary technology. Limited testing of the backup technology should be conducted as a risk mitigation strategy.

  13. Submitted Eighth USA/Europe Air Traffic Management Research and Development Seminar (ATM2009) Trading-off Multi-Dimensional NAS Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Submitted Eighth USA/Europe Air Traffic Management Research and Development Seminar (ATM2009 Schaar, Ph.D. Candidate Center for Air Transportation Systems Research George Mason University Fairfax, VA, USA dschaar@gmu.edu Lance Sherry, Ph.D. Center for Air Transportation Systems Research George

  14. SEAB Memorandum on NAS Report, Aligning the Governance Structure of the NNSA Laboratories to Meet 21st Century National Security Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum transmits the comments of the SEAB Task Force on DOE National Laboratories on the recently released report of the Committee on Assessment of the Governance Structure of the NNSA National Security, entitled Aligning the Governance Structure of the NNSA Laboratories to Meet 21st Century National Security Challenges. That committee, chaired by Richard A. Meserve, was formed by the National Research Council in response to the FY2013 National Defense Authorization Act which directed the Administrator of the NNSA to “commission an independent assessment regarding the transition of the NNSA laboratories to multiagency, federally funded research and development centers (FFRDCs) with direct sustainment and sponsorship by multiple national security agencies.”

  15. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 2, 586592 On Linearization of Superon-Graviton Model (SGM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovych, Roman

    2 abab , Lea µ(x) = a beb µ + 4 4 abcd ¯5d(µ bc). (6) The local Lorentz transformation forms a closed algebra, for example, on ea µ(x) [L1 , L2 ]ea µ = a beb µ + 4 4 abcd ¯5d(µbc), (7) where ab = -ba

  16. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

  17. CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

    2011-06-08

    This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.'

  18. JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2011-07-05

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for an assessment of the flow patterns on the tank mixing. Pump design and operating parameters used for the analysis are summarized in Table 1. The baseline pump orientations are chosen by the previous work [Lee et. al, 2008] and the initial engineering judgement for the conservative flow estimate since the modeling results for the other pump orientations are compared with the baseline results. As shown in Table 1, the present study assumes that each slurry pump has 900 gpm flowrate for the tank mixing analysis, although the Standard Operating Procedure for Tank 48 currently limits the actual pump speed and flowrate to a value less than 900 gpm for a 29 inch liquid level. Table 2 shows material properties and weight distributions for the solids to be modeled for the mixing analysis in Tank 48.

  19. My Documents\\Presentations\\IFE\\NAS\\JCF_IFE_NAS_LANL_V4Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Slide 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    targets, R&D objectives ­ R&D roadmap · Support ICF consensus opinion · Aggressive program to take us from byNNSA XP&5 )75&$!/ )75&$!!/ )75&$!!!/ Fig. 3. The Inertial Fusion Energy Roadmap

  20. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M

    2008-05-09

    Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

  1. Performance of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product Under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Rod, Kenton A.; Bowden, Mark E.; Brown, Christopher F.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2014-05-01

    Currently, several candidates for secondary waste immobilization at the Hanford site in the State of Washington, USA are being considered. To demonstrate the durability of the product in the unsaturated Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the site, a series of tests have been performed one of the candidate materials using the Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) system. The material that was tested was the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) granular product and the granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix. The FBSR product is composed primarily of an insoluble sodium aluminosilicate matrix with the dominant phases being feldspathoid minerals mostly nepheline, sodalite, and nosean. The PUF test method allows for the accelerated weathering of materials, including radioactive waste forms, under hydraulically unsaturated conditions, thus mimicking the open-flow and transport properties that most likely will be present at the IDF. The experiments show a trend of decreasing tracer release as a function of time for several of the elements released from the material including Na, Si, Al, and Cs. However, some of the elements, notably I and Re, show a steady release throughout the yearlong test. This result suggests that the release of these minerals from the sodalite cage occurs at a different rate compared with the dissolution of the predominant nepheline phase.

  2. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT FOR HANFORD'S LOW ACTIVITY WASTE AND SECONDARY WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Cozzi, A.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Daniel, G.

    2011-02-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of I-125/129 and Tc-99 to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Ninety six grams of radioactive product were made for testing. The second campaign commenced using SRS LAW chemically trimmed to look like Hanford's LAW. Six hundred grams of radioactive product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

  3. Experimental investigation on the chemical precipitation generation under the loss of coolant accident of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, C. H.; Sung, J. J. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 25-1, Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Y. W. [FNC Technology Co., Ltd., Seoul National Univ., Bldg. 135-301, Gwanakro 599, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The PWR containment buildings are designed to facilitate core cooling in the event of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The cooling process requires water discharged from the break and containment spray to be collected in a sump for recirculation. The containment sump contains screens to protect the components of the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) and Containment Spray System (CSS) from debris. Since the containment materials may dissolve or corrode when exposed to the reactor coolant and spray solutions, various chemical precipitations can be generated in a post-LOCA environment. These chemical precipitations may become another source of debris loading to be considered in sump screen performance and downstream effects. In this study, new experimental methodology to predict the type and quantity of chemical precipitations has been developed. To generate the plant-specific chemical precipitation in a post-LOCA environment, the plant specific chemical condition of the recirculation sump during post-LOCA is simulated with the experimental reactor for the chemical effect. The plant-specific containment materials are used in the present experiment such as glass fibers, concrete blocks, aluminum specimens, and chemical reagent - boric acid, spray additives or buffering chemicals (sodium hydroxide, Tri-Sodium Phosphate (TSP), or others). The inside temperature of the reactor is controlled to simulate the plant-specific temperature profile of the recirculation sump. The total amount of aluminum released from aluminum specimens is evaluated by ICP-AES analysis to determine the amount of AlOOH and NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8} which induce very adverse effect on the head loss across the sump screens. The amount of these precipitations generated in the present experimental study is compared with the results of WCAP-16530-NP-A. (authors)

  4. Optical Basicity and Nepheline Crystallization in High Alumina Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Winschell, Abigail E.

    2011-02-25

    The purpose of this study was to find compositions that increase waste loading of high-alumina wastes beyond what is currently acceptable while avoiding crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) on slow cooling. Nepheline crystallization has been shown to have a large impact on the chemical durability of high-level waste glasses. It was hypothesized that there would be some composition regions where high-alumina would not result in nepheline crystal production, compositions not currently allowed by the nepheline discriminator. Optical basicity (OB) and the nepheline discriminator (ND) are two ways of describing a given complex glass composition. This report presents the theoretical and experimental basis for these models. They are being studied together in a quadrant system as metrics to explore nepheline crystallization and chemical durability as a function of waste glass composition. These metrics were calculated for glasses with existing data and also for theoretical glasses to explore nepheline formation in Quadrant IV (passes OB metric but fails ND metric), where glasses are presumed to have good chemical durability. Several of these compositions were chosen, and glasses were made to fill poorly represented regions in Quadrant IV. To evaluate nepheline formation and chemical durability of these glasses, quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the Product Consistency Test were conducted. A large amount of quantitative XRD data is collected here, both from new glasses and from glasses of previous studies that had not previously performed quantitative XRD on the phase assemblage. Appendix A critically discusses a large dataset to be considered for future quantitative studies on nepheline formation in glass. Appendix B provides a theoretical justification for choice of the oxide coefficients used to compute the OB criterion for nepheline formation.

  5. Detailed abundances for a large sample of giant stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordero, M. J.; Pilachowski, C. A. [Astronomy Department, Indiana University Bloomington, Swain West 319, 727 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Johnson, C. I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-15, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Simmerer, J., E-mail: majocord@indiana.edu, E-mail: catyp@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: cjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mcdonald@jb.man.ac.uk, E-mail: albert.zijlstra@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: jennifer@physics.utah.edu [University of Utah, Physics and Astronomy, 115 South 1400 East #201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    47 Tuc is an ideal target to study chemical evolution and globular cluster (GC) formation in massive more metal-rich GCs, as it is the closest massive GC. We present chemical abundances for O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, Ni, La, and Eu in 164 red giant branch stars in the massive GC 47 Tuc using spectra obtained with both the Hydra multifiber spectrograph at the Blanco 4 m telescope and the FLAMES multiobject spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. We find an average [Fe/H] = –0.79 ± 0.09 dex, consistent with literature values, as well as overabundances of alpha-elements ([?/Fe] ? 0.3 dex). The n-capture process elements indicate that 47 Tuc is r process-dominated ([Eu/La] = +0.24), and the light elements O, Na, and Al exhibit star-to-star variations. The Na-O anticorrelation, a signature typically seen in Galactic GCs, is present in 47 Tuc, and extends to include a small number of stars with [O/Fe] ? –0.5. Additionally, the [O/Na] ratios of our sample reveal that the cluster stars can be separated into three distinct populations. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test demonstrates that the O-poor/Na-rich stars are more centrally concentrated than the O-rich/Na-poor stars. The observed number and radial distribution of 47 Tuc's stellar populations, as distinguished by their light element composition, agrees closely with the results obtained from photometric data. We do not find evidence supporting a strong Na-Al correlation in 47 Tuc, which is consistent with current models of asymptotic giant branch nucleosynthesis yields.

  6. Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Neeway, James J.

    2014-04-02

    Silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4). In general, higher [H4SiO4] leads to lower dissolution rates. It has often been observed that the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products can cause the dissolution of the glass to increase, even after the rate has decreased significantly. However, it has also been observed that in the concentrations of these silica-bearing solution species do not significantly decrease while other elements continue to be released. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a silica-bearing alteration product, analcime (Na(AlSi2O6)?H2O). In this initial study and to simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The ‘cross affinity’ code option allowed us to account for the fact that glass is a thermodynamically unstable solid with respect to its alteration products in contact with water. The cross-affinity option in the Geochemist’s Workbench geochemical code allowed us to substitute the amorphous silica equilibrium-constant matrix for the glass equilibrium-constant matrix. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. In all cases, our results indicate that the glass dissolution rate controls the rate of analcime precipitation in the long term. Our results, compared in general terms with experiments, show the importance of the gel layer that forms during glass alteration. The meaning of these results pertinent to long-term glass durability is discussed.

  7. STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burket, P

    2009-02-24

    This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

  8. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

    2008-01-11

    Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

  9. EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product, which is one of the objectives of this current study, is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. FBSR testing of a Hanford LAW simulant and a WTP-SW simulant at the pilot scale was performed by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC at Hazen Research Inc. in April/May 2008. The Hanford LAW simulant was the Rassat 68 tank blend and the target concentrations for the LAW was increased by a factor of 10 for Sb, As, Ag, Cd, and Tl; 100 for Ba and Re (Tc surrogate); 1,000 for I; and 254,902 for Cs based on discussions with the DOE field office and the environmental regulators and an evaluation of the Hanford Tank Waste Envelopes A, B, and C. It was determined through the evaluation of the actual tank waste metals concentrations that some metal levels were not sufficient to achieve reliable detection in the off-gas sampling. Therefore, the identified metals concentrations were increased in the Rassat simulant processed by TTT at HRI to ensure detection and enable calculation of system removal efficiencies, product retention efficiencies, and mass balance closure without regard to potential results of those determinations or impacts on product durability response such as Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). A WTP-SW simulant based on melter off-gas analyses from Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was also tested at HRI in the 15-inch diameter Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) dual reformer at HRI in 2008. The target concentrations for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were increased by 16X for Se, 29X for Tl, 42X for Ba, 48X for Sb, by 100X for Pb and Ni, 1000X for Ag, and 1297X for Cd to ensure detection by the an

  10. Alteration of rhyolite in CO{sub 2} charged water at 200 and 350{degree}C: The unreactivity of CO{sub 2} at higher temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, J.L.; Rosenbauer, R.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Geochemical and hydrologic modeling indicates that geothermal waters in the T > 270{degrees}C reservoirs beneath Yellowstone National Park have HCO{sub 3} {much_lt} Cl and contrast with waters in reservoirs at lower temperatures which attain HCO{sub 3} about equal to Cl. Experiments reacting rhyolite with 0.5 molal solutions of CO{sub 2} at 200{degrees} and 350{degrees}C were carried out to test the hypothesis of Fournier to explain the chemistry of these springs: that CO{sub 2} is relatively unreactive with volcanic rocks at temperatures >270{degrees}C. The experimental results strongly support this hypothesis. Extent of alteration is twenty-seven times greater at 200{degrees}C than at 350{degrees}C. The dominant process in the experiments appears to be the alteration of the albitic component of the rhyolite by dissolved CO{sub 2} to form a kaolinite-like alteration product plus quartz: 2NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8} + 2CO{sub 2} + 3H{sub 2}O = 2Na{sup +} + 2HCO{sub 3}{sup -} + Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4} + 4SiO{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} reacts with water to form H{sub 2}CO{sub 3} which dissociates to H{sup +} and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, more so at lower temperatures. Kinetic and thermodynamic considerations suggest that the reactivity of H{sub 2}CO{sub 3} with wallrocks is at its maximum between 150{degrees} and 200{degrees}C, consuming most of the H{sup +} and liberating equivalent amounts of cations and bicarbonate. Wallrocks in higher temperature reservoirs are relatively unreactive to dissolved CO{sub 2} which is eventually lost from the system by boiling. These observations also offer a possible explanation for the change in chemical sediments from chloride-dominated to bicarbonate-dominated salts found in the stratigraphic section at Searles Lake, California, the terminus of the Owens River which derives its dissolved load from hot springs of the Long Valley caldera. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Universidade de Braslia Decanato de Ensino de Graduao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucero, Jorge Carlos

    seccional no Moodle: inserção da Radiologia Oral nas novas diretrizes curriculares no curso de Odontologia 1

  12. EDITAL N 01, de 6 de maro 2014 Publicado no DOU de 07 de maro de 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    instituição nacional credenciada para esse fim, nas áreas de conhecimento de Meteorologia, Oceanografia

  13. EDITAL N 01/2012 Em 29 de maio de 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    certificado/declaração de conclusão de Doutorado, nas áreas de conhecimento de Meteorologia, Física, Ciências

  14. Group classification of nonlinear wave equations State Pedagogical University, 36000 Poltava, Ukraine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhdanov, Renat

    Poltava, Ukraine R. Zhdanovb Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine Received 9

  15. Engine Design for LIFE Presentation to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be transported for maintenance or replacement Unsealed chamber, separate from the vacuum and optical systems connections are made with hydraulic couplers from industry Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011Latkowski -- NAS with hydraulic couplers from industry Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011NIF

  16. 59Dezembro, 2003 Campinas, SP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neshich, Goran

    covalentes (University of Paisley, 2003). Nas proteínas com formato globular, os contatos hidrofóbicos são

  17. jiliiil]iff(iiiiiJ ~ ~ ,,: "'-~I'~-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paraná, Universidade Federal do

    contribuindo com as discussões e sugerindo soluções que assegurem a democracia nas tomadas de decisão; IV

  18. Mercados externos pesam 20% do negcio da Gatewit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    projectos de investigação nas áreas de tec- nologia de informação e sustentabilidade aplicáveis à actividade

  19. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) Input Coal Analyses and Off-Gass Filter (OGF) Content Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Missimer, David M.; Guenther, Chris P.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; VanEssendelft, Dirk T.; Means, Nicholas C.

    2015-04-23

    A full engineering scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) system is being used at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) to stabilize acidic Low Activity Waste (LAW) known as Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW). The INTEC facility, known as the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), underwent an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) in March 2014. The IWTU began non-radioactive simulant processing in late 2014 and by January, 2015 ; the IWTU had processed 62,000 gallons of simulant. The facility is currently in a planned outage for inspection of the equipment and will resume processing simulated waste feed before commencing to process 900,000 gallons of radioactive SBW. The SBW acidic waste will be made into a granular FBSR product (carbonate based) for disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In the FBSR process calcined coal is used to create a CO2 fugacity to force the waste species to convert to carbonate species. The quality of the coal, which is a feed input, is important because the reactivity, moisture, and volatiles (C,H,N,O, and S) in the coal impact the reactions and control of the mineralizing process in the primary steam reforming vessel, the Denitration and Mineralizing Reformer (DMR). Too much moisture in the coal can require that additional coal be used. However since moisture in the coal is only a small fraction of the moisture from the fluidizing steam this can be self-correcting. If the coal reactivity or heating value is too low then the coal feedrate needs to be adjusted to achieve the desired heat generation. Too little coal and autothermal heat generation in the DMR cannot be sustained and/or the carbon dioxide fugacity will be too low to create the desired carbonate mineral species. Too much coal and excess S and hydroxide species can form. Excess sulfur from coal that (1) is too rich in sulfur or (2) from overfeeding coal can promote wall scale and contribute to corrosion in process piping and materials, in excessive off-gas absorbent loading, and in undesired process emissions. The ash content of the coal is important as the ash adds to the DMR and other vessel products which affect the final waste product mass and composition. The amount and composition of the ash also affects the reaction kinetics. Thus ash content and composition contributes to the mass balance. In addition, sodium, potassium, calcium, sulfur, and maybe silica and alumina in the ash may contribute to wall-scale formation. Sodium, potassium, and alumina in the ash will be overwhelmed by the sodium, potassium, and alumina from the feed but the impact from the other ash components needs to be quantified. A maximum coal particle size is specified so the feed system does not plug and a minimum particle size is specified to prevent excess elutriation from the DMR to the Process Gas Filter (PGF). A vendor specification was used to procure the calcined coal for IWTU processing. While the vendor supplied a composite analysis for the 22 tons of coal (Appendix A), this study compares independent analyses of the coal performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Three supersacks a were sampled at three different heights within the sack in order to determine within bag variability and between bag variability of the coal. These analyses were also compared to the vendor’s composite analyses and to the coal specification. These analyses were also compared to historic data on Bestac coal analyses that had been performed at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) between 2004-2011.

  20. Fluidized bed steam reformed mineral waste form performance testing to support Hanford Supplemental Low Activity Waste Immobilization Technology Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Pierce, E. M.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Crawford, C. L.; Daniel, W. E.; Fox, K. M.; Herman, C. C.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.; Brown, C. F.; Qafoku, N. P.; Neeway, J. J.; Valenta, M. M.; Gill, G. A.; Swanberg, D. J.; Robbins, R. A.; Thompson, L. E.

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the benchscale testing with simulant and radioactive Hanford Tank Blends, mineral product characterization and testing, and monolith testing and characterization. These projects were funded by DOE EM-31 Technology Development & Deployment (TDD) Program Technical Task Plan WP-5.2.1-2010-001 and are entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-Level Waste Form Qualification”, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO) M0SRV00054 with Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Savannah River Site (SRS) Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”, and IEWO M0SRV00080, “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form Qualification Testing Using SRS Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”. This was a multi-organizational program that included Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), THOR® Treatment Technologies (TTT), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Office of River Protection (ORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS). The SRNL testing of the non-radioactive pilot-scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) products made by TTT, subsequent SRNL monolith formulation and testing and studies of these products, and SRNL Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) radioactive campaign were funded by DOE Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) Phase 2 Project in connection with a Work-For-Others (WFO) between SRNL and TTT.

  1. Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—THOR® Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-07-14

    Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

  2. Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-26

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

  3. DEVELOPMENT QUALIFICATION AND DISPOSAL OF AN ALTERNATIVE IMMOBILIZED LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE FORM AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAMS TL; EDGE JA; SWANBERG DJ; ROBBINS RA

    2011-01-13

    Demonstrating that a waste form produced by a given immobilization process is chemically and physically durable as well as compliant with disposal facility acceptance criteria is critical to the success of a waste treatment program, and must be pursued in conjunction with the maturation of the waste processing technology. Testing of waste forms produced using differing scales of processing units and classes of feeds (simulants versus actual waste) is the crux of the waste form qualification process. Testing is typically focused on leachability of constituents of concern (COCs), as well as chemical and physical durability of the waste form. A principal challenge regarding testing immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) forms is the absence of a standard test suite or set of mandatory parameters against which waste forms may be tested, compared, and qualified for acceptance in existing and proposed nuclear waste disposal sites at Hanford and across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. A coherent and widely applicable compliance strategy to support characterization and disposal of new waste forms is essential to enhance and accelerate the remediation of DOE tank waste. This paper provides a background summary of important entities, regulations, and considerations for nuclear waste form qualification and disposal. Against this backdrop, this paper describes a strategy for meeting and demonstrating compliance with disposal requirements emphasizing the River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site and the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) mineralized low-activity waste (LAW) product stream.

  4. Identification of Communication and Coordination Issues in the U. S. Air Traffic Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davison, Hayley

    Today’s air traffic control system is approaching the point of saturation, as evidenced by increasing delays across the National Airspace System (NAS). There exists an opportunity to enhance NAS efficiency and reduce ...

  5. Storageflow: An SDN Approach to Storage Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Pradipta

    2014-08-04

    Network Attached Storage (NAS) systems have become popular due to their efficiency, ease of use, and ability to protect and restore data. Many NAS implementations provide efficient service and utilize sophisticated techniques such as coding...

  6. The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2010-01-01

    NAS) (2007) Environmental Impacts of Wind-Energy Projects.Committee on Environmental Impacts of Wind Energy Projects -

  7. Nmero de bolseiros no ensino superior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    existiam dívidas fiscais ou contributivas nas famílias e que estão agora a contac- tar os serviços das

  8. Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection Data Package—Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pires, Richard P.

    2011-09-12

    The Hanford Site in southeast Washington State has 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes stored in 177 underground tanks (ORP 2010). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), through its contractors, is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to convert the radioactive and hazardous wastes into stable glass waste forms for disposal. Within the WTP, the pretreatment facility will receive the retrieved waste from the tank farms and separate it into two treated process streams. These waste streams will be vitrified, and the resulting waste canisters will be sent to offsite (high-level waste [HLW]) and onsite (immobilized low-activity waste [ILAW]) repositories. As part of the pretreatment and ILAW processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed of in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is developing data packages to support that down-selection. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilizing and solidifying the liquid secondary wastes. At the Hanford Site, the FBSR process is being evaluated as a supplemental technology for treating and immobilizing Hanford LAW radioactive tank waste and for treating secondary wastes from the WTP pretreatment and LAW vitrification processes.

  9. Acronyms,Acronyms, InitialismsInitialisms, and, and Abbreviations in Science WritingAbbreviations in Science Writing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Taekjip

    ) National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Bose­Einstein condensate (BEC) #12;6 The use of periods (.) inThe use

  10. Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan C

    2007-01-01

    gasoline (NAS 2004). Biomass gasification is one technologyhydrogen via biomass gasification (Hamelinck et al. 2002;of scale of the biomass gasification facility. Low costs are

  11. Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    gasoline (NAS 2004). Biomass gasification is one technologyhydrogen via biomass gasification (Hamelinck et al. 2002;of scale of the biomass gasification facility. Low costs are

  12. Group classification of the general second-order evolution equation. Semi-simple invariance groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhdanov, Renat

    R. Zhdanov Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine V. Lahno State Pedagogical University, 2 Ostrogradskogo Street, 36000 Poltava, Ukraine Abstract

  13. SEAB Memorandum on the Congressional Advisory Panel on the Governance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on the Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories SEAB Memorandum on NAS Report, Aligning the Governance Structure of...

  14. Tiragem: 14617 Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    bolsas de investigação, da produção científica, do registo de patentes, da criação de empresas de base tecnológica e mesmo da incorporação de valor nas nossas expor- tações

  15. Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    Production by Gasification of Biomass." Department of Energygasoline (NAS 2004). Biomass gasification is one technologyhydrogen via biomass gasification (Hamelinck et al. 2002;

  16. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    only in development. System management technology is not yetbattery technologies (Na/S, demand-side management advancedtechnology for widespread residential time-of-use demand side management

  17. Information Management Robert E. Filman RIACS/NASA Ames Research Center filman@computer.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filman, Robert E.

    -Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (www.nas -architecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101 automation is possible, though not necessarily easy. An Airspace Utopia Ideally, when an airplane flying over applications), · scalability (this is a big system, it will grow, and you don't want it to be architecturally

  18. LMS Reliability FMECA and SPFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LMS Reliability FMECA and SPFS Contract No. NAS 9-5829 NO. ATM 97C PAGE 1 REV. MO. B OF~- DATE 21 will use the fixed mode ionization voltage. Prepared by: Approved by: .... ~~~lfo*R. Hiebert LMS III v VI LMS Reliability FMECA and SPFS Contract No. NAS9-5829 TABLE CJF CONTENTS DISCUSSION

  19. Condensed Matter Physics 2010, Vol. 13, No 3, 33601: 1--12 http://www.icmp.lviv.ua/journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Nazarenko 1 , M. Ÿ Skarabot 4 , I. MuŸ seviŸ c 4 1 Institute of Physics NAS Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine 2 National Technical University of Ukraine ``Kyiv Polytechnic Institute'', Kyiv, Ukraine 3 Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics NAS Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine 4 J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000

  20. Group classification and exact solutions of nonlinear wave equations State Pedagogical University, 2 Ostrogradskogo Street, 36000 Poltava, Ukraine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhdanov, Renat

    University, 2 Ostrogradskogo Street, 36000 Poltava, Ukraine R. Zhdanov Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine O. Magda Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, 01601 Kyiv, Ukraine Abstract We perform complete group classification

  1. Condensed Matter Physics 2010, Vol. 13, No 3, 33601: 112 http://www.icmp.lviv.ua/journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 , M. Skarabot4 , I. Musevic4 1 Institute of Physics NAS Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine 2 National Technical University of Ukraine "Kyiv Polytechnic Institute", Kyiv, Ukraine 3 Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics NAS Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine 4 J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

  2. Thermodynamically Stable Dispersions of Quantum Dots in a Nematic Liquid Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reznikov, Yuri

    *, State Scientific Institution "Institute for Single Crystals", NAS of Ukraine, 60, Lenin Ave., Kharkov, 61001, Ukraine Faculty of Pharmacy, UMR CNRS 7213, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France § Institute of Physics, NAS of Ukraine, 46, Nauki Ave., Kiev, 03039, Ukraine North Carolina A&T State

  3. R.Z. Zhdanov \\Lambda , I.M. Tsyfra y , and R.O. Popovych z A precise definition of reduction of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhdanov, Renat

    of partial differential equations Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, 252004 Kyiv, Ukraine E­mail: \\Lambda renat@imath.kiev.ua, y ivan@apmat.freenet.kiev.ua, z roman. Zhdanov Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Street, 252004 Kyiv, Ukraine E

  4. 1EV GaN[subscript x]As[subscript 1-x-y]Sb[subscript y] material for lattice-matched III-V solar cell implementation on GaAs and Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Soon Fatt

    The effect of different arsenic species (As[subscript 2] or As[subscript 4]) on the quality of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown GaNAsSb materials (samples A and B) and GaAs/ GaNAsSb/GaAs p+n-n+ devices (samples C and D) ...

  5. Damage Detection and Characterization in Smart Material Structures \\Lambda y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damage Detection and Characterization in Smart Material Structures \\Lambda y H.T. Banks and Y. Wang Nos. NAS1­ 18605 and NAS1­19480. #12; 1 Introduction It has been known for some time that damage­maps'' as done in the thermal based tomography techniques of [BK1, BK2, BKW] wherein the damaged physical domain

  6. Renascena Online Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    total de 7000 postos de trabalho nas empresas que entram no sistema. Em contraciclo com a situação de outros países, nomeadamente metais, plásticos e energia, mais do que supera os custos que são total de 7000 postos de trabalho nas empresas que entram no sistema. Já se sabia que a reciclagem de

  7. ARTIGO INTERNET Bioengenharia de Clulas Estaminais e Redes de Comunicaes em debate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    riquíssimas que estão na ordem do dia da área das Tecnologias da Informação. Através de um programa bastante. A consolidação da sua posição de Grande Escola do País nas áreas de Engenharia, Ciência e Tecnologia deve-se às de Engenharia, Ciência e Tecnologia, nas vertentes de graduação e pós-graduação. Além disso, tem um

  8. Improved Alumina Loading in High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.; Vienna, J.D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Peeler, D.K.; Fox, K.M. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Aloy, A.; Trofimenko, A.V. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gerdes, K.D. [EM-21, Office of Waste Processing, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Recent tank retrieval, blending, and treatment strategies at both the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford have identified increased amounts of high-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} waste streams that are scheduled to be processed through their respective high-level waste (HLW) vitrification facilities. It is well known that the addition of small amounts of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to borosilicate glasses generally enhances the durability of the waste glasses. However, at higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}) formation can result in a severe deterioration of the chemical durability of the slowly cooled glass near the center of the canister. Additionally, higher concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} generally increase the liquidus temperature of the melt and decrease the processing rate. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) are jointly performing laboratory and scaled-melter tests, through US Department of Energy, EM-21 Office of Waste Processing program, to develop glass formulations with increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations. These glasses are formulated for specific DOE waste compositions at Hanford and Savannah River Site. The objectives are to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints such as viscosity, liquidus temperature, and glass durability. This paper summarizes the results of recent tests of simulated Hanford HLW glasses containing up to 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in glass. In summary: Glasses with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading ranging from 25 to 27 wt% were formulated and tested at a crucible scale. Successful glass formulations with up to 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} that do not precipitate nepheline during CCC treatment and had spinel crystals 1 vol% or less after 24 hr heat treatment at 950 deg. C were obtained. The selected glass, HAL-17 with 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, had viscosity and electrical conductivity within the boundaries for adequate processing in the Joule heated melters operated at 1150 deg. C. This HAL-17 glass was successfully processed using small-scale (SMK) and larger scale (EP-5) melters. There was no indication of spinel settling during processing. The product glass samples from these melter tests contained 1 to 4 vol% spinel crystals that are likely formed during cooling. The PCT tests on the product glasses are underway. The present study demonstrated that it is possible to formulate the glasses with up to 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} that satisfy the property requirements and is processable with Joule-heated melters operated at 1150 deg. C. The 'nepheline discriminator' for HAL-17 glass is 0.45, which supports that claim that the current rule ('nepheline discriminator' < 0.62) is too restrictive. Considering that the cost of HLW treatment is highly dependent on loading of waste in glass, this result provides a potential for significant cost saving for Hanford. The maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading that can be achieved will also depend on concentrations of other components in wastes. For example, the loading of waste used in this study was also limited by the spinel crystallization after 950 deg. C 24 hr heat treatment, which suggests that the concentrations of spinel-forming components such as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiO, ZnO, and MnO would be critical in addition to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading achievable. The observed glass production rate per unit melter surface area of 0.75 MT/(d.m{sup 2}) for SMK test is comparable to the design capacity of WTP HLW melters at 0.8 MT/(d.m{sup 2}). However, the test with EP-5 melter achieved 0.38 MT/(d.m{sup 2}), which is roughly a half of the WTP design capacity. This result may imply that the glass with 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} may not achieve the WTP design production rate. However, this hypothesis is not conclusive because of unknown effects of melter size and operation

  9. Folk Song 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tshe ring bsam 'grub

    ??????????????????????? ????????????????? ???????????????? 5??????????????????????????? 6?????????????????????????????????? 7?????????????????????????? Wylie O ye/ ye zhang nga la la la mo/ gdong nga glu ngas len/ 1'brug sing sing rma rgyal sbom nas grags// 2char sam... sim 'bab p'i rten 'brel red// 3bya sing sing rgya rdzong nags nas grags// 4bya khu byug grags p'i rten 'brel red// ye zhang nga la la la mo/ gdong nga glu ngas len/ 5glu sing sing rang gi yul nas len// 6bdag zhang 'dzin 'tshogs p'i rten 'brel red...

  10. Competition and congestion in the National Aviation System : multi-agent, multi-stakeholder approaches for evaluation and mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaze, Vikrant (Vikrant Suhas)

    2011-01-01

    The US National Aviation System (NAS) is a complex system with multiple, interacting agents including airlines, passengers, and system operators, each with somewhat different objectives and incentives. These interactions ...

  11. Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    of coal produced by surface versus underground mining, wecoal the most important distinction is underground versus surface mining,the coal has a low heating value (NAS 2007). Surface mining

  12. Effects of reduced IFR arrival-arrival wake vortex separation minima and improved runaway operations sequencing on flight delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bly, Elizabeth, 1981-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) 65.6% and 67.0% and the average NAS delay by 24.3% and 24.7% relative to the FIFO and Serve-the-Longest-Queue algorithms respectively.

  13. FAA SUA PRPRIA ANLISE O Grupo de Previso de Tempo (GPT) do CPTEC/INPE disponibiliza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vinculado com a meteorologia (engenheiros, geógrafos, físicos, matemáticos, oceanógrafos, professores operacionais e os alunos e professores da área de meteorologia sinótica que trabalham nas diferentes Faculdades estaduais e federais de Meteorologia do Brasil e da América do Sul. #12;

  14. Geothermal Update NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES / NOVEMBER 4,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    GTO-NAS.pdf More Documents & Publications GEA Geothermal Summit Presentation Lauren Boyd Geothermal R&D: The DOE Perspective U.S. Department of Energy progress in geothermal...

  15. MSMW'07 Symposium Proceedings. Kharkov, Ukraine, June 25-30, 2007 SPATIAL CORRELATION OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR ELECTRON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    MSMW'07 Symposium Proceedings. Kharkov, Ukraine, June 25-30, 2007 SPATIAL CORRELATION OF LINEAR temperature Physics & Engineering, NAS ofUkraine 47 Lenin Avenue, Kharkov, 61103, Ukraine Tel.: +380

  16. DC Current in 4-N-Pentyl-40 -Cyanobiphenyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reznikov, Yuri

    of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine 2 Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA of Physics, NAS of Ukraine, 46, Nauka Ave., Kyiv 03680, Ukraine. Tel.: þ38-044-5250820; Fax: þ38

  17. Exponentially convergent Duhamel's like algorithms for differential equations with an operator coefficient possessing a variable domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .3) National Aviation University of Ukraine, 1, Komarov ave. , 03058 Kyiv, Ukraine (bohonoff@ba-eisenach.de). Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., Kyiv-4, 01601, Ukraine (makarov

  18. The Lichenologist 47(6): 403414 (2015) British Lichen Society, 2015 doi:10.1017/S0024282915000341

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Republic. A. Voytsekhovich: M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany of the NAS of Ukraine, Tereshchenkivska str. 2, Kyiv 01601, Ukraine. #12;where it is expected that most of the photo- biont diversity remains

  19. DownloadedBy:[Reznikov,Yu.]At:00:4421February2008 Highly Sensitive Photoaligning Materials on a Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reznikov, Yuri

    of Science, Kyiv, Ukraine 2 Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry and Petrochemistry, NAS, Kyiv, Ukraine 3, Ukraine. E-mail: yuri@iop.kiev.ua Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst., Vol. 480, pp. 81­90, 2008 Copyright # Taylor

  20. Review and evaluation of national airspace system models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odoni, Amedeo R.

    1979-01-01

    Abstract from Technical Report Documentation Page: This report is intended to serve as a guide to the availability and capability of state-of-the-art analytical and simulation models of the National Airspace System (NAS). ...

  1. A Green Prison: Santa Rita Jail Creeps Towards Zero Net Energy (ZNE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2011-01-01

    is electric storage, in the form of a 12 MWh battery bankstorage is installed, LBNL intends to deliver week-ahead optimized batteryStorage Previously, a 2 MW 12 MWh NGK sodium-sulfur (NaS) battery

  2. Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    is electric storage, in the form of a 12 MWh battery bankstorage is installed, LBNL intends to deliver week-ahead optimized batteryStorage Previously, a 2 MW 12 MWh NGK sodium-sulfur (NaS) battery

  3. Towards a Comprehensive Set of Big Data Geoffrey C. FOX a, 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    not get adopted as a standard benchmark set. Rather the NAS Parallel Benchmarks [9], Linpack [10 processing view (labelled PV) has facets which describe classes of processing steps including algorithms

  4. Within-orchard edge effects of the azimuth of the sun on Diaphorina citri adults in mature orchards.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anco, D J; Gottwald, T R

    2015-01-01

    0.42, P = 0.22) from autumnal equinox to winter solstice, Nas from summer solstice to autumnal equinox. Sampling areaexception was during autumnal equinox when interior sampling

  5. Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

    2014-01-01

    NAS mpg, +ZEVs, automation NGV, more efficiency, automationSciences; NG = natural gas; NGV = natural gas vehicle; OTC =and ignored, as EV and NGV demand forecasts were provided by

  6. Metabolomic and transcriptomic analysis of the rice response to the bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    system in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae required for AvrXa212002). The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. lozengeoryzae raxP andPf1 against Xanthomo- nas oryzae pv. oryzae in rice leaves.

  7. Metabolomic and transcriptomic analysis of the rice response to the bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    system in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae required for AvrXa212002). The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. lozengeoryzae raxP andPf1 against Xanthomo- nas oryzae pv. oryzae in rice leaves.

  8. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 155320 (2012) Unconventional Hall effect near charge neutrality point in a two-dimensional electron-hole system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gusev, Guennady

    2012-01-01

    . N. Mikhailov,3 S. A. Dvoretsky,3 and J. C. Portal4,5,6 1 Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS, 135960-170 S~ao Paulo, SP, Brazil 3 Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia 4

  9. Workshops & Conferences Archive | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    link Denver, CO June 13-14, 2011 NAS Board on Research Data and Information (BRDI) BRDI web page External link Washington, DC BRDI May 9-20, 2011 INCITS External link DM32 Data...

  10. Characterization of Novel Semiconductor Alloys for Band Gap Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broesler, Robert Joseph

    2010-01-01

    of Semiconductors: Physics and Materials Properties. 1999,in Properties of Advanced Semiconductor Materials GaN, AlN,Semiconductor Alloys: InAlN, ZnSeO and GaNAs 2 Materials Properties

  11. The Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management System – Battery Storage Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Weimar, Mark R.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Ma, Jian; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2009-07-01

    This report presents the modeling approach, methodologies, and results of the sodium sulfur (NaS) battery evaluation study, which was conducted by Battelle for the California Energy Commission (CEC).

  12. WORKSHOP ON APPLICATION OF REMOTE SENSING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DISASTER RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    stations ·· Catalog; SCEC CMM3Catalog; SCEC CMM3 #12;4 NAS - Irvine Southern California is the nation, and effects of ground tilt and subsidence on water systemson water systems Can be used in realCan be used

  13. Thicket: Construc~ao e Manutenc~ao de Multiplas Arvores numa Rede entre Pares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigues, Luís E.T.

    num pequeno subconjunto de todas as ´arvores, e folha nas restantes. As m´ultiplas ´arvores permitem participantes. O principal problema que afecta este tipo de sistemas ´e o desbalanceamento na contribui¸c~ao de

  14. Instituto Superior Tcnico vai promover formao no Secundrio Id: 40454389

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    a inserção no Ensino Superior - nomeadamente nas áreas das ciências e tecnologia. O Programa Escola 2 áreas das ciências básicas e das Tecnologias de Informação e Comunicação", detalha o IST. As ações em

  15. O Diretor do Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais -INPE, no uso da competncia que lhe foi delegada pelo Ministro de Estado da Cincia, Tecnologia e Inovao -MCTI, por meio da Portaria n 407, de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    delegada pelo Ministro de Estado da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação - MCTI, por meio da Portaria nº 407, de objetivo capacitar e atualizar recursos humanos nos domínios da Ciência e Tecnologia e suas aplicações nas

  16. The 1996 U.S. Purse Seine Fishery for Tropical Tunas in the Central-Western Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for tropical tu nas (yellowfin, Thunnus albacares; skipjack, Katsuwonus pelamis; and big eye, T. obesus, and skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and continued a de clining trend that started in 1995. Catch rates also

  17. Global Warming: Connecting the Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    ' (>500 years); oil and gas reservoirs sufficient to yield ~ 450 ppm; others must be left in ground Charts) Carbon Tax/Technology Investment, (3) Energy Efficiency Standards, (4) NAS study on ice sheets, (5

  18. Overview of Chamber and Power Plant Designs for IFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (all fusion). · Breed, recover and recycle tritium to provide a self-sustained fuel cycle (all fusion NAS Review 1/30/11 9 Direct drive energy split: 2% x-rays 28% ions 70% neutrons Indirect drive energy

  19. Development of remedial process options: Phase II, Feasibility study: Installation Restoration Program, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronk, T.A.; Smuin, D.R. ); Schlosser, R.M. )

    1991-11-01

    This technical memorandum develops process options which are appropriate for environmental restoration activities at Naval Air Station Fallon (NAS Fallon), Nevada. Introduction of contaminants to the environment has resulted from deliberate disposal activities (both through dumping and landfilling) and accidental spills and leaks associated with normal activities at NAS Fallon over its lifetime of operation. Environmental sampling results indicate that the vast majority of contaminants of concern are petroleum hydrocarbon related. These contaminants include JP-4, JP-5, leaded and unleaded gasoline, waste oils and lubricants, hydraulic fluids, and numerous solvents and cleaners. The principal exposure pathways of concern associated with NAS Fallon contaminants appear to be the surface flows and shallow drainage systems to which the base contributes. Available data indicate NAS Fallon IR Program sites are not contributing excessive contamination to surface flows emanating from the base. Contaminants appear to be contained in a relatively immobile state in the shallow subsurface with little or no contaminant migration off site.

  20. Identification of Robust Routes using Convective Weather Forcasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Diana

    Convective weather is responsible for large delays and widespread disruptions in the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS), especially during summer months when travel demand is high. This has been the motivation for Air ...

  1. Dynamic reconfiguration of terminal airspace during convective weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Diana

    Dynamic airspace configuration (DAC) algorithms strive to restructure the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS) in ways that allow air traffic control to better manage aircraft flows. Although past research has largely focused ...

  2. Safety considerations for operation of different classes of unmanned aerial vehicles in the National Airspace System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weibel, Roland E. (Roland Everett)

    2005-01-01

    There is currently a broad effort underway in the United States and internationally by several organizations to craft regulations enabling the safe operation of UAVs in the NAS. Current federal regulations governing unmanned ...

  3. Safety Considerations for Operation of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weibel, Roland E

    2006-11-21

    There is currently a broad effort underway in the United States and internationally by several organizations to craft regulations enabling the safe operation of UAVs in the NAS. Current federal regulations governing unmanned ...

  4. Evaluating the depiction of complex RNAV/RNP procedures and analyzing a potential de-cluttering technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butchibabu, Abhizna

    2012-01-01

    Performance Based Navigation (PBN) is a key element of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) NextGen Program. In order to increase National Airspace System (NAS) capacity and efficiency, PBN routes and procedures are ...

  5. Development of the prototype pneumatic transfer system for ITER neutron activation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheon, M. S.; Seon, C. R.; Pak, S.; Lee, H. G.; Bertalot, L.

    2012-10-15

    The neutron activation system (NAS) measures neutron fluence at the first wall and the total neutron flux from the ITER plasma, providing evaluation of the fusion power for all operational phases. The pneumatic transfer system (PTS) is one of the key components of the NAS for the proper operation of the system, playing a role of transferring encapsulated samples between the capsule loading machine, irradiation stations, counting stations, and disposal bin. For the validation and the optimization of the design, a prototype of the PTS was developed and capsule transfer tests were performed with the developed system.

  6. Tutorial on the Physics of Inertial Confinement Fusion for energy applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tutorial on the Physics of Inertial Confinement Fusion for energy applications R. Betti University of Rochester and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 3rd Meeting of the NAS panel on Inertial Fusion Energy · The implications of ignition to fusion ENERGY production Does the NIF address all the plasma-target PHYSICS issues

  7. Technical Evaluation Report "Baseline Design for the COS Aperture Plate"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Technical Evaluation Report "Baseline Design for the COS Aperture Plate" Date: October 14, 1999 Document Number: COS-11-0009 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: SE-05 Prepared By: J. Morse, COS Project Scientist, CU/CASA Date Reviewed By: E. Wilkinson, COS Instrument Scientist

  8. COS FUV Detector RIU-Direct Thermistor Limits Monitoring Values Date: August 14, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS FUV Detector RIU-Direct Thermistor Limits Monitoring Values Date: August 14, 2002 Document Number: COS-11-0034 Revision: Revision A Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: SE-05 Prepared By: Kenneth Brownsberger 9/5/2001 K. Brownsberger, COS Sr. Software Scientist, CU/CASA Date Reviewed By: Jason McPhate 9

  9. COS FUV01 Detector Telemetry Values for the CS FSW "Limits Monitoring" Task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS FUV01 Detector Telemetry Values for the CS FSW "Limits Monitoring" Task Date: August 14, 2002 Document Number: COS-11-0031 Revision: Revision A Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: SE-05 Prepared By: Kenneth Brownsberger 8/15/2001 K. Brownsberger, COS Sr. Software Scientist, CU/CASA Date Reviewed By

  10. COS G130M FUV Grating Calibration And Qualification Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS G130M FUV Grating Calibration And Qualification Plan Date: October 11, 1999 Document Number: COS-01-0002 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No. AV-02 Prepared By: S. Osterman, COS Optical Scientist, CU/CASA Date Reviewed By: E. Wilkinson, COS Instrument Scientist, CU/CASA Date

  11. COS/HST FUV Grating Shipping Container Handling Procedure Date: November 30, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS/HST FUV Grating Shipping Container Handling Procedure Date: November 30, 1999 Document Number: COS-05-0002 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: N/A Prepared By: Erik. Wilkinson 11-30-99 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: COS/HST FUV Grating Shipping

  12. COS Prelaunch Calibration Data Date: March 13, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS Prelaunch Calibration Data Date: March 13, 2008 Document Number: COS-01-0008 Revision: Revision A Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: AV-04 Prepared By: Dr. Erik Wilkinson 5/14/04 Dr. E. Wilkinson, COS Project Scientist, CU Date Reviewed By: Dr. Dennis Ebbets 5/14/04 Dr. D. Ebbets, COS Calibration Scientist

  13. COS FUV01 Detector Errors and Recommended Actions Date: July 30, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS FUV01 Detector Errors and Recommended Actions Date: July 30, 2001 Document Number: COS-11-0032 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: SE-05 Prepared By: K. Brownsberger, COS Sr. Software Scientist, CU/CASA Date Reviewed By: J. McPhate, COS FUV Detector Scientist, UCB Date Reviewed By

  14. COS NUV Grating Specification Date: August 23, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS NUV Grating Specification Date: August 23, 2000 Document Number: COS-08-0005 Revision: Revision B Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: N/A Prepared By: E. Wilkinson 8-12-99 E. Wilkinson, COS, Calibration Scientist, BATC Date Approved By: J. Andrews 8-25-99 J. Andrews, COS Experiment Manager, CU

  15. Technical Evaluation Report "ND2 Attenuation of the COS Bright Object Aperture"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Technical Evaluation Report "ND2 Attenuation of the COS Bright Object Aperture" Date: 30 June 2000 Document Number: COS-11-0019 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: N/A Prepared By: J. Morse, COS Project Scientist, CU/CASA Date Reviewed By: J. Green, COS Principal Investigator, CU

  16. Technical Evaluation Report "COS FUV Detector Geometric Distortion Maps"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Technical Evaluation Report "COS FUV Detector Geometric Distortion Maps" Date: November 12, 2003 Document Number: COS-11-0044 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: Prepared By: Mr. S. Beland, COS Software Engineer Date Reviewed By: Dr. E. Wilkinson, Instrument Scientist Date

  17. Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) Science Operations Requirements Document

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) Science Operations Requirements Document (OP-01) Date: March 17, 2004 Document Number: COS-01-0001 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: OP-01 Prepared By: J. Morse, COS Project Scientist, CU/CASA Date Reviewed By: E. Wilkinson, COS Instrument

  18. COS G160M FUV Grating Calibration and Qualification Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS G160M FUV Grating Calibration and Qualification Plan Date: January 4, 2001 Document Number: COS-01-0005 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No. Prepared By: S. Osterman, COS Optical Scientist, CU/CASA Date Reviewed By: E. Wilkinson, COS Instrument Scientist, CU/CASA Date Approved

  19. Technical Evaluation Report "OTA Scattered Light & Effects on COS Performance"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Technical Evaluation Report "OTA Scattered Light & Effects on COS Performance" Date: July 10, 2000 Document Number: COS-11-0020 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: N/A Prepared By: Dr. Erik Wilkinson, COS Instrument Scientist Date Reviewed By: Dr. Jon Morse, COS Project Scientist

  20. COS NUV Grating Substrate Specification Date: August 20, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS NUV Grating Substrate Specification Date: August 20, 2001 Document Number: COS-08-0013 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: Prepared By: E. Wilkinson, COS Instrument Scientist, CU, BATC Date Approved By: D. Ebbets, Calibration Scientist, BATC Date Approved By: J. Andrews, COS

  1. Updated Exposure Times for the COS SMS LSSFN2P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Updated Exposure Times for the COS SMS LSSFN2P (COS Short System Functional Nitrogen2 Purge) Date: April 25, 2006 Document Number: COS-11-0046 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: Prepared By: Dr. Steven Penton, COS Software Scientist, CU Date Reviewed By: Dr. Steven Osterman, COS

  2. COS G140L FUV Grating Calibration and Qualification Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS G140L FUV Grating Calibration and Qualification Plan Date: January 4, 2001 Document Number: COS-01-0004 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No. Prepared By: S. Osterman, COS Optical Scientist, CU/CASA Date Reviewed By: E. Wilkinson, COS Instrument Scientist, CU/CASA Date Approved

  3. Calculo Diferencial e Integral II Semestre 2013/2014 MEAmbi e MEBiol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ventura, Joana

    aula da pr´atica e sobre o desem- penho em determinados exerc´icios escritos realizados nas aulas e que. (8) Haver´a uma lista de exerc´icios propostos para cada aula pr´atica. Estes exerc´icios devem ser resolvidos pelos alunos antes das respectivas aulas pr´aticas. Durante as aulas pr´aticas os alunos trabalhar

  4. 658 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY, VOL. 47, NO. 3, AUGUST 2005 A Triple-Band Internal Antenna: Design and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Seong-Ook

    applications. Anten- nas must be small enough to be built in the practical mobile handsets and have good-Band Internal Antenna: Design and Performance in Presence of the Handset Case, Battery, and Human Head Dong is extended and modified to tune the desired frequency bandwidth on the placement of handset case and battery

  5. Society of Petroleum Engineers Oil Deposits in Diatomites: A New Challenge for Subterranean Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Society of Petroleum Engineers SPE 75230 Oil Deposits in Diatomites: A New Challenge for Subterranean Mechanics G. I. Barenblatt1 , For. Mem. RS, NAE, NAS, T. W. Patzek2 , SPE, V. M. Prostokishin3 and D. B. Silin4 Copyright 2002, Society of Petroleum Engineers, Inc. This paper was prepared

  6. 1) O que o Inpe faz? O Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) foi criado em 1961 com o objetivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    espacial, meteorologia, observação da Terra por imagens de satélite e estudos de mudanças climáticas. 2-graduação nas áreas de Astrofísica, Geofísica Espacial, Computação Aplicada, Meteorologia, Sensoriamento Remoto meteorologia e ciências ligadas ao meio ambiente), mas não é uma agência. No Brasil, existe a Agência Espacial

  7. 148 American EntomologistFall 2012 man Resources. 2012. Plant and Enviromental Protection Sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    of nuclear power plants (NAS 2012), and from nuclear accidentssuchasthoseattheThreeMileIsland,Chernobyl,andFuku- shima Daiichi power plants. In some parts of the world (e.g. Ramsar, Iran148 American Entomologist·Fall 2012 man Resources. 2012. Plant and Enviromental Protection Sciences

  8. The Fourth International Conference NONLINEAR DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Fourth International Conference NONLINEAR DYNAMICS June, 19-22, 2013 PROCEEDINGS #12;Ministry of Mechanics NAS of Ukraine (Kiev, UKRAINE) McGill University (Montreal, CANADA) The Fourth International-617-669-100-6 4- The book of Proceedings includes extended abstracts of presentations on the Fourth International

  9. MSMW'O4 Symposium Proceedings.Kharkov, Ukraine,June 21-26,2004 SPATIALLYRESOLVEDANALYSES OF MICROWAVEAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    MSMW'O4 Symposium Proceedings.Kharkov, Ukraine,June 21-26,2004 SPATIALLYRESOLVEDANALYSES Alexander P. Zhuravel B. Verkin Institute for Low temperature Physics & Engineering, NAS of Ukraine Address: 47 Lenin Avenue, Kharkov, 61103, Ukraine Tel.: +380-572308507, Fax: +380 -572322370,E -mail: zhuravel

  10. Oceanography Vol.17, No.3, Sept. 20046 CO M M E N TA RY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, James S.

    Oceanography Vol.17, No.3, Sept. 20046 CO M M E N TA RY The United States Congress formed motivation was a 1992 report from the NAS/ NRC Ocean Studies Board, Oceanography in the Next Decade. This article has been published in Oceanography, Volume 17, Number 3, a quarterly journal of The Oceanography

  11. Contenido del programa de estudios Conceptos generales. Biomolculas. Agua, sus propiedades e interacciones.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contenido del programa de estudios Bioquímica Conceptos generales. Biomoléculas. Agua, sus propiedades e interacciones. Hidrofobicidad. Polaridad. Capacidad disolvente del agua. Agua y PH. Constante de disociación del agua y PH. Sistema bicarbonato-ácidocarbónico. Proteínas. Aminoácidos. Características

  12. NASA Contractor Report 194949 ICASE Report No. 94-59

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    NASA Contractor Report 194949 ICASE Report No. 94-59 ?_7¢ S MULTIRESOLUTION REPRESENTATION AND NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS: A BRIEF REVIEW Ami Harten (NASA-CR-I94949) MULTIRESOLUTION REPRESENTATICN ANO - 18605 and NAS 1-19480 October 1994 Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering NASA

  13. NASA/TM2014218280 Analysis of Well-Clear Boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    NASA/TM­2014­218280 Analysis of Well-Clear Boundary Models for the Integration of UAS in the NAS Research Center, Hampton, Virginia June 2014 #12;NASA STI Program . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA scientific

  14. Going Beyond 10,000 Years at Yucca Mountain P.F. Peterson, W.E. Kastenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    comes from the 1999 Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS). Figure 1 shows FEIS predictions, brought by the State of Nevada, argued that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had deviated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository in New Mexico. The NAS report concluded that there is "no

  15. Quantized electromagnetic tornado in pulsar vacuum gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    light-house-like beams of radio waves sweep Earth, producing highly regular radio pulses. 2 1/s #12;L. D, B0031-07 are a riddle which is not solved yet. V.M.Kontorovich Radio Astronomy Institute NAS radio radiation (1967). Pulsars were identified with rotating neutron stars. A. Hewish (b. 1924) 3 #12

  16. PERFORMANCE PREDICTION AND ANALYSIS OF THE LUNAR HEAT FLOW PROBES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    of Prime Contract No. NAS 9-6037 with Columbia University Arthur D. Little, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140 January 1970 C-71424 Arthur D Little,Inc. #12;Acknowledgments Summary List of Figures List discussions with Dr. E. Drake, Dr. A. E. Wechsler and Mr. Frank Ruccia of Arthur D. Little, Inc., regarding

  17. Eighth USA/Europe Air Traffic Management Research and Development Seminar (ATM2009) Application of Reinforcement Learning Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eighth USA/Europe Air Traffic Management Research and Development Seminar (ATM2009) Application Ganesan,Ph.D., Lance Sherry, Ph.D. Center for Air Transportation Systems Research George Mason University for the development of a more efficient air traffic management system. The dynamic nature of operations in the NAS

  18. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 14691484, 2006 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/6/1469/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    throughout the entire air quality monitoring network (a to- tal of 37 coastal and inland stations) covering Urquijo s/n, 48 013 Bilbao, Spain 2Environment & Systems, S. A., Luis Bri~nas 9, 1 izda, 48 013 Bilbao and June 2003) in the air quality monitoring network of the Basque Country (BC) are analyzed

  19. ARTIGO INTERNET Portugal participa na maior experincia de fuso nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    NewsSearch ARTIGO INTERNET Portugal participa na maior experiência de fusão nuclear in http experiência de fusão nuclear Portugal tem a quarta participação mais importante nas campanhas experimentais do maior reactor experimental de fusão nuclear actualmente em operação na Terra, o tokamak JET. A seguir à

  20. Assista aos concertos com a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    nas redes sociais Falências de famílias quase duplicaram num ano Máquinas de fusão nuclear confinam energia semelhante às estrelas Áudio Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear abre portas à Renascença. Cerca de duas dezenas de inves gadores do Ins tuto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, do Técnico, juntam-se a uma

  1. Ins$tute(of(Networking(and(( Security(Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaeger, Trent

    I N S R Ins$tute(of(Networking(and(( Security(Research Technical)Report NAS-TR-0168-2014 Cloud-XXXXX-XX-X/XX/XX ...$15.00. Keywords cloud computing, security, trust 1. INTRODUCTION One problem facing cloud computingArmor : Protecting Cloud Instances by Validating Client Commands Yuqiong Sun, Giuseppe Petracca, Hayawardh

  2. American Journal of Computational Linguistics M i c r o f i c h e 6 Published by the Center for Applied Linguistics for the Associa-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 SOLAR PROJECT DISTRIBUTES MATERIALS I I I 7 NAS/NRC STUDIES INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION PROGRAMS I I-machine division of labor, not to say power, will end is not yet settled, but we may transcent ourselves, Buffalo. KAY, MARTIN^ To Xerox Palo Alto Reseatch Center; home address 935 Peninsula Way, Menlo Park

  3. AVALIAC ~AO DO MODELO DE ONDAS O modelo de onda WAVEWATCH implementado operacionalmente no CP-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WWATCH-III est~ao arquivadas nas horas 0,3,6,...,21,24, e em pontos de grade com espa¸camento de 1 grau `a ob- serva¸c~ao do sat´elite. No espa¸co, aplicou-se uma interpola¸c~ao bi-c´ubica, e no tempo, uma

  4. United States Air and Radiation EPA 402-R-00-01 Environmental Protection (6608J) June 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Report to Congress #12;Executive Summary In reports accompanying the appropriations bills (TENORM). EPA was to submit the completed NAS study to Congress, along with Agency's own report on what Radioactive Materials (TENORM) Report to Congress Introduction Over the past 20 years, EPA and other

  5. Preliminary Analysis of Potential ADS-B User Benefits for Hawaiian Helicopter Air Tour Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lester, Edward

    ADS-B ground infrastructure is currently planned to be installed in Hawaii between 2010 and 2013 as part of the National Airspace System (NAS) wide implementation of ADS-B. Current plans call for ADS-B coverage to be focused ...

  6. PROBCAST: A Web-Based Portal to Mesoscale Probabilistic Forecasts Clifford Mass1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass, Clifford F.

    1 PROBCAST: A Web-Based Portal to Mesoscale Probabilistic Forecasts Clifford Mass1 , Susan Joslyn over the Pacific Northwest. PROBCAST products are derived from the output of a mesoscale ensemble-processing of mesoscale, short-range ensembles. The NAS report also noted current deficiencies in the communication

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF LEUCOCYTOZOON TODDI GROUP (HAEMOSPORIDA: LEUCOCYTOZOIDAE), WITH REMARKS ON THE SPECIES TAXONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sehgal, Ravinder

    ON THE SPECIES TAXONOMY OF LEUCOCYTOZOIDS Gediminas Valkiu¯nas, Ravinder N. M. Sehgal*, Tatjana A. Iezhova. e-mail: gedvalk@ekoi.lt ABSTRACT: The current taxonomy of leucocytozoids (Haemosporida identified species of avian haemosporidians. Based on the current taxonomy, Leucocytozoon toddi is the sole

  8. Krypton Fluoride Laser Driven Inertial Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems San Ramon CA January 29, 2011 presented by John Sethian1 Krypton Fluoride Laser Driven Inertial Fusion Energy Presented to NAS Committee on the Prospects POWER PLANT: Attractive Technology #12;6 Outline S. ObenschainVision of R&D path to Inertial Fusion

  9. O professor do IST diz ser necessrio repensar o funcionamento das democracias Mal-estar europeu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    O professor do IST diz ser necessário repensar o funcionamento das democracias Mal-estar europeu financeiros e de que o voto pesa pouco nas orientações seguidas, são sintomas perigosos para a democracia.E democracias", isto é, alargar o perímetro de legitimação democrática além do Estado-nação, criar uma

  10. Proviso de QoS Adaptvel em Sistemas Operacionais: O Subsistema de Rede1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colcher, Sérgio

    funcionalidades, além do gerenciamento dos canais de comunicação nas suas diversas portas de entrada e saída. O parâmetros de configuração podem ser citados, como as tarefas que irão compor a pilha de protocolos de

  11. Universidade Universidade de Lisboa sem verba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    que também já cortam nas fotocópias, na vigilância e na energia Uma invenção importante é sobre antibióticos. O reitor da UL, Cruz Serra, diz que estão a tentar que empresas nacionais comprem as patentes problema -uma vez que sem este pagamento as in- venções ficam livres para ser usa- das por outras empresas

  12. Pgina Inicial Empresas Start-ups portuguesas mostram-se hoje a investidores suecos em Lisboa Empresas criadas em

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Energia Internacional O Governo quer cortar os salários também nas empresas públicas. Mas ao contrário do ano... LEIA TUDO Últimas Telecom Construção Energia Internacional | Empresas criadas em PortugalPágina Inicial Empresas Start-ups portuguesas mostram-se hoje a investidores suecos em Lisboa

  13. 27 Colquio Brasileiro de Matemtica IMPA, Rio de Janeiro, de 27/07 at 31/07.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    .07.2009 Alceu Domingues Alves Introduzindo a geometria fractal no ensino médio: uma abordagem baseada nas formas - Aprendizagem da matématica na escola: Abstração e Concreção Ensino de Matemática Sexta-feira 31.07.2009 Amanda-afim de pontos interiores para problemas de programação quadrática convexa com variáveis canalizadas IC

  14. Visitas dirias: 132045 Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    ID: 58339367 12-03-2015 Ano Internacional da Luz arranca amanhã em Portugal URL: http amanhã, dia 13, marca o início da celebração do Ano Internacional da Luz em Portugal. A iniciativa fundamental da luz nas mais diversas áreas do conhecimento e das actividades humanas - da astrofísica à

  15. "Abre a pestana, tana", diz o rnpper Boss AC na leira de 'Baza, Baza'. Foi o

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    a bolsa Quero Estudar Melhor (QEM), oferecida pela Impresa epela Prébuild. Um ano depois, Inês c Dinis era obrigatório". Apesar de reconhecer que se senle mais motivada a estudar por causa da bolsa QEM in vestigadores visados nas notícias". DINIS SANTOS Gestão Industrial MÉDIA: 16,6 valores DIZ QUE A UNIVERSIDADE

  16. Um quinto dos cursos tem taxa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    . Os valores constam de um documento elaborado pela Direcção -Geral do Ensino Superior (DGES) - a que o desemprego entre os alunos di- plomados há mais de um ano, enquanto nas universidades esse valor cai para os bolsas + Superior para os alunos que escolham es- tudar nestas regiões e que vai arrancar no próximo ano

  17. Perinuclear Mlp proteins downregulate gene expression in response to a defect in mRNA export

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    Perinuclear Mlp proteins downregulate gene expression in response to a defect in mRNA export of Cell Biology, Sciences III, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland The mRNA export adaptor Yra1p/REF contributes to nas- cent mRNP assembly and recruitment of the export recep- tor Mex67p. yra1 mutants exhibit m

  18. Secretariado do IPCC, aos cuidados da OMM, 7bis, Avenue de la Paix, C.P. N 2300, 1211 Genebra 2, SUA Telefone: +41 22 730 8254/8284 Fax: +41 22 730 8025/8013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ipcc.ch OMM PAINEL INTERGOVERNAMENTAL SOBRE MUDANÇA DO CLIMA PNUMA Mudança do Clima 2007: A Base das Ciências Físicas Contribuição do Grupo de Trabalho I ao Quarto Relatório de Avaliação do Painel Intergovernamental efeito estufa e aerossóis da atmosfera, na radiação solar e nas propriedades da superfície terrestre

  19. United States Environmental Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Yucca Mountain Standards"(NAS Report, Docket A-95-12, Item II-A-1). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 1 3. Regulatory Time Frame is the site of DOE's potential geologic repository designed to dispose of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high

  20. PBBT Valuation Study Purpose PBBT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tester is a roller dynamometer that measures the efficiency of each brake on a vehicle. Brake efficiency: · Determine time savings afforded by using CMV Inspection Pit to conduct NAS Level- 1 inspections · Determine possible within an 8-hour shift when used in conjunction with a PBBT · Quantify time savings with using

  1. Administrator Asst. Admin.(OAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's Guide to Radon (`86) > (`86) > RERP (`86) > (`87) > Air Concentration and Dose Conversion Factors for (`88) > Radionuclide NESHAPs (`89) > l I (`92) > l l (`93) > l (`93) > i (`94) > i ions i ites (`95) > Radiation Standards (87) > NAS BEIR IV - Health Risks of Radon and Other Internally Deposited Alpha

  2. Cooking with Ground Pork (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    molida de puerco La carne molida de puerco es una excelente fuente de prote?nas, vitaminas y minerales. Una porci?n es equivalente a 3 onzas y su tama?o es el de una baraja, aproximadamente. Una libra de puerco molido rinde cuatro porciones...

  3. Tiragem: 34943 Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Universidadesacusamfaltadeumapolíticanacionalparaousodasnovastecnologiasnosuperior Um relatório europeu sobre o uso de novas tecnologias no ensino superior deixou Portugal de fora. O documento subli- nha ainda a mais-valia da integração destas tecnologias nas estratégias de projectos específicos para o e-learning e o uso das novas tecnologias está presente nos planos estratégicos

  4. Tiragem: 22956 Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    profissionais de Ciência e Tecnologia (C&T) que há nas empre- sas da região flamenca. "Só para engenheiros há cerca de três mil va- gas, mas, se juntarmos os profissionais do sec- tordaCiênciaeTecnologia vagas no sector das engenharias e tecnologias, a Bélgica decidiu começar a contratar em países onde há

  5. Reviews Hardware Reviews Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    desenvolvimento das Ciências da Computação e Tecnologias de Informação. A cerimónia terá lugar no Salão Nobre do especializados nas áreas das Tecnologias de Informação ... Analista Aplicacional Sénior - Data War Ofertas de emprego em tecnologia Ministro da Educação e Ciência preside cerimónia de entrega do Prémi... http

  6. RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neves, Nuno

    RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols Nuno Neves W. Kent that allows the rapid testing of checkpoint protocols with standard benchmarks. To achieve this goal, RENEW evaluated using the RENEW envi- ronment with SPEC and NAS benchmarks on a network of workstations connected

  7. RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neves, Nuno

    RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols Nuno Neves W. Kent that allows the rapid testing of checkpoint protocols with standard benchmarks. To achieve this goal, RENEW evaluated using the RENEW envi­ ronment with SPEC and NAS benchmarks on a network of workstations connected

  8. LIFE Economics and Delivery Pathway Presentation to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIFE Economics and Delivery Pathway Presentation to National Research Council's review is necessary (but not sufficient) for economic viability Minimumforeconomics Cost and risk to buy additional systems approach is required to develop an economically viable plant design Anklam--NAS/NAE, January 29

  9. More than 400 employees joined the UAB National Alumni Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    luncheon comments President Carol Garrison encouraged those in attendance to join and extend their role the things we do here every day," Garrison says. "Your membership in the NAS will strengthen the legacy Carol Garrison encouraged employee alumni to join the UAB National Alumni Society at a recent luncheon

  10. ENTRY POINTS FOR THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE DEAN'S OFFICE Administrative Annual Reports and Scorecard Morgan/Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    Morgan/Price Calendar/due dates Price College data Furrow Combined Virginia Campaign (CVC) Stearns Committee Assignments Price COOP & Emergency Action Plans Simpkins/Stearns Departmental reviews (Contact/Wardell Heads' Meetings Price Heads' Retreat Price Information Technology issues (NAS) Furrow New programs

  11. Technical Challenges of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    S9-a Pumped Hydro, Changeover delay 0 S9-c Pumped Hydro, Changeover delay 4 min NaS Energy storage sizes to meet balancing requirement (GWh) 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 S1 S2...

  12. Tutorial Fator de Impacto BIBLIOTECA DE CINCIAS DA SADE SD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paraná, Universidade Federal do

    calculo realizado nas demais colunas Total Cites ­ número de citações que a revista teve nos últimos dois Half-life ­ Idade mediana ­ Calculo do número de citações ano a contar pelo 1º. Número da revista #12;

  13. MINISTRIO DA EDUCAO UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DO PARAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paraná, Universidade Federal do

    epóxi, com rodízios com trava nas rodas dianteiras e apoio para pé em aço inox. Mesa de trabalho com tampo em aço inox; válvula de alívio de bolsa reservatório; entrada de gases padrão ABNT para O2, N2O e

  14. UNIVERSIDAD DE SANTIAGO DE CHILE FACULTAD DE CIENCIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Variable compleja y aplicaciones Ed. Mc Graw Hill Ruel V. Churchill James Ward Brown Quinta Edición. España Graw Hill George F. Simmons 1993 Madrid. PAGÍNAS WWW Y SITIOS AFINES #12;ORGANIZACI�N de los contenidos

  15. APPLICATION OF THE pV3 COPROCESSING VISUALIZATION ENVIRONMENT TO 3D UNSTRUCTURED MESH CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    APPLICATION OF THE pV3 CO­PROCESSING VISUALIZATION ENVIRONMENT TO 3­D UNSTRUCTURED MESH Moffett Field, CA 94035 barth@nas.nasa.gov (415) 604­6740 Introduction The pV3 visualization system­domain. The Visualization System pV3[2] is a complete distributed CFD­style visualization package. It is new, but builds

  16. Reconstruc~ao de Imagens de Resson^ancia Magnetica de Fluxo com Compressed Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvalho, João Luiz

    ; Resson^ancia magn´etica nuclear (RMN): alternativa proeminente com o potencial para um exame) reconstru¸c~ao por energia m´inima, (d) reconstru¸c~ao por CS [3]. s~ao as diferen¸cas finitas nas dire a energia do sinal esteja fortemente concentrada em

  17. Muestreo Probabil'istico en Gr'aficas Sergio Rajsbaum \\Lambda Carlos Velarde y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velarde, Carlos

    ,1997) Resumen Se revisan trabajos recientes de David Karger donde se explora el muestreo como una herramienta situaciones. Por ejemplo, la red Internet se puede representar mediante una gr'afica, donde los v~nas que Internet. Afortunadamente, existen algoritmos eficientes (de tiempo polinomial) para calcular el

  18. 978-1-4799-4891-8/14/$31.00 2014 IEEE A SYSTEMS ENGINEERING APPROACH TO COLLABORATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baras, John S.

    and safety evaluation. A hardware abstraction layer allows us to design algorithms useful for multiple results in the joint characterizations of performance and safety. We use a combination of multi-criteria COORDINATION OF UAS IN THE NAS WITH SAFETY GUARANTEES Jacob Moschler, Yuchen R. Zhou, and John S. Baras

  19. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment United States Naval Base Norfolk Naval Air Station. Project report, 20 June-30 September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, D.; DeWaters, J.; Smith, J.; Snow, S.; Thomas, R.

    1995-08-01

    The approach for conducting a Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) at the Norfolk NAS is described along with background information about the site. Section 2 provides background information related to cooling tower operations and water treatment processes. Section 3 describes the current cooling tower activities and operations that were observed during the NAS site visit. Possible alternative practices for minimizing these wastes are discussed in Section 4. Recommendations on potential follow-up activities are also included in Section 4. Appendices include PPOA worksheets (Appendix A), National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) discharge limits (Appendix B), discharge data (Appendix C), material safety data sheets (MSDS) (Appendix D), the Hampton Roads Sanitation District Cooling Tower Waste Discharge Policy with Industrial Wastewater Pollutant Limitations and Discharge Requirements (Appendix E), and the MSDS for DIAS-Aid Tower Treatment XP-300 (Appendix F).

  20. Scalable Communication Trace Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Agarwal, Khushbu

    2010-05-17

    Characterizing the communication behavior of parallel programs through tracing can help understand an application’s characteristics, model its performance, and predict behavior on future systems. However, lossless communication traces can get prohibitively large, causing programmers to resort to variety of other techniques. In this paper, we present a novel approach to lossless communication trace compression. We augment the sequitur compression algorithm to employ it in communication trace compression of parallel programs. We present optimizations to reduce the memory overhead, reduce size of the trace files generated, and enable compression across multiple processes in a parallel program. The evaluation shows improved compression and reduced overhead over other approaches, with up to 3 orders of magnitude improvement for the NAS MG benchmark. We also observe that, unlike existing schemes, the trace files sizes and the memory overhead incurred are less sensitive to, if not independent of, the problem size for the NAS benchmarks.

  1. Infrared reflectivity spectra of gas-source molecular beam epitaxy grown dilute InN{sub x}As{sub 1-x}/InP (001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talwar, Devki N. [Department of Physics, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 975 Oakland Avenue, 56 Weyandt Hall, Indiana, Pennsylvania 15705-1087 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 975 Oakland Avenue, 56 Weyandt Hall, Indiana, Pennsylvania 15705-1087 (United States); Yang, Tzuen-Rong [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106-11, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106-11, Taiwan (China); Hsiung Lin, Hao; Chuan Feng, Zhe [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Engineering Material and Advanced Devices National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Engineering Material and Advanced Devices National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-04

    Vibrational spectra of gas-source molecular beam epitaxy grown dilute InN{sub x}As{sub 1-x}/InP (001) alloys are obtained using a Fourier-transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. A triply degenerate N{sub As} local vibrational mode of T{sub d}-symmetry is observed near 438 cm{sup -1} corresponding to the In-N bond energy. The analysis of composition dependent infrared reflectivity spectra in InNAs has predicted a two-phonon-mode behavior. In In(Ga)-rich GaInNAs alloys the observed splitting of the N{sub As} local mode into a doublet for the N{sub As}-Ga{sub 1}(In{sub 1})In{sub 3}(Ga{sub 3}) pair-defect of C{sub 3v}-symmetry is consistent with our simulated results based on a sophisticated Green's function theory.

  2. Molten-Salt Batteries for Medium and Large-Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Yang, Zhenguo

    2014-12-01

    This chapter discusses two types of molten salt batteries. Both of them are based on a beta-alumina solid electrolyte and molten sodium anode, i.e., sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries. The chapter first reviews the basic electrochemistries and materials for various battery components. It then describes the performance of state-of-the-art batteries and future direction in material development for these batteries.

  3. Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

    2009-03-31

    This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

  4. Going the Distance? NRC's Response to the National Academy of Science's Transportation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easton, E.P.; Bajwa, C.S.

    2008-07-01

    In February 2006, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) published the results of a 3 1/2-year study, titled Going the Distance, that examined the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) in the United States. NAS initiated this study to address what it perceived to be a national need for an independent, objective, and authoritative analysis of SNF and HLW transport in the United States. The study was co-sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. This paper addresses some of the recommendations made in the NAS study related to the performance of SNF transportation casks in long duration fires, the use of full-scale package testing, and the need for an independent review of transportation security prior to the commencement of large scale shipping campaigns to an interim storage site or geologic repository. In conclusion: The NRC believes that the current regulations in 10 CFR Part 71 for the design of SNF and HLW transportation packages provide a very high level of protection to the public for very severe accidents and credible threat scenarios. As recommended by the NAS study, additional studies of accidents involving severe fires have been completed. These studies have confirmed that spent fuel casks would be expected to withstand very severe fires without the release of any fission products from the spent fuel. Additionally, changes in rail operating procedures such as the use of dedicated trains and prohibition on the co-location of SNF and flammable liquids in rail tunnels can further reduce the already low probability of severe rail accident fires involving SNF and HLW. (authors)

  5. 0.2 C'alculo em variedades de Banach. Come,camos definindo o conceito de variedade de Banach. A defini,c"ao 'e t*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tausk, Daniel Victor

    M 'e uma trinca (U, ', E) onde U M 'e um subconjunto, E 'e um espa,co de Banach e ' : U ! "U'e uma qualquer, como * *foi explicado acima. Se os espa,cos E que aparecem nas cartas (U, ', E) 2 A s"ao to* *dos espa,cos de Hilbert ent"ao dizemos que M 'e uma variedade de Hilbert. Observa,c"ao: A rigor, o

  6. MAC5711 AN ALISE DE ALGORITMOS Instruc~oes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

    MAC5711 AN ´ALISE DE ALGORITMOS LISTA 11 Instru¸c~oes: 1. Estas listas de exerc´icios s quest~ao por folha. 3. Nas quest~oes que envolvem elabora¸c~ao de algoritmos, coloque coment´arios objetivos e relevantes. Nunca escreva um algoritmo mais elaborado sem explica¸c~oes relevantes `em linguagem

  7. MAC5711 AN ALISE DE ALGORITMOS Instruc~oes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

    MAC5711 AN ´ALISE DE ALGORITMOS PROVA 1 Instru¸c~oes: 1. Esta prova ´e individual e sem consulta. Cuidado com a legibilidade. 2. Nas quest~oes que envolvem elabora¸c~ao de algoritmos, coloque coment´arios objetivos e relevantes. Nunca escreva um algoritmo mais elaborado sem explica¸c~oes relevantes `em linguagem

  8. MAC5711 AN ALISE DE ALGORITMOS Instruc~oes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

    MAC5711 AN ´ALISE DE ALGORITMOS LISTA 4 Instru¸c~oes: 1. Estas listas de exerc´icios s quest~ao por folha. 3. Nas quest~oes que envolvem elabora¸c~ao de algoritmos, coloque coment´arios objetivos e relevantes. Nunca escreva um algoritmo mais elaborado sem explica¸c~oes relevantes `em linguagem

  9. MAC5711 AN ALISE DE ALGORITMOS Instruc~oes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

    MAC5711 AN ´ALISE DE ALGORITMOS LISTA 10 Instru¸c~oes: 1. Estas listas de exerc´icios s quest~ao por folha. 3. Nas quest~oes que envolvem elabora¸c~ao de algoritmos, coloque coment´arios objetivos e relevantes. Nunca escreva um algoritmo mais elaborado sem explica¸c~oes relevantes `em linguagem

  10. MAC5711 AN ALISE DE ALGORITMOS Instruc~oes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

    MAC5711 AN ´ALISE DE ALGORITMOS LISTA 9 Instru¸c~oes: 1. Estas listas de exerc´icios s quest~ao por folha. 3. Nas quest~oes que envolvem elabora¸c~ao de algoritmos, coloque coment´arios objetivos e relevantes. Nunca escreva um algoritmo mais elaborado sem explica¸c~oes relevantes `em linguagem

  11. MAC5711 AN ALISE DE ALGORITMOS Instruc~oes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

    MAC5711 AN ´ALISE DE ALGORITMOS LISTA 1 Instru¸c~oes: 1. Estas listas de exerc´icios s quest~ao por folha. 3. Nas quest~oes que envolvem elabora¸c~ao de algoritmos, coloque coment´arios objetivos e relevantes. Nunca escreva um algoritmo mais elaborado sem explica¸c~oes relevantes `em linguagem

  12. MAC5711 AN ALISE DE ALGORITMOS Instruc~oes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohayakawa, Yoshiharu

    MAC5711 AN ´ALISE DE ALGORITMOS LISTA 13 Instru¸c~oes: 1. Estas listas de exerc´icios s quest~ao por folha. 3. Nas quest~oes que envolvem elabora¸c~ao de algoritmos, coloque coment´arios objetivos e relevantes. Nunca escreva um algoritmo mais elaborado sem explica¸c~oes relevantes `em linguagem

  13. FSICA MODERNA I -2o SEMESTRE 2008 6a LISTA DE EXERCCIOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribas, Roberto Vicençotto

    potencial de altura Vo nas mesmas condições. 5.- Uma reação de fusão importante na produção de energia solar obtido em medidas da quantidade de movimento da partícula neste estado? (b) � a energia mecânica conservada neste estado? Se sua resposta for positiva, determine o valor da energia. Se for negativa

  14. Mec^anica Geometrica A entregar ate `a aula de Quarta-feira dia 27 de Outubro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natário, José

    Sistema Solar conservam o momento angular mas tendem a dissipar energia). 3. (a) Mostre que a express¸c~oes em torno de e3 s~ao est´aveis. (c) Se I1 > I2 > I3 ent~ao para um dado momento angular a energia cin~ao local da energia cin´etica de um corpo r´igido com um ponto fixo e I1 = I2 nas coordenadas de TSO(3

  15. Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test. Final report, September 30, 1992--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes the work performed for manufacturing and demonstrating the performance of its 250-kW molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) stack in an integrated system at the Naval Air Station Miramar (NAS Miramar) located in San Diego, California. The stack constructed for the demonstration test at the NAS Miramar consisted of 250 cells. It was manufactured using M-C Power`s patented Internally Manifolded Heat Exchanger (IMHEX{reg_sign}) stack design. The demonstration test at NAS Miramar was designed to operate the 250-kW MCFC stack in a cogeneration mode. This test represented the first attempt to thermally integrate an MCFC stack in a cogeneration system. The test was started on January 10, 1997, and voluntarily terminated on May 12, 1997, after 2,350 hours of operation at temperatures above 1,100 F and at a pressure of three atmospheres. It produced 160 MWh of d.c. power and 346,000 lbs of 110 psig steam for export during 1,566 hours of on-load operations. The test demonstrated a d.c. power output of 206 kW. Most of the balance of the plant (BOP) equipment operated satisfactorily. However, the off-the-shelf automotive turbocharger used for supplying air to the plant failed on numerous occasions and the hot gas blower developed seal leakage problems which impacted continuous plant operations. Overall the demonstration test at NAS Miramar was successful in demonstrating many critical features of the IMHEX technology. Lessons learned from this test will be very useful for improving designs and operations for future MCFC power plants.

  16. COLETNEA DE MELHORES PRTICAS DE GESTO DO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paraná, Universidade Federal do

    Energia DIAGRAMA��O E PROJETO GRÁFICO INFORMA��ES Secretaria de Orçamento Federal (SOF) SEPN 516, Bloco D.eficiente@planejamento.gov.br #12;"Quando os anos 80 chegaram [junto com a competição japonesa], nós [da empresa General Electric qualquer parte e compartilhavam-nas com qualquer pessoa dentro da empresa. Nós viemos a chamar esse

  17. Maria Adelaide Amaral ou a Crise da Classe Média Brasileira

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravetti, Graciela; Rojo, Sara

    1996-10-01

    para prender o nidade com bolsa rompida Turco... (p. 17). O conflito dramático desta peça apresenta uma série de valores e condutas individuais que nos permitem decodificar significados mais profundos na estruturação ideológica da sociedade..., a definição dos valores morais e sociais que aparecem nas obras e, em segundo lugar, vincular essas estruturas às ideias, conceitos e experiências em que se apoiam (p. 105); neste caso, especialmente, os signos emitidos em direção àquilo que se...

  18. Spatial and temporal variation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls in Crassostrea virginica and sediments from Galveston Bay, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Richard George

    1988-01-01

    , such as pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), enter coastal environments from riverine discharge, coastal sewage effluents, industrial wastes, runoff, and as aerosols (NAS, 1979 and Rapaport et al. , 1985). Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs...SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS, PESTICIDES, AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS IN CRASSOSTREA VZRGINICA AND SEDIMENTS FROM GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS A Thesis by RICHARD GEORGE FOX Submitted to the Graduate College...

  19. Tiragem: 41286 Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    ener- gia nuclear mais limpa, dado que se desintegra totalmente sem deixar re- síduos". Porém, o futuro protão e três vezes mais leve que um pião (a mais leve partícula que participa nas interacções nucleares zona de energia tão baixa". Partindo do princípio básico de qu

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrderNATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer CreekIsland Bus NaS

  1. High Energy Density Na-S/NiCl2 Hybrid Battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Lemmon, John P.; Kim, Jin Yong; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-02-15

    High temperature (250-350°C) sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) are attractive energy storage devices for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications. Currently, two technologies are commercially available in NBBs, e.g., sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries. In this study, we investigated the combination of these two chemistries with a mixed cathode. In particular, the cathode of the cell consisted of molten NaAlCl4 as a catholyte and a mixture of Ni, NaCl and Na2S as active materials. During cycling, two reversible plateaus were observed in cell voltage profiles, which matched electrochemical reactions for Na-S and Na-NiCl2 redox couples. An irreversible reaction between sulfur species and Ni was identified during initial charge at 280°C, which caused a decrease in cell capacity. The final products on discharge included Na2Sn with 1< n < 3, which differed from Na2S3 found in traditional Na-S battery. Reduction of sulfur in the mixed cathode led to an increase in overall energy density over ZEBRA batteries. Despite of the initial drop in cell capacity, the mixed cathode demonstrated relatively stable cycling with more than 95% of capacity retained over 60 cycles under 10mA/cm2. Optimization of the cathode may lead to further improvements in battery performance.

  2. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

    1993-06-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

  3. LMS RELIABILITY PART APPLICATION ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    ( LMS RELIABILITY PART APPLICATION ANALYSIS Contract No. NAS 9-5829 MO. ATM-966 PAGE 1 RIV. NO, B 3. 0 3. I 3. 2 3.3 3. 3. I 3. 3. 2 3.3.3 3. 3. 4 4. 0 PARA. NO. 1. 0 1.1 LMS RELIABILITY PART 1. 5 1. 6 1. 7 2. 0 2. 1 2. 2 2. 2. 1 2. 2. 2 2. 2. 3 2. 2. 4 -:-?· 2. ,5 2. 3 2. 3. 1 LMS

  4. Unidirectional and Wavelength Selective Photonic Sphere-Array Nanoantennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang G; Sha, Wei E I; Chew, Weng Cho

    2015-01-01

    We design a photonic sphere-array nanoantenna (NA) exhibiting both strong directionality and wavelength selectivity. Although the geometric configuration of the photonic NA resembles a plasmonic Yagi-Uda NA, it has different working principles, and most importantly, reduces the inherent metallic loss from plasmonic elements. For any selected optical wavelength, a sharp Fano-resonance by the reflector is tunable to overlap spectrally with a wider dipole resonance by the sphere-chain director leading to the high directionality. The work provides design principles for directional and selective photonic NAs, which is particularly useful for photon detection and spontaneous emission manipulation.

  5. A feasibility assessment of magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling space power converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curwen, P.W.; Rao, D.K.; Wilson, D.S.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes work performed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) under NASA Contract NAS3-26061, {open_quotes}A Feasibility Assessment of Magnetic Bearings for Free-Piston Stirling Space Engines.{close_quotes} The work was performed over the period from July 1990 through August 1991. The objective of the effort was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery of the type currently being evaluated for possible use in future long-term space missions.

  6. Cooking with Canned Beef Stew (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    de carne de res en lata El estofado de res en lata viene cocido y listo para comer. Cada lata de 24 onzas equivale a tres porciones de 1 taza cada una. El guisado de res constituye una buena fuente de vitamina A, prote?nas y hierro. S?rvalo sobre... arroz o fideos como una sabrosa comida, acompa?ado, por ejemplo, de una guarnici?n de ejotes. Almacenamiento Almacene las latas cerradas de guisado de carne a temperatura ambiente. Para conservar su sabor, cons?malas antes de un a?o de haberlas...

  7. Cooking with Ground Beef (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    molida de res Este tipo de carne es 100% de res molida y empacada. Es una excelente fuente de prote?nas, vitamina B12, hierro y zinc. Una porci?n equivale a 3 onzas y su tama?o es el de un mazo de baraja. Usos Puede utilizar la carne molida para... preparar distintos platillos, tales como fideos largos, tacos y pasteles de carne. Tambi?n puede preparar sabrosas hamburguesas. Un paquete de una libra de carne molida rinde para 4 hamburguesas. Almacenamiento Conserve la carne molida de res congelada...

  8. The Buddhist princess and the woolly turban: non-Buddhist others in a 15th century biography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diemberger, Hildegard

    2008-01-01

    of Magadha leave the Buddha in the dwelling of the Anath?pin-dikavih?ra and worship the heretical Jain teachers in the town of Buram shing phel. The princess said, “We can’t stand this! Chase them away throwing stones!” Her retinue did accordingly... mdzad pas spyan cer gzigs par gyur ba na/ slar de dag gis blta bar ma yod de kha cig na re bag ma ni rnam pa ‘char dbu ‘phang mtho zhes gleng par byed cing/. 11 de nas rgyal mo’i khang bzangs su phyogs te bon pos lha ‘dogs bgyid par ‘dod pa na/ kho...

  9. Repellents to prevent cattle browsing of pine seedlings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Don Arlen

    1959-01-01

    of undamaged did. w n J 17, 1 E th to V; transformation. '7. Treatment means tbat, difrer. d oigmiflcant1y, determined by iiultiple Ssnge Test. 2I3 O' Brosslng damage by ms)or damage clsoseo on June 1'f, by tres~mont and, by individual plot. ~ ~ 32 g... { Q f'Gnc'al anl couthuectern ncl i si 'un@ much of unich Qn. once cove QJ 1rith nn e. =c&cnt stcnd. of longle-f pine io non largely c1xiov. " land that nas not restockel or lrciiucci n Qu'b;tnnticl cmount ol timb ~ since tile virgin foxest ms cub...

  10. La Casa Verde de Mario Vargas Llosa: una imagen del hombre 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frick, Magdalena Capurro

    1976-01-01

    real orden de los sucesos en el tiempo La des truccion de la sucesion del pasado, presente y futuro, por medio del entrecruzamiento de diferentes niveles tern porales, hace que la nocion del tiempo corno progresion sea susti. tufda por una de... distintos niveles temporales, la anulacion de la cronologfa lineal y el desarrollo paralelo de dos o:nas etapas de la vida de un personaje, hacen que el tiempo deje de transcurrir en la novels y que los hombres se fijen en un estatismo donde cada nueva...

  11. DoD Fuel Cell Demonstration Program: Energy Savings and Emissions Reductions to Date 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holcomb, F. H.; Binder, M. J.; Taylor, W. R.

    1998-01-01

    conducted while the fuel cell was operatin at three different power levels: 200 kW, 150 kW, nd 100 kW. Testing at Kirtland AFB was conducte on November 15 and 18. 1996 while the fuel tell 337 ESL-IE-98-04-56 Proceedings from the Twentieth National... this mode in the future. Of the five utilizing this mode, two (NAS Fallon and Naval Hospital, MCAGCC Twentynine Palms) are providing emergency backup power for galleys, two (Pine Bluff Arsenal and Kirtland AFB) are providing emergency backup power...

  12. A Dharani-mantra in the Vinaya-vastu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pathak, Suniti K.

    1989-01-01

    offence (Vinaya-pitaka, Culla-vagga, V. 8.2. (PTS edn). See also' KevaUa SuUa (No. 11) Vol. p 214 (PTS edn). 4. Dutt, N. Early Monastic Buddhism p. 153-158, Calcutta, 1960. 5. Sukomal Choudhuri : Contemporary Buddhism in Bangladesh pp 116... dag gis zas sbyar na ji Ita bu yin pa ma ses nasI de rnams kyi sman pa la dris pa dan{ des _ smras pal 'phags pa dag kyed nyid kyi Slon pa beom Idan 'das ei thams cad (46b:2) mkhyen pa thams edd gzigs pa kho ns nyid yin tel de nyid mkhyen Ie zhes...

  13. Application of Centrifugal Elutriation for aqueous suspension 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Jeffrey Thomas

    1993-01-01

    of the solute on the surface; and 3) adsorption occurs only on localized sites and there is no interaction between sorbate and sorbent molecules. Equation (1) represents the Langmiur isotherm as written to describe a solid-liquid system: Q bC (1+ b... 3. 2. Components of algal growth media used in batch cultures. Chemical Compound Molecular Weight (g/Mole) Stock Concentrations mls Stock/ Liter/Media 1. CaCls 2. MgSO47HsO 3. NaHCOs 4. NasSiOs 7HrO 5, NaqEDTA 6. Trace Metal Solution...

  14. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrderNATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer CreekIsland Bus NaS Battery

  15. Characterizing Computation-Communication Overlap in Message-Passing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Bernholdt; Jarek Nieplocha; P. Sadayappan; Aniruddha G. Shet; Vinod Tipparaju

    2008-01-31

    Effective overlap of computation and communication is a well understood technique for latency hiding and can yield significant performance gains for applications on high-end computers. In this report, we describe an instrumentation framework developed for messagepassing systems to characterize the degree of overlap of communication with computation in the execution of parallel applications. The inability to obtain precise time-stamps for pertinent communication events is a significant problem, and is addressed by generation of minimum and maximum bounds on achieved overlap. The overlap measures can aid application developers and system designers in investigating scalability issues. The approach has been used to instrument two MPI implementations as well as the ARMCI system. The implementation resides entirely within the communication library and thus integrates well with existing approaches that operate outside the library. The utility of the framework is demonstrated by analyzing communication-computation overlap for micro-benchmarks and the NAS benchmarks, and the insights obtained are used to modify the NAS SP benchmark, resulting in improved overlap.

  16. Characterizing Computation-Communication Overlap in Message-Passing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Bernholdt; Jarek Nieplocha; P. Sadayappan; Aniruddha G. Shet; Vinod Tipparaju

    2008-01-31

    Effective overlap of computation and communication is a well understood technique for latency hiding and can yield significant performance gains for applications on high-end computers. In this report, we describe an instrumentation framework developed for message-passing systems to characterize the degree of overlap of communication with computation in the execution of parallel applications. The inability to obtain precise time-stamps for pertinent communication events is a significant problem, and is addressed by generation of minimum and maximum bounds on achieved overlap. The overlap measures can aid application developers and system designers in investigating scalability issues. The approach has been used to instrument two MPI implementations as well as the ARMCI system. The implementation resides entirely within the communication library and thus integrates well with existing approaches that operate outside the library. The utility of the framework is demonstrated by analyzing communication-computation overlap for micro-benchmarks and the NAS benchmarks, and the insights obtained are used to modify the NAS SP benchmark, resulting in improved overlap.

  17. Inertial confinement fusion. ICF quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993, Volume 4, Number 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, H.T.; Schleich, D.P.; Murphy, P.W. [eds.

    1994-05-01

    In the 1990 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report of its review of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, it was recommended that a high priority be placed on completing the Precision Nova Project and its associated experimental campaign. Since fiscal year 1990, the lab has therefore campaigned vigorously on Nova and in its supporting laboratories to develop the Precision Nova capabilities needed to perform the stressful target experiments recommended in the 1990 NAS report. The activities to enable these experiments have been directed at improvements in three areas - the Nova laser, target fabrication capabilities, and target diagnostics. As summarized in the five articles in this report, the Precision Nova improvements have been successfully completed. These improvements have had a positive impact on target performance and on the ability to diagnose the results, as evidenced by the HEP-1 experimental results. The five articles generally concentrate on improvements to the capabilities rather than on the associated target physics experiments. Separate abstracts are included for each paper.

  18. Establishment of the United States Navy Mine Warfare Center of Excellence in the Corpus Christi Bay Area, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosclski, J.L.; Boyer, R. [Turner Collie and Braden, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Sloger, W. [Naval Facilities Engineering Command, North Charleston, SC (United States). Southern Div.

    1997-08-01

    The proposed establishment of the US Navy Mine Warfare Center of Excellence (MWCE) in the Corpus Christi Bay Area, Texas, involved the collocation of the Navy`s Mine Warfare and Mine Counter Measures assets in proximity to each other at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Ingleside and Naval Air Station (NAS) Corpus Christi, Texas. Collocation of these Navy forces would provide significant advantages in meeting mission and operational requirements. This action would improve the operational training and readiness of the forces. In addition to new construction or modifications at NAVSTA Ingleside, NAS Corpus Christi, and off-base; the establishment of offshore training and operating areas was required. When the project was first proposed in 1993, considerable concern was expressed by environmental interests, shrimpers, and state and federal resource agencies regarding the impact of the proposed training activities within Gulf waters. The Navy and Turner Collie and Braden, Inc., under contract to the Navy, conducted several technical studies and extensive coordination with concerned interests during the environmental impact statement process to identify and document the potential intensity, magnitude, and duration of impact from each proposed training activity.

  19. Network Fault Tolerance in Open MPI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipman, Galen; Graham, Richard L; Bosilca, George

    2007-01-01

    High Performance Computing (HPC) systems are rapidly growing in size and complexity. As a result, transient and persistent network failures can occur on the time scale of application run times, reducing the productive utilization of these systems. The ubiquitous network protocol used to deal with such failures is TCP/IP, however, available implementations of this protocol provide unacceptable performance for HPC system users, and do not provide the high bandwidth, low latency communications of modern interconnects. This paper describes methods used to provide protection against several network errors such as dropped packets, corrupt packets, and loss of network interfaces while maintaining high-performance communications. Micro-benchmark experiments using vendor supplied TCP/IP and O/S bypass low-level communications stacks over InfiniBand and Myrinet are used to demonstrate the high-performance characteristics of our protocol. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks are used to demonstrate the scalability and the minimal performance impact of this protocol. The micro-benchmarks show that providing higher data reliability decrease performance by up to 30% relative to unprotected communications, but provide performance improvements of a factor of four over TCP/IP running over InfiniBand DDR. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks show virtually no impact of the data reliability protocol on overall run-time.

  20. Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

  1. Evaluation of tuff as a medium for a nuclear waste repository: interim status report on the properties of tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, J.K.; Wolfsberg, K.

    1980-07-01

    This report is the second in a series of summary briefings to the National Academy of Science`s (NAS) Committee on Radioactive Waste Management dealing with feasibility of disposal of heat-producing radioactive waste in silicic tuff. The interim status of studies of tuff properties determined on samples obtained from Yucca Mountain and Rainier Mesa (G-tunnel) located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are discussed. In particular, progress is described on resolving issues identified during the first briefing to the NAS which include behavior of water in tuff when heated, the effect of the presence or absence of water and joints on the thermal/physical properties of tuff and the detailed/complex sorptive properties of highly altered and unaltered tuff. Initial correlations of thermal/physical and sorptive properties with the highly variable porosity and mineralogy are described. Three in-situ, at-depth field experiments, one nearly completed and two just getting underway are described. In particular, the current status of mineralogy and petrology, geochemistry, thermal and mechanical, radiation effects and water behavior studies are described. The goals and initial results of a Mine Design Working Group are discussed. Regional factors such as seismicity, volcanism and hydrology are not discussed.

  2. National Assessment of Energy Storage for Grid Balancing and Arbitrage: Phase 1, WECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Balducci, Patrick J.; Colella, Whitney G.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Nguyen, Tony B.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Zhang, Yu

    2012-06-01

    To examine the role that energy storage could play in mitigating the impacts of the stochastic variability of wind generation on regional grid operation, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) examined a hypothetical 2020 grid scenario in which additional wind generation capacity is built to meet renewable portfolio standard targets in the Western Interconnection. PNNL developed a stochastic model for estimating the balancing requirements using historical wind statistics and forecasting error, a detailed engineering model to analyze the dispatch of energy storage and fast-ramping generation devices for estimating size requirements of energy storage and generation systems for meeting new balancing requirements, and financial models for estimating the life-cycle cost of storage and generation systems in addressing the future balancing requirements for sub-regions in the Western Interconnection. Evaluated technologies include combustion turbines, sodium sulfur (Na-S) batteries, lithium ion batteries, pumped-hydro energy storage, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, redox flow batteries, and demand response. Distinct power and energy capacity requirements were estimated for each technology option, and battery size was optimized to minimize costs. Modeling results indicate that in a future power grid with high-penetration of renewables, the most cost competitive technologies for meeting balancing requirements include Na-S batteries and flywheels.

  3. Biosensors Fabricated through Electrostatic Assembly of Enzymes/Polyelectrolyte Hybrid Layers on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun

    2006-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as new class of nanomaterials that is receiving considerable interest because of their unique structure, mechanical, and electronic properties. One promising application of CNTs is to fabricate highly sensitive chemo/biosensors.1-4 For construction of these CNT-based sensors, the CNTs first have to be modified with some molecules specific to the interests. Generally, covalent binding, affinity, and electrostatic interaction have been utilized for the modification of CNTs. Among them, the electrostatic method is attractive due to its simplicity and high efficiency. In present work, we have developed highly sensitively amperometric biosensors for glucose, choline, organophosphate pesticide (OPP) and nerve agents (NAs) based on electrostatically assembling enzymes on the surface of CNTs. All these biosensors were fabricated by immobilization of enzymes on the negatively charged CNTs surface through alternately assembling a cationic poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) layer and an enzyme layer. Using this layer-by-layer (LBL) technique, a bioactive nanocomposite film was fabricated on the electrode surface. Owing to the electrocatalytic effect of CNTs, an amplified electrochemical signal was achieved, which leads to low detections limits for glucose, choline, and OPP and NAs.

  4. Comparison of Vehicle Efficiency Technology Attributes and Synergy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duleep, G.

    2011-02-01

    Analyzing the future fuel economy of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) requires detailed knowledge of the vehicle technologies available to improve LDV fuel economy. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been relying on technology data from a 2001 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study (NAS 2001) on corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, but the technology parameters were updated in the new proposed rulemaking (EPA and NHTSA 2009) to set CAFE and greenhouse gas standards for the 2011 to 2016 period. The update is based largely on an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of technology attributes augmented by NHTSA data and contractor staff assessments. These technology cost and performance data were documented in the Draft Joint Technical Support Document (TSD) issued by EPA and NHTSA in September 2009 (EPA/NHTSA 2009). For these tasks, the Energy and Environmental Analysis (EEA) division of ICF International (ICF) examined each technology and technology package in the Draft TSD and assessed their costs and performance potential based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program assessments. ICF also assessed the technologies? other relevant attributes based on data from actual production vehicles and from recently published technical articles in engineering journals. ICF examined technology synergy issues through an ICF in-house model that uses a discrete parameter approach.

  5. Comparison of Vehicle Efficiency Technology Attributes and Synergy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duleep, G.

    2011-02-01

    Analyzing the future fuel economy of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) requires detailed knowledge of the vehicle technologies available to improve LDV fuel economy. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been relying on technology data from a 2001 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study (NAS 2001) on corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, but the technology parameters were updated in the new proposed rulemaking (EPA and NHTSA 2009) to set CAFE and greenhouse gas standards for the 2011 to 2016 period. The update is based largely on an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of technology attributes augmented by NHTSA data and contractor staff assessments. These technology cost and performance data were documented in the Draft Joint Technical Support Document (TSD) issued by EPA and NHTSA in September 2009 (EPA/NHTSA 2009). For these tasks, the Energy and Environmental Analysis (EEA) division of ICF International (ICF) examined each technology and technology package in the Draft TSD and assessed their costs and performance potential based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program assessments. ICF also assessed the technologies, other relevant attributes based on data from actual production vehicles, and recently published technical articles in engineering journals. ICF examined technology synergy issues through an ICF in-house model that uses a discrete parameter approach.

  6. Key Geomechanics Issues at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geomechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HANSEN,FRANCIS D.

    1999-09-01

    Mechanical and hydrological properties of rock salt provide excellent bases for geological isolation of hazardous materials. Regulatory compliance determinations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) stand as testament to the widely held conclusion that salt provides excellent isolation properties. The WIPP saga began in the 1950s when the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommended a salt vault as a promising solution to the national problem of nuclear waste disposal. For over 20 years, the Scientific basis for the NAS recommendation has been fortified by Sandia National Laboratories through a series of large scale field tests and laboratory investigations of salt properties. These scientific investigations helped develop a comprehensive understanding of salt's 4 reformational behavior over an applicable range of stresses and temperatures. Sophisticated constitutive modeling, validated through underground testing, provides the computational ability to model long-term behavior of repository configurations. In concert with advancement of the mechanical models, fluid flow measurements showed not only that the evaporite lithology was essentially impermeable but that the WIPP setting was hydrologically inactive. Favorable mechanical properties ensure isolation of materials placed in a salt geological setting. Key areas of the geomechanics investigations leading to the certification of WIPP are in situ experiments, laboratory tests, and shaft seal design.

  7. SODIUM ALUMINOSILICATE FOULING AND CLEANING OF DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION COALESCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2008-10-28

    During initial non-radioactive operations at the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), the pressure drop across the decontaminated salt solution coalescer reached {approx}10 psi while processing {approx}1250 gallons of salt solution, indicating possible fouling or plugging of the coalescer. An analysis of the feed solution and the 'plugged coalescer' concluded that the plugging was due to sodium aluminosilicate solids. MCU personnel requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate the formation of the sodium aluminosilicate solids (NAS) and the impact of the solids on the decontaminated salt solution coalescer. Researchers performed developmental testing of the cleaning protocols with a bench-scale coalescer container 1-inch long segments of a new coalescer element fouled using simulant solution. In addition, the authors obtained a 'plugged' Decontaminated Salt Solution coalescer from non-radioactive testing in the MCU and cleaned it according to the proposed cleaning procedure. Conclusions from this testing include the following: (1) Testing with the bench-scale coalescer showed an increase in pressure drop from solid particles, but the increase was not as large as observed at MCU. (2) Cleaning the bench-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (11 g of bayerite if all aluminum is present in that form or 23 g of sodium aluminosilicate if all silicon is present in that form). (3) Based on analysis of the cleaning solutions from bench-scale test, the 'dirt capacity' of a 40 inch coalescer for the NAS solids tested is calculated as 450-950 grams. (4) Cleaning the full-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (60 g of aluminum and 5 g of silicon). (5) Piping holdup in the full-scale coalescer system caused the pH to differ from the target value. Comparable hold-up in the facility could lead to less effective cleaning and precipitation of bayerite solid particles. (6) Based on analysis of the cleaning solutions from the full-scale test, the 'dirt capacity' of a 40 inch coalescer for these NAS solids was calculated to be 40-170 grams.

  8. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfenning, Andreas Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas

    2014-03-10

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3??m. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29??m. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×10{sup 4} A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found.

  9. Glasoslovni opis treh prekmurskih govorov in komentar k zgodovinskemu glasoslovju in obligoglasju prekmurskega nare?ja

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Marc L.

    1993-10-01

    'a:va , koi'a:?, i'a:ni, petn'a.jst, pr'a:la, Prk'a:že, sam'a:r 'osel' (?e se je ta izposojenka iz madžarš?ine res obravnavala kot drugi samostalniki z akutirano pripono -8:r), tr'a:va , žu?'a:k 'rumenjak'; f- *3: gEn'a:u 'to?no', kr'a:v, m'a:n 'imam', m' a...' E (- *e m'atErE,p' i:šEŠ; (- *3 h'[bEt, /' agcv 'sod', r'oubEC; (- *e v nekaterih besedah bEti:n; f- *~ d' eitE., mes'ou, petn'a.jst, splet' e:, zeb' e: a f- *a k/dvd, ['ipd, pr'i nas, v'upan o f- *0 g' otovo, ZOVI e:, ž' Eliti.mo; f- *Q kr...

  10. Installation of the first Distributed Energy Storage System (DESS) at American Electric Power (AEP).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nourai, Ali (American Electric Power Company, Columbus, OH)

    2007-06-01

    AEP studied the direct and indirect benefits, strengths, and weaknesses of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) and chose to transform its entire utility grid into a system that achieves optimal integration of both central and distributed energy assets. To that end, AEP installed the first NAS battery-based, energy storage system in North America. After one year of operation and testing, AEP has concluded that, although the initial costs of DESS are greater than conventional power solutions, the net benefits justify the AEP decision to create a grid of DESS with intelligent monitoring, communications, and control, in order to enable the utility grid of the future. This report details the site selection, construction, benefits and lessons learned of the first installation, at Chemical Station in North Charleston, WV.

  11. RESULTS OF THE 2H EVAPORATOR ACID CLEANING AND IN-POT NEUTRALIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilmarth, B; Phillip Norris, P; Terry Allen, T

    2007-05-29

    The estimated 200 gallons of sodium aluminosilicate scale (NAS) present in the 242-16H Evaporator pot prior to chemical cleaning was subjected to four batches of 1.5 M (9 wt%) nitric acid. Each batch was neutralized with 19 M (50 wt %) sodium hydroxide (caustic) before transfer to Tank 38. The chemical cleaning process began on November 20, 2006, and was terminated on December 10, 2006. An inspection of the pot's interior was performed and based on data gathered during that inspection; the current volume of scale in the pot is conservatively estimated to be 36.3 gallons, which is well below the 200 gallon limit specified in the Technical Safety Requirements. In addition, the performance during all aspects of cleaning agreed well with the flowsheet developed at the bench and pilot scale. There were some lessons learned during the cleaning outage and are detailed in appendices of this report.

  12. Study of a third order phase-lock loop 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jack Masters

    1967-01-01

    COE ) 16) s RQQTR) 15) s ROOT I )15) MR I TE 1 6o 99) 99 FG)THAT ) IHI ) N=1 10 READ 15sl3) Nl 13 FORNAT I 12) NAs:Nl+I READ 15sl) 'I COE ( J) s J~l sNA) FGRNAT & 8 I F9. Oo IX ) ) MRITE 1617) M 7 FGRNATIIXs48HCQEFFICIENTS FOR DESCENDINQ...=AXR ALPZI=AXK N=2 GOY'099 SETZI~TENK AXS=Qa9 ALP3R~AXR ALNSI=AXI N~3 607099 13 SET3R=TENR SET3I~TENK TEK=ALP1R-ALP3R TEZ=ALRKK-ALP31 TES=AI. P3R-Al. PZR TES=ALPt31-ALPZI TEN~TE5~TE5+TE6~TE6 TE3~tTBK+TE5+TEZ+TE6l/TEN HPRS0008 HPRS0009...

  13. An efficient parallel algorithm for matrix-vector multiplication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.; Plimpton, S.

    1993-03-01

    The multiplication of a vector by a matrix is the kernel computation of many algorithms in scientific computation. A fast parallel algorithm for this calculation is therefore necessary if one is to make full use of the new generation of parallel supercomputers. This paper presents a high performance, parallel matrix-vector multiplication algorithm that is particularly well suited to hypercube multiprocessors. For an n x n matrix on p processors, the communication cost of this algorithm is O(n/[radical]p + log(p)), independent of the matrix sparsity pattern. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by employing it as the kernel in the well-known NAS conjugate gradient benchmark, where a run time of 6.09 seconds was observed. This is the best published performance on this benchmark achieved to date using a massively parallel supercomputer.

  14. Band anticrossing in dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2003-12-23

    Alloying III-V compounds with small amounts of nitrogen leads to dramatic reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy in the resulting dilute nitride alloys. The effect originates from an anti-crossing interaction between the extended conduction-band states and localized N states. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic subbands. The downward shift of the lower conduction subband edge is responsible for the N-induced reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy. The changes in the conduction band structure result in significant increase in electron effective mass and decrease in the electron mobility, and lead to a large enhance of the maximum doping level in GaInNAs doped with group VI donors. In addition, a striking asymmetry in the electrical activation of group IV and group VI donors can be attributed to mutual passivation process through formation of the nearest neighbor group-IV donor nitrogen pairs.

  15. The effect of gibberellic acid on root growth stoppage in several grasses following severe clipping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres Mas, Joaquin

    1958-01-01

    eg4 9+01 LSAS Sogg Se56 LgoRS Swig S 45 SA5 6, 04 S. R Jkdik ~ %AS 0 e4$ 4 Ssgs Sollasisg tresaseet kt thse of troeaeset got eliygof Mess Syos Les sess 5+SL 4~ 5+44 5+50 7 +40 4AS L4L 5o04 6 i%5 5el6 5e'N 5+4$ 5A5 6, 01 LQ %w...? Secgeea? k, W? L9$L ~ Ocseth ea4 7LaL4 st eertaia gceagaeee ae Iatlaeaesg h7 ce4aetkea eg 9hetee7athet5s tleese. gflgacgfa gi SSL SOL? g 0 West& g, k altseL m ee4 NasL7& 9 N L9$7 $CL4sase gsc "OIhhereLLCa?LLhs" seheteaeee Ores flsasrSag 9Laate? Pcee...

  16. Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory's Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

  17. Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1991-12-31

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory`s & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R & D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R & D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

  18. MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frischer, Marc E.; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

    2013-09-12

    Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

  19. Annual symposium on Frontiers in Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, N.; Fulton, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    This final report summarizes activities conducted for the National Academy of Sciences' Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Science with support from the US Department of Energy for the period July 1, 1993 through May 31, 1998. During the report period, five Frontiers of Science symposia were held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. For each Symposium, an organizing committee appointed by the NAS President selected and planned the eight sessions for the Symposium and identified general participants for invitation by the NAS President. These Symposia accomplished their goal of bringing together outstanding younger (age 45 or less) scientists to hear presentations in disciplines outside their own and to discuss exciting advances and opportunities in their fields in a format that encourages, and allows adequate time for, informal one-on-one discussions among participants. Of the 458 younger scientists who participated, over a quarter (124) were women. Participant lists for all symposia (1993--1997) are attached. The scientific participants were leaders in basic research from academic, industrial, and federal laboratories in such disciplines as astronomy, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biochemistry, cell biology, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, engineering, genetics, material sciences, mathematics, microbiology, neuroscience, physics, and physiology. For each symposia, the 24 speakers and discussants on the program were urged to focus their presentations on current cutting-edge research in their field for a scientifically sophisticated but non-specialist audience, and to provide a sense of the experimental data--what is actually measured and seen in the various fields. They were also asked to address questions such as: What are the major research problems and unique tools in their field? What are the current limitations on advances as well as the frontiers? Speakers were asked to provide a 2500- to 3000-word synopsis of their speech in advance, so that participants, particularly those in other fields, could familiarize themselves with the topic.

  20. Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-04-30

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

  1. Hydrogen Scenario Analysis Summary Report: Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; James, Brian [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Perez, Julie [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Melendez, Margo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Unnasch, Stefan [Life Cycle Associates; Rutherford, Daniel [TIAX, LLC; Hooks, Matthew [TIAX, LLC

    2008-03-01

    Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and retailers, consumers, and governments. The interaction of these agents in the marketplace will determine the real costs and benefits of early market transformation policies, and ultimately the success of the transition itself. The transition to hydrogen-powered transportation faces imposing economic barriers. The challenges include developing and refining a new and different power-train technology, building a supporting fuel infrastructure, creating a market for new and unfamiliar vehicles, and achieving economies of scale in vehicle production while providing an attractive selection of vehicle makes and models for car-buyers. The upfront costs will be high and could persist for a decade or more, delaying profitability until an adequate number of vehicles can be produced and moved into consumer markets. However, the potential rewards to the economy, environment, and national security are immense. Such a profound market transformation will require careful planning and strong, consistent policy incentives. Section 811 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005, Public Law 109-59 (U.S. House, 2005), calls for a report from the Secretary of Energy on measures to support the transition to a hydrogen economy. The report was to specifically address production and deployment of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure needed to support those vehicles. In addition, the 2004 report of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 2004), The Hydrogen Economy, contained two recommendations for analyses to be conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to strengthen hydrogen energy transition and infrastructure planning for the hydrogen economy. In response to the EPACT requirement and NAS recommendations, DOE's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT) has supported a series of analyses to evaluate alternative scenarios for deployment of millions of hydrogen fueled vehicles and supporting infrastructure. To ensure that these alternative market penetration scenarios took into consideration the thinking of the automobile manufacturers, energy companies, industrial hydrogen suppliers, and others from the private sector, DOE held several stakeholder meetings to explain the analyses, describe the models, and solicit comments about the methods, assumptions, and preliminary results (U.S. DOE, 2006a). The first stakeholder meeting was held on January 26, 2006, to solicit guidance during the initial phases of the analysis; this was followed by a second meeting on August 9-10, 2006, to review the preliminary results. A third and final meeting was held on January 31, 2007, to discuss the final analysis results. More than 60 hydrogen energy experts from industry, government, national laboratories, and universities attended these meetings and provided their comments to help guide DOE's analysis. The final scenarios attempt to reflect the collective judgment of the participants in these meetings. However, they should not be interpreted as having been explicitly endorsed by DOE or any of the stakeholders participating. The DOE analysis examined three vehicle penetration scenarios: Scenario 1--Production of thousands of vehicles per year by 2015 and hundreds of thousands per year by 2019. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 2.0 million fuel cell vehicles (FCV) by 2025. Scenario 2--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013 and hundreds of thousands by 2018. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 5.0 million FCVs by 2025. Scenario 3--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013, hundreds of thousands by 2018, and millions by 2021 such that market penetration is 10 million by 2025. Scenario 3 was formulated to comply with the NAS recommendation: 'DOE should map out and evaluate a transition plan consistent with developing the infrastructure and hydrogen res

  2. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flach, G. [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Freedman, V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bott, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faybishenko, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorton, I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Murray, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moulton, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rockhold, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, A. [LBNL; Steefel, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Waichler, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-09-28

    In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energy’s Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.

  3. SOLIDS PRECIPITATION EVENT IN MCU CAUSAL ANALYSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM SOLIDS RECOVERY TEAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, A.; Aponte, C.

    2014-08-15

    A process upset occurred in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility on April 6th, 2014. During recovery efforts, a significant amount of solids were found in the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Salt Solution Receipt Tanks (SSRTs), two extraction contactors, and scrub contactors. The solids were identified by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as primarily sodium oxalate and sodium alumina silicate (NAS) with the presence of some aluminum hydroxide. NAS solids have been present in the SSFT since simulant runs during cold chemical startup of MCU in 2007, and have not hindered operations since that time. During the process upset in April 2014, the oxalate solids partially blocked the aqueous outlet of the extraction contactors, causing salt solution to exit through the contactor organic outlet to the scrub contactors with the organic phase. This salt solution overwhelmed the scrub contactors and passed with the organic phase to the strip section of MCU. The partially reversed flow of salt solution resulted in a Strip Effluent (SE) stream that was high in Isopar™ L, pH and sodium. The primary cause of the excessive solids accumulation in the SSRTs and SSFT at MCU is attributed to an increase in the frequency of oxalic acid cleaning of the 512-S primary filter. Agitation in the SSRTs at MCU in response to cold weather likely provided the primary mechanism to transfer the solids to the contactors. Sources of the sodium oxalate solids are attributed to the oxalic acid cleaning solution used to clean the primary filter at the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) filtration at 512-S, as well as precipitation from the salt batch feed, which is at or near oxalate saturation. The Solids Recovery Team was formed to determine the cause of the solids formation and develop recommendations to prevent or mitigate this event in the future. A total of 53 recommendations were generated. These recommendations were organized into 4 focus areas: • Improve understanding of oxalate equilibrium and kinetics in salt solutions • Reduction/elimination of oxalic acid cleaning in 512-S • Flowsheet optimization • Improving diagnostic capability The recommendations implemented prior to resumption of MCU operations provide a risk mitigation or detection function through additional sampling and observation. The longer term recommendations provide a framework to increase the basic process knowledge of both oxalate chemistry and filtration behavior and then facilitate decisions that improve the salt flowsheet as a system.

  4. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 3: A new reactor concept without uranium or thorium for burning weapons-grade plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Schnitzler, B.G.; Fletcher, C.D. [and others

    1993-06-01

    The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) requested that the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) examine concepts that focus only on the destruction of 50,000 kg of weapons-grade plutonium. A concept has been developed by the INEL for a low-temperature, low-pressure, low-power density, low-coolant-flow-rate light water reactor that destroys plutonium quickly without using uranium or thorium. This concept is very safe and could be designed, constructed, and operated in a reasonable time frame. This concept does not produce electricity. Not considering other missions frees the design from the paradigms and constraints used by proponents of other dispositioning concepts. The plutonium destruction design goal is most easily achievable with a large, moderate power reactor that operates at a significantly lower thermal power density than is appropriate for reactors with multiple design goals. This volume presents the assumptions and requirements, a reactor concept overview, and a list of recommendations. The appendices contain detailed discussions on plutonium dispositioning, self-protection, fuel types, neutronics, thermal hydraulics, off-site radiation releases, and economics.

  5. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    Contents include articles entitled: Chem-Nuclear documents new plan for Barnwell; Nebraska releases technical analysis of LLRW facility; Southeast Compact suspends funding for NC facility development; NC governor and Southeast Compact differ on proposed MOU; Midwest Compact to return export fees; State legislators` group revises radioactive waste policy; Internal documents discuss administration`s policy on Ward Valley; BLM issues EA for Ward Valley testing; California DHS, NRC criticize DOI`s testing protocols; Army removes training mines from Ward Valley site; The 1997 gubernatorial elections and a look ahead to 1998; Court throws out case challenging Pennsylvania`s siting law; DOE files notice of appeal in WCS suit; Central Compact moves to dismiss ``Veto`` authority suit; Congress exempts NAS from FACA; Judge sets schedule for Ward Valley case; Court won`t order DOE to accept spent fuel by deadline; NRC chairman expresses concern re CERCLA reauthorization; Senators question EPA`s guidance on remediation; EPA issues guidance, criticizes NRC decommissioning rule; Members of Congress clarify FUSRAP transfer; HLW legislation passes House by wide margin; Takings legislation passes House; Energy and water bill signed into law; and Senate confirms 5 of 6 DOE appointees.

  6. PDS: A Performance Database Server

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berry, Michael W.; Dongarra, Jack J.; Larose, Brian H.; Letsche, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    The process of gathering, archiving, and distributing computer benchmark data is a cumbersome task usually performed by computer users and vendors with little coordination. Most important, there is no publicly available central depository of performance data for all ranges of machines from personal computers to supercomputers. We present an Internet-accessible performance database server (PDS) that can be used to extract current benchmark data and literature. As an extension to the X-Windows-based user interface (Xnetlib) to the Netlib archival system, PDS provides an on-line catalog of public domain computer benchmarks such as the LINPACK benchmark, Perfect benchmarks, and the NAS parallelmore »benchmarks. PDS does not reformat or present the benchmark data in any way that conflicts with the original methodology of any particular benchmark; it is thereby devoid of any subjective interpretations of machine performance. We believe that all branches (research laboratories, academia, and industry) of the general computing community can use this facility to archive performance metrics and make them readily available to the public. PDS can provide a more manageable approach to the development and support of a large dynamic database of published performance metrics.« less

  7. Superior thermoelectric performance in PbTe-PbS pseudo-binary. Extremely low thermal conductivity and modulated carrier concentration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, D.; Zhao, L. -D.; Tong, X.; Li, W.; Wu, L.; Tan, Q.; Pei, Y.; Huang, L.; Li, J. -F.; Zhu, Y.; et al

    2015-05-19

    Lead chalcogenides have exhibited their irreplaceable role as thermoelectric materials at the medium temperature range, owing to highly degenerate electronic bands and intrinsically low thermal conductivities. PbTe-PbS pseudo-binary has been paid extensive attentions due to the even lower thermal conductivity which originates largely from the coexistence of both alloying and phase-separated precipitations. To investigate the competition between alloying and phase separation and its pronounced effect on the thermoelectric performance in PbTe-PbS, we systematically studied Spark Plasma Sintered (SPSed), 3 at% Na- doped (PbTe)1-x(PbS)x samples with x=10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30% and 35% by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observationsmore »and theoretical calculations. Corresponding to the lowest lattice thermal conductivity as a result of the balance between point defect- and precipitates- scattering, the highest figure of merit ZT~2.3 was obtained at 923 K when PbS phase fraction x is at 20%. The consistently lower lattice thermal conductivities in SPSed samples compared with corresponding ingots, resulting from the powdering and follow-up consolidation processes, also contribute to the observed superior ZT. Notably, the onset of carrier concentration modulation ~600 K due to excessive Na’s diffusion and re-dissolution leads to the observed saturations of electrical transport properties, which is believed equally crucial to the outstanding thermoelectric performance of SPSed PbTe-PbS samples.« less

  8. A Green Prison: Santa Rita Jail Creeps Towards Zero Net Energy (ZNE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; DeForest, Nicholas; Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jon; Dierckxsens, Carlos; Mendes, Goncalo; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo Ferreira

    2011-03-18

    A large project is underway at Alameda County's twenty-year old 45 ha 4,000-inmate Santa Rita Jail, about 70 km east of San Francisco. Often described as a green prison, it has a considerable installed base of distributed energy resources including a seven-year old 1.2 MW PV array, a four-year old 1 MW fuel cell with heat recovery, and efficiency investments. A current US$14 M expansion will add approximately 2 MW of NaS batteries, and undetermined wind capacity and a concentrating solar thermal system. This ongoing effort by a progressive local government with considerable Federal and State support provides some excellent lessons for the struggle to lower building carbon footprint. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) finds true optimal combinations of equipment and operating schedules for microgrids that minimize energy bills and/or carbon emissions without 2 of 12 significant searching or rules-of-thumb prioritization, such as"efficiency first then on-site generation." The results often recommend complex systems, and sensitivities show how policy changes will affect choices. This paper reports an analysis of the historic performance of the PV system and fuel cell, describes the complex optimization applied to the battery scheduling, and shows how results will affect the jail's operational costs, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. DER-CAM is used to assess the existing and proposed DER equipment in its ability to reduce tariff charges.

  9. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Holly M.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  10. Plutonium disposition study phase 1b final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-09-15

    This report provides the results of the Westinghouse activities performed as part of the Plutonium Disposition Study Phase 1b. These activities, which took place from May 16, 1993 to September 15, 1993, build upon the work completed in Phase 1a, which concluded on May 15, 1993. In Phase 1a, three Plutonium Disposal Reactor (PDR) options were developed for the disposal of excess weapons grade plutonium from returned and dismantled nuclear weapons. This report documents the results of several tasks that were performed to further knowledge in specific areas leading up to Phase 2 of the PDR Study. The Westinghouse activities for Phase 1b are summarized as follows: (1) resolved technical issues concerning reactor physics including equilibrium cycle calculations, use of gadolinium, moderator temperature coefficient, and others as documented in Section 2.0; (2) analyzed large Westinghouse commercial plants for plutonium disposal; (3) reactor safety issues including the steam line break were resolved, and are included in Section 2.0; (4) several tasks related to the PDR Fuel Cycle were examined; (5) cost and deployment options were examined to determine optimal configuration for both plutonium disposal and tritium production; (6) response to questions from DOE and National Academy of Scientists (NAS) reviewers concerning the PDR Phase 1a report are included in Appendix A.

  11. Liquid-Metal Electrode to Enable Ultra-Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Metal electrodes have a high capacity for energy storage but have found limited applications in batteries because of dendrite formation and other problems. In this paper, we report a new alloying strategy that can significantly reduce the melting temperature and improve wetting with the electrolyte to allow the use of liquid metal as anode in sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) at much lower temperatures (e.g., 95 to 175°C). Commercial NBBs such as sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries typically operate at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 300-350°C) due to poor wettability of sodium on the surface of ?"-Al2O3. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that Na-Cs alloy can replace pure sodium as the anode material, which provides a significant improvement in wettability, particularly at lower temperatures (i.e., <200°C). Single cells with the Na-Cs alloy anode exhibit excellent cycling life over those with pure sodium anode at 175 and 150°C. The cells can even operate at 95°C, which is below the melting temperature of pure sodium. These results demonstrate that NBB can be operated at ultra lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a new strategy to use liquid metal as the electrode materials for advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation on the anode.

  12. Scalable, efficient ion-photon coupling with phase Fresnel lenses for large-scale quantum computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. W. Streed; B. G. Norton; J. J. Chapman; D. Kielpinski

    2008-05-16

    Efficient ion-photon coupling is an important component for large-scale ion-trap quantum computing. We propose that arrays of phase Fresnel lenses (PFLs) are a favorable optical coupling technology to match with multi-zone ion traps. Both are scalable technologies based on conventional micro-fabrication techniques. The large numerical apertures (NAs) possible with PFLs can reduce the readout time for ion qubits. PFLs also provide good coherent ion-photon coupling by matching a large fraction of an ion's emission pattern to a single optical propagation mode (TEM00). To this end we have optically characterized a large numerical aperture phase Fresnel lens (NA=0.64) designed for use at 369.5 nm, the principal fluorescence detection transition for Yb+ ions. A diffraction-limited spot w0=350+/-15 nm (1/e^2 waist) with mode quality M^2= 1.08+/-0.05 was measured with this PFL. From this we estimate the minimum expected free space coherent ion-photon coupling to be 0.64%, which is twice the best previous experimental measurement using a conventional multi-element lens. We also evaluate two techniques for improving the entanglement fidelity between the ion state and photon polarization with large numerical aperture lenses.

  13. Electric and Magnetic Fields Research and Public Information Dissemination Program annual report for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) Research and Public Information Dissemination (RAPID) Program was authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 as a near-term effort to expand and accelerate the research needed to address the EMF issue. As required by this legislation, the EMF Interagency Committee, the National EMF Advisory Committee (NEMFAC), and the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) are providing valued input and advice for the direction of this program. With this input and advice, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) have developed and are implementing five-year program plans. Multi-year health effects research projects and related EMF measurement and exposure assessment projects are underway using funds appropriated in fiscal years 1994, 1995, and 1996 together with voluntary non-Federal contributions. The results of these research projects, along with the results of other EMF research, will be used as input to the hazard evaluation effort, which is the focus of the EMF RAPID Program. A coordinated interagency program is underway to communicate needed information on the EMF issue in a clear manner to the public and other decision makers.

  14. Results of advanced batter technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  15. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1993-03-25

    Argonne National Laboratory`s Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy`s. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

  16. Results of advanced battery technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1992-09-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies [Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  17. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1993-03-25

    Argonne National Laboratory's Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy's. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

  18. TJ Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Daniel

    2009-04-17

    This talk will discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction photovoltaic technology which have led to the highest-efficiency solar cells ever demonstrated. The relationship between the materials science of III-V semiconductors and the achievement of record solar cell efficiencies will be emphasized. For instance, epitaxially-grown GAInP has been found to form a spontaneously-ordered GaP/InP (111) superlattice. This ordering affects the band gap of the material, which in turn affects the design of solar cells which incorporate GaInP. For the next generation of ultrahigh-efficiency III-V solar cells, we need a new semiconductor which is lattice-matched to GaAs, has a band gap of 1 eV, and has long minority-carrier diffusion lengths. Out of a number of candidate materials, the recently-discovered alloy GaInNAs appears to have the greatest promise. This material satisfies the first two criteria, but has to date shown very low diffusion lengths, a problem which is our current focus in the development of these next-generation cells.

  19. TJ Solar Cell (GaInP/GaAs/Ge Ultrahigh-Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Daniel

    2002-04-17

    This talk will discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction photovoltaic technology which have led to the highest-efficiency solar cells ever demonstrated. The relationship between the materials science of III-V semiconductors and the achievement of record solar cell efficiencies will be emphasized. For instance, epitaxially-grown GAInP has been found to form a spontaneously-ordered GaP/InP (111) superlattice. This ordering affects the band gap of the material, which in turn affects the design of solar cells which incorporate GaInP. For the next generation of ultrahigh-efficiency III-V solar cells, we need a new semiconductor which is lattice-matched to GaAs, has a band gap of 1 eV, and has long minority-carrier diffusion lengths. Out of a number of candidate materials, the recently-discovered alloy GaInNAs appears to have the greatest promise. This material satisfies the first two criteria, but has to date shown very low diffusion lengths, a problem which is our current focus in the development of these next-generation cells.

  20. Consortia Focused on Photovoltaic R&D, Manufacturing, and Testing: A Review of Existing Models and Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coggeshall, C.; Margolis, R. M.

    2010-03-01

    As the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program prepares to initiate a new cost-shared research and development (R&D) effort on photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing, it is useful to review the experience to date with consortia focused on PV R&D, manufacturing, and testing. Information was gathered for this report by conducting interviews and accessing Web sites of 14 U.S. consortia and four European consortia, each with either a primary focus on or an emerging interest in PV technology R&D, manufacturing, or testing. Additional input was collected from several workshops held by the DOE and National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 2009, which examined the practical steps -- including public-private partnerships and policy support -- necessary to enhance the United States' capacity to competitively manufacture photovoltaics. This report categorizes the 18 consortia into three groups: university-led consortia, industry-led consortia, and manufacturing and testing facilities consortia. The first section summarizes the organizations within the different categories, with a particular focus on the key benefits and challenges for each grouping. The second section provides a more detailed overview of each consortium, including the origins, goals, organization, membership, funding sources, and key contacts. This survey is a useful resource for stakeholders interested in PV manufacturing R&D, but should not imply endorsement of any of these groups.

  1. Center for Fundamental and Applied Research in Nanostructured and Lightweight Materials. Final Technical Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, Michael; Rogers, Tony; King, Julia; Keith, Jason; Cornilsen, Bahne; Allen, Jeffrey; Gilbert, Ryan; Holles, Joseph

    2010-09-28

    The core projects for this DOE-sponsored Center at Michigan Tech have focused on several of the materials problems identified by the NAS. These include: new electrode materials, enhanced PEM materials, lighter and more effective bipolar plates, and improvement of the carbon used as a current carrier. This project involved fundamental and applied research in the development and testing of lightweight and nanostructured materials to be used in fuel cell applications and for chemical synthesis. The advent of new classes of materials engineered at the nanometer level can produce materials that are lightweight and have unique physical and chemical properties. The grant was used to obtain and improve the equipment infrastructure to support this research and also served to fund seven research projects. These included: 1. Development of lightweight, thermally conductive bipolar plates for improved thermal management in fuel cells; 2. Exploration of pseudomorphic nanoscale overlayer bimetallic catalysts for fuel cells; 3. Development of hybrid inorganic/organic polymer nanocomposites with improved ionic and electronic properties; 4. Development of oriented polymeric materials for membrane applications; 5. Preparation of a graphitic carbon foam current collectors; 6. The development of lightweight carbon electrodes using graphitic carbon foams for battery and fuel cell applications; and 7. Movement of water in fuel cell electrodes.

  2. Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

  3. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 4. Plutonium dispositioning in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterbentz, J.W.; Olsen, C.S.; Sinha, U.P.

    1993-06-01

    This study is in response to a request by the Reactor Panel Subcommittee of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) to evaluate the feasibility of using plutonium fuels (without uranium) for disposal in existing conventional or advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs and in low temperature/pressure LWR designs that might be developed for plutonium disposal. Three plutonium-based fuel forms (oxides, aluminum metallics, and carbides) are evaluated for neutronic performance, fabrication technology, and material and compatibility issues. For the carbides, only the fabrication technologies are addressed. Viable plutonium oxide fuels for conventional or advanced LWRs include plutonium-zirconium-calcium oxide (PuO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}-CaO) with the addition of thorium oxide (ThO{sub 2}) or a burnable poison such as erbium oxide (Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}) or europium oxide (Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to achieve acceptable neutronic performance. Thorium will breed fissile uranium that may be unacceptable from a proliferation standpoint. Fabrication of uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuels is well established; however, fabrication of plutonium-based oxide fuels will require further development. Viable aluminum-plutonium metallic fuels for a low temperature/pressure LWR include plutonium aluminide in an aluminum matrix (PuAl{sub 4}-Al) with the addition of a burnable poison such as erbium (Er) or europium (Eu). Fabrication of low-enriched plutonium in aluminum-plutonium metallic fuel rods was initially established 30 years ago and will require development to recapture and adapt the technology to meet current environmental and safety regulations. Fabrication of high-enriched uranium plate fuel by the picture-frame process is a well established process, but the use of plutonium would require the process to be upgraded in the United States to conform with current regulations and minimize the waste streams.

  4. A perspective on safeguarding and monitoring of excess military plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1994-10-02

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective and framework for the development of safeguarding and monitoring procedures for the various stages of disposition of excess military plutonium. The paper briefly outlines and comments on some of the issues involved in safeguarding and monitoring excess military plutonium as it progresses from weapons through dismantlement, to fabrication as reactor fuel, to use in a reactor, and finally to storage and disposal as spent fuel. {open_quotes}Military{close_quotes} refers to ownership, and includes both reactor-grade and weapon-grade plutonium. {open_quotes}Excess{close_quotes} refers to plutonium (in any form) that a government decides is no longer needed for military use and can be irrevocably removed from military stockpiles. Many of the issues and proposals presented in this paper are based on, or are similar to, those mentioned in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on excess military plutonium. Safeguards for plutonium disposition are discussed elsewhere in terms of requirements established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Here, the discussion is less specific. The term {open_quotes}safeguarding{close_quotes} is used broadly to refer to materials control and accountancy (MC&A), containment and surveillance (C&S), and physical protection of nuclear materials by the state that possesses those materials. This is also referred to as material protection, control, and accountancy (MPCA). The term {open_quotes}safeguarding{close_quotes} was chosen for brevity and to distinguish MPCA considered in this paper from international or IAEA safeguards. {open_quotes}Monitoring{close_quotes} is used to refer to activities designed to assure another party (state or international organization) that the nuclear materials of the host state (the United States or Russia) are secure and not subject to unauthorized use.

  5. Commercialization of New Lattice-Matched Multi-Junction Solar Cells Based on Dilute Nitrides: July 8, 2010 - March 7, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herb, J.

    2012-04-01

    Final Technical Progress Report for PV Incubator subcontract NAT-0-99013-03. The overall objective of this Incubator subcontract was to complete the work necessary to make commercial ready solar cells using the dilute nitride technology. The specific objectives of this program were aimed at completing the development of a triple-junction solar cell that incorporates a GaInNAs {approx}1eV subcell to the point of commercial readiness, and determining the cell reliability and, if necessary, identifying and eliminating process or material related issues that lead to early-life cell failures. There were three major objectives for Phase 1, each of which focuses on a key element of the solar cell that determines its performance in a commercial CPV system. One objective was to optimize the quality and performance of the key individual components making up the solar cell structure and then to optimize the integration of these components into a complete triple-junction cell. A second objective was to design and test anti-reflective coating that maximizes the light coupled into a 3J cell with a {approx}1 eV bottom cell bandgap. The third objective was to develop Highly Accelerated Life Tests (HALT) protocols and tools for identifying and correcting potential reliability problems. The Phase 2 objectives were a continuation of the work begun in Phase 1 but aimed at optimizing cell performance for commercial requirements. Phase 2 had four primary objectives: (1) develop a glass-matched anti-reflective coating (ARC) and optimize the cell/ARC to give good performance at 60C operating temperature, (2) optimize the cell for good operation at 60C and high concentration, and (3) complete the light biased HALT system and use it to determine what, if any, failures are observed, and (4) determine the reliability limits of the optimized cell.

  6. Bandgap Engineering in High-Efficiency Multijunction Concentrator Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, R. R.; Sherif, R. A.; Kinsey, G. S.; Kurtz, S.; Fetzer, C. M.; Edmondson, K. M.; Law, D. C.; Cotal, H. L.; Krut, D. D.; Ermer, J. H.; Karam, N. H.

    2005-08-01

    This paper discusses semiconductor device research paths under investigation with the aim of reaching the milestone efficiency of 40%. A cost analysis shows that achieving very high cell efficiencies is crucial for the realization of cost-effective photovoltaics, because of the strongly leveraging effect of efficiency on module packaging and balance-of systems costs. Lattice-matched (LM) GaInP/ GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cells have achieved the highest independently confirmed efficiency at 175 suns, 25?C, of 37.3% under the standard AM1.5D, low-AOD terrestrial spectrum. Lattice-mismatched, or metamorphic (MM), materials offer still higher potential efficiencies, if the crystal quality can be maintained. Theoretical efficiencies well over 50% are possible for a MM GaInP/ 1.17-eV GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cell limited by radiative recombination at 500 suns. The bandgap - open circuit voltage offset, (Eg/q) - Voc, is used as a valuable theoretical and experimental tool to characterize multijunction cells with subcell bandgaps ranging from 0.7 to 2.1 eV. Experimental results are presented for prototype 6-junction cells employing an active {approx}1.1-eV dilute nitride GaInNAs subcell, with active-area efficiency greater than 23% and over 5.3 V open-circuit voltage under the 1-sun AM0 space spectrum. Such cell designs have theoretical efficiencies under the terrestrial spectrum at 500 suns concentration exceeding 55% efficiency, even for lattice-matched designs.

  7. A High Temperature Electrochemical Energy Storage System Based on Sodium Beta-Alumina Solid Electrolyte (Base)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anil Virkar

    2008-03-31

    This report summarizes the work done during the period September 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008. Work was conducted in the following areas: (1) Fabrication of sodium beta{double_prime} alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) using a vapor phase process. (2) Mechanistic studies on the conversion of {alpha}-alumina + zirconia into beta{double_prime}-alumina + zirconia by the vapor phase process. (3) Characterization of BASE by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and conductivity measurements. (4) Design, construction and electrochemical testing of a symmetric cell containing BASE as the electrolyte and NaCl + ZnCl{sub 2} as the electrodes. (5) Design, construction, and electrochemical evaluation of Na/BASE/ZnCl{sub 2} electrochemical cells. (6) Stability studies in ZnCl{sub 2}, SnCl{sub 2}, and SnI{sub 4} (7) Design, assembly and testing of planar stacks. (8) Investigation of the effect of porous surface layers on BASE on cell resistance. The conventional process for the fabrication of sodium ion conducting beta{double_prime}-alumina involves calcination of {alpha}-alumina + Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} + LiNO{sub 3} at 1250 C, followed by sintering powder compacts in sealed containers (platinum or MgO) at {approx}1600 C. The novel vapor phase process involves first sintering a mixture of {alpha}-alumina + yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) into a dense ceramic followed by exposure to soda vapor at {approx}1450 C to convert {alpha}-alumina into beta{double_prime}-alumina. The vapor phase process leads to a high strength BASE, which is also resistant to moisture attack, unlike BASE made by the conventional process. The PI is the lead inventor of the process. Discs and tubes of BASE were fabricated in the present work. In the conventional process, sintering of BASE is accomplished by a transient liquid phase mechanism wherein the liquid phase contains NaAlO{sub 2}. Some NaAlO{sub 2} continues to remain at grain boundaries; and is the root cause of its water sensitivity. In the vapor phase process, NaAlO{sub 2} is never formed. Conversion occurs by a coupled transport of Na{sup +} through BASE formed and of O{sup 2-} through YSZ to the reaction front. Transport to the reaction front is described in terms of a chemical diffusion coefficient of Na{sub 2}O. The conversion kinetics as a function of microstructure is under investigation. The mechanism of conversion is described in this report. A number of discs and tubes of BASE have been fabricated by the vapor phase process. The material was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), before and after conversion. Conductivity (which is almost exclusively due to sodium ion transport at the temperatures of interest) was measured. Conductivity was measured using sodium-sodium tests as well as by impedance spectroscopy. Various types of both planar and tubular electrochemical cells were assembled and tested. In some cases the objective was to determine if there was any interaction between the salt and BASE. The interaction of interest was mainly ion exchange (possible replacement of sodium ion by the salt cation). It was noted that Zn{sup 2+} did not replace Na+ over the conditions of interest. For this reason much of the work was conducted with ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode salt. In the case of Sn-based, Sn{sup 2+} did ion exchange, but Sn{sup 4+} did not. This suggests that Sn{sup 4+} salts are viable candidates. These results and implications are discussed in the report. Cells made with Na as the anode and ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode were successfully charged/discharged numerous times. The key advantages of the batteries under investigation here over the Na-S batteries are: (1) Steel wool can be used in the cathode compartment unlike Na-S batteries which require expensive graphite. (2) Planar cells can be constructed in addition to tubular, allowing for greater design flexibility and integration with other devices such as planar SOFC. (3) Comparable or higher open circuit voltage (OCV) than the Na-S battery. (4) Wider operating temperature range and higher temper

  8. Cost Effective Surfactant Formulations for Improved Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Yongfu Wu

    2007-09-30

    This report summarizes work during the 30 month time period of this project. This was planned originally for 3-years duration, but due to its financial limitations, DOE halted funding after 2 years. The California Institute of Technology continued working on this project for an additional 6 months based on a no-cost extension granted by DOE. The objective of this project is to improve the performance of aqueous phase formulations that are designed to increase oil recovery from fractured, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. This process works by increasing the rate and extent of aqueous phase imbibition into the matrix blocks in the reservoir and thereby displacing crude oil normally not recovered in a conventional waterflood operation. The project had three major components: (1) developing methods for the rapid screening of surfactant formulations towards identifying candidates suitable for more detailed evaluation, (2) more fundamental studies to relate the chemical structure of acid components of an oil and surfactants in aqueous solution as relates to their tendency to wet a carbonate surface by oil or water, and (3) a more applied study where aqueous solutions of different commercial surfactants are examined for their ability to recover a West Texas crude oil from a limestone core via an imbibition process. The first item, regarding rapid screening methods for suitable surfactants has been summarized as a Topical Report. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the surface of these chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite power is pre-treated to make the surface oil-wet. The next step is to add the pre-treated powder to a test tube and add a candidate aqueous surfactant formulation; the greater the percentage of the calcite that now sinks to the bottom rather than floats, the more effective the surfactant is in changing the solids to become now preferentially water-wet. Results from the screening test generally are consistent with surfactant oil recovery performance reported in the literature. The second effort is a more fundamental study. It considers the effect of chemical structures of different naphthenic acids (NA) dissolved in decane as model oils that render calcite surfaces oil-wet to a different degree. NAs are common to crude oil and are at least partially responsible for the frequent observation that carbonate reservoirs are oil-wet. Because pure NA compounds are used, trends in wetting behavior can be related to NA molecular structure as measured by solid adsorption, contact angle and our novel, simple flotation test with calcite. Experiments with different surfactants and NA-treated calcite powder provide information about mechanisms responsible for sought after reversal to a water-wet state. Key findings include: (1) more hydrophobic NA's are more prone to induce oil-wetting, and (2) recovery of the model oil from limestone core was better with cationic surfactants, but one nonionic surfactant, Igepal CO-530, also had favorable results. This portion of the project included theoretical calculations to investigate key basic properties of several NAs such as their acidic strength and their relative water/oil solubility, and relate this to their chemical structure. The third category of this project focused on the recovery of a light crude oil from West Texas (McElroy Field) from a carbonate rock (limestone outcrop). For this effort, the first item was to establish a suite of surfactants that would be compatible with the McElroy Field brine. Those were examined further for their ability to recover oil by imbibition. Results demonstrate several types of promising candida

  9. Full-Scale Cask Testing and Public Acceptance of Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments - 12254

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilger, Fred; Halstead, Robert J.; Ballard, James D.

    2012-07-01

    Full-scale physical testing of spent fuel shipping casks has been proposed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2006 report on spent nuclear fuel transportation, and by the Presidential Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future 2011 draft report. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2005 proposed full-scale testing of a rail cask, and considered 'regulatory limits' testing of both rail and truck casks (SRM SECY-05-0051). The recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project, NRC evaluation of extended spent fuel storage (possibly beyond 60-120 years) before transportation, nuclear industry adoption of very large dual-purpose canisters for spent fuel storage and transport, and the deliberations of the BRC, will fundamentally change assumptions about the future spent fuel transportation system, and reopen the debate over shipping cask performance in severe accidents and acts of sabotage. This paper examines possible approaches to full-scale testing for enhancing public confidence in risk analyses, perception of risk, and acceptance of spent fuel shipments. The paper reviews the literature on public perception of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste transportation risks. We review and summarize opinion surveys sponsored by the State of Nevada over the past two decades, which show consistent patterns of concern among Nevada residents about health and safety impacts, and socioeconomic impacts such as reduced property values along likely transportation routes. We also review and summarize the large body of public opinion survey research on transportation concerns at regional and national levels. The paper reviews three past cask testing programs, the way in which these cask testing program results were portrayed in films and videos, and examines public and official responses to these three programs: the 1970's impact and fire testing of spent fuel truck casks at Sandia National Laboratories, the 1980's regulatory and demonstration testing of MAGNOX fuel flasks in the United Kingdom (the CEGB 'Operation Smash Hit' tests), and the 1980's regulatory drop and fire tests conducted on the TRUPACT II containers used for transuranic waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. The primary focus of the paper is a detailed evaluation of the cask testing programs proposed by the NRC in its decision implementing staff recommendations based on the Package Performance Study, and by the State of Nevada recommendations based on previous work by Audin, Resnikoff, Dilger, Halstead, and Greiner. The NRC approach is based on demonstration impact testing (locomotive strike) of a large rail cask, either the TAD cask proposed by DOE for spent fuel shipments to Yucca Mountain, or a similar currently licensed dual-purpose cask. The NRC program might also be expanded to include fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask. The Nevada approach calls for a minimum of two tests: regulatory testing (impact, fire, puncture, immersion) of a rail cask, and extra-regulatory fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask, based on the cask performance modeling work by Greiner. The paper concludes with a discussion of key procedural elements - test costs and funding sources, development of testing protocols, selection of testing facilities, and test peer review - and various methods of communicating the test results to a broad range of stakeholder audiences. (authors)

  10. Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranski, Dr. Michael J.

    2011-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the maximum score possible. A highly ranked ANA or ARA is one that is large in size compared to other areas, includes a greater proportion of the watershed within Reservation boundaries, contains a number of status taxa at high densities, exhibits a high overall biodiversity, has very good or excellent habitat and water quality, is well protected and isolated from disturbances, and shows several other characteristics that contribute to natural area value. In this report, the term 'natural area' is loosely defined as a terrestrial or aquatic system that exhibits, or is thought to exhibit, high natural integrity and other significant natural values. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate and rank the currently recognized Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for their natural area value. A previous study (Baranski 2009) analyzed, evaluated, and ranked terrestrial areas (Natural Areas [NAs], Reference Areas [RAs], and Cooperative Management Areas [CMAs]) on the ORR for natural area value, and a precise methodology for natural area evaluation was developed. The present study is intended to be a complement and companion to the terrestrial area study and attempts to employ a similar methodology for aquatic areas so that aquatic and terrestrial areas can be compared on a similar scale. This study specifically develops criteria for assessing the ecological, biodiversity, and natural area importance and significance of aquatic systems on the Reservation in a relevant and consistent manner. The information can be integrated into the Tennessee Natural Heritage Program (http://tn.gov/environment/na/nhp.shtml) system and applied to potential new aquatic areas. Further, the information will be useful in planning, management, and protection efforts on the ORR.