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1

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable Projects HTS Cable Projects FactHandbook|AWasteLow

2

Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-AI-SI (NAS) Waste Form for Hanford LAW and Secondary Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW and/or Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW). Objectives of the project: 1) Prove the robustness of FBSR as a waste form for either LAW and/or WTP-SW; 2) Reduce the risk associated with implementing the FBSR NAS waste form as a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW and/or WTP-SW; 3) Conduct two treatability studies with SRS radioactive wastes that have been shimmed to look like Hanford WTP-SW and LAW; 4) Conduct three treatability studies with actual Hanford tank wastes; 5) Fill key data gaps; 6) Link previous and new results together.

Jantzen, C.; Pierce, E.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) PRODUCT: MONOLITH FORMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most important requirement for Hanford's low activity waste (LAW) form for shallow land disposal is the chemical durability of the product. A secondary, but still essential specification, is the compressive strength of the material with regards to the strength of the material under shallow land disposal conditions, e.g. the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations, because the term ''near-surface disposal'' indicates disposal in the uppermost portion, or approximately the top 30 meters, of the earth's surface. The THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) mineral waste form for LAW is granular in nature because it is formed by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). As a granular product it has been shown to be as durable as Hanford's LAW glass during testing with ASTM C-1285-02 known as the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and with the Single Pass Flow Through Test (SPFT). Hanford Envelope A and Envelope C simulants both performed well during PCT and SPFT testing and during subsequent performance assessment modeling. This is partially due to the high aluminosilicate content of the mineral product which provides a natural aluminosilicate buffering mechanism that inhibits leaching and is known to occur in naturally occurring aluminosilicate mineral analogs. In order for the TTT Na-Al-Si (NAS) granular mineral product to meet the compressive strength requirements (ASTM C39) for a Hanford waste form, the granular product needs to be made into a monolith or disposed of in High Integrity Containers (HIC's). Additionally, the Hanford intruder scenario for disposal in the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) trench is mitigated as there is reduced intruder exposure when a waste form is in a monolithic form. During the preliminary testing of a monolith binder for TTT's FBSR mineral product, four parameters were monitored: (1) waste loading (not optimized for each waste form tested); (2) density; (3) compressive strength; and (4) durability must not be compromised--binding agent should not react with the NAS product and binding agent should not create an unfavorable pH environment that may cause accelerated leaching. It is the goal of the present study to survey cementitious waste forms based on Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Ceramicrete, and hydroceramic binders by correlating waste loading, density and compressive strength and then determine if these binders affect the product performance in terms of the PCT response. This will be done by making a one-to-one comparison of the PCT response measured on granular NAS mineral product (mixed bed and fines products) with the PCT response of the monolithed NAS product in the different binders. Future studies may include, refining the above binders, and examining other binders. It is likely that binders formed from kaolin would be most compatible with the chemistry of the THOR{reg_sign} mineral waste form which is made by steam reforming of kaolin and sodium rich wastes. The economics of production on a large scale have yet to be investigated for any of the binders tested.

Jantzen, C

2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

4

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating Organizations 3...

5

Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) With Hanford Low Activity Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750?C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Burket, P. R.; Bannochie, C. J.; Daniel, W. G.; Nash, C. A.; Cozzi, A. D.; Herman, C. C.

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

6

Characterization and Leaching Tests of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Form for LAW Immobilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) have been evaluated. One such immobilization technology is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was involved in an extensive characterization campaign. This goal of this campaign was study the durability of the FBSR mineral product and the mineral product encapsulated in a monolith to meet compressive strength requirements. This paper gives an overview of results obtained using the ASTM C 1285 Product Consistency Test (PCT), the EPA Test Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the ASTMC 1662 Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) test. Along with these durability tests an overview of the characteristics of the waste form has been collected using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), microwave digestions for chemical composition, and surface area from Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) theory.

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Characterization and Leaching Tests of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Form for LAW Immobilization - 13400  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) have been evaluated. One such immobilization technology is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was involved in an extensive characterization campaign. The goal of this campaign was to study the durability of the FBSR mineral product and the encapsulated FBSR product in a geo-polymer monolith. This paper gives an overview of results obtained using the ASTM C 1285 Product Consistency Test (PCT), the EPA Test Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the ASTMC 1662 Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) test. Along with these durability tests an overview of the characteristics of the waste form has been collected using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), microwave digestions for chemical composition, and surface area from Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) theory. (authors)

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Peterson, Reid A.; Brown, Christopher F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

A thermodynamic model for hydrous silicate melts in the system NaAlSi3O8KAlSi3O8Si4O8H2O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A thermodynamic model for hydrous silicate melts in the system NaAlSi3O8­KAlSi3O8­Si4O8­H2O Marcus ­ remplacé par UMR6113 - ISTO Abstract Computation of crystal­liquid equilibria in hydrous silicate systems system. Author Keywords: Haplogranite system; Hydrous silicate melt; Liquidus phase equilibria; Linear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

Stabilization of Savannah River National Laboartory (SRNL) Aqueous Waste by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) in Aiken, South Carolina. Research and development programs have been conducted at SRNL for {approx}50 years generating non-radioactive (hazardous and non-hazardous) and radioactive aqueous wastes. Typically the aqueous effluents from the R&D activities are disposed of from each laboratory module via the High Activity Drains (HAD) or the Low Activity Drains (LAD) depending on whether they are radioactive or not. The aqueous effluents are collected in holding tanks, analyzed and shipped to either H-Area (HAD waste) or the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) (LAD waste) for volume reduction. Because collection, analysis, and transport of LAD and HAD waste is cumbersome and since future treatment of this waste may be curtailed as the F/H-Area evaporators and waste tanks are decommissioned, SRNL laboratory operations requested several proof of principle demonstrations of alternate technologies that would define an alternative disposal path for the aqueous wastes. Proof of principle for the disposal of SRNL HAD waste using a technology known as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is the focus of the current study. The FBSR technology can be performed either as a batch process, e.g. in each laboratory module in small furnaces with an 8'' by 8'' footprint, or in a semi-continuous Bench Scale Reformer (BSR). The proof of principle experiments described in this study cover the use of the FBSR technology at any scale (pilot or full scale). The proof of principle experiments described in this study used a non-radioactive HAD simulant.

Jantzen, C

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING WITH ACUTAL HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES VERIFYING FBSR AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the cleanup mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplementary treatments being considered. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and other secondary wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates/nitrites, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, and/or radio-nuclides like I-129 and Tc-99. Radioactive testing of Savannah River LAW (Tank 50) shimmed to resemble Hanford LAW and actual Hanford LAW (SX-105 and AN-103) have produced a ceramic (mineral) waste form which is the same as the non-radioactive waste simulants tested at the engineering scale. The radioactive testing demonstrated that the FBSR process can retain the volatile radioactive components that cannot be contained at vitrification temperatures. The radioactive and nonradioactive mineral waste forms that were produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process are shown to be as durable as LAW glass.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

11

MINERALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR): COMPARISONS TO VITREOUS WASTE FORMS, AND PERTINENT DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to generate a document for the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cover the following topics: (1) A description of the mineral structures produced by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) of Hanford type Low Activity Waste (LAW including LAWR which is LAW melter recycle waste) waste, especially the cage structured minerals and how they are formed. (2) How the cage structured minerals contain some contaminants, while others become part of the mineral structure (Note that all contaminants become part of the mineral structure and this will be described in the subsequent sections of this report). (3) Possible contaminant release mechanisms from the mineral structures. (4) Appropriate analyses to evaluate these release mechanisms. (5) Why the appropriate analyses are comparable to the existing Hanford glass dataset. In order to discuss the mineral structures and how they bond contaminants a brief description of the structures of both mineral (ceramic) and vitreous waste forms will be given to show their similarities. By demonstrating the similarities of mineral and vitreous waste forms on atomic level, the contaminant release mechanisms of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous (glass) waste forms can be compared. This will then logically lead to the discussion of why many of the analyses used to evaluate vitreous waste forms and glass-ceramics (also known as glass composite materials) are appropriate for determining the release mechanisms of LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms and how the durability data on LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms relate to the durability data for LAW/LAWR glasses. The text will discuss the LAW mineral waste form made by FBSR. The nanoscale mechanism by which the minerals form will be also be described in the text. The appropriate analyses to evaluate contaminant release mechanisms will be discussed, as will the FBSR test results to date and how they compare to testing performed on LAW glasses. Other details about vitreous waste form durability and impacts of REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) on durability are given in Appendix A. Details about the FBSR process, various pilot scale demonstrations, and applications are given in Appendix B. Details describing all the different leach tests that need to be used jointly to determine the leaching mechanisms of a waste form are given in Appendix C. Cautions regarding the way in which the waste form surface area is measured and in the choice of leachant buffers (if used) are given in Appendix D.

Jantzen, C

2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

12

Durability Testing of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes but especially aqueous high sodium wastes at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The FBSR technology converts organic compounds to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, converts nitrate/nitrite species to N{sub 2}, and produces a solid residue through reactions with superheated steam, the fluidizing media. If clay is added during processing a ''mineralized'' granular waste form can be produced. The mineral components of the waste form are primarily Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The cage and ring structured minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc{sup 99} and Cs{sup 137} and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals appear to stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Durability testing of the FBSR products was performed using ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The FBSR mineral products (bed and fines) evaluated in this study were found to be two orders of magnitude more durable than the Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass requirement of 2 g/m{sup 2} release of Na{sup +}. The PCT responses for the FBSR samples tested were consistent with results from previous FBSR Hanford LAW product testing. Differences in the response can be explained by the minerals formed and their effects on PCT leachate chemistry.

JANTZEN, CAROL M.; PAREIZS, JOHN M.; LORIER, TROY H.; MARRA, JAMES C.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48 RADIOACTIVE WASTE SAMPLE USING FBSR TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC DESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

Hammond, C; William Pepper, W

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

14

Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanfords tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTPs LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at <2g/m2 during ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency) durability testing. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product was investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage. Monolithing in an inorganic geopolymer binder, which is amorphous, macro-encapsulates the granules, and the monoliths pass ANSI/ANS 16.1 and ASTM C1308 durability testing with Re achieving a Leach Index (LI) of 9 (the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, IDF, criteria for Tc-99) after a few days and Na achieving an LI of >6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanfords blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a tie back between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for to

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

15

Experimental determination of the speciation, partitioning, and release of perrhenate as a chemical surrogate for pertechnetate from a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key component to closing the nuclear fuel cycle is the storage and disposition of nuclear waste in geologic systems. Multiphase ceramic waste forms have been studied extensively as a potential host matrix for nuclear waste. Understanding the speciation, partitioning, and release behavior of radionuclides immobilized in multiphase ceramic waste forms is a critical aspect of developing the scientific and technical basis for nuclear waste management. In this study, we evaluated a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form (i.e., fluidized-bed steam reform sodium aluminosilicate [FBSR NAS] product) as a potential host matrix for long-lived radionuclides, such as technetium (99Tc). The FBSR NAS material consists primarily of nepheline (ideally NaAlSiO4), anion-bearing sodalites (ideally M8[Al6Si6O24]X2, where M refers to alkali and alkaline earth cations and X refers to monovalent anions), and nosean (ideally Na8[AlSiO4]6SO4). Bulk X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the multiphase ceramic waste form, suggest rhenium (Re) is in the Re(VII) oxidation state and has partitioned to a Re-bearing sodalite phase (most likely a perrhenate sodalite Na8[Al6Si6O24](ReO4)2). Rhenium was added as a chemical surrogate for 99Tc during the FBSR NAS synthesis process. The weathering behavior of the FBSR NAS material was evaluated under hydraulically unsaturated conditions with deionized water at 90 ?C. The steady-state Al, Na, and Si concentrations suggests the weathering mechanisms are consistent with what has been observed for other aluminosilicate minerals and include a combination of ion exchange, network hydrolysis, and the formation of an enriched-silica surface layer or phase. The steady-state S and Re concentrations are within an order of magnitude of the nosean and perrhenate sodalite solubility, respectively. The order of magnitude difference between the observed and predicted concentration for Re and S may be associated with the fact that the anion-bearing sodalites contained in the multiphase ceramic matrix are present as mixed-anion sodalite phases. These results suggest the multiphase FBSR NAS material may be a viable host matrix for long-lived, highly mobilie radionuclides which is a critical aspect in the management of nuclear waste.

Pierce, Eric M.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Fitts, Jeff. P.; Jantzen, Carol. M.; Tang, G.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Experimental Determination of the Speciation, Partitioning, and Release of Perrhenate as a Chemical Surrogate for Pertechnetate from a Sodalite-Bearing Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key component to closing the nuclear fuel cycle is the storage and disposition of nuclear waste in geologic systems. Multiphase ceramic waste forms have been studied extensively as a potential host matrix for nuclear waste. Understanding the speciation, partitioning, and release behavior of radionuclides immobilized in multiphase ceramic waste forms is a critical aspect of developing the scientific and technical basis for nuclear waste management. In this study, we evaluated a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form (i.e., fluidized-bed steam reform sodium aluminosilicate [FBSR NAS] product) as a potential host matrix for long-lived radionuclides, such as technetium (99Tc). The FBSR NAS material consists primarily of nepheline (ideally NaAlSiO4), anion-bearing sodalites (ideally M8[Al6Si6O24]X2, where M refers to alkali and alkaline earth cations and X refers to monovalent anions), and nosean (ideally Na8[AlSiO4]6SO4). Bulk x-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the multiphase ceramic waste form, suggest rhenium (Re) is in the Re(VII) oxidation state and has partitioned to a Re-bearing sodalite phase (most likely a perrhenate sodalite Na8[Al6Si6O24](ReO4)2). Rhenium was added as a chemical surrogate for 99Tc during the FBSR NAS synthesis process. The weathering behavior of the FBSR NAS material was evaluated under hydraulically unsaturated conditions with deionized water at 90 C. The steady-state Al, Na, and Si concentrations suggests the weathering mechanisms are consistent with what has been observed for other aluminosilicate minerals and include a combination of ion exchange, network hydrolysis, and the formation of an enriched-silica surface layer or phase. The steady-state S and Re concentrations are within an order of magnitude of the nosean and perrhenate sodalite solubility, respectively. The order of magnitude difference between the observed and predicted concentration for Re and S may be associated with the fact that the anion-bearing sodalites contained in the multiphase ceramic matrix are present as mixed-anion sodalite phases. These results suggest the multiphase FBSR NAS material may be a viable host matrix for long-lived, highly mobilie radionuclides which is a critical aspect in the management of nuclear waste.

Pierce, Eric M [ORNL] [ORNL; Lukens, Wayne W [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Fitts, Jeffrey P [Princeton University] [Princeton University; Tang, Guoping [ORNL] [ORNL; Jantzen, C M [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) ORGANIC AND NITRATE DESTRUCTION PRIOR TO VITRIFICATION: CRUCIBLE SCALE TO ENGINEERING SCALE DEMONSTRATIONS AND NON-RADIOACTIVE TO RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over a decade ago, an in-tank precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from radioactive high level waste (HLW) supernates was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The full scale demonstration with actual HLW was performed in SRS Tank 48 (T48). Sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) was added to enable Cs-137 extraction as CsTPB. The CsTPB, an organic, and its decomposition products proved to be problematic for subsequent processing of the Cs-137 precipitate in the SRS HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal in a HLW repository. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a technology for destroying the organics and nitrates in the T48 waste to render it compatible with subsequent HLW vitrification. During FBSR processing the T48 waste is converted into organic-free and nitrate-free carbonate-based minerals which are water soluble. The soluble nature of the carbonate-based minerals allows them to be dissolved and pumped to the vitrification facility or returned to the tank farm for future vitrification. The initial use of the FBSR process for T48 waste was demonstrated with simulated waste in 2003 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a specially designed sealed crucible test that reproduces the FBSR pyrolysis reactions, i.e. carbonate formation, organic and nitrate destruction. This was followed by pilot scale testing of simulants at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science & Technology Application Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and SRNL in 2003-4 and then engineering scale demonstrations by THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) and SRS/SRNL at the Hazen Research, Inc. (HRI) test facility in Golden, CO in 2006 and 2008. Radioactive sealed crucible testing with real T48 waste was performed at SRNL in 2008, and radioactive Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was performed in the SRNL Shielded Cell Facility (SCF) in 2008.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M; Gene Daniel, G; Paul Burket, P; Charles Crawford, C

2009-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

18

Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105, Tank AN-103, And AZ-101/102) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is a robust technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes. Applications have been tested at the pilot scale for the high sodium, sulfate, halide, organic and nitrate wastes at the Hanford site, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). Due to the moderate processing temperatures, halides, sulfates, and technetium are retained in mineral phases of the feldspathoid family (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite, etc). The feldspathoid minerals bind the contaminants such as Tc-99 in cage (sodalite, nosean) or ring (nepheline) structures to surrounding aluminosilicate tetrahedra in the feldspathoid structures. The granular FBSR mineral waste form that is produced has a comparable durability to LAW glass based on the short term PCT testing in this study, the INL studies, SPFT and PUF testing from previous studies as given in the columns in Table 1-3 that represent the various durability tests. Monolithing of the granular product was shown to be feasible in a separate study. Macro-encapsulating the granular product provides a decrease in leaching compared to the FBSR granular product when the geopolymer is correctly formulated.

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

19

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE (WTP-SW) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanfords tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanfords WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular products (both simulant and radioactive) were tested and a subset of the granular material (both simulant and radioactive) were stabilized in a geopolymer matrix. Extensive testing and characterization of the granular and monolith material were made including the following: ? ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) testing of granular and monolith; ? ASTM C1308 accelerated leach testing of the radioactive monolith; ? ASTM C192 compression testing of monoliths; and ? EPA Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The significant findings of the testing completed on simulant and radioactive WTP-SW are given below: ? Data indicates {sup 99}Tc, Re, Cs, and I

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

20

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO4, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Porting the NAS-NPB Conjugate Gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.kr/Center_for_Manycore_Programming/SNU_NPB_Suite.html NPB Benchmarks #12;! "A conjugate gradient method is used to compute an approximation to the smallestPorting the NAS-NPB Conjugate Gradient Benchmark to CUDA NVIDIA Corporation #12;Outline ! Overview coding methodologies and architectures. ! Suite of benchmarks: ! Integer Sort ! Conjugate Gradient ! CFD

Crawford, T. Daniel

23

EEG Response to NAS WIPP Committee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizes dynamics inE-printEEG RESPONSE TO NAS

24

atendimento nas unidades: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agenda Storage : DAS SAN NAS Dploiement VLAN - 802.1Q Gestion d Scurisation de Windows Scurisation de UNIX Qu'est-ce...

25

acacia dealbata nas: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the significant effort underway to integrate UAV operations in the NAS, a preliminary hazard analysis was conducted for two critical hazards of UAV operation. Models were...

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - airspace system nas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

USAEurope Air Traffic Management Research and Development Seminar (ATM2009) A Comparison of Algorithm Generated Summary: for the National Airspace System (NAS), ns(NAS), at...

27

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricola nas proximidades Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de Fsica, Universidade Federal do Paran Collection: Physics 43 Programa de seguimiento y planificacin de especies amenazadas de Canarias Summary: linearizado nas...

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliovalentes nas propriedades Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

os surfistas nas ondas do mar, tambm os electres Source: Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica - Polo de Lisboa (Institute for Systems and Robotics, Lisbon pole) Portugal...

29

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesignOffice - 201420122 DOE Hydrogen andTechnology

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - agua nas palhadas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: agua nas palhadas Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Fonaments d'Ones, Fluids i Termodinamica curs 2011-2012 Coleccion de Problemas I (Fluidos) Summary: la...

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - activities score nas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

land areas that are multi-cropped with rice. NAS data for most countries (all except India Source: New Hampshire, University of - Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and...

32

GaNAsP: An intermediate band semiconductor grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dilute nitride GaNAsP thin films were grown via a GaAsP metamorphic buffer on GaP(100) substrate with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The compositions of this III-V-V-V compound were determined by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis. Photoreflectance shows two distinctive transitions from the valence band to the split conduction bands due to N incorporation. Photoluminescence and optical absorption show the fundamental bandgap of Ga(N)AsP is largely tailored by the small amount of N. The observed multiband characteristics and the bandgap tunability of GaNAsP are two merits that fit into the intermediate-band solar cell roadmap, and GaNAsP of high crystal quality provides a strong candidate for intermediate band solar cell materials.

Kuang, Y. J. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W. [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kudrawiec, R. [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze, Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Luce, A. V. [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Electronic Materials Program, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ting, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tu, C. W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

33

Propuesta de autorizacin para entornos Grid basada en la arquitectura NAS-SAML  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Propuesta de autorización para entornos Grid basada en la arquitectura NAS-SAML Manuel Sánchez1 que acceden a sus recursos. Se han propuesto varias arquitecturas de autorización para este tipo de como un recurso más. La arquitectura AAA fue diseñada para resolver este problema usando diferentes

Sánchez Cuenca, Manuel

34

Effect of antimony on the deep-level traps in GaInNAsSb thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Admittance spectroscopy has been performed to investigate the effect of antimony (Sb) on GaInNAs material in relation to the deep-level defects in this material. Two electron traps, E1 and E2 at an energy level 0.12 and 0.41?eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}), respectively, were found in undoped GaInNAs. Bias-voltage dependent admittance confirmed that E1 is an interface-type defect being spatially localized at the GaInNAs/GaAs interface, while E2 is a bulk-type defect located around mid-gap of GaInNAs layer. Introduction of Sb improved the material quality which was evident from the reduction of both the interface and bulk-type defects.

Islam, Muhammad Monirul, E-mail: islam.monir.ke@u.tsukuba.ac.jp; Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

CLEARANCE OF BULK MATERIALS FROM D&D - LIFE AFTER THE NAS REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lack of consistent free release standards for solid materials has been an issue that has been around for several decades. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has had specific and dose-based standards for the release of liquids and gases for several decades, but no regulatory mechanisms for the release of solid materials from a nuclear power plant. Even though free releases of small quantities of solid materials continue under existing guidelines from operating plants, the regulatory void creates major difficulties for the bulk materials that result from decommissioning projects. For the nation's fleet of nuclear reactors the cost of this regulatory void could be as high as $10 billion. The NRC has recently resumed the enhanced rulemaking process that was originally initiated in 1999 but was deferred pending a study by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS)/National Research Council. The NAS report and recommendations were issued in March 2002 and the NRC decided in October 2002 to resume the rulemaking process. This paper provides an overview of the developments in this area. It specifically discusses the applicability of ANSI N13.12 as a consensus standard that should be seriously considered for adoption as a regulatory standard.

Devgun, Jas S., Ph.D.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

36

Theoretical studies of optical gain tuning by hydrostatic pressure in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to describe theoretically the tuning of the optical gain by hydrostatic pressure in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs), the optical gain calculations within kp approach were developed and applied for N-containing and N-free QWs. The electronic band structure and the optical gain for GaInNAs/GaAs QW were calculated within the 10-band kp model which takes into account the interaction of electron levels in the QW with the nitrogen resonant level in GaInNAs. It has been shown that this interaction increases with the hydrostatic pressure and as a result the optical gain for GaInNAs/GaAs QW decreases by about 40% and 80% for transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes, respectively, for the hydrostatic pressure change from 0 to 40 kilobars. Such an effect is not observed for N-free QWs where the dispersion of electron and hole energies remains unchanged with the hydrostatic pressure. This is due to the fact that the conduction and valence band potentials in GaInAs/GaAs QW scale linearly with the hydrostatic pressure.

Gladysiewicz, M.; Wartak, M. S. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27 (Poland); Department of Physics and Computer Science, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); Kudrawiec, R. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27 (Poland)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

37

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 341342. On -Wild Algebras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 2, 341­342. On -Wild) be the group C-algebra. Definition (see [1]). We call a discrete group F -wild if there exist n N of -wild groups (other than the semi-direct products F G, where F is a wild group). Note that the group W

Popovych, Roman

38

Nonlinear absorption edge properties of 1.3-m GaInNAs saturable R. Grange,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-starting and stable operation of the laser at tens of GHz repetition rates.4 So far, InGaAsP,5 InGaAs,6,7 and AlNonlinear absorption edge properties of 1.3- m GaInNAs saturable absorbers R. Grange,a A. Rutz, V above the PL peak and R scales with the linear absorption even in the bandtail. The product R

Keller, Ursula

39

Nitrogen-concentration control in GaNAs/AlGaAs quantum wells using nitrogen ?-doping technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GaNAs/Al{sub 0.35}Ga{sub 0.65}As multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with nitrogen ?-doping were fabricated on GaAs (100) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High controllability of nitrogen-concentrations in the MQWs was achieved by tuning nitrogen ?-doping time. The maximum nitrogen concentration in the MQWs was 2.8%. The MQWs exhibit intense, narrow photoluminescence emission.

Mano, Takaaki; Jo, Masafumi; Kuroda, Takashi; Noda, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Sakuma, Yoshiki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Elborg, Martin; Sakoda, Kazuaki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

1.22 {mu}m GaInNAs Saturable Absorber Mirrors with Tailored Recovery Time  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of in-situ N-ion irradiation on the recombination dynamics of GaInNAs/GaAs semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors has been studied. The samples were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy using a radio frequency plasma source for nitrogen incorporation in the absorber layers as well as for the irradiation. The recombination dynamics of irradiated samples were studied by pump-probe measurements. The recombination time of the absorbers could be reduced by increasing the irradiation time. The effect of the reduced recombination time on the pulse dynamics of a mode-locked laser setup was studied with a Bi-doped fibre laser. The pulse quality was found to improve with increased irradiation time and reduced recombination time, demonstrating the potential of the in-situ irradiation method for device applications.

Puustinen, Janne; Guina, Mircea; Korpijaervi, Ville-Markus; Tukiainen, Antti; Kivistoe, Samuli; Pessa, Markus [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland); Marcinkevicius, Saulius [Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 16440, Kista (Sweden)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Study of a 1?eV GaNAsSb photovoltaic cell grown on a silicon substrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the performance of a 1?eV GaNAsSb photovoltaic cell grown on a Si substrate with a SiGe graded buffer grown using molecular beam epitaxy. For comparison, the performance of a similar 1?eV GaN{sub 0.018}As{sub 0.897}Sb{sub 0.085} photovoltaic cell grown on a GaAs substrate was also reported. Both devices were in situ annealed at 700?C for 5?min, and a significant performance improvement over our previous result was observed. The device on the GaAs substrate showed a low open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of 0.42?V and a short circuit current density (J{sub SC}) of 23.4?mA/cm{sup 2} while the device on the Si substrate showed a V{sub OC} of 0.39?V and a J{sub SC} of 21.3?mA/cm{sup 2}. Both devices delivered a quantum efficiency of 50%55% without any anti-reflection coating.

Tan, K. H.; Loke, W. K.; Wicaksono, S.; Li, D.; Leong, Y. R.; Yoon, S. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sharma, P.; Milakovich, T.; Bulsara, M. T.; Fitzgerald, E. A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

My Documents\\Presentations\\IFE\\NAS\\JCF_IFE_NAS_LANL_V4Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Slide 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Slide 1 Prospects for Inertial Fusion\\Presentations\\IFE\\NAS\\JCF_IFE_NAS_LANL_V4Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Slide 3 LANL fully supports

43

Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational EnergyCommitteeRenewable1234Department ofTechnology FactKey

44

Report for Treating Hanford LAW and WTP SW Simulants: Pilot Plant Mineralizing Flowsheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is responsible for managing the disposal of radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site in Washington State. The Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant (WPT) will separate the waste into a small volume of high level waste (HLW), containing most of the radioactive constituents, and a larger volume of low activity waste (LAW), containing most of the non-radioactive chemical and hazardous constituents. The HLW and LAW will be converted into immobilized waste forms for disposal. Currently there is inadequate LAW vitrification capacity planned at the WTP to complete the mission within the required timeframe. Therefore additional LAW capacity is required. One candidate supplemental treatment technology is the fluidized bed steam reformer process (FBSR). This report describes the demonstration testing of the FBSR process using a mineralizing flowsheet for treating simulated Hanford LAW and secondary waste from the WTP (WTP SW). The FBSR testing project produced leach-resistant solid products and environmentally compliant gaseous effluents. The solid products incorporated normally soluble ions into an alkali alumino-silicate (NaS) mineral matrix. Gaseous emissions were found to be within regulatory limits. Cesium and rhenium were captured in the mineralized products with system removal efficiencies of 99.999% and 99.998 respectively. The durability and leach performance of the FBSR granular solid were superior to the low activity reference material (LMR) glass standards. Normalized product consistency test (PCT) release rates for constituents of concern were approximately 2 orders of magnitude less than that of sodium in the Hanford glass [standard].

Arlin Olson

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

Map of a UAV flight operation in the NAS at the JER. The initial external pilot (EP) position is at P0. The UAV is launched at the red cross position into the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Map of a UAV flight operation in the NAS at the JER. The initial external pilot (EP) position holding orbit. Once the EP has moved from P0 to P1, the UAV acquires imagery over the first flight area in the northwest near P1. After completion, the UAV is moved back to H1. The EP Rangeland Resource Assessment

46

Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS Dploiement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'une infrastructure informatique ­ SLA, KPI, ITIL · Politique de sécurité / ISO17799 alias ISO/IEC 27002

Collette. Sébastien

47

nas82d5.tmp  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE J. NoremImwileyII: Early Government

48

CX-004176: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Making Nepheline (NaAlSiO4), Phase Pure StandardsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 09/23/2010Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

49

NAS-NS-3008[Rev.) NUCLEARSCIENCESERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory FL P. Schuman Atomic Ensrgy Division Phillips Petroleum Company (Idaho Fall&) A. W. Fairhrdl E. P Massachusetts Institute of Technology #12;Radiochemistry of Rhodium James C. Armstrong, Jr. Florida State i

50

NATIVE AMERICAN www.nas.pdx.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Anthropology Homepage: http://web.pdx.edu/~tthornto Don Tyree (Cherokee), Prof. Emeritus of English Tabitha

51

UESC Success Stories at NAS Pensacola  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers utility energy service contract (UESC) success stories at Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast PWD given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Spring 2008 meeting in Destin, Florida.

52

NAS-NS-3002[Rev.) NUCLEARSCIENCESERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Scientific Reeeweh J. Howard Mcbfillen Nationn.1Sctence Foundation smmmllmm~ N. E. -U, Chairman W. E. Nervlk.awrence Hadiatloo Laboratory Phillipe Petroleum Company (Idaho Falls) A W. Fsdrhell E. P. Steinberg Urdversity--National Research Council Printed in USA. Price $1.00. Available from the Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific

53

Multiband GaNAsP Quaternary Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have synthesized GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-y}P{sub y} alloys (x {approx} 0.3-1% and y = 0-0.4) using nitrogen N ion implantation into GaAsP epilayers followed by pulsed laser melting and rapid thermal annealing techniques. As predicted by the band anticrossing model, the incorporation of N splits the conduction band (E{sub M}) of the GaAs{sub 1-y}P{sub y} substrate, and strong optical transitions from the valence band to the lower (E{sub -}) and upper (E{sub +}) conduction subbands are observed. The relative strengths of the E{sub -} and E{sub +} transition change as the localized N level E{sub N} emerges from the conduction band forming narrow intermediate band for y > 0.3. The results show that GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x-y}P{sub y} alloys with y > 0.3 is a three band semiconductor alloy with potential applications for high-efficiency intermediate band solar cells.

Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Bour, D.; Farshchi,R.; Dubon, O.D.; Li, S.X.; Sharp, I.D.; Haller, E.E.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

54

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on SRS Low Activity Waste (LAW) modified to simulate Hanford waste....

55

automation system nas: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ioannou A, utomatic is todesign and test avehicle control system in order toachieve full vehicle automation in the longitudinal vehicle following isan important feature of a fully...

56

Negociao-Colaborao nas Revises Tcnicas Formais de Especificaes Funcionais  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processo de negociação-colaboração e propõe o aperfeiçoamento do apoio metodológico e computacional ao

Antunes, Pedro

57

Comparison of leading parallel NAS file systems on commodity hardware  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High performance computing has experienced tremendous gains in system performance over the past 20 years. Unfortunately other system capabilities, such as file I/O, have not grown commensurately. In this activity, we present the results of our tests of two leading file systems (GPFS and Lustre) on the same physical hardware. This hardware is the standard commodity storage solution in use at LLNL and, while much smaller in size, is intended to enable us to learn about differences between the two systems in terms of performance, ease of use and resilience. This work represents the first hardware consistent study of the two leading file systems that the authors are aware of.

Hedges, R; Fitzgerald, K; Gary, M; Stearman, D M

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

58

Kathy Yelick Appointed to NAS Computer Science and Telecommunications...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Appointed to National Academies Computer Science and Telecommunications Board Kathy Yelick Appointed to National Academies Computer Science and Telecommunications Board September...

59

alta resolucao nas: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de Computacion Cientifica y Programacion Paralela http:luna.inf.um.esgrupo investigacion San Alberto, 14 noviembre 2014 Computacion de Altas Prestaciones San...

60

Kathy Yelick Appointed to NAS Computer Science and Telecommunications Board  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation forTechnologiesDialysis Provider3KarlKathy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NAS Report and Microsite Trace SSL Evolution and Future Promise |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev.TechDepartment of Energy

62

SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the sample selection, sample preparation, environmental, and regulatory considerations for shipment of Hanford radioactive waste samples for treatability studies of the FBSR process at the Savannah River National Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

ROBBINS RA

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

63

Summary - Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ng (FBSR). Th deciding which ng the Tank 48 he TRA Team m determined t ts (CTEs) and t ess Level (TRL) on Process: stem (TRL3) atment System RA reports, please v govPages...

64

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT...

65

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR THE BENCH STEAM REFORMER TEST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing. The type, quantity and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluid bed steam reformer (FBSR). A determination of the adequacy of the FBSR process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the FBSR process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used to test the FBSR process. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the testing criteria.

BANNING DL

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

66

Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105 And AN-103) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the immobilization technologies under consideration as a Supplemental Treatment for Hanfords Low Activity Waste (LAW) is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). The FBSR technology forms a mineral waste form at moderate processing temperatures thus retaining and atomically bonding the halides, sulfates, and technetium in the mineral phases (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite). Additions of kaolin clay are used instead of glass formers and the minerals formed by the FBSR technology offers (1) atomic bonding of the radionuclides and constituents of concern (COC) comparable to glass, (2) short and long term durability comparable to glass, (3) disposal volumes comparable to glass, and (4) higher Na2O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings than glass. The higher FBSR Na{sub 2}O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings contribute to the low disposal volumes but also provide for more rapid processing of the LAW. Recent FBSR processing and testing of Hanford radioactive LAW (Tank SX-105 and AN-103) waste is reported and compared to previous radioactive and non-radioactive LAW processing and testing.

Jantzen, Carol; Herman, Connie; Crawford, Charles; Bannochie, Christopher; Burket, Paul; Daniel, Gene; Cozzi, Alex; Nash, Charles; Miller, Donald; Missimer, David

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Integrated Approach to Evaluating Risk Mitigation Measures for UAV Operational Concepts in the NAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An integrated approach is outlined in this paper to evaluate risks posed by operating Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace System. The approach supports the systematic evaluation of potential risk mitigation ...

Weibel, Roland E

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

69

NAS battery demonstration at American Electric Power:a study for the DOE energy storage program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first U.S. demonstration of the NGK sodium/sulfur battery technology was launched in August 2002 when a prototype system was installed at a commercial office building in Gahanna, Ohio. American Electric Power served as the host utility that provided the office space and technical support throughout the project. The system was used to both reduce demand peaks (peak-shaving operation) and to mitigate grid power disturbances (power quality operation) at the demonstration site. This report documents the results of the demonstration, provides an economic analysis of a commercial sodium/sulfur battery energy storage system at a typical site, and describes a side-by-side demonstration of the capabilities of the sodium/sulfur battery system, a lead-acid battery system, and a flywheel-based energy storage system in a power quality application.

Newmiller, Jeff (Endecon Engineering, San Ramon, CA); Norris, Benjamin L. (Norris Energy Consulting Company, Martinez, CA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

DO "PRETO" DO CESTO AO MOLEQUE DO VINTM: A ESCRAVIDO NAS COMDIAS DE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aproximadamente de dois terços de negros, escravos ou livres5 e concentrava-se no Rio de Janeiro, a "Corte" onde (24%).9 Além disso, em meados do século XIX era ela que comercializava no mercado exterior a maior

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced supercomputing nas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Nanostructure electronics 3. Atomic chain electronics 4. Quantum optoelectronics (Web page: ... Source: Biegel, Bryan - Advanced Supercomputing Division, NASA...

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - autores nas revistas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instituto de Qumica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas Collection: Chemistry 4 CURRICULUM VITAE ET STUDIORUM Nombre: Felix Ritort Farran Summary: -Glass Model REVISTA: Journal...

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - alto impacto nas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de jarabe de glucosa con un alto contenido de maltosa o mediante la hidrogenacin de... Impacto Ambiental de proyectos La disposicin final sptima de la Ley 342007, de 15 de...

74

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambientais nas nascentes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

problemas ligados aos Estudos Ambientais, onde grande o impacto do... , Avaliao de Impacto Ambiental, Ordenamento Territorial e os Prognsticos Ambientais. Nesta viso, os...

75

Crdito e Confiana: a influncia das normas sociais nas relaes de crdito  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sem confiana? Bibliografia Arida, P. , Bacha, E. , & Lara-indiretamente, a lei Ver Arida, P. , Bacha, E. , & Lara-

Flores Filho, Edgar Gastn Jacobs; Lopes, Lucas Miotto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - agulha fina nas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Escolano, Francisco - Departamento de Ciencia de la Computacin e Inteligencia Artificial, Universitat d'Alacant Collection: Engineering Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << <...

77

Thermoelectric and electrical characterization of Si nanowires and GaNAs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1.2 Peltier and Thompson effects . . . . . . . . . . 1.2and (b) Peltier cooler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .leading to larger |S|. Peltier and Thompson effects The

Pichanusakorn, Paothep

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

fortunate position of "preaching to the choir" today. After all, there are few things we care more passionately about than the need to strengthen America's position in the world...

79

E-Print Network 3.0 - area rural nas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Friday, November 19, 2010 Summary: areas." Even without the changes caused by health care reform, Hart says the nation's rural areas have... showed that while more than 20...

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - adotadas nas maternidades Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

por dois perodos... Maternidade: Art. 30, Pargrafo nico*: Aplica-se o disposto neste artigo aos afastamentos em razo de Source: Floeter, Sergio Ricardo - Departamento de...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente nas cidades Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a qualidade ... Source: Camara, Gilberto - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (Brasil) Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences ; Environmental Sciences...

82

Crdito e Confiana: a influncia das normas sociais nas relaes de crdito  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Brazil. MIT Press, 2005. BRASIL. Cdigo Civil. So Paulo:da Repblica Federativa do Brasil. Braslia: Senado, 2006.na Nota do Banco Central do Brasil de 25-08-2008). Edio de

Flores Filho, Edgar Gastn Jacobs; Lopes, Lucas Miotto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - aleitamento materno nas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Anthology Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 2 ROBERTA MARIA PEREIRA LEITE CICLO ESTRAL E MENSTRUAL: REPERCUSSO DA Summary: houve alterao da...

84

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMAMayCrossColoradoMotionMunicipalCodesLater:

85

Two-Meter Temperature Surveys for Geothermal Exploration Project at NAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformationTulsa,TuscarawasFallon | Open Energy Information

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - achados tomograficos nas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nos Summary: sintomas, achados no exame fsico e alteraes eletrocardiogrficas (ECG) caractersticas. Em 49-76% os... ) Gravidade - Classe I: incio recente -...

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - agressividade nas pessoas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

VISGRAF Instituto de Matematica Pura e Aplicada Summary: Lucinelma Pessoa Albuquerque Luiz Velho (orientador) Technical Report TR-02-04 Relatorio Tecnico June... Lucinelma...

88

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 6976 Bogoyavlenskij Symmetries of Isotropic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but are not limited to the problem of controlled thermonuclear fusion, astrophysical applications (star formation

Popovych, Roman

89

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 540547 Quantum Algebras, Particle Phenomenology,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Algebras, Particle Phenomenology, and (Quasi)Supersymmetry A.M. GAVRILIK Bogolyubov Institute, within the application of quantum algebras Uq(sun) [1, 2] to phenomenological description (see [3, 4, 7 for the Gi, ¯Gi) have been utilized. By means of #12;Quantum Algebras, Particle Phenomenology

Popovych, Roman

90

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 196203 Symmetries of Differential Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Snezhinsk, Chelyabinsk Region, Russia E-mail: morozov@sfti.snz.ru Applications of Cartan's equivalence

Popovych, Roman

91

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2000, Vol. 30, Part 1, 239244. On Invariant Wave Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

substances ­ concrete, air- liquid mixtures, polymers and so on. When studying high-speed high-frequency) sound velocity, is the time of relaxation, is equal to the square of frozen (high-frequency) sound

Popovych, Roman

92

Radionuclide and contaminant immobilization in the fluidized bed steam reforming waste products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process and resulting waste form. The first section of the chapter gives an overview of the potential need for FBSR processing in nuclear waste remediation followed by an overview of the engineering involved in the process itself. This is followed by a description of waste form production at a chemical level followed by a section describing different process streams that have undergone the FBSR process. The third section describes the resulting mineral product in terms of phases that are present and the ability of the waste form to encapsulate hazardous and radioactive wastes from several sources. Following this description is a presentation of the physical properties of the granular and monolith waste form product including and contaminant release mechanisms. The last section gives a brief summary of this chapter and includes a section on the strengths associated with this waste form and the needs for additional data and remaining questions yet to be answered. The reader is directed elsewhere for more information on other waste forms such as Cast Stone (Lockrem, 2005), Ceramicrete (Singh et al., 1997, Wagh et al., 1999) and geopolymers (Kyritsis et al., 2009; Russell et al., 2006).

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Brown, Christopher F.; Jantzen, Carol; Pierce, Eric M.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101 & 241AZ-102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-l0-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FBSR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-5.2.1-2010-001, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of both experimental and modeling studies performed using Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulants and FBSR product from Tank 48 simulant testing in order to develop higher levels of coal-carbon that can be managed by DWPF. Once the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process starts up for treatment of Tank 48 legacy waste, the FBSR product stream will contribute higher levels of coal-carbon in the sludge batch for processing at DWPF. Coal-carbon is added into the FBSR process as a reductant and some of it will be present in the FBSR product as unreacted coal. The FBSR product will be slurried in water, transferred to Tank Farm and will be combined with sludge and washed to produce the sludge batch that DWPF will process. The FBSR product is high in both water soluble sodium carbonate and unreacted coal-carbon. Most of the sodium carbonate is removed during washing but all of the coal-carbon will remain and become part of the DWPF sludge batch. A paper study was performed earlier to assess the impact of FBSR coal-carbon on the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) operation and melter off-gas flammability by combining it with SB10-SB13. The results of the paper study are documented in Ref. 7 and the key findings included that SB10 would be the most difficult batch to process with the FBSR coal present and up to 5,000 mg/kg of coal-carbon could be fed to the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. In the present study, a bench-scale demonstration of the DWPF CPC processing was performed using SB10 simulants spiked with varying amounts of coal, and the resulting seven CPC products were fed to the DWPF melter cold cap and off-gas dynamics models to determine the maximum coal that can be processed through the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. Based on the results of these experimental and modeling studies, the presence of coal-carbon in the sludge feed to DWPF is found to have both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off-gas flammability safety basis limits during the 9X/5X off-gas surge for normal bubbled melter

Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

December 1415, 2007 Meeting BOARD ON PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY Tel 202-334-3520 Fax 202-334-3575 E-mail bpa@nas.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Japanese participation in ITER and research plans S. Matsuda, Japan Atomic Energy Agency 3:00 pm Break 3 Activities of the U.S. BPO long-range burning plasma program strategy subcommittee E. Marmar, MIT 5:00 pm U.S. engagement in ITER technology research S. Milora, ORNL 5:45 pm Adjourn #12;6:30 pm Working dinner at local

96

Issued 02/03/2011 BOARD ON PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY Tel 202-334-3520 Fax 202-334-3575 E-mail bpa@nas.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drivers (NRL) High-Repetition-Rate Solid-State Laser Drivers (LLNL) Heavy Ion Accelerator Drivers (LBNL) Pulsed Power Drivers (Sandia) Laser-Plasma Interactions (LLNL) Beam-Plasma Interactions (LBNL

97

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 1, 219223 Lie Symmetries of (1+1)-Dimensional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Theorem 1. Any operator Q = tt + xx + + from the maximal Lie invariance algebra Amax(V ) of equation (1 + x Vx + t tV = 0. (3) #12;220 R.O. Popovych, N.M. Ivanova and H. Eshraghi Note 1. The linear span fields. Since for any Q A where (t, x) = (0, 0) we can find V satisfying condition (3) then A = V Amax

Popovych, Roman

98

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 2, 843849 Nonlinear Amplitude MaxwellDirac Equations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Thus, NME is written as a set of Nonlinear Dirac Equations (NDE). Exact solutions of NDE with classical that the optical analogy of the Nonlinear Dirac Equations of field (NDE) leads to a nonlinear part only in the first coupled equation. This result allows to solve the NDE by separation of variables and to obtain

Popovych, Roman

99

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

100

JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for an assessment of the flow patterns on the tank mixing. Pump design and operating parameters used for the analysis are summarized in Table 1. The baseline pump orientations are chosen by the previous work [Lee et. al, 2008] and the initial engineering judgement for the conservative flow estimate since the modeling results for the other pump orientations are compared with the baseline results. As shown in Table 1, the present study assumes that each slurry pump has 900 gpm flowrate for the tank mixing analysis, although the Standard Operating Procedure for Tank 48 currently limits the actual pump speed and flowrate to a value less than 900 gpm for a 29 inch liquid level. Table 2 shows material properties and weight distributions for the solids to be modeled for the mixing analysis in Tank 48.

Lee, S.

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.'

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

Performance of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming product under hydraulically unsaturated conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several candidates for supplemental low-activity waste (LAW) immobilization at the Hanford site in Washington State, USA are being considered. One waste sequestering technology considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). The granular product resulting from the FBSR process is composed primarily of an insoluble sodium aluminosilicate matrix with the dominant phases being feldspathoid minerals with a 1:1:1 molar ratio of Na, Al and Si. To demonstrate the durability of the product, which can be disposed of at the unsaturated Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford, a series of tests has been performed using the Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) system, which allows for the accelerated weathering of the solid materials. The system maintains hydraulically unsaturated conditions, thus mimicking the open-flow and transport properties that will be present at the IDF. Two materials were tested using the system: 1) the FBSR granular product and 2) the FBSR granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer to form a monolith. Results of the experiments show a trend of relatively constant effluent concentration of Na, Si, Al, and Cs as a function of time from both materials. The elements I and Re show a steady release throughout the yearlong test from the granular material but their concentrations seem to be increasing at one year from the monolith material. This result suggests that these two elements may be present in the sodalite cage structure rather than in the predominant nepheline phase because their release occurs at a different rate compared to nepheline phase. Also, these elements to not seem to reprecipitate when released from the starting material. Calculated one-year release rates for Si are on the order of 10 6 g/(m2 d) for the granular material and 10 5 g/(m2 d) for the monolith material while Re release is seen to be two orders of magnitude higher than Si release rates. SEM imaging and XRD analysis show how the alteration of the two materials is dependent on their depth in the column. This phenomenom is a result of depth-dependent solution concentrations giving rise chemical environments that may be supersaturated with respect to a number of mineral phases.

Neeway, James J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rod, Kenton A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Bowden, Mark E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Pierce, Eric M [ORNL] [ORNL; Qafoku, Nikolla [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Williams, Benjamin D [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Brown, Christopher F [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

Williams, M

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

Performance of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product Under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, several candidates for secondary waste immobilization at the Hanford site in the State of Washington, USA are being considered. To demonstrate the durability of the product in the unsaturated Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the site, a series of tests have been performed one of the candidate materials using the Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) system. The material that was tested was the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) granular product and the granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix. The FBSR product is composed primarily of an insoluble sodium aluminosilicate matrix with the dominant phases being feldspathoid minerals mostly nepheline, sodalite, and nosean. The PUF test method allows for the accelerated weathering of materials, including radioactive waste forms, under hydraulically unsaturated conditions, thus mimicking the open-flow and transport properties that most likely will be present at the IDF. The experiments show a trend of decreasing tracer release as a function of time for several of the elements released from the material including Na, Si, Al, and Cs. However, some of the elements, notably I and Re, show a steady release throughout the yearlong test. This result suggests that the release of these minerals from the sodalite cage occurs at a different rate compared with the dissolution of the predominant nepheline phase.

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Rod, Kenton A.; Bowden, Mark E.; Brown, Christopher F.; Pierce, Eric M.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT FOR HANFORD'S LOW ACTIVITY WASTE AND SECONDARY WASTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of I-125/129 and Tc-99 to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Ninety six grams of radioactive product were made for testing. The second campaign commenced using SRS LAW chemically trimmed to look like Hanford's LAW. Six hundred grams of radioactive product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Cozzi, A.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Daniel, G.

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

106

Two Ohio State researchers elected to National Academy of Sciences Two Ohio State professors have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), one of the most prestigious  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Henkin, professor and chair of microbiology and the Robert W. and Estelle S. Bingham Professor-effective replacement for precious metal cathodes in batteries and fuels. Award celebrates research that improves health

107

Chemical and Hydrostatic Pressure in Natrolites: Pressure Induced Hydration of an Aluminogermanate Natrolite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ambient structure and pressure-induced structural changes of a synthetic sodium aluminogermanate with a natrolite (NAT) framework topology (Na-AlGe-NAT) were characterized by using Rietveld refinements of high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data at ambient and high pressures. Unlike a previously established model for Na{sub 8}Al{sub 8}Ge{sub 12}O{sub 40} {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}O based on a single-crystal study, the ambient structure of the Na-AlGe-NAT is found to adopt a monoclinic space group Cc (or Fd) with a ca. 6% expanded unit cell. The refined ambient structure of Na{sub 8}Al{sub 8}Ge{sub 12}O{sub 40} {center_dot} 12H{sub 2}O indicates an increased water content of 50%, compared to the single-crystal structure. The unit-cell volume and water-content relationships observed between the two Na-AlGe-NAT structures at ambient conditions with 8 and 12 H{sub 2}O respectively seem to mirror the ones found under hydrostatic pressure between the Na{sub 8}Al{sub 8}Ge{sub 12}O{sub 40} {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}O and the parantrolite phase Na{sub 8}Al{sub 8}Ge{sub 12}O{sub 40} {center_dot} 12H{sub 2}O. Under hydrostatic pressures mediated by a pore-penetrating alcohol and water mixture, the monoclinic Na-AlGe-NAT exhibits a gradual decrease of the unit-cell volume up to ca. 2.0 GPa, where the unit-cell volume then contracts abruptly by ca. 4.6%. This is in marked contrast to what is observed in the Na-AlSi-NAT and Na-GaSi-NAT systems, where one observes a pressure-induced hydration and volume expansion due to the auxetic nature of the frameworks. Above 2 GPa, the monoclinic phase of Na-AlGe-NAT transforms into a tetragonal structure with the unit-cell composition of Na{sub 8}Al{sub 8}Ge{sub 12}O{sub 40} {center_dot} 16H{sub 2}O, revealing pressure-induced hydration and a unit cell volume contraction. Unlike in the Na-Al,Si-paranatrolite phase, however, the sodium cations in the Na-AlGe-NAT maintain a 6-fold coordination in the monoclinic structure and only become 7-fold coordinated at higher pressures in the tetragonal structure. When comparing the pressure-induced hydration in the observed natrolite-type zeolites, Na-AlGe-NAT appears to have a nonauxetic framework and reveals the highest onset pressure for complete superhydration.

Lee, Y.; Kao, C.; Seoung,D.H.,Bai,J., Kao,C.C.; Parise,J.B.; Vogt, T.

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

Optical Basicity and Nepheline Crystallization in High Alumina Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to find compositions that increase waste loading of high-alumina wastes beyond what is currently acceptable while avoiding crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) on slow cooling. Nepheline crystallization has been shown to have a large impact on the chemical durability of high-level waste glasses. It was hypothesized that there would be some composition regions where high-alumina would not result in nepheline crystal production, compositions not currently allowed by the nepheline discriminator. Optical basicity (OB) and the nepheline discriminator (ND) are two ways of describing a given complex glass composition. This report presents the theoretical and experimental basis for these models. They are being studied together in a quadrant system as metrics to explore nepheline crystallization and chemical durability as a function of waste glass composition. These metrics were calculated for glasses with existing data and also for theoretical glasses to explore nepheline formation in Quadrant IV (passes OB metric but fails ND metric), where glasses are presumed to have good chemical durability. Several of these compositions were chosen, and glasses were made to fill poorly represented regions in Quadrant IV. To evaluate nepheline formation and chemical durability of these glasses, quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the Product Consistency Test were conducted. A large amount of quantitative XRD data is collected here, both from new glasses and from glasses of previous studies that had not previously performed quantitative XRD on the phase assemblage. Appendix A critically discusses a large dataset to be considered for future quantitative studies on nepheline formation in glass. Appendix B provides a theoretical justification for choice of the oxide coefficients used to compute the OB criterion for nepheline formation.

Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Winschell, Abigail E.

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

109

Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4). In general, higher [H4SiO4] leads to lower dissolution rates. It has often been observed that the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products can cause the dissolution of the glass to increase, even after the rate has decreased significantly. However, it has also been observed that in the concentrations of these silica-bearing solution species do not significantly decrease while other elements continue to be released. In this study, we have used the Geochemists Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a silica-bearing alteration product, analcime (Na(AlSi2O6)?H2O). In this initial study and to simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The cross affinity code option allowed us to account for the fact that glass is a thermodynamically unstable solid with respect to its alteration products in contact with water. The cross-affinity option in the Geochemists Workbench geochemical code allowed us to substitute the amorphous silica equilibrium-constant matrix for the glass equilibrium-constant matrix. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. In all cases, our results indicate that the glass dissolution rate controls the rate of analcime precipitation in the long term. Our results, compared in general terms with experiments, show the importance of the gel layer that forms during glass alteration. The meaning of these results pertinent to long-term glass durability is discussed.

Strachan, Denis M.; Neeway, James J.

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

111

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Zinc- Air Battery Demand Response CostsSodium Sulfur (NaS) Zinc- Air Battery Low High AverageSodium Sulfur (NaS) Zinc- Air Battery Demand Response Costs

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

National Research Council NUCLEAR SCIENCE SERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.00 Alumlnum and G.sllium, NAS-NS-3032 [1961] , $4.50 Americium and Curium, NAS-NS-3006 [ 1960] , $4

114

Herramientas para el Ciudadan@  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

muchos `Ciudadanos y Ciudada- nas X', quienes hemos tenido la fortuna de conocer durante nuestro tiempo

115

EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product, which is one of the objectives of this current study, is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. FBSR testing of a Hanford LAW simulant and a WTP-SW simulant at the pilot scale was performed by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC at Hazen Research Inc. in April/May 2008. The Hanford LAW simulant was the Rassat 68 tank blend and the target concentrations for the LAW was increased by a factor of 10 for Sb, As, Ag, Cd, and Tl; 100 for Ba and Re (Tc surrogate); 1,000 for I; and 254,902 for Cs based on discussions with the DOE field office and the environmental regulators and an evaluation of the Hanford Tank Waste Envelopes A, B, and C. It was determined through the evaluation of the actual tank waste metals concentrations that some metal levels were not sufficient to achieve reliable detection in the off-gas sampling. Therefore, the identified metals concentrations were increased in the Rassat simulant processed by TTT at HRI to ensure detection and enable calculation of system removal efficiencies, product retention efficiencies, and mass balance closure without regard to potential results of those determinations or impacts on product durability response such as Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). A WTP-SW simulant based on melter off-gas analyses from Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was also tested at HRI in the 15-inch diameter Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) dual reformer at HRI in 2008. The target concentrations for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were increased by 16X for Se, 29X for Tl, 42X for Ba, 48X for Sb, by 100X for Pb and Ni, 1000X for Ag, and 1297X for Cd to ensure detection by the an

Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

116

DEVELOPMENT QUALIFICATION AND DISPOSAL OF AN ALTERNATIVE IMMOBILIZED LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE FORM AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstrating that a waste form produced by a given immobilization process is chemically and physically durable as well as compliant with disposal facility acceptance criteria is critical to the success of a waste treatment program, and must be pursued in conjunction with the maturation of the waste processing technology. Testing of waste forms produced using differing scales of processing units and classes of feeds (simulants versus actual waste) is the crux of the waste form qualification process. Testing is typically focused on leachability of constituents of concern (COCs), as well as chemical and physical durability of the waste form. A principal challenge regarding testing immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) forms is the absence of a standard test suite or set of mandatory parameters against which waste forms may be tested, compared, and qualified for acceptance in existing and proposed nuclear waste disposal sites at Hanford and across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. A coherent and widely applicable compliance strategy to support characterization and disposal of new waste forms is essential to enhance and accelerate the remediation of DOE tank waste. This paper provides a background summary of important entities, regulations, and considerations for nuclear waste form qualification and disposal. Against this backdrop, this paper describes a strategy for meeting and demonstrating compliance with disposal requirements emphasizing the River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site and the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) mineralized low-activity waste (LAW) product stream.

SAMS TL; EDGE JA; SWANBERG DJ; ROBBINS RA

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Secondary Waste Form Screening Test ResultsTHOR Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - acroqueratosis verruciforme diagnosticada...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nas reas ... Source: Camara, Gilberto - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (Brasil) Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences ; Environmental Sciences...

120

Influence of liquid structure on diffusive isotope separation in molten silicates and aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular diffusion in natural volcanic liquids discriminates between isotopes of major ions (e.g., Fe, Mg, Ca, and Li). Although isotope separation by diffusion is expected on theoretical grounds, the dependence on mass is highly variable for different elements and in different media. Silicate liquid diffusion experiments using simple liquid compositions were carried out to further probe the compositional dependence of diffusive isotopic discrimination and its relationship to liquid structure. Two diffusion couples consisting of the mineral constituents anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}; denoted AN), albite (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}; denoted AB), and diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}; denoted DI) were held at 1450C for 2 h and then quenched to ambient pressure and temperature. Major-element as well as Ca and Mg isotope profiles were measured on the recovered quenched glasses. In both experiments, Ca diffuses rapidly with respect to Si. In the ABAN experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 20 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Ca is much greater than in natural liquid experiments where D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 1. In the ABDI experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 6 and the efficiency of isotope separation is between that of the natural liquid experiments and the ABAN experiment. In the ABDI experiment, D{sub Mg}/D{sub Si} ~ 1 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Mg is smaller than it is for Ca yet similar to that observed for Mg in natural liquids. The results from the experiments reported here, in combination with results from natural volcanic liquids, show clearly that the efficiency of diffusive separation of Ca isotopes is systematically related to the solvent-normalized diffusivitythe ratio of the diffusivity of the cation (D{sub Ca}) to the diffusivity of silicon (D{sub Si}). The results on Ca isotopes are consistent with available data on Fe, Li, and Mg isotopes in silicate liquids, when considered in terms of the parameter D{sub cation}/D{sub Si}. Cations diffusing in aqueous solutions display a similar relationship between isotopic separation efficiency and D{sub cation} =D{sub H 2 O} , although the efficiencies are smaller than in silicate liquids. Our empirical relationship provides a tool for predicting the magnitude of diffusive isotopic effects in many geologic environments and a basis for a more comprehensive theory of isotope separation in liquid solutions. We present a conceptual model for the relationship between diffusivity and liquid structure that is consistent with available data.

Watkins, J.M.; DePaolo, D.J.; Ryerson, F.J.; Peterson, B.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection Data PackageFluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site in southeast Washington State has 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes stored in 177 underground tanks (ORP 2010). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), through its contractors, is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to convert the radioactive and hazardous wastes into stable glass waste forms for disposal. Within the WTP, the pretreatment facility will receive the retrieved waste from the tank farms and separate it into two treated process streams. These waste streams will be vitrified, and the resulting waste canisters will be sent to offsite (high-level waste [HLW]) and onsite (immobilized low-activity waste [ILAW]) repositories. As part of the pretreatment and ILAW processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed of in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is developing data packages to support that down-selection. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilizing and solidifying the liquid secondary wastes. At the Hanford Site, the FBSR process is being evaluated as a supplemental technology for treating and immobilizing Hanford LAW radioactive tank waste and for treating secondary wastes from the WTP pretreatment and LAW vitrification processes.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pires, Richard P.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

122

Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the form of a 12 MWh battery bank manufactured by NGK. InNGK sodium-sulfur (NaS) battery bank had been proposed for

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Green Prison: Santa Rita Jail Creeps Towards Zero Net Energy (ZNE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the form of a 12 MWh battery bank manufactured by NGK. InNGK sodium-sulfur (NaS) battery bank had been proposed for

Marnay, Chris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Presentation to the NSF Review Panel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mies Report") - Shared panelists: Norman Augustine and TJ Glauthier * National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Assessment of the Governance Structure of the NNSA National...

125

Universidade de Braslia Instituto de Cincias Biolgicas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, nas seguintes Linhas de Pesquisa: a) Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação para Sustentabilidade da Região

Maier, Rudolf Richard

126

Mercados externos pesam 20% do negcio da Gatewit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projectos de investigação nas áreas de tec- nologia de informação e sustentabilidade aplicáveis à actividade

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

127

An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$4. Wind electrolysis-derived hydrogen would cost about $7-Electrolysis 24,000 kg/day NAS/NRC, 2004 Note: Delivered hydrogen costs

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation,...

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosferas modificadas na Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fax: +41 22 730 80258013 Summary: efeito estufa e aerossis da atmosfera, na radiao solar e nas propriedades da superfcie terrestre... na alterao do equilbrio da...

130

Zita Martins Astrobiloga portuguesa do Imperial College de Londres "Estamos mais perto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-- que nós defendemos -- afirma que a vida tem origem nas moléculas orgânicas extra- terrestres. O que

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

131

Environmental Assessment for the Methane Energy and Agricultural...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOEEA-1402 vi MW Megawatts NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards NAS Naval Air Station NDPES National Pollution Discharge Elimination System NEPA National...

132

Prticas discursivas sobre o espanhol atravs da comunicao mediada por computador: la lengua ma, la lengua tuya, la lengua nuestra.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Proponho-me, nesta pesquisa, detalhar os contextos de interao em lngua espanhola nas listas de discusso internacionais da Internet (em que participam, em geral, pessoas de (more)

Valesca Brasil Irala

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - aplicado ao contexto Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de Qumica e Summary: excluam completamente o uso de reagentes eou solventes. Neste contexto, tanto nas indstrias qumicas... requisitos, para ser aplicado tanto em...

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidente nuclear em Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EUA em relao ao programa nuclear de seu pas e analisa acidentes areos no Brasil >> No incomum... Meshkati um especialista em segurana industrial nas reas...

135

Primeira-Dama Tropical: A cidade e o corpo feminino na fico de Jlia Lopes de Almeida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

e polmicas literarias no Brasil. So Paulo: Companhia dase Terra, 1984. Telles, Norma. Brasil. "Escritoras, escritas,tambm segundo Brbara Brasil XXXV (2006) participou nas

Eisenhart, Vanina

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - autoral brasileira como Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 5 100 anos de queimadas nas Razes do Brasil 05Julho2007 Summary: provvel que nenhum outro autor tenha dado tanta ateno ...

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental das atividades Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Sistemas de Gerncia de Workflows: Caractersticas, Distribuio e Luiz Antnio M. Pereira Summary: ;8 ambiente operacional e colocao das vrias atividades nas...

138

Geothermal Update NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES / NOVEMBER 4,...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Update NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES NOVEMBER 4, 2013 Geothermal Update NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES NOVEMBER 4, 2013 GTO-NAS.pdf More Documents & Publications GEA Geothermal...

139

NETL-RUA Annual Review FY2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1579 National Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NAE National Academy of Engineering NAS National Academy of Sciences NATCARB National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System NETL National Energy...

140

LIFE Economics and Delivery Pathway Presentation to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utilities Install Process Equipment infrastructure Install & commission LRUs Inert / low yield commissioning design 7 years build 7 years qualification Anklam--NAS/NA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 1, Cell and battery safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD&D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH&S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

Ohi, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

ESTADO DO PAR PODER JUDICIRIO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barroso, nº 3.089, Bairro Souza, Belém/PA, nas seguintes datas e horários, conforme convocação constante

Maier, Rudolf Richard

143

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAS. 1995. Coal: Energy for the Future. http://value of the FFC energy for coal. 3.2.4 Issue for Furtherapproximately 65% of energy used in coal production is from

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Two-Meter Temperature Surveys for Geothermal Exploration Project...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Two-Meter Temperature Surveys for Geothermal Exploration Project at NAS Fallon Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Two-Meter...

145

CX-010908: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09252013...

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment hta recommendations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in a future paper. We have implemented most of the NAS benchmarks using our HTA MATLAB extensions... in these languages. The HTA class is the result of our efforts to...

147

MFR PAPER 1029 Comminuted fish flesh treated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

\\IA 01930. T'he re earch reported here nas conducted nhile he \\\\as on temporar) as ignment to the Food Irradiation Labora- ton, L.S. Amn Natick Labora- tories, "'atick, ~las . Fred Heilig- man and Eugen Wierbicki

148

Evaluating the depiction of complex RNAV/RNP procedures and analyzing a potential de-cluttering technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Based Navigation (PBN) is a key element of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) NextGen Program. In order to increase National Airspace System (NAS) capacity and efficiency, PBN routes and procedures are ...

Butchibabu, Abhizna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

DOE Launches the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, or...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and many other technological breakthroughs. ARPA-E was recommended by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and was authorized by Congress in 2007, but it received its first...

150

Mobilizing the Grassroots from Above: Political Engagement among AIDS Associations in Democratic Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seja nas relaes governo/sociedade civil local. Entosinalizador de como que o governo local est vendo essascivil se relaciona com o governo. Ento para mim , onde

Rich, Jessica A. J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

EXPERIMENTO MENTAL I: A CONCEPO CONTRATUALISTA CLSSICA, O MODELO DA TRAGDIA DOS COMUNS E AS CONDIES DE EMERGNCIA DA COOPERAO. LOCKE, ROUSSEAU E KANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

o colocam nas mos do governo instituindo um novo mecanismoreconhecimento por parte do governo a seu direito natural mais do que reconhec-la, o governo deve ser o fiador desse

Leister, Carolina; Chiappin, J. R. N.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated gaas surface Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Materials Science 8 Dissimilar and Nanomaterials for Optoelectronic Devices Summary: ) on GaAs Diluted-N-based QW Sb-based QW (GaInNAsSb) QD-based active...

153

Safety Considerations for Operation of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is currently a broad effort underway in the United States and internationally by several organizations to craft regulations enabling the safe operation of UAVs in the NAS. Current federal regulations governing unmanned ...

Weibel, Roland E

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management System Battery Storage Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the modeling approach, methodologies, and results of the sodium sulfur (NaS) battery evaluation study, which was conducted by Battelle for the California Energy Commission (CEC).

Lu, Ning; Weimar, Mark R.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Ma, Jian; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0.07/kWh has on hydrogen cost for electrolysis type station.3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station,3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station, NAS

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0.07/kWh has on hydrogen cost for electrolysis type station.3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station,3-12: Hydrogen Cost Comparison for Electrolysis Station, NAS

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Linde, LLC SCCCapture Division FY14-15 1012013 - 9302015 Steve Mascaro Murray Hill, NJ Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for...

158

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SCCCapture Division FY14-15 1012013 - 9302015 Steve Mascaro Research Triangle Park, Durham, NC Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for...

159

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial em trabalhadores Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

em que o ponto mdio de satisfao 3,0) ... Source: Institute for Systems and Robotics, Lisboa Collection: Engineering 2 Cdigo de tica nas empresas pode evitar o assdio Por...

160

Review and evaluation of national airspace system models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract from Technical Report Documentation Page: This report is intended to serve as a guide to the availability and capability of state-of-the-art analytical and simulation models of the National Airspace System (NAS). ...

Odoni, Amedeo R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - aniba rosaeodora ducke Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-- NAS Z YDELISa,c, *, DANIEL ESLERa , MOLLY KIRKa and W. SEAN BOYDb a Centre... . The interaction between off-bottom, suspended oyster farming and wintering sea ducks in...

162

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Island Bus NaS Battery Energy Storage Project U.S. DOE Peer Review Seattle, WA October 8, 2009 Steve Eckroad Electric Power Research Institute Seckroad@epri.com (704) 595-2717 2 ...

163

Workshops & Conferences Archive | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

link Denver, CO June 13-14, 2011 NAS Board on Research Data and Information (BRDI) BRDI web page External link Washington, DC BRDI May 9-20, 2011 INCITS External link DM32 Data...

164

FPA Annual Mtg, Oct. 11, 2005 -rjf Development of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Snowmass Meetings · FESAC and NAS reviews · Responding to community recommendations · BP PAC "Guidelines · IEA international collaborations and bilateral agreements · etc. #12;FPA Annual Mtg, Oct. 11, 2005

165

A CIESIN Thematic Guide to Social Science Applications of Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Earth scientists and the national security community. Early civilian satellite instruments were designed) of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center under contract NAS5

Columbia University

166

Using tactical flight level resource allocation to alleviate congested en-route airspace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A motivation exists to formulate and implement new tools and methodologies to address the problem of congestion in the National Airspace System (NAS). This thesis presents a novel methodology for allocating aircraft among ...

Abad, Antonio Manuel, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Title 40 CFR Part 191 Subparts B and C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Abbreviations BCLDP Battelle Columbus Laboratory Decommissioning Project CAO Carlsbad Area Office CARD National Laboratory MP Management Procedure NAS National Academy of Sciences NEA/OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

168

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 4, In-vehicle safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the last of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues that may affect the commercial-scale use of sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles. The reports are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers the in-vehicle safety issues of electric vehicles powered by Na/S batteries. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, and private industry. It has three major goals: (1) to identify the unique hazards associated with electric vehicle (EV) use; (2) to describe the existing standards, regulations, and guidelines that are or could be applicable to these hazards; and (3) to discuss the adequacy of the existing requirements in addressing the safety concerns of EVs.

Mark, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the last of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues that may affect the commercial-scale use of sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles. The reports are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers the in-vehicle safety issues of electric vehicles powered by Na/S batteries. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, and private industry. It has three major goals: (1) to identify the unique hazards associated with electric vehicle (EV) use; (2) to describe the existing standards, regulations, and guidelines that are or could be applicable to these hazards; and (3) to discuss the adequacy of the existing requirements in addressing the safety concerns of EVs.

Mark, J

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48H RADIOACTIVEWASTE SAMPLE USING FLUIDIZED BED STEAMREFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANICDESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

Crawford, C

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

OpenSHMEM Performance and Potential: A NPB Experimental Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OpenSHMEM is a recently introduced open stan- dard for all SHMEM libraries. In this paper we discuss the dif- ferent aspects of porting the NAS parallel benchmarks from their MPI 1 implementations to those that use the new OpenSHMEM library API. We compare performance and scalability of these unoptimized OpenSHMEM NAS benchmarks with their MPI 1, and in some cases, MPI 2 counter parts. Through the perfor- mance results of the OpenSHMEM NAS parallel benchmarks on three different platforms that use different OpenSHMEM library implementations we show that even without optimizations these benchmarks have performance comparable to MPI 1 and better than MPI 2 on more mature library implementations. We also do an in-depth analysis of the performance and expect that with hardware support and better implementation of collectives the OpenSHMEM implementations can outperform MPI.

Pophale, Swaroop [University of Houston, Houston] [University of Houston, Houston; Nanjegowda, Ramachandra [University of Houston, Houston] [University of Houston, Houston; Curtis, Anthony R [ORNL] [ORNL; Chapman, Barbara [University of Houston, Houston] [University of Houston, Houston; Jin, Haoqiang [NASA Ames Research Center] [NASA Ames Research Center; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Prof. Robert Goldston, Princeton University Director, DOE Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy storage, very long distance transmission, nor local CO2 sequestration. Estimated to be cost Actual Fusion Energy Development Plan, 2003 (MFE) $M,FY02 1980 FED ITER Demo Demo NAS "Gathering Storm Congressional Research and Development Caucus December 7, 2005 #12;Internal heating Tritium replenishment Li

173

For Immediate Release --Friday, February 28, 2014 Advisory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engagements on Wednesday, Mar. 5 (12 p.m. in W570 and 6 p.m. in PE264). All.m. - The Ten Grandmothers Project ~ Dr. Linda Many Guns NAS W570 12 p -- 30 -- Contact: Trevor Kenney, News & Information Manager 403

Seldin, Jonathan P.

174

Reciclagem de lixo oferece boa economia de energia e, hoje,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reciclagem de lixo oferece boa economia de energia e, hoje, é fonte de sustento não apenas para no Brasil", apresentando propostas para atender ao núme- ro crescente de jovens que buscam assento nas parte do Brasil. Especialistas afirmam que nós consumimos carne de gado europeu antes de fevereiro deste

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

175

Reconstruc~ao de Imagens de Resson^ancia Magnetica de Fluxo com Compressed Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´obitos no Brasil. A visualiza¸c~ao e quantifica¸c~ao do fluxo cardiovascular trazem informa) reconstru¸c~ao por energia m´inima, (d) reconstru¸c~ao por CS [3]. s~ao as diferen¸cas finitas nas dire a energia do sinal esteja fortemente concentrada em

Carvalho, João Luiz

176

CX-010909: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/25/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

177

148 American EntomologistFall 2012 man Resources. 2012. Plant and Enviromental Protection Sciences.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Wildlife in Chernobyl We have been studying the impacts of nuclear accidents on wildlife for more than 12, as a consequence of human release of radioactive material such as during nuclear testing and the operations of nuclear power plants (NAS 2012), and from nuclear accidentssuchasthoseatthe

Mousseau, Timothy A.

178

NUCLEAR SCIENCE SERIES National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Technical Information Center, Office of Information Services UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION #12 George Rogo=, U. S, Atomic Energy Commission Subcommittee on Radiochemistry Grago~ R. Choppin, Chairman National LaboratoW Kurt Wolfsberg, Los Alarnos Scientific LaboratoW #12;NAS-N.WOW AEC Distriktion c%egory U

179

Programa Integrado de Monitoria Remota de Fragmentos Florestais e  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pontos para alimentar a base de dados do projeto. ? valido destacar que tais tabelas foram geradas nas-se as favelas a partir da base de dados disponíveis pelo Instituto Pereira Passos do ano de 1999. Assim, o de Campo e Pós-processamento dos Dados Ao longo dos meses de Julho e Agosto a equipe do INEA realizou

180

Anurio Estatstico 2013 (2008-2012)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anuário foi organizado com base nas informações prestadas pelas unidades acadêmicas e administrativas, pelos centros, órgãos complementares e sistemas eletrônicos de dados da Universidade de Brasília ........................................................................................................... 26 1. Informações e Dados Gerais

Maier, Rudolf Richard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Adaptive architectures for peak power management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iq fq ialu falu ldst ic dc ipr fpr g721d mesa-texgen epiciq fq ialu falu ldst ic dc ipr fpr perim big mst treeaddNas iq fq ialu falu ldst ic dc ipr fpr mg.big ft.big sp.big

Kontorinis, Vasileios

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Observation of picosecond superfluorescent pulses in rubidium atomic vapor pumped by 100-fs laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Physical Research, NAS of Armenia, Ashtarak-2, Armenia. [22] K. Ikeda et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 48, 1636 (1980). [23] F. Haake, J. W. Haus, H. King, G. Schroder, and R. Glauber, Phys. Rev. A 23, 1322 (1981). [24] R. Florian, L. C. Schwan, and D. Schmid...

Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Kash, Michael M.; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Li, Hebin; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Welch, George R.; Scully, Marlan O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols Nuno Neves W. Kent that allows the rapid testing of checkpoint protocols with standard benchmarks. To achieve this goal, RENEW evaluated using the RENEW envi- ronment with SPEC and NAS benchmarks on a network of workstations connected

Neves, Nuno

184

RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RENEW: A Tool for Fast and Efficient Implementation of Checkpoint Protocols Nuno Neves W. Kent that allows the rapid testing of checkpoint protocols with standard benchmarks. To achieve this goal, RENEW evaluated using the RENEW envi­ ronment with SPEC and NAS benchmarks on a network of workstations connected

Neves, Nuno

185

The dynamic structure underlying subthreshold oscillatory activity and the onset  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stellate cells display subthresh- old oscillations (STOs). We study a single compartment biophysical model and a reset voltage. We show that the synchronization properties in networks made up of the NAS cells established that the SCs develop low-amplitude (1-4 mV) rhythmic subthreshold membrane potential oscillations

Rotstein, Horacio G.

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - aq hot aq Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

P4... (s) + O2(g)(excess) f) Na(s) + H2O(l) g) Li2O(s) + H2O(l) h) Zn(s) + HCl(aq) i) CaCl2(aq) + NaF(aq) j... solution (propanol is converted ... Source: Hitchcock, Adam P. -...

187

Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories under Contract Numbers DE-AC02-05CH1123 Jan 29, 2011- We presented to NAS a requested R&D plan based on presumed success of NIF: three R. Its not premature to consider a "Plan B" that allows more time to assess NIF results and to make

188

ICF Program StatusSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA Presented to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· NAS, OSTP reports · Budget outlook remains tight · FY2006 appropriation · Outyear plans #12 2010, possible next steps assessed by 2012-2015 · Strong ICF/HEDP technical progress in the past year and Analysis Director Patrick J. Higgins, Jr. NA-131 Office of Planning, Budgeting, and Integration Director

189

Abiotic Stress-Associated miRNAs: Detection and Functional Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RNAs, accelerating their degradation (6). Many functional studies have demonstrated that plant miR- NAs playRNAs, which is thought to protect them against degradation [(4) and Chapter 10]. The effect of these mutants report that miRNAs are regulated in response to cold, drought, salt, UV-B radiation, phosphate or sulfate

Green, Pamela

190

Vegetation changes on an abandoned rice field following herbicide and fertilizer treatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ass (pa icum ~v(r turn L. ), a d rownseed nasn I (~nas alum plicat I ~ Michx. ). In co treat, vegetation of abend ed rice land is composed principally of annual forbs intermixed with three-awns (Aristida spp. ). Forbs, as used in this paper, wili...

Cwik, Michael Joseph

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

FEVEREIRO DE 2011 RELATRIO FINAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nas discussões sobre as mudanças climáticas e seus impactos sobre as políticas públicas e o processo condução do Programa de Mudanças Climáticas na Secretaria do Verde e do Meio Ambiente, pela coordenação e

192

Galp e seis universidades lanam Instituto do Petrleo e do Gs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galp e seis universidades lanam Instituto do Petrleo e do Gs ? ENSINO A GALP Energia e as seis maiores universidades portuguesas anuncia- ram a criao do Instituto do Petr- leo e do Gs para desenvolver inves- tigao e formao nas reas do pe- trleo e do gs no mundo lusfono. O Instituto do

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

193

Simulation du transfert de polluants dans les sols et les eaux souterraines : recommandations pour le choix du modle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'obtention de résultats exploitables pour parvenir à une gestion raisonnée et proportionnée d'une pollution. Or 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 ConcentrationenPCE(µg/l) S-2 S-3 PLPR-3S-5 BV BIOCHLOR NAS ANTEA ENVIROS INERIS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

Helen Conover and Kathryn Regner InformationTechnology & Systems Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

working relationship with NSIDC DAAC is governed by: Interface Control Documents Operations Agreement, Integration & Test Sun Storage 7310 With J4400 Disk Array 8TB NAS Storage Buildout Completed July 2009 10 by the Science Team Processing automation controlled by SIPS scripts Pass processing is data driven L3 product

Christian, Eric

195

Forest ecology Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest ecology Introduction Forest ecology is a part of ecology that is con- cerned with forests as opposed to grasslands, savan- nas, or tundra. Ecology is the study of the processes of interaction among organisms and between organ- isms and their environment. Ecology is often subdi- vided into physiological

Johnson, Edward A.

196

24 Jan 2007 Institute of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, 2007 1 Laser Intra-cavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As GaInP InGaAs GaInNAs InGaAsP GaInAsSb · Intra-cavity power up to ~100W Pump Pump optics Mirror and intraVECSEL and intra--cavity sensingcavity sensing · Intra-Cavity Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (ICLAS

Strathclyde, University of

197

Welcome to the Computational Fluid Dynamics Matt de Stadler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications Wake behind Guadalupe island http://www.nasaimages.org/luna/servlet/detail/nasaNAS~10~10~8 4390 flow over a ridge [movie] #12;Stratified turbulent wakes Wakes are generated by every moving body is the energy distributed? What characteristic

Wang, Deli

198

Welcome to the Computational Fluid Dynamics Matt de Stadler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications Wake behind Guadalupe island http://www.nasaimages.org/luna/servlet/detail/nasaNAS~1 0 Wakes are generated by every moving body and flow past any fixed body Application sizes range from spray will the wake last? How is the energy distributed? What characteristic features emerge? Low-level winds rushing

Wang, Deli

199

Inaugurao do Reator IEA -USP Marcelo Damy de Souza Santos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inauguração do Reator IEA - USP Marcelo Damy de Souza Santos Jucelino Kubitschek Janio Quadros 1958. Maris, Quasi-free scattering and nuclear structure. Reviews of Modern Physics, 38:121, 1966) Tornou-se o Review, 132:2325, 1963 Iniciou mais uma área, que passou logo a ser amplamente representada nas

dos Santos, C.A.

200

EMC PERSPECTIVE: THE POWER OF WINDOWS SERVER 2012 AND EMC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMC PERSPECTIVE: THE POWER OF WINDOWS SERVER 2012 AND EMC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR MICROSOFT PRIVATE and storage optimization features of intelligent storage arrays, such as the EMC® Symmetrix® VMAX® storage family, the EMC® VNX® series, and the EMC® Isilon® scale-out NAS family. With new technologies

Chaudhuri, Surajit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Full Hybrids Reformer FCV Gasoline Diesel Hydrogen ICE NAS 2004 HyTrans Retail Price X X Operating% 100% Fraction of Makes and Models Offering Alternative RetailPriceEquivalent Cost of Limited Fuel - Make & model diversity - Price, fuel economy, etc. Vehicle Manufacturing Cost Estimates (assisted

202

Folk Song 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open???? ?????????? Notes and context (include reference to any related documentation, such as photographs) ?????? ????????????????? ???????????????? 1????????????????????????????? 2??????????????????????????????? 3???????????????????????????? 4??????... ??????????????????????? ????????????????? ???????????????? 5??????????????????????????? 6?????????????????????????????????? 7?????????????????????????? Wylie O ye/ ye zhang nga la la la mo/ gdong nga glu ngas len/ 1'brug sing sing rma rgyal sbom nas grags// 2char sam...

Tshe ring bsam 'grub

203

PROCEEDINGS O F THE IEEE, VOL.56, NO. 1, JANUARY196837 [`I J. J. Wysocki,"Lithium-doped radiation-resistant silicon solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,"Lithium-doped radiation-resistant silicon solar cells," IEEE Trans. Nuclear Science. vol.NS-13, pp. 168-173, December 1966 damagein semiconductorsXI1: Effects ofhighenergy electrons in silicon and silicon solar cells," Contract NAS 5-3805, May 25, 1966. 14] R. V. Tauke, "Thermal annealing of irradiated n-on-p silicon solar cells

Teich, Malvin C.

204

Dan Martin Watson Department of Physics and Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

panel. 2008, 2011, 2013 NASA: Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Science: Origins of Solar Postoctoral Fellowship Program review panel. 2012 NSF: Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research review panel 2009-2011 National Academy of Sciences (NAS)/National Research Council (NRC) 2010 Decadal

205

Authenticating Aviation Augmentation System Sherman C. Lo, Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the national airspace (NAS). Assessing and developing security for these #12;systems can provide useful. INTRODUCTION An important function of augmentation systems for Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS systems is a useful first case study for developing and implementing enhanced information security

Stanford University

206

Preliminary Assessment of Alternative Navigation Means for Civil Aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Homeland Security Presidential Directive 7 (HSPD-7) and National Security Presidential Directive 39 (NSPD Administration (FAA) is looking to develop alternative navigation means to global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) and GPS. While the national airspace (NAS) includes many navigation systems such as distance

Stanford University

207

Texas Tech Embraces National Academies Report on Laboratory Safety By: M. Duane Nellis, President; Lawrence Schovanec, Provost and Senior Vice President;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Culture of Safety in Academic Chemical Research was released July 31. See the NAS/NRC news release and support systems that reinforce a strong safety culture and enable strong scholarship, teaching and service laboratories, there are lessons to be learned about safety culture and behaviors for any research space. Our

Zhang, Yuanlin

208

Eos, Vol. 87, No. 6, 7 February 2006 In his 31 January State of the Union  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the need for information on them to be centralized. The report compiled research on the cur- rent status."The NAS 2005 report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter on petroleum. --MOHI KUMAR, Staff Writer PAGE 62 Bush Pledges Increased Science Research and Education Funding

209

Teorema de Frobenius e Aplica,c"oes O objetivo deste texto 'e unificar algumas situa,c"oes que aparecem em geom*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algumas situa,c"oes que aparecem em geom* *etria dife- rencial nas quais se usa o teorema de Frobenius identificamos 1-formas e campos vetorias em Rn. Esta 'e uma EDP particular* *mente simples j'a que a inc para um dado campo vetorial F em um aberto U Rn. Sabemos que tal potencial existir'a localmente

Tausk, Daniel Victor

210

U.S. Fusion Road Map Study D. Meade, A. Garofalo, D. Hill, C. Kessel, B. Lipschultz(D. Whyte),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and assess three aggressive technically feasible paths for the US Fusion Program mo). - Technical Readiness Levels - EU Road Map used TRLs for materials and technology - NAS IFE Assessment 2013 Power Plant (FPP) - Use recent ARIES Study to define general characteristics of DEMO/FPP - Mission

211

National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS) and Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC to the Director for Forensic Science Vice-Chair, National Commission on Forensic Science 25th International Symposium on Human Identification Phoenix, AZ October 1, 2014 #12;Forensic Science Realignment · NAS report

212

National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS) and Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC on Forensic Science #12;Forensic Science Realignment · NAS report ­ Feb 2009 · White House Subcommittee on Forensic Science (SoFS) ­ July 2009 to Dec 2012 · DOJ/NIST Partnership ­ NCFS (National Commission

213

Waste Examination Assay Facility operations: TRU waste certification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORNL Waste Examination Assay Facility (WEAF) was established to nondestructively assay (NDA) transuranic (TRU) waste generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The present facility charter encompasses the NDA and nondestructive examination (NDE) of both TRU and low-level wastes (LLW). Presently, equipment includes a Neutron Assay System (NAS), a Segmented Gamma Scanner (SGS), a drum-sized Real-Time Radiography (RTR) system, and a Neutron Slab Detector (NSD). The first three instruments are computer interfaced. Approximately 2300 TRU waste drums have been assayed with the NAS and the SGS. Another 3000 TRU and LLW drums have been examined with the RTR unit. Computer data bases have been developed to collate the large amount of data generated during the assays and examinations. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Schultz, F.J.; Caylor, B.A.; Coffey, D.E.; Phoenix, L.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

N E U R O C I N C I A 4 2 G A L I L E U | S E T E M B R O 2 0 0 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUA em relação ao programa nuclear de seu país e analisa acidentes aéreos no Brasil >> Não é incomum Meshkati é um especialista em segurança industrial nas áreas de energia nuclear, química e aeronáutica Chernobyl em solo iraniano. Meshkati também acredita que os grandes acidentes que aconteceram no Brasil nos

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

216

Certificao Sun Para Programador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energia Espaço Informática Materiais Mecânica Meio ambiente Nanotecnologia Robótica Plantão Modelio System/ cel. no Brasil Pague menos nas suas chamadas Apenas 0,08 ¢ p/ min. para celular www.local03.com/8centtoBrasil Anúncios Google Monitorar Rede Flutuantes Monitoramento Rede Sign Up for mail.com Mail

217

Sesso Temtica: Monitoramento orbital das pastagens Brasileiras: em busca de uma pecuria mais produtiva e ambientalmente sustentvel (Orbital monitoring of the Brazilian pasturelands: in search of a more productive and environmentally sustainable cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brasil alcançar suas metas de redução de gases de efeito estufa, bem como reduzir a perda de habitats a área e a localização das pastagens degradadas no Brasil? 2) Quais são os impactos das pastagens degradadas nos fluxos de carbono e energia? 3) Quais são as tendências de produtividade das pastagens nas

218

Comportamento espectro-temporal da cana-de-acar: uma nova proposta na distribuio espacial dos pontos de controle utilizados na interpolao de  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campos - SP, Brasil {pupin, bernardo, daniel}@dsr.inpe.br 2 Universidade Federal de Viçosa - UFV Campus Universitário ­ 36570-000 - Viçosa - MG, Brasil carlos.vieira@ufv.br Abstract. The major attribute of remotely do Brasil quanto nas questões ambientais internacionais relacionadas com a redução da emissão de

Hammerton, James

219

Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subjects covered in this section are: (1) DOE's draft EIS on Yucca Mountain an important milestone; (2) EPA issues draft standards for Yucca Mountain; (3) Wisconsin Electric files spent fuel suit against DOE, asks for stay; (4) Transportation impacts considered in amended NRC rule; (5) Chem-Nuclear for sale: Bechtel/NAS pact: and other business developments; and (6) Rollin' up the river: Trojan's last voyage.

NONE

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The F-path approach for pattern generation in microprocessor testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X CONCLUSIONS 99 REFERENCES 101 APPENDICES A MC68000 ASSEMBLER LANGUAGE DESCRIPTION. . . . . . . B INSTRUCTION SET FOR MINIMUM CONTROL TESTING 104 107 VITA 110 vnt LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5...THE F-PATH APPROACH FOR PATTERN GENERATION IN MICROPROCESSOR TESTING A Thesis by JOSE SAL1NAS Approved as to style and content by: Fabrizio Lombardi (Chair of Committee) Donald Friesen (Member) Richard Vo (Head of Department) Karan...

Salinas, Jose?

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

FSICA MODERNA I -2o SEMESTRE 2008 6a LISTA DE EXERCCIOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potencial de altura Vo nas mesmas condições. 5.- Uma reação de fusão importante na produção de energia solar obtido em medidas da quantidade de movimento da partícula neste estado? (b) ? a energia mecânica conservada neste estado? Se sua resposta for positiva, determine o valor da energia. Se for negativa

Ribas, Roberto Vicençotto

222

Mec^anica Geometrica A entregar ate `a aula de Quarta-feira dia 27 de Outubro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sistema Solar conservam o momento angular mas tendem a dissipar energia). 3. (a) Mostre que a express¸c~oes em torno de e3 s~ao est´aveis. (c) Se I1 > I2 > I3 ent~ao para um dado momento angular a energia cin~ao local da energia cin´etica de um corpo r´igido com um ponto fixo e I1 = I2 nas coordenadas de TSO(3

Natário, José

223

MESTRADO EM MICROBIOLOGIA GENMICA FUNCIONAL E COMPARATIVA Instituto Superior Tcnico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

de proteínas 3. Análise filogenética com base em mapas de sintenia 4. Análise quantitativa de geis bidimensionais 5. Interpretação do significado biológico de dados à escala do genoma 6. Análise de dados de Edições Técnicas, Lisboa, Portugal, 2007 *Sá-Correia I., Teixeira M.C., Two-dimensional Electrophoresis-based

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

224

ISSN 0103-9741 Monografias em Cincia da Computao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proteínas. Palavras-chave: Esquema Lógico, Base de Dados Biológicos, Integração de Dados, Alinhamento de uma grande quantidade de dados, e permitido à comunidade científica o estudo da estrutura, organização desses dados biológicos, sem que haja comprometimento da interpretação e compreensão dos sistemas

Endler, Markus

225

Anlise Preliminar de um Processo para Identificao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Homology-derived Structures of Proteins (HSSP) é uma base de dados que agrega informações de proteínas com arquivo que relata um alinhamento formado por seqüências homólogas obtidas da base de dados de seqüências disponível para arquivos PDBs recentes e ainda não processados pelo HSSP. Além disso, como os dados do HSSP

Neshich, Goran

226

Um quinto dos cursos tem taxa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eco- nómico teve acesso - que está a servir de base para a decisão das novas vagas a abrir nas uni no primeiro trimestre deste ano. ? a partir destes dados, for- necidos pelo lEFP, que a tutela actualiza o os estudantes associem es- tes dados à qualidade das insti- tuições e frisa: "O que estes da- dos

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

227

TEORIA & PESQUISA VOL. XVI -n 01 -JAN/JUN DE 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

primeira questão, várias outras surgiram: terá a migração internacional nas áreas de fronteiras um impacto ambiental no Mercosul". Este projeto é de cooperação Brasil-França, entre o CNPq e o Institut de Recherche depois da realização de trabalhos de contextualização socioeconômica/demográfica/ambiental, calcados

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Amores de Abat-jour: A cena teatral brasileira e a escrita de mulheres nos anos vinte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FALL 2001 75 Amores de Abat-jour: a cena teatral brasileira e a escrita de mulheres nos anos vinte Ktia da Costa Bezerra Nas ltimas dcadas, muitos pesquisadores tm se dedicado a um verdadeiro trabalho de escavao arqueolgica na busca por... vozes silenciadas. Para tanto, eles tm procurado desencavar de arquivos e acervos empoeirados nomes e obras esquecidos pela historiografa oficial. Um projeto de resgate queja comea a surtir efeito dado o nmero crescente de antologias e ensaios...

Costa Bezerra, Ká tia da

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Rev. Filos., Aurora, Curitiba, v. 22, n. 31, p. 495-513, jul./dez. 2010 ISSN 0104-4443  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rev. Filos., Aurora, Curitiba, v. 22, n. 31, p. 495-513, jul./dez. 2010 ISSN 0104-4443 Licenciado a psicanálise reverte, nas suas teorizações, as categorias fenomenológicas #12;AYOUCH, T. Rev. Filos., Aurora. Filos., Aurora, Curitiba, v. 22, n. 31, p. 495-513, jul./dez. 2010 497 Assim começa o soneto 130 de

230

Study to define demographics, economics, and environmental awareness of charter anglers in Galveston, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach? (President, 1993). Fisheries management during recent decades must consider ecological, political, economic, and sociocultural factors to meet their charge of conservation and optimum use (NAS, 2006). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS... of jobs in businesses and industries that support wildlife-related recreation; and they generated funds through licenses and taxes that pay for many of the country?s ______________ This thesis follows the style of the journal Human Dimensions...

Cummins, Rhonda D.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test. Final report, September 30, 1992--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed for manufacturing and demonstrating the performance of its 250-kW molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) stack in an integrated system at the Naval Air Station Miramar (NAS Miramar) located in San Diego, California. The stack constructed for the demonstration test at the NAS Miramar consisted of 250 cells. It was manufactured using M-C Power`s patented Internally Manifolded Heat Exchanger (IMHEX{reg_sign}) stack design. The demonstration test at NAS Miramar was designed to operate the 250-kW MCFC stack in a cogeneration mode. This test represented the first attempt to thermally integrate an MCFC stack in a cogeneration system. The test was started on January 10, 1997, and voluntarily terminated on May 12, 1997, after 2,350 hours of operation at temperatures above 1,100 F and at a pressure of three atmospheres. It produced 160 MWh of d.c. power and 346,000 lbs of 110 psig steam for export during 1,566 hours of on-load operations. The test demonstrated a d.c. power output of 206 kW. Most of the balance of the plant (BOP) equipment operated satisfactorily. However, the off-the-shelf automotive turbocharger used for supplying air to the plant failed on numerous occasions and the hot gas blower developed seal leakage problems which impacted continuous plant operations. Overall the demonstration test at NAS Miramar was successful in demonstrating many critical features of the IMHEX technology. Lessons learned from this test will be very useful for improving designs and operations for future MCFC power plants.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Comparison of Different Methods of Harvesting Cotton.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- - TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, Director College Station. Texas BULLETIN NO. 683 OCTOBER, 1946 COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT METHODS OF HARVESTING COTTON Division of Agricultural Engineering . and Division of Agronomy... on the rougher methods of harvesting cotton, such as hand-snapping and machine harvesting both with the picker type and the stripper type mechanical harvesters. This n-as largely because the lint from the roughly harvested cottons contained more foreign...

Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

reconstrudos ALERTA Peritos acusam Gover-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

primeiro regulamento de estruturas que impunha o cál- culo dos efeitos dos sismos nas construções. Cerca de custos materiais e humanos. "Para ter o mesmo número de mortes de 1755 não é preciso um sismo igual Lisboa a vi- ver em casas não construídas a contar com os sismos é hoje muito maior do que era nessa

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

234

Freeze-drying bovine spermatozoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~- ssopiosl ~cion, bae in x690 ie esca kxt~n P ) +ho originaesd ehs so~ 9n usa ends''~ 999s sorh nas in ehs 89. sld o9! syeoloIXp, His proosdsrs osa eo iwss"s senXX piness o9 eisans and eo hasp ehm eve s&~2mle aoQI'sndsr va~ ae -20C oneil elm emesrisX mes...

Faris, Harvey Lee

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Uncovering stellar atmospheres with gravitational microlensing telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A strong differential magnification over the face of the source star passing the caustic created by a binary lens star allows to measure its radial intensity profile with an angular resolution of 20-60 nas from broad-band photometric observations for ~15 stars per year and to study its chemical composition from time-resolved high-resolution spectroscopy for ~2 stars per year.

M. Dominik

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

236

Preparation and Characterization of Chemical Plugs Based on Selected Hanford Waste Simulants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of preparation and characterization of chemical plugs based on selected Hanford Site waste simulants. Included are the results of chemical plug bench testing conducted in support of the M1/M6 Flow Loop Chemical Plugging/Unplugging Test (TP-RPP-WTP-495 Rev A). These results support the proposed plug simulants for the chemical plugging/ unplugging tests. Based on the available simulant data, a set of simulants was identified that would likely result in chemical plugs. The three types of chemical plugs that were generated and tested in this task consisted of: 1. Aluminum hydroxide (NAH), 2. Sodium aluminosilicate (NAS), and 3. Sodium aluminum phosphate (NAP). While both solvents, namely 2 molar (2 M) nitric acid (HNO3) and 2 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 60C, used in these tests were effective in dissolving the chemical plugs, the 2 M nitric acid was significantly more effective in dissolving the NAH and NAS plugs. The caustic was only slightly more effecting at dissolving the NAP plug. In the bench-scale dissolution tests, hot (60C) 2 M nitric acid was the most effective solvent in that it completely dissolved both NAH and NAS chemical plugs much faster (1.5 2 x) than 2 M sodium hydroxide. So unless there are operational benefits for the use of caustic verses nitric acid, 2 M nitric acid heated to 60C C should be the solvent of choice for dissolving these chemical plugs. Flow-loop testing was planned to identify a combination of parameters such as pressure, flush solution, composition, and temperature that would effectively dissolve and flush each type of chemical plug from preformed chemical plugs in 3-inch-diameter and 4-feet-long pipe sections. However, based on a review of the results of the bench-top tests and technical discussions, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Research and Technology (R&T), Engineering and Mechanical Systems (EMS), and Operations concluded that flow-loop testing of the chemically plugged pipe sections would not provide any additional information or useful data. The decision was communicated through a Sub Contract Change Notice (SCN-070) that included a revised scope as follows: Photographing the chemical plugs in the pipes before extrusion to compare the morphology of aged gels with that of fresh gels. Setting up an extrusion apparatus and extruding the chemical plugs. Documenting the qualitative observations on the efforts to remove the chemical plug materials from the pipe sections. Performing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of extruded gel samples to detect any crystallization of gel during storage. Disposing of the extruded gel as a waste. Documenting the analytical results in a test report. There were no significant morphological differences between the fresh and aged plugs except for an overgrowth of small transparent crystals on the surface of the aged NAS gel plug. An initial pressure of <150 psi was required to start extruding the aged NAS and NAP plugs, whereas the NAH plug began to extrude with the application of minimal pressure. The shear strength of extruded samples ranged from ~9 to >15 KPa for the NAS plug and from ~2 to 6 KPa for the NAH plug. Following extrusion, the NAP plug sections were thixotropic. The bulk of all the aged gel plugs consisted of amorphous material with nitratine constituting the crystalline phase. A separate question about the whether the current in-tank waste conditions will bound the future multi-tank blended feed conditions for the Waste Treatment Plant is outside the scope of this study.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Gunderson, Katie M.; Baum, Steven R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Poloski, Adam P.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Calculations supporting evaluation of potential environmental standards for Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992, Section 801 (US Congress, 1992) provides for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to contract the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to conduct a study and provide findings and recommendations on reasonable standards for the disposal of high-level wastes at the Yucca Mountain site. The NAS study is to provide findings and recommendations which include, among other things, whether a health-based standard based on dose to individual members of the public from releases to the accessible environment will provide a reasonable standard for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The EPA, based upon and consistent with the findings and recommendations of the NAS, is required to promulgate standards for protection of the public from releases from radioactive materials stored or disposed of in a repository at the Yucca Mountain site. This document presents a number of different ``simple`` analyses of undisturbed repository performance that are intended to provide input to those responsible for setting appropriate environmental standards for a potential repository at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. Each of the processes included in the analyses has been simplified to capture the primary significance of that process in containing or isolating the waste from the biosphere. In these simplified analyses, the complex waste package interactions were approximated by a simple waste package ``failure`` distribution which is defined by the initiation and rate of waste package ``failures``. Similarly, releases from the waste package and the engineered barrier system are controlled by the very near field environment and the presence and rate of advective and diffusive release processes. Release was approximated by either a simple alteration-controlled release for the high solubility radionuclides and either a diffusive or advective-controlled release for the solubility-limited radionuclides.

Duguid, J.O.; Andrews, R.W.; Brandstetter, E.; Dale, T.F.; Reeves, M. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Inertial confinement fusion. Quarterly report, July--September 1995, Volume 5, Number 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) final report recommended proceeding with the construction of a 1- to 2-MJ Nd-doped glass laser designed to achieve ignition in the laboratory (a laser originally called the Nova Upgrade, but now called the National Ignition Facility, or NIF, and envisioned as a national user facility). As a prerequisite, the report recommended completion of a series of target physics objectives on the Nova laser in use at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Meeting these objectives, which were called the Nova Technical Contract (NTC), would demonstrate (the Academy committee believed) that the physics of ignition targets was understood well enough that the laser requirements could be accurately specified. Completion of the NTC objectives was given the highest priority in the NAS report. The NAS committee also recommended a concentrated effort on advanced target design for ignition. As recommended in the report, completion of these objectives has been the joint responsibility of LLNL and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the articles in this issue of the ICF Quarterly were written jointly by scientists from both institutions. Several of the NTC objectives required the completion of improvements to Nova`s power balance and pointing accuracy and of new diagnostics and new target fabrication capabilities. These improvements were called {open_quotes}Precision Nova{close_quotes} and are documented. The original NTC objectives have been largely met. This Introduction summarizes those objectives and their motivation in the context of the requirements for ignition. The articles that follow describe the NIF ignition target designs and summarize the principal accomplishments in the various elements of the NTC.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ultrasonic absorption in liquid mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, It is obvious that much moxe experimental dates both absorption snd thermalv is needed before this theory can be substantiated Purpose of the Investigation Ths present research was undertaken to investigate thoroughly ths absorption in mixtuxws of ethanol... Agricultural and lheohaaioal College of %nas ia partial fulfi&went of tbs aequtreaante for the daggse of ~t %53 ~or Sub)eot Pllgedss Table of Contents Ii Beokgxeund snd Theory Absorption in Pure Liqu1ds 8, Absorpt1on in Idquid Bixtures XI Purpose...

Davis, James Madison

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The effect of adding axial freedom to the blades of a two bladed helicopter rotor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cire used on the rotor, the link nas all the blades attacned to it, and tne "teeter-totter" nin!;e rr&rst be excnanSe&! for a univ& rsal point, preferably of tne con: t-rrrt velocitv tyi e. Tne a?de&& blades snoula rrnve a stabilizin;, . irif i...THE Epr'ECT OZ ADDIRQ AX' AL RREEDO?l TO THE Bl ADRS QF A TWO BLADED HELICOPTER ROTOR A Thesis Frank Robert Oradat, Jr. Approveo as to style and content by: (Cnair. san of Co xttee) (liead of Dep tment) May I955 THE EPPECT OP ADDING AXIAL...

Oradat, Frank Robert

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A phenological study of selected vascular plants of Brazos and Leon Counties, Texas, 1972  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flowering initially. February 28 - March 5 Carukunine panvi gona var. anenicoLa Senecio ampuUaceus Cents canadenaia Tnadeacantia aubacauLQ CongdaLia aunea Pea cunaini a pinnata Pnunua merci cana Saw a)nas aLbidum CaakiLLeja indivisa VioLa Lang... miaaowuenaia February '14 - February 20 Jaaminum paimuGnum Ceecia canadenaka February 21 - February 27 February 28 - Harch 5 Paunua angua&)olia hledi cago polgamapha var. vulgaaia Loni ceaa a empeaviaena Caalille ja indiviaa Queacua kleflaia Phlox...

Clark, Carolyn A

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Investigations into the Chemistry of Laudering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the solution 1711-1666 Same as above, but completely immersed 1634, 1634 Boiled in 2.5 N a 2 C 0 3 , for 3.5 hrs. half im mersed 1648 Same as one above but completely immersed... 1636 Boiled in 5 per cent NasCOa for 3.5 hrs., im mersed completely 1625... D OF CLOTH solution used Original muslin JVJJ Muslin, bleached medium (Muslin A ) v/!;; Muslin, bleached strongly (Muslin B) A/ 1 0 _ Muslin B N 7 1 0 rinsed 3 times with distilled wat( Original muslin A V J O Muslin A A7J0 Muslin B AV 0...

Faragher, W.F.

1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Previously Unrecorded Fragment of the Middle English Short Metrical Chronicle in Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica M199  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be teo (CFR), to be (D), comen (different word order A), absent (B) 43 his is (BDFR), e (C), & when at Bladud was ded (different construction, A) 44 yeade wende 45 was nas (ABDFR), ne was (C) 56 gonnehold Denewold 62 had he he hadde 63 ye... bathe: BPH M199 seems to intend the actual salt bath, while the other manuscripts mention the city of Bath. 43 his mr: his probably refer to sowle in line 44. The other manuscripts use this, the or use a different construction (see the table...

Grund, Peter

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The rate of carbonic acid decomposition in sea water and its oceanographic significance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compressed Air Purging . . . . . . . . , . . 58 15 L6 Carbon-14 Uptake by ~la ~nas sp. in a Closed System, under 4f Carbon Dioxide Gas Purging and under N Gas Purging using Low pH Sea Water . C b -V, Uptk by~Mt ~~lt ik Cl System and under N2 Gas... and under Nitrogen Gas Purging and 4$ Carbon Dioxide Purging, using low pH Sea Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , 63 12 Carbon-14 Uptake by Nitzuhia closterium in a Closed System and under Nitrogen Gas Purging . 1v PREFATORY' NOTE The author...

Park, Kilho

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A study of methods for the determination of sugars in cotton plant tissue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Master of goienee h's$er Sub)sot i OhssistrJ 3y Jerry Nao ~ June 1957 The nrieer niche ~ te shank Dr. Q. A. Greathouee enact nhnse 4ireefinn ahie worn nas 4nn? an4 alee Dr. c. 0. Hedges an4 Dr. f. %. lessen for %hair snsgestions ?n4 erf... in an srlensspor flesh. Th? solution was boile4 gentlp to expel 004. The bisarbonats was then added on4 dissolv?4 and the solution souled snd diluted to volume. C. Xodato solut5, oa. Bo4iua oarbonate (anhydrous) (40 ga. yer liter ). Tartario Aoid p. b Sn. yer...

Marek, Jerry William

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

PRIMEIRA LISTA -FI-195 1. Considere uma particula em queda livre vertical onde a dist^ancia inicial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ..., xn)dxi = 0 . Um v´inculo desse tipo ´e holon^omico apenas se existir uma fun¸c~ao f(x1, x2, ..., xn´inculos s~ao n~ao-holon^omicos. 5. Duas rodas de raio a s~ao montadas nas pontas de um eixo de tamanho b de´inculos n~ao-holon^omicos dados por cos dx + sin dy = 0 sin dx - cos dy = a 2 (d + d ) e um v´inculo holon

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

248

High-current, fast-switching transistor development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work that shows how the results obtained under a previous contract (NAS3-18916) have been applied to a larger-diameter (33-mm) transistor are described. An improved base contact for equalizing the base-emitter voltage at high currents has been developed along with an improved emitter contact preform which increases the silicon area available for current conduction. The electrical performance achieved is consistent with the proposed optimum design. The device design, wafer-processing techniques, and various measurements which include forward SOA, dc characteristics, and switching times are described.

Hower, P.L.

1981-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

National Assessment of Energy Storage for Grid Balancing and Arbitrage: Phase 1, WECC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To examine the role that energy storage could play in mitigating the impacts of the stochastic variability of wind generation on regional grid operation, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) examined a hypothetical 2020 grid scenario in which additional wind generation capacity is built to meet renewable portfolio standard targets in the Western Interconnection. PNNL developed a stochastic model for estimating the balancing requirements using historical wind statistics and forecasting error, a detailed engineering model to analyze the dispatch of energy storage and fast-ramping generation devices for estimating size requirements of energy storage and generation systems for meeting new balancing requirements, and financial models for estimating the life-cycle cost of storage and generation systems in addressing the future balancing requirements for sub-regions in the Western Interconnection. Evaluated technologies include combustion turbines, sodium sulfur (Na-S) batteries, lithium ion batteries, pumped-hydro energy storage, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, redox flow batteries, and demand response. Distinct power and energy capacity requirements were estimated for each technology option, and battery size was optimized to minimize costs. Modeling results indicate that in a future power grid with high-penetration of renewables, the most cost competitive technologies for meeting balancing requirements include Na-S batteries and flywheels.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Balducci, Patrick J.; Colella, Whitney G.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Nguyen, Tony B.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Zhang, Yu

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Comparison of Vehicle Efficiency Technology Attributes and Synergy Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyzing the future fuel economy of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) requires detailed knowledge of the vehicle technologies available to improve LDV fuel economy. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been relying on technology data from a 2001 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study (NAS 2001) on corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, but the technology parameters were updated in the new proposed rulemaking (EPA and NHTSA 2009) to set CAFE and greenhouse gas standards for the 2011 to 2016 period. The update is based largely on an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of technology attributes augmented by NHTSA data and contractor staff assessments. These technology cost and performance data were documented in the Draft Joint Technical Support Document (TSD) issued by EPA and NHTSA in September 2009 (EPA/NHTSA 2009). For these tasks, the Energy and Environmental Analysis (EEA) division of ICF International (ICF) examined each technology and technology package in the Draft TSD and assessed their costs and performance potential based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program assessments. ICF also assessed the technologies? other relevant attributes based on data from actual production vehicles and from recently published technical articles in engineering journals. ICF examined technology synergy issues through an ICF in-house model that uses a discrete parameter approach.

Duleep, G.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Key Geomechanics Issues at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geomechanics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanical and hydrological properties of rock salt provide excellent bases for geological isolation of hazardous materials. Regulatory compliance determinations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) stand as testament to the widely held conclusion that salt provides excellent isolation properties. The WIPP saga began in the 1950s when the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommended a salt vault as a promising solution to the national problem of nuclear waste disposal. For over 20 years, the Scientific basis for the NAS recommendation has been fortified by Sandia National Laboratories through a series of large scale field tests and laboratory investigations of salt properties. These scientific investigations helped develop a comprehensive understanding of salt's 4 reformational behavior over an applicable range of stresses and temperatures. Sophisticated constitutive modeling, validated through underground testing, provides the computational ability to model long-term behavior of repository configurations. In concert with advancement of the mechanical models, fluid flow measurements showed not only that the evaporite lithology was essentially impermeable but that the WIPP setting was hydrologically inactive. Favorable mechanical properties ensure isolation of materials placed in a salt geological setting. Key areas of the geomechanics investigations leading to the certification of WIPP are in situ experiments, laboratory tests, and shaft seal design.

HANSEN,FRANCIS D.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Factors that affect the degradation of naphthenic acids in oil sands wastewater by indigenous microbial communities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acute toxicity of wastewater generated during the extraction of bitumen from oil sands is believed to be due to naphthenic acids (NAs). To determine the factors that affect the rate of degradation of representative NAs in microcosms containing wastewater and the acute toxicity of treated and untreated wastewater, the effects of temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, and phosphate addition on the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release form two representative naphthenic acid substrates, (linear) U-{sup 14}C-palmitic acid (PA) and (bicyclic) decahydro-2-naphthoic acid-8-{sup 14}C (DHNA), were monitored. Tailings pond water (TPW) contained microorganisms well adapted to mineralizing both PA and DHNA:PA was degraded more quickly (10--15% in 4 weeks) compared to DHNA (2--4% in 8 weeks). On addition of phosphate, the rate of NA degradation increased up to twofold in the first 4 weeks, with a concurrent increase in the rate of oxygen consumption by oil sands TPW. The degradation rate then declined to levels equivalent to those measured in flasks without phosphate. The observed plateau was not due to phosphate limitation. Decreases in either the dissolved oxygen concentration or the temperature reduced the rate. Phosphate addition also significantly decreased the acute toxicity of TPW to fathead minnows. In contrast, Microtox{reg_sign} analyses showed no reduction in the toxicity of treated or untreated TPW after incubation for up to 8 weeks at 15 C.

Lai, J.W.S.; Pinto, L.J.; Kiehlmann, E.; Bendell-Young, L.I.; Moore, M.M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Exploiting Processor Groups to Extend Scalability of the GA Shared Memory Programming Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploiting processor groups is becoming increasingly important for programming next-generation high-end systems composed of tens or hundreds of thousands of processors. This paper discusses the requirements, functionality and development of multilevel-parallelism based on processor groups in the context of the Global Array (GA) shared memory programming model. The main effort involves management of shared data, rather than interprocessor communication. Experimental results for the NAS NPB Conjugate Gradient benchmark and a molecular dynamics (MD) application are presented for a Linux cluster with Myrinet and illustrate the value of the proposed approach for improving scalability. While the original GA version of the CG benchmark lagged MPI, the processor-group version outperforms MPI in all cases, except for a few points on the smallest problem size. Similarly, the group version of the MD application improves execution time by 58% on 32 processors.

Nieplocha, Jarek; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tipparaju, Vinod; Zhang, Yeliang

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

255

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Ellipsoidal and parabolic glass capillaries as condensers for x-ray microscopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-bounce ellipsoidal and paraboloidal glass capillary focusing optics have been fabricated for use as condenser lenses for both synchrotron and tabletop x-ray microscopes in the x-ray energy range of 2.5-18 keV. The condenser numerical apertures (NAs) of these devices are designed to match the NA of x-ray zone plate objectives, which gives them a great advantage over zone plate condensers in laboratory microscopes. The fabricated condensers have slope errors as low as 20 {mu}rad rms. These capillaries provide a uniform hollow-cone illumination with almost full focusing efficiency, which is much higher than what is available with zone plate condensers. Sub-50 nm resolution at 8 keV x-ray energy was achieved by utilizing this high-efficiency condenser in a laboratory microscope based on a rotating anode generator.

Zeng Xianghui; Duewer, Fred; Feser, Michael; Huang, Carson; Lyon, Alan; Tkachuk, Andrei; Yun Wenbing

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

An efficient parallel algorithm for matrix-vector multiplication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multiplication of a vector by a matrix is the kernel computation of many algorithms in scientific computation. A fast parallel algorithm for this calculation is therefore necessary if one is to make full use of the new generation of parallel supercomputers. This paper presents a high performance, parallel matrix-vector multiplication algorithm that is particularly well suited to hypercube multiprocessors. For an n x n matrix on p processors, the communication cost of this algorithm is O(n/[radical]p + log(p)), independent of the matrix sparsity pattern. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by employing it as the kernel in the well-known NAS conjugate gradient benchmark, where a run time of 6.09 seconds was observed. This is the best published performance on this benchmark achieved to date using a massively parallel supercomputer.

Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.; Plimpton, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Installation of the first Distributed Energy Storage System (DESS) at American Electric Power (AEP).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AEP studied the direct and indirect benefits, strengths, and weaknesses of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) and chose to transform its entire utility grid into a system that achieves optimal integration of both central and distributed energy assets. To that end, AEP installed the first NAS battery-based, energy storage system in North America. After one year of operation and testing, AEP has concluded that, although the initial costs of DESS are greater than conventional power solutions, the net benefits justify the AEP decision to create a grid of DESS with intelligent monitoring, communications, and control, in order to enable the utility grid of the future. This report details the site selection, construction, benefits and lessons learned of the first installation, at Chemical Station in North Charleston, WV.

Nourai, Ali (American Electric Power Company, Columbus, OH)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Sodium/sulfur battery engineering for stationary energy storage. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of modular systems to distribute power using batteries to store off-peak energy and a state of the art power inverter is envisioned to offer important national benefits. A 4-year, cost- shared contract was performed to design and develop a modular, 300kVA/300-kWh system for utility and customer applications. Called Nas-P{sub AC}, this system uses advanced sodium/sulfur batteries and requires only about 20% of the space of a lead-acid-based system with a smaller energy content. Ten, 300-VDC, 40-kWh sodium/sulfur battery packs are accommodated behind a power conversion system envelope with integrated digital control. The resulting design facilities transportation, site selection, and deployment because the system is quiet and non-polluting, and can be located in proximity to the load. This report contains a detailed description of the design and supporting hardware development performed under this contract.

Koenig, A.; Rasmussen, J. [Silent Power, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Land use and macroclimate in Presidio County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 'igg0 "rom cire 13ex, r District arid; =-. formally or ger:ised. In 1875. 'I'hc?o(ee is derived !rem P -esidio dc-. . l N rte, as it r!as c;el I ed 'cy the Spani=h cxplorers, meaning gateuey on. Rio Craiide. 'I'hc county is loc:i, i. cl in the Trar... completion o. two major higtways. Cne of these routes, FN 170 or El Carnino del Rio, nas been completed. from Presidio to the Big Bend National Park. Money has beer acorcpriated to complete thi- road to El Paso, thereby pzoviding a. I'ighway from t'?e west...

Ellermeier, Duane Carl

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

262

Annual symposium on Frontiers in Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes activities conducted for the National Academy of Sciences' Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Science with support from the US Department of Energy for the period July 1, 1993 through May 31, 1998. During the report period, five Frontiers of Science symposia were held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. For each Symposium, an organizing committee appointed by the NAS President selected and planned the eight sessions for the Symposium and identified general participants for invitation by the NAS President. These Symposia accomplished their goal of bringing together outstanding younger (age 45 or less) scientists to hear presentations in disciplines outside their own and to discuss exciting advances and opportunities in their fields in a format that encourages, and allows adequate time for, informal one-on-one discussions among participants. Of the 458 younger scientists who participated, over a quarter (124) were women. Participant lists for all symposia (1993--1997) are attached. The scientific participants were leaders in basic research from academic, industrial, and federal laboratories in such disciplines as astronomy, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biochemistry, cell biology, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, engineering, genetics, material sciences, mathematics, microbiology, neuroscience, physics, and physiology. For each symposia, the 24 speakers and discussants on the program were urged to focus their presentations on current cutting-edge research in their field for a scientifically sophisticated but non-specialist audience, and to provide a sense of the experimental data--what is actually measured and seen in the various fields. They were also asked to address questions such as: What are the major research problems and unique tools in their field? What are the current limitations on advances as well as the frontiers? Speakers were asked to provide a 2500- to 3000-word synopsis of their speech in advance, so that participants, particularly those in other fields, could familiarize themselves with the topic.

Metzger, N.; Fulton, K.R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

NONE

1994-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Factors controlling naphthenic acid corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory study was conducted to elucidate the influence of chemical and physical parameters on corrosion of type 1018 carbon steel (CS, UNS G10180) and 5% Cr-0.5% Mo steel in oils containing naphthenic acids (NAs) for application to crude oil refinery systems. Effects of test duration, temperature, and acid concentration were assessed for a range of single acids of varying carbon numbers and for NA mixtures in mineral oil (MO) and in heavy vacuum gas oil (HGVO). In addition, a limited study of the effect of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) addition to the acid-oil mixture was conducted. Use of the total acid number (TAN) as a measure of corrosiveness of a crude oil was discredited further. For the same TAN value, molecular size and structure of the acid were shown to have an important influence. Tests conducted in HGVO showed lower corrosion rates than in MO, suggesting inhibition caused by S species in the oil or the steric hindrance of naphtheno-aromatic acids. In oil containing the mixture of NAs, the corrosion rate of type 1018 CS was lower than that for 5% Cr-0.5% Mo steel. The 0.1% H{sub 2}S that passed through the acid-oil mixtures had an inhibiting effect on corrosion. Predicting corrosiveness of a crude oil from the measurement of TAN, distribution of NA composition, and S content and form was particularly challenging. The simple tests used were informative, but further work will be required to establish a standard test method that can provide an adequate ranking of crudes.

Turnbull, A. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom); Slavcheva, E. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Shone, B. [Ty Isa, Nr Mold (United Kingdom)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energys Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.?

Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

SOLIDS PRECIPITATION EVENT IN MCU CAUSAL ANALYSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM SOLIDS RECOVERY TEAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process upset occurred in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility on April 6th, 2014. During recovery efforts, a significant amount of solids were found in the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Salt Solution Receipt Tanks (SSRTs), two extraction contactors, and scrub contactors. The solids were identified by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as primarily sodium oxalate and sodium alumina silicate (NAS) with the presence of some aluminum hydroxide. NAS solids have been present in the SSFT since simulant runs during cold chemical startup of MCU in 2007, and have not hindered operations since that time. During the process upset in April 2014, the oxalate solids partially blocked the aqueous outlet of the extraction contactors, causing salt solution to exit through the contactor organic outlet to the scrub contactors with the organic phase. This salt solution overwhelmed the scrub contactors and passed with the organic phase to the strip section of MCU. The partially reversed flow of salt solution resulted in a Strip Effluent (SE) stream that was high in Isopar L, pH and sodium. The primary cause of the excessive solids accumulation in the SSRTs and SSFT at MCU is attributed to an increase in the frequency of oxalic acid cleaning of the 512-S primary filter. Agitation in the SSRTs at MCU in response to cold weather likely provided the primary mechanism to transfer the solids to the contactors. Sources of the sodium oxalate solids are attributed to the oxalic acid cleaning solution used to clean the primary filter at the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) filtration at 512-S, as well as precipitation from the salt batch feed, which is at or near oxalate saturation. The Solids Recovery Team was formed to determine the cause of the solids formation and develop recommendations to prevent or mitigate this event in the future. A total of 53 recommendations were generated. These recommendations were organized into 4 focus areas: Improve understanding of oxalate equilibrium and kinetics in salt solutions Reduction/elimination of oxalic acid cleaning in 512-S Flowsheet optimization Improving diagnostic capability The recommendations implemented prior to resumption of MCU operations provide a risk mitigation or detection function through additional sampling and observation. The longer term recommendations provide a framework to increase the basic process knowledge of both oxalate chemistry and filtration behavior and then facilitate decisions that improve the salt flowsheet as a system.

Garrison, A.; Aponte, C.

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

A Green Prison: Santa Rita Jail Creeps Towards Zero Net Energy (ZNE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large project is underway at Alameda County's twenty-year old 45 ha 4,000-inmate Santa Rita Jail, about 70 km east of San Francisco. Often described as a green prison, it has a considerable installed base of distributed energy resources including a seven-year old 1.2 MW PV array, a four-year old 1 MW fuel cell with heat recovery, and efficiency investments. A current US$14 M expansion will add approximately 2 MW of NaS batteries, and undetermined wind capacity and a concentrating solar thermal system. This ongoing effort by a progressive local government with considerable Federal and State support provides some excellent lessons for the struggle to lower building carbon footprint. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) finds true optimal combinations of equipment and operating schedules for microgrids that minimize energy bills and/or carbon emissions without 2 of 12 significant searching or rules-of-thumb prioritization, such as"efficiency first then on-site generation." The results often recommend complex systems, and sensitivities show how policy changes will affect choices. This paper reports an analysis of the historic performance of the PV system and fuel cell, describes the complex optimization applied to the battery scheduling, and shows how results will affect the jail's operational costs, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. DER-CAM is used to assess the existing and proposed DER equipment in its ability to reduce tariff charges.

Marnay, Chris; DeForest, Nicholas; Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jon; Dierckxsens, Carlos; Mendes, Goncalo; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo Ferreira

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

Final Technical Summary: Center for Fundamental and Applied Research in Nanostructured and Lightweight Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The core projects for this DOE-sponsored Center at Michigan Tech have focused on several of the materials problems identified by the NAS. These include: new electrode materials, enhanced PEM materials, lighter and more effective bipolar plates, and improvement of the carbon used as a current carrier. This project involved fundamental and applied research in the development and testing of lightweight and nanostructured materials to be used in fuel cell applications and for chemical synthesis. The advent of new classes of materials engineered at the nanometer level can produce materials that are lightweight and have unique physical and chemical properties. The grant was used to obtain and improve the equipment infrastructure to support this research and also served to fund seven research projects. These included: 1. Development of lightweight, thermally conductive bipolar plates for improved thermal management in fuel cells; 2. Exploration of pseudomorphic nanoscale overlayer bimetallic catalysts for fuel cells; 3. Development of hybrid inorganic/organic polymer nanocomposites with improved ionic and electronic properties; 4. Development of oriented polymeric materials for membrane applications; 5. Preparation of a graphitic carbon foam current collectors; 6. The development of lightweight carbon electrodes using graphitic carbon foams for battery and fuel cell applications; and 7. Movement of water in fuel cell electrodes.

Michael Mullins, Tony Rogers, Julia King, Jason Keith, Bahne Cornilsen, Jeffrey Allen, Ryan Gilbert, Joseph Holles.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

Machine characterization and benchmark performance prediction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From runs of standard benchmarks or benchmark suites, it is not possible to characterize the machine nor to predict the run time of other benchmarks which have not been run. A new approach to benchmarking and machine characterization is reported. The creation and use of a machine analyzer is described, which measures the performance of a given machine on FORTRAN source language constructs. The machine analyzer yields a set of parameters which characterize the machine and spotlight its strong and weak points. Also described is a program analyzer, which analyzes FORTRAN programs and determines the frequency of execution of each of the same set of source language operations. It is then shown that by combining a machine characterization and a program characterization, we are able to predict with good accuracy the run time of a given benchmark on a given machine. Characterizations are provided for the Cray-X-MP/48, Cyber 205, IBM 3090/200, Amdahl 5840, Convex C-1, VAX 8600, VAX 11/785, VAX 11/780, SUN 3/50, and IBM RT-PC/125, and for the following benchmark programs or suites: Los Alamos (BMK8A1), Baskett, Linpack, Livermore Loops, Madelbrot Set, NAS Kernels, Shell Sort, Smith, Whetstone and Sieve of Erathostenes.

Saavedra-Barrera, R.H.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Advanced Materials for Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries: Status, Challenges and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing penetration of renewable energy and the trend toward clean, efficient transportation have spurred growing interests in sodium-beta alumina batteries that store electrical energy via sodium ion transport across a ?"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte at elevated temperatures (typically 300~350C). Currently, the negative electrode or anode is metallic sodium in molten state during battery operation; the positive electrode or cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). Since the groundbreaking works in the sodium-beta alumina batteries a few decades ago, encouraging progress has been achieved in improving battery performance, along with cost reduction. However there remain issues that hinder broad applications and market penetration of the technologies. To better the Na-beta alumina technologies require further advancement in materials along with component and system design and engineering. This paper offers a comprehensive review on materials of electrodes and electrolytes for the Na-beta alumina batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Xia, Guanguang; Lemmon, John P.; Yang, Zhenguo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Consortia Focused on Photovoltaic R&D, Manufacturing, and Testing: A Review of Existing Models and Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program prepares to initiate a new cost-shared research and development (R&D) effort on photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing, it is useful to review the experience to date with consortia focused on PV R&D, manufacturing, and testing. Information was gathered for this report by conducting interviews and accessing Web sites of 14 U.S. consortia and four European consortia, each with either a primary focus on or an emerging interest in PV technology R&D, manufacturing, or testing. Additional input was collected from several workshops held by the DOE and National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 2009, which examined the practical steps -- including public-private partnerships and policy support -- necessary to enhance the United States' capacity to competitively manufacture photovoltaics. This report categorizes the 18 consortia into three groups: university-led consortia, industry-led consortia, and manufacturing and testing facilities consortia. The first section summarizes the organizations within the different categories, with a particular focus on the key benefits and challenges for each grouping. The second section provides a more detailed overview of each consortium, including the origins, goals, organization, membership, funding sources, and key contacts. This survey is a useful resource for stakeholders interested in PV manufacturing R&D, but should not imply endorsement of any of these groups.

Coggeshall, C.; Margolis, R. M.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory`s Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy`s. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1993-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

273

Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory's Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy's. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1993-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

274

An assessment of bias and uncertainty in recorded dose from external sources of radiation for workers at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Worker dose estimates are used in epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers. A major objective of these studies is to provide a direct assessment of the carcinogenic risk of exposure to ionizing radiation at low doses and dose rates. If dose estimates used in analyses of worker data are biased, then risk estimates expressed per unit of dose will also be biased. In addition, random error in dose estimates may lead to underestimation of risk coefficients and can also distort dose-response analyses. Analyses of data from nuclear worker studies, including Hanford, have typically not been adjusted for biases and uncertainties in dose estimates in part because of the lack of adequate information on the nature and magnitude of these biases and uncertainties. This report describes an approach used to assess bias and uncertainty in radiation dose for Hanford dosimetry systems. The approach can be considered as an elaboration of work conducted by a technical committee appointed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) used to quantify the bias and uncertainty in estimated doses for personnel exposed to radiation as a result of atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons between 1945 and 1962. In addition, laboratory studies were conducted to measure bias for selected sources of photon radiation resulting from angular response characteristics of Hanford dosimeter systems. An overall assessment is presented of bias and uncertainty for photon radiation greater than 100 keV. This radiation is expected to have caused the vast majority of recorded dose for Hanford workers.

Fix, J.J.; Gilbert, E.S.; Baumgartner, W.V.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Liquid-Metal Electrode to Enable Ultra-Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal electrodes have a high capacity for energy storage but have found limited applications in batteries because of dendrite formation and other problems. In this paper, we report a new alloying strategy that can significantly reduce the melting temperature and improve wetting with the electrolyte to allow the use of liquid metal as anode in sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) at much lower temperatures (e.g., 95 to 175C). Commercial NBBs such as sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries typically operate at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 300-350C) due to poor wettability of sodium on the surface of ?"-Al2O3. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that Na-Cs alloy can replace pure sodium as the anode material, which provides a significant improvement in wettability, particularly at lower temperatures (i.e., <200C). Single cells with the Na-Cs alloy anode exhibit excellent cycling life over those with pure sodium anode at 175 and 150C. The cells can even operate at 95C, which is below the melting temperature of pure sodium. These results demonstrate that NBB can be operated at ultra lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a new strategy to use liquid metal as the electrode materials for advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation on the anode.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Evaluation of Simple Causal Message Logging for Large-Scale Fault Tolerant HPC Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The era of petascale computing brought machines with hundreds of thousands of processors. The next generation of exascale supercomputers will make available clusters with millions of processors. In those machines, mean time between failures will range from a few minutes to few tens of minutes, making the crash of a processor the common case, instead of a rarity. Parallel applications running on those large machines will need to simultaneously survive crashes and maintain high productivity. To achieve that, fault tolerance techniques will have to go beyond checkpoint/restart, which requires all processors to roll back in case of a failure. Incorporating some form of message logging will provide a framework where only a subset of processors are rolled back after a crash. In this paper, we discuss why a simple causal message logging protocol seems a promising alternative to provide fault tolerance in large supercomputers. As opposed to pessimistic message logging, it has low latency overhead, especially in collective communication operations. Besides, it saves messages when more than one thread is running per processor. Finally, we demonstrate that a simple causal message logging protocol has a faster recovery and a low performance penalty when compared to checkpoint/restart. Running NAS Parallel Benchmarks (CG, MG and BT) on 1024 processors, simple causal message logging has a latency overhead below 5%.

Bronevetsky, G; Meneses, E; Kale, L V

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

277

Realizacao domestica e escolar de foto e video 3D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

English: Industry does not give attention to the small domestic or professional market of digital technologies for 3D images. What was done on the XX century by using photographic film is not know available to the common people, though the facilities are even better. Some technique developed in Brasil twenty years ago and the use of conventional domestic photo or video cameras allows fot making pictures and films at home by using digital conversions for editing, and two-color goggles. The anaglyphic technique, the same NASA employs to show Mars images to the public, is not employed in Brazil yet. We must analize the reasons for that. Portugues: A industria nao tem dado atencao ao mercado domestico ou profissional de pequena escala nas novas tecnologias digitais para imagem 3D. O que foi feito ao longo do seculo XX usando filme fotografico nao esta hoje ao alcance das pessoas, sendo que a facilidade de uso e muito maior. Tecnicas desenvolvidas no Brasil ha mais de vinte anos, e o uso de simples cameras convencionais de fotografia e video permitem realizar fotos e filmes caseiros por meio de conversoes digitais na edicao e o uso de oculos bicolor. A tecnica anagifica, a mesma que a NASA usa para mostrar ao publico as imagens de Marte, por exemplo, nao teve espaco no Brasil ainda. Devemos analisar os motivos que podem estar influenciando e os caminhos para mudar isso.

Jose J. Lunazzi

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hyperactivated Motility of Stallion Spermatozoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s t s of chan ges t o t he s perm pl as m a m em brane, c yt os ol and a xonem al s t ruct ures , i ncl u di ng i ncreas ed p rot ei n t yros i ne phos phor yl at i on (P Y, [ 9 ] ), i ncre as ed i nt ra cel l ul ar pH [ 10 - 13 ] , i ncreas ed i nt racel l... ] . B i carbonat e s t i m ul at es t he prot ei n ki nas e A pat hw a y vi a s t i m ul at i on of t he s perm s ol ubl e aden yl at e c yc l as e and product i on o f cAM P [ 27 ] and a l s o fac i l i t at es an i ncreas e i n m e di um pH, whi ch...

Loux, Shavahn C

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Some evidence on determinants of fuel economy as a function of driving cycle and test type  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Statistical methods are used with 107 vehicles whose fuel economy was presented and reported for five test types in a single publication by Consumers Union (CU) for 1986--1988 vehicles. Standard loglinear statistical formulations (i.e., multiplicative models of interactions) are used with data from this and supplementary sources to develop coefficients estimating the percent fuel economy gain per percent change in engine/vehicle design characteristic. The coefficients are developed for the five different test conditions evaluated by CU and are compared with each other on the basis of attributes of the tests. The insights of engineering models are used to develop expectations regarding the shift in size of coefficients as driving cycles change. In both the engineering models and the statistical model, the effect of weight is estimated to be higher in urban driving than in highway driving. For two test categories -- field tests and dynamometer tests -- the benefits of weight reduction are statistically estimated to be greatest in urban driving conditions. The effect on idle fuel flow rate of designing vehicles to hold performance roughly constant by maintaining power per kilogram and/or displacement per kilogram is examined, and its implication for the size of the weight effect is simply approximated from Sovran`s 1983 engineering model results. The fuel-economy-decreasing effect of the desire for performance is estimated to be somewhat larger in the statistical analysis than in the NAS study, when engine technology is held constant.

Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Development and evaluation of probability density functions for a set of human exposure factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe efforts carried out during 1998 and 1999 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to assist the U.S. EPA in developing and ranking the robustness of a set of default probability distributions for exposure assessment factors. Among the current needs of the exposure-assessment community is the need to provide data for linking exposure, dose, and health information in ways that improve environmental surveillance, improve predictive models, and enhance risk assessment and risk management (NAS, 1994). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) plays a lead role in developing national guidance and planning future activities that support the EPA Superfund Program. OERR is in the process of updating its 1989 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS) as part of the EPA Superfund reform activities. Volume III of RAGS, when completed in 1999 will provide guidance for conducting probabilistic risk assessments. This revised document will contain technical information including probability density functions (PDFs) and methods used to develop and evaluate these PDFs. The PDFs provided in this EPA document are limited to those relating to exposure factors.

Maddalena, R.L.; McKone, T.E.; Bodnar, A.; Jacobson, J.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fbsr na-al-si nas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents include articles entitled: Chem-Nuclear documents new plan for Barnwell; Nebraska releases technical analysis of LLRW facility; Southeast Compact suspends funding for NC facility development; NC governor and Southeast Compact differ on proposed MOU; Midwest Compact to return export fees; State legislators` group revises radioactive waste policy; Internal documents discuss administration`s policy on Ward Valley; BLM issues EA for Ward Valley testing; California DHS, NRC criticize DOI`s testing protocols; Army removes training mines from Ward Valley site; The 1997 gubernatorial elections and a look ahead to 1998; Court throws out case challenging Pennsylvania`s siting law; DOE files notice of appeal in WCS suit; Central Compact moves to dismiss ``Veto`` authority suit; Congress exempts NAS from FACA; Judge sets schedule for Ward Valley case; Court won`t order DOE to accept spent fuel by deadline; NRC chairman expresses concern re CERCLA reauthorization; Senators question EPA`s guidance on remediation; EPA issues guidance, criticizes NRC decommissioning rule; Members of Congress clarify FUSRAP transfer; HLW legislation passes House by wide margin; Takings legislation passes House; Energy and water bill signed into law; and Senate confirms 5 of 6 DOE appointees.

Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 4, July 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue includes the following articles: Federal Facility Compliance Act Task Force forms mixed waste workgroup; Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety considers construction of centralized storage facility; Midwest Commission agrees on capacity limit, advisory committee; EPA responds to California site developer`s queries regarding application of air pollutant standards; county-level disqualification site screening of Pennsylvania complete; Texas Compact legislation introduced in US Senate; Generators ask court to rule in their favor on surcharge rebates lawsuit; Vermont authority and Battelle settle wetlands dispute; Eighth Circuit affirms decision in Nebraska community consent lawsuit; Nebraska court dismisses action filed by Boyd County local monitoring committee; NC authority, Chem-Nuclear, and Stowe exonerated; Senator Johnson introduces legislation to transfer Ward Valley site; Representative Dingell writes to Clinton regarding disposal of low-level radioactive waste; NAS committee on California site convenes; NRC to improve public petition process; NRC releases draft proposed rule on criteria for decontamination and closure of NRC-licensed facilities; and EPA names first environmental justice federal advisory council.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC): Panel 7 report on Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The charge to FEAC Panel 7 on inertial fusion energy (IFE) is encompassed in the four articles of correspondence. To briefly summarize, the scope of the panel`s review and analysis adhered to the following guidelines. (1) Consistent with previous recommendations by the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC) and the National Academy of Science (NAS) panel on inertial fusion, the principal focus of FEAC Panel 7`s review and planning activities for next-generation experimental facilities in IFE was limited to heavy ions. (2) The panel considered the three budget cases: $5M, $10M, and $15M annual funding at constant level-of-effort (FY92 dollars), with a time horizon of about five years. (3) While limiting the analysis of next-generation experimental facilities to heavy ions, the panel assessed both the induction and rf linac approaches, and factored European plans into its considerations as well. (4) Finally, the panel identified high-priority areas in system studies and supporting IFE technologies, taking into account how IFE can benefit from related activities funded by the Office of Fusion Energy and by Defense Programs. This report presents the technical assessment, findings, and recommendations on inertial fusion energy prepared by FEAC Panel 7.

Davidson, R.; Ripin, B.; Abdou, M.; Baldwin, D.E.; Commisso, R.; Dean, S.O.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.; Lee, E.; Lindl, J.; McCrory, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Energy Storage for Variable Renewable Energy Resource Integration - A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the following key questions in the discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid: a) what will be the future balancing requirement to accommodate a simulated expansion of wind energy resources from 3.3 GW in 2008 to 14.4 GW in 2019 in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP), and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting the balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP). A life-cycle analysis was performed to assess the least-cost technology option for meeting the new balancing requirement. The technologies considered in this study include conventional turbines (CT), sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries, lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries, pumped hydro energy storage (PH), and demand response (DR). Hybrid concepts that combine 2 or more of the technologies above are also evaluated. This analysis was performed with collaboration by the Bonneville Power Administration and funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Guo, Xinxin; Nguyen, Tony B.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

Optimization of Trona/Limestone Injection for SO2 Control in Coal-Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mobotec USA develops and markets air pollution control systems for utility boilers and other combustion systems. They have a particular interest in technologies that can reduce NOx, SOx, and mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers, and have been investigating the injection of sorbents such as limestone and trona into a boiler to reduce SOx and Hg emissions. WRI proposed to use the Combustion Test Facility (CTF) to enable Mobotec to conduct a thorough evaluation of limestone and trona injection for SO{sub 2} control. The overall goal of the project was to characterize the SO{sub 2} reductions resulting from the injection of limestone and trona into the CTF when fired with a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal used in one of Mobotec's Midwest installations. Results revealed that when limestone was injected at Ca:S molar ratios of 1.5 to 3.0, the resulting SO{sub 2} reductions were 35-55%. It is believed that further reductions can be attained with improved mixing of the sorbent with the combustion gases. When limestone was added to the coal, at Ca:S molar ratios of 0.5 to 1.5, the SO{sub 2} reductions were 13-21%. The lower reductions were attributed to dead-burning of the sorbent in the high temperature flame zone. In cases where limestone was both injected into the furnace and added to the coal, the total SO{sub 2} reductions for a given Ca:S molar ratio were similar to the reductions for furnace injection only. The injection of trona into the mid-furnace zone, for Na:S molar ratios of 1.4 to 2.4, resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 29-43%. Limestone injection did not produce any slag deposits on an ash deposition probe while trona injection resulted in noticeable slag deposition.

None

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Job Pause Service under LAM/MPI+BLCR for Transparent Fault Tolerance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Checkpoint/restart (C/R) has become a requirement for long-running jobs in large-scale clusters due to a meantime- to-failure (MTTF) in the order of hours. After a failure, C/R mechanisms generally require a complete restart of an MPI job from the last checkpoint. A complete restart, however, is unnecessary since all but one node are typically still alive. Furthermore, a restart may result in lengthy job requeuing even though the original job had not exceeded its time quantum. In this paper, we overcome these shortcomings. Instead of job restart, we have developed a transparent mechanism for job pause within LAM/MPI+BLCR. This mechanism allows live nodes to remain active and roll back to the last checkpoint while failed nodes are dynamically replaced by spares before resuming from the last checkpoint. Our methodology includes LAM/MPI enhancements in support of scalable group communicationwith fluctuating number of nodes, reuse of network connections, transparent coordinated checkpoint scheduling and a BLCR enhancement for job pause. Experiments in a cluster with the NAS Parallel Benchmark suite show that our overhead for job pause is comparable to that of a complete job restart. A minimal overhead of 5.6% is only incurred in case migration takes place while the regular checkpoint overhead remains unchanged. Yet, our approach alleviates the need to reboot the LAM run-time environment, which accounts for considerable overhead resulting in net savings of our scheme in the experiments. Our solution further provides full transparency and automation with the additional benefit of reusing existing resources. Executing continues after failures within the scheduled job, i.e., the application staging overhead is not incurred again in contrast to a restart. Our scheme offers additional potential for savings through incremental checkpointing and proactive diskless live migration, which we are currently working on.

Wang, Chao [North Carolina State University; Mueller, Frank [North Carolina State University; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Steven L [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Commercialization of New Lattice-Matched Multi-Junction Solar Cells Based on Dilute Nitrides: July 8, 2010 - March 7, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Technical Progress Report for PV Incubator subcontract NAT-0-99013-03. The overall objective of this Incubator subcontract was to complete the work necessary to make commercial ready solar cells using the dilute nitride technology. The specific objectives of this program were aimed at completing the development of a triple-junction solar cell that incorporates a GaInNAs {approx}1eV subcell to the point of commercial readiness, and determining the cell reliability and, if necessary, identifying and eliminating process or material related issues that lead to early-life cell failures. There were three major objectives for Phase 1, each of which focuses on a key element of the solar cell that determines its performance in a commercial CPV system. One objective was to optimize the quality and performance of the key individual components making up the solar cell structure and then to optimize the integration of these components into a complete triple-junction cell. A second objective was to design and test anti-reflective coating that maximizes the light coupled into a 3J cell with a {approx}1 eV bottom cell bandgap. The third objective was to develop Highly Accelerated Life Tests (HALT) protocols and tools for identifying and correcting potential reliability problems. The Phase 2 objectives were a continuation of the work begun in Phase 1 but aimed at optimizing cell performance for commercial requirements. Phase 2 had four primary objectives: (1) develop a glass-matched anti-reflective coating (ARC) and optimize the cell/ARC to give good performance at 60C operating temperature, (2) optimize the cell for good operation at 60C and high concentration, and (3) complete the light biased HALT system and use it to determine what, if any, failures are observed, and (4) determine the reliability limits of the optimized cell.

Herb, J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Bandgap Engineering in High-Efficiency Multijunction Concentrator Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses semiconductor device research paths under investigation with the aim of reaching the milestone efficiency of 40%. A cost analysis shows that achieving very high cell efficiencies is crucial for the realization of cost-effective photovoltaics, because of the strongly leveraging effect of efficiency on module packaging and balance-of systems costs. Lattice-matched (LM) GaInP/ GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cells have achieved the highest independently confirmed efficiency at 175 suns, 25?C, of 37.3% under the standard AM1.5D, low-AOD terrestrial spectrum. Lattice-mismatched, or metamorphic (MM), materials offer still higher potential efficiencies, if the crystal quality can be maintained. Theoretical efficiencies well over 50% are possible for a MM GaInP/ 1.17-eV GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cell limited by radiative recombination at 500 suns. The bandgap - open circuit voltage offset, (Eg/q) - Voc, is used as a valuable theoretical and experimental tool to characterize multijunction cells with subcell bandgaps ranging from 0.7 to 2.1 eV. Experimental results are presented for prototype 6-junction cells employing an active {approx}1.1-eV dilute nitride GaInNAs subcell, with active-area efficiency greater than 23% and over 5.3 V open-circuit voltage under the 1-sun AM0 space spectrum. Such cell designs have theoretical efficiencies under the terrestrial spectrum at 500 suns concentration exceeding 55% efficiency, even for lattice-matched designs.

King, R. R.; Sherif, R. A.; Kinsey, G. S.; Kurtz, S.; Fetzer, C. M.; Edmondson, K. M.; Law, D. C.; Cotal, H. L.; Krut, D. D.; Ermer, J. H.; Karam, N. H.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A High Temperature Electrochemical Energy Storage System Based on Sodium Beta-Alumina Solid Electrolyte (Base)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done during the period September 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008. Work was conducted in the following areas: (1) Fabrication of sodium beta{double_prime} alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) using a vapor phase process. (2) Mechanistic studies on the conversion of {alpha}-alumina + zirconia into beta{double_prime}-alumina + zirconia by the vapor phase process. (3) Characterization of BASE by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and conductivity measurements. (4) Design, construction and electrochemical testing of a symmetric cell containing BASE as the electrolyte and NaCl + ZnCl{sub 2} as the electrodes. (5) Design, construction, and electrochemical evaluation of Na/BASE/ZnCl{sub 2} electrochemical cells. (6) Stability studies in ZnCl{sub 2}, SnCl{sub 2}, and SnI{sub 4} (7) Design, assembly and testing of planar stacks. (8) Investigation of the effect of porous surface layers on BASE on cell resistance. The conventional process for the fabrication of sodium ion conducting beta{double_prime}-alumina involves calcination of {alpha}-alumina + Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} + LiNO{sub 3} at 1250 C, followed by sintering powder compacts in sealed containers (platinum or MgO) at {approx}1600 C. The novel vapor phase process involves first sintering a mixture of {alpha}-alumina + yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) into a dense ceramic followed by exposure to soda vapor at {approx}1450 C to convert {alpha}-alumina into beta{double_prime}-alumina. The vapor phase process leads to a high strength BASE, which is also resistant to moisture attack, unlike BASE made by the conventional process. The PI is the lead inventor of the process. Discs and tubes of BASE were fabricated in the present work. In the conventional process, sintering of BASE is accomplished by a transient liquid phase mechanism wherein the liquid phase contains NaAlO{sub 2}. Some NaAlO{sub 2} continues to remain at grain boundaries; and is the root cause of its water sensitivity. In the vapor phase process, NaAlO{sub 2} is never formed. Conversion occurs by a coupled transport of Na{sup +} through BASE formed and of O{sup 2-} through YSZ to the reaction front. Transport to the reaction front is described in terms of a chemical diffusion coefficient of Na{sub 2}O. The conversion kinetics as a function of microstructure is under investigation. The mechanism of conversion is described in this report. A number of discs and tubes of BASE have been fabricated by the vapor phase process. The material was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), before and after conversion. Conductivity (which is almost exclusively due to sodium ion transport at the temperatures of interest) was measured. Conductivity was measured using sodium-sodium tests as well as by impedance spectroscopy. Various types of both planar and tubular electrochemical cells were assembled and tested. In some cases the objective was to determine if there was any interaction between the salt and BASE. The interaction of interest was mainly ion exchange (possible replacement of sodium ion by the salt cation). It was noted that Zn{sup 2+} did not replace Na+ over the conditions of interest. For this reason much of the work was conducted with ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode salt. In the case of Sn-based, Sn{sup 2+} did ion exchange, but Sn{sup 4+} did not. This suggests that Sn{sup 4+} salts are viable candidates. These results and implications are discussed in the report. Cells made with Na as the anode and ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode were successfully charged/discharged numerous times. The key advantages of the batteries under investigation here over the Na-S batteries are: (1) Steel wool can be used in the cathode compartment unlike Na-S batteries which require expensive graphite. (2) Planar cells can be constructed in addition to tubular, allowing for greater design flexibility and integration with other devices such as planar SOFC. (3) Comparable or higher open circuit voltage (OCV) than the Na-S battery. (4) Wider operating temperature range and higher temper

Anil Virkar

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Preliminary Assessment of Overweight Mainline Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration requested information regarding overweight and oversized vehicle traffic entering inspection stations (ISs) in order to develop strategies for future research efforts and possibly help guide regulatory issues involving overweight commercial motor vehicles (CMVs). For a period of one month, inspection stations in Knox County and Greene County, Tennessee, recorded overweight and oversized vehicles that entered these ISs. During this period, 435 CMVs were recorded using an electronic form filled out by enforcement personnel at the IS. Of the 435 CMVs recorded, 381 had weight information documented with them. The majority (52.2%) of the vehicles recorded were five-axle combination vehicles, and 50.6% of all the vehicles were permitted to operate above the legal weight limit in Tennessee, which is 80,000 lb for vehicles with five or more axles. Only 16.8% of the CMVs recorded were overweight gross (11.5% of permitted vehicles) and 54.1% were overweight on an axle group. The low percentage of overweight gross CMVs was because only 45 of the vehicles over 80,000 lb. were not permitted. On average, axles that were overweight were 2,000 lb. over the legal limit for an axle or group of axles. Of the vehicles recorded, 172 vehicles were given a North American Standard (NAS) inspection during the assessment. Of those, 69% of the inspections were driver-only inspections (Level III) and only 25% of the inspections had a vehicle component (such as a Level I or Level II). The remaining 6% of inspections did not have valid Aspen numbers; the type of was inspection unknown. Data collected on the types of trailers of each vehicle showed that about half of the recorded CMVs could realistically be given a Level I (full vehicle and driver) inspection; this estimate was solely based on trailer type. Enforcement personnel at ISs without an inspection pit have difficulty fully inspecting certain vehicles due to low clearance below the trailer. Because of this, overweight and oversized vehicles were normally only given a Level III (driver) inspection; thus, little is known about the safety of these vehicles. The out-of-service (OOS) rate of all the inspected vehicles (driver and vehicle inspections) was 18.6%, while the OOS rate for vehicle inspections (Level I and II) was 52.4%. Future work will focus on performing Level I inspections on five-axle combination tractor-trailers and the types of violations that overweight vehicles may have. This research will be conducted in Tennessee and possibly in other states as well.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

TWRS vadose zone contamination issue expert panel report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When members were first canvassed for participation in the Vadose Zone Expert Panel the stated purpose for convening the Panel was to review a controversial draft report, the SX Tank Farm Report. This report was produced by a DOE Grand Junction Project Office (GJPO) contractor, RUST Geotech, now MACTEC-ERS, for the DOE Richland Office (DOERL). Three meetings were planned for June, July and August, 1995 to review the draft report and to complete a Panel report by mid-September. The Expert Panel has found its efforts confounded by various non-technical issues. The Expert Panel has chosen to address some of the non-technical issues in this Preface rather than to dilute the technical discussion that follows in the body of this independent expert panel status report (Panel Report). Rather than performing a straightforward manuscript review, the Panel was asked to resolve conflicting interpretations of gamma-ray logging measurements performed in vadose zone boreholes (drywells) surrounding the high-level radioactive wastes of the SX tank farm. There are numerous and complex technical issues that must be evaluated before the vertical and radial extent of contaminant migration at the SX tank farm can be accurately assessed. When the Panel first met in early June, 1996, it quickly became apparent that the scientific and technical issues were obscured by policy and institutional affairs which have polarized discussion among various segments of the Hanford organization. This situation reflects the kinds of institutional problems described separately in reports by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS/NRC), The Hanford Tanks Environmental Impacts and Policy Choices and BmTiers to Science: Technical Management of the Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Program. The Vadose Zone Characterization Program, appears to be caught between conflicting pressures and organizational mandates, some imposed from outside DOE-RL and some self-imposed. The institutional problems they encountered include having both Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), the parent organization of the Vadose Zone Characterization Program and Environmental Restoration (ER), each under different regulatory controls and different organizational units, seeking to defend the status quo and discount many of the Panel`s conclusions and recommendations. The results presented in the SX Tank Farm Report, especially the visualizations, have created concern in the public sector, both on a local, personal level and on a national political level.

Shafer, D.S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A HOLISTIC APPROACH FOR DISPOSITION OF LONG-LIVED RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past 45 years, one of the most challenging scientific, engineering, socio-economic, and political tasks and obligations of our time has been to site and develop technical, politically acceptable, solutions to the safe disposition of long-lived radioactive materials (LLRMs). However, at the end of the year 2002, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in the United States of America (USA) hosts the world's only operating LLRM-disposal system, which (1) is based on the LLRM-disposal principles recommended by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1957, i.e., deep geological disposal in a ''stable'' salt vault/repository, (2) complies with the nation's ''Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'', and (3) may receive 175,584 cubic meters (m3) of transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW)a. Pending the scheduled opening of repositories for once-used nuclear fuel (OUNF) in the USA, Sweden, and Finland in the years 2010, 2015, and 2017, respectively, LLRM-disposal solutions remain the missing link in all national LLRM-disposition programs. Furthermore, for a variety of reasons, many nations with nuclear programs have chosen a ''spectator'' stance in terms of enhancing the global nuclear safety culture and the nuclear renaissance, and have either ''slow-tracked'' or deferred their LLRM-disposal programs to allow time for an informed national consensus to evolve based on LLRM-disposition experiences and solutions gained elsewhere. In the meantime, LLRMs will continue to amass in different types and levels of safeguarded storage facilities around the world. In an attempt to contribute to the enhancement of the global nuclear safety culture and the nuclear renaissance, the authors developed the sample holistic approach for synergistic disposition of LLRMs comprising LLRM-disposition components considered either ''proven'' or ''promising'' by the authors. The fundamental principles of the holistic approach are: (1) Risk minimization; (2) Minimization of the LLRM volume requiring deep geological disposal; and (3) LLRM-disposition flexibility. An integral element of these principles is to allow time for LLRM-disposition solutions to evolve/mature technically, financially, and politically. Furthermore, contingent upon the desired outcome(s), available financial, scientific, and technical resources, and political will, these components may be implemented separately or in combinations by one or a group of nations.

Eriksson, Leif G.; Dials, George E.; Parker, Frank L.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

Cost Effective Surfactant Formulations for Improved Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work during the 30 month time period of this project. This was planned originally for 3-years duration, but due to its financial limitations, DOE halted funding after 2 years. The California Institute of Technology continued working on this project for an additional 6 months based on a no-cost extension granted by DOE. The objective of this project is to improve the performance of aqueous phase formulations that are designed to increase oil recovery from fractured, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. This process works by increasing the rate and extent of aqueous phase imbibition into the matrix blocks in the reservoir and thereby displacing crude oil normally not recovered in a conventional waterflood operation. The project had three major components: (1) developing methods for the rapid screening of surfactant formulations towards identifying candidates suitable for more detailed evaluation, (2) more fundamental studies to relate the chemical structure of acid components of an oil and surfactants in aqueous solution as relates to their tendency to wet a carbonate surface by oil or water, and (3) a more applied study where aqueous solutions of different commercial surfactants are examined for their ability to recover a West Texas crude oil from a limestone core via an imbibition process. The first item, regarding rapid screening methods for suitable surfactants has been summarized as a Topical Report. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the surface of these chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite power is pre-treated to make the surface oil-wet. The next step is to add the pre-treated powder to a test tube and add a candidate aqueous surfactant formulation; the greater the percentage of the calcite that now sinks to the bottom rather than floats, the more effective the surfactant is in changing the solids to become now preferentially water-wet. Results from the screening test generally are consistent with surfactant oil recovery performance reported in the literature. The second effort is a more fundamental study. It considers the effect of chemical structures of different naphthenic acids (NA) dissolved in decane as model oils that render calcite surfaces oil-wet to a different degree. NAs are common to crude oil and are at least partially responsible for the frequent observation that carbonate reservoirs are oil-wet. Because pure NA compounds are used, trends in wetting behavior can be related to NA molecular structure as measured by solid adsorption, contact angle and our novel, simple flotation test with calcite. Experiments with different surfactants and NA-treated calcite powder provide information about mechanisms responsible for sought after reversal to a water-wet state. Key findings include: (1) more hydrophobic NA's are more prone to induce oil-wetting, and (2) recovery of the model oil from limestone core was better with cationic surfactants, but one nonionic surfactant, Igepal CO-530, also had favorable results. This portion of the project included theoretical calculations to investigate key basic properties of several NAs such as their acidic strength and their relative water/oil solubility, and relate this to their chemical structure. The third category of this project focused on the recovery of a light crude oil from West Texas (McElroy Field) from a carbonate rock (limestone outcrop). For this effort, the first item was to establish a suite of surfactants that would be compatible with the McElroy Field brine. Those were examined further for their ability to recover oil by imbibition. Results demonstrate several types of promising candida

William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Yongfu Wu

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Full-Scale Cask Testing and Public Acceptance of Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments - 12254  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Full-scale physical testing of spent fuel shipping casks has been proposed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2006 report on spent nuclear fuel transportation, and by the Presidential Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future 2011 draft report. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2005 proposed full-scale testing of a rail cask, and considered 'regulatory limits' testing of both rail and truck casks (SRM SECY-05-0051). The recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project, NRC evaluation of extended spent fuel storage (possibly beyond 60-120 years) before transportation, nuclear industry adoption of very large dual-purpose canisters for spent fuel storage and transport, and the deliberations of the BRC, will fundamentally change assumptions about the future spent fuel transportation system, and reopen the debate over shipping cask performance in severe accidents and acts of sabotage. This paper examines possible approaches to full-scale testing for enhancing public confidence in risk analyses, perception of risk, and acceptance of spent fuel shipments. The paper reviews the literature on public perception of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste transportation risks. We review and summarize opinion surveys sponsored by the State of Nevada over the past two decades, which show consistent patterns of concern among Nevada residents about health and safety impacts, and socioeconomic impacts such as reduced property values along likely transportation routes. We also review and summarize the large body of public opinion survey research on transportation concerns at regional and national levels. The paper reviews three past cask testing programs, the way in which these cask testing program results were portrayed in films and videos, and examines public and official responses to these three programs: the 1970's impact and fire testing of spent fuel truck casks at Sandia National Laboratories, the 1980's regulatory and demonstration testing of MAGNOX fuel flasks in the United Kingdom (the CEGB 'Operation Smash Hit' tests), and the 1980's regulatory drop and fire tests conducted on the TRUPACT II containers used for transuranic waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. The primary focus of the paper is a detailed evaluation of the cask testing programs proposed by the NRC in its decision implementing staff recommendations based on the Package Performance Study, and by the State of Nevada recommendations based on previous work by Audin, Resnikoff, Dilger, Halstead, and Greiner. The NRC approach is based on demonstration impact testing (locomotive strike) of a large rail cask, either the TAD cask proposed by DOE for spent fuel shipments to Yucca Mountain, or a similar currently licensed dual-purpose cask. The NRC program might also be expanded to include fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask. The Nevada approach calls for a minimum of two tests: regulatory testing (impact, fire, puncture, immersion) of a rail cask, and extra-regulatory fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask, based on the cask performance modeling work by Greiner. The paper concludes with a discussion of key procedural elements - test costs and funding sources, development of testing protocols, selection of testing facilities, and test peer review - and various methods of communicating the test results to a broad range of stakeholder audiences. (authors)

Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

LONG-TERM TECHNETIUM INTERACTIONS WITH REDUCING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technetium is among the key risk drivers at the Saltstone Facility. The way that it is immobilized in this cementitious waste form is by converting its highly mobile Tc(VII) form to a much less mobile Tc(IV) form through reduction by the cement's blast furnace slag. This report includes a review of published data and experimental results dealing with Tc leaching from Portland cement waste forms. The objectives for the literature study were to document previous reports of Tc interactions with slag-containing cementitious materials. The objectives for the laboratory study were to measure Tc-saltstone Kd values under reducing conditions. From the literature it was concluded: (1) Spectroscopic evidence showed that when Tc(IV) in a slag-cement was exposed to an oxidizing environment, it will convert to the more mobile Tc(VII) species within a short time frame, 2.5 years. (2) SRS saltstone will reduce Tc(VII) in the absence of NaS or sodium dithionite in a reducing atmosphere. (3) Only trace concentrations of atmospheric oxygen (30 to 60 ppm O{sub 2}; Eh 120 mV) at the high pH levels of cementitious systems is required to maintain Tc as Tc(VII). (4) Experimental conditions must be responsible for wide variability of measured K{sub d} values, such that they are either very low, {approx}1 mL/g, or they are very high {approx}1000 mL/g, suggesting that Tc(VII) or Tc(IV) dominate the systems. Much of this variability appears to be the result of experimental conditions, especially direct controls of oxygen contact with the sample. (5) A field study conducted at SRS in the 1980s indicated that a slag-saltstone immobilized Tc for 2.5 years. Below background concentrations of Tc leached out of the slag-containing saltstone, whereas Tc leached out of the slag-free saltstone at the rate of nitrate loss. One possible explanation for the immobilization of Tc in this study was that the slag-saltstone maintained reducing conditions within the core of the 55-gallon sample, whereas in the small-scale lab experiments, where samples were crushed to <1mm, oxygen diffused through the particles and reoxidize the slag during the contact period. (6) Present site specific reduction capacity value of 820 {micro}eq/g is in the realm of literature values that were either measured or theoretically estimated based on thermodynamic calculations. (7) Almond and Kaplan (2011) measured desorption K{sub d} values from a Vault 4 saltstone core sample. Desorption leaching tests were conducted in a glovebag maintained at 30 to 60 ppm O2. A ground olive-colored saltstone sample, as compared to black monolith sample, was used in this study, indicating the sample had been exposed to O2, which is likely the cause for the lower then anticipated Kd value measured, 139 mL/g. Tc adsorption experiments were conducted under reducing conditions (<0.5 ppm O{sub 2}(g) -585 mV, 2% H{sub 2}, pH 11.66) and obtained K{sub d} values of {approx}1000 mL/g in a saltstone formulated with 45% slag (nominal concentration) and a K{sub d} of 10,000 mL/g when the saltstone contained 95% slag. The K{sub d} values logarithmically increased from 1 day to 56 days, with little sorption generally occurring in the first eight days. Steady state had not been achieved during the initial 56 days. However, the slag-free cement control samples also had K{sub d} values near 1000 mL/g and extremely low redox conditions, due to the 2% H{sub 2} atmosphere. A key concept that this literature review and the experimental results provide is that Tc immobilization is dependent on experimental conditions, specifically, the available oxygen that can oxidize technetium in a portland cement or saltstone-like monolith. The shrinking core model used in the saltstone performance assessment describes the existence of an oxidized outer layer of concrete surrounding a shrinking core of reducing intact saltstone. A sharp boundary between the two zones moves slowly inward, resulting in oxidation of Tc(IV). This work largely reinforced our conceptual model of the shrinking core model, but more importantly provided cla

Kaplan, D.; Lilley, M.; Almond, P.; Powell, B.

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z